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Encyclopedia > Al Gore controversies
Official portrait 1994

Al Gore, former Vice-President of the United States (1993-2001) and 2000 Democratic Party presidential nominee, has been the subject of some controversies. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2400x3000, 929 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Al Gore ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2400x3000, 929 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Al Gore ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who is, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, a heartbeat from the presidency. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... In the United States of America the President has the executive authority to nominate people to various governmental positions, subject to the approval of Congress. ... A controversy is a contentious dispute, a disagreement over which parties are actively arguing. ...

Contents

Fund raising

Nobel Pace Prize Winner 2008

Gore was criticized for attending an event at the Buddhist Hsi Lai Temple in Hacienda Heights, California in 1996. He said that he was unaware it was a fundraising event though in an interview in 1997 he said it was wrong for him to attend. President Clinton with convicted fund-raiser Charlie Trie The 1996 United States campaign finance controversy was an alleged effort by the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) to influence domestic American politics prior to and during the Clinton administration and also involved the fund-raising practices of the administration itself. ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... The Path To Buddhahood, linking both the Bodhisattva hall and the Main Shrine. ... Hacienda Heights is an unincorporated census-designated place in Los Angeles County, California, USA. As of the 2000 census, the community had a total population of 53,122. ...

I did not know that it was a fund-raiser. I knew it was a political event, and I knew there were finance people that were going to be present, and so that alone should have told me, 'This is inappropriate and this is a mistake; don't do this.' And I take responsibility for that. It was a mistake—Gore on NBC's Today show, Jan. 24, 1997.[1]

The temple was later implicated in a campaign donation laundering scheme. In that scheme, donations nominally from Buddhist nuns in lawful amounts had actually been donated by wealthy monastics and devotees. This article is about the television network. ... Today, commonly referred to as The Today Show to avoid ambiguity, is an American morning news and talk show airing weekday mornings on the NBC television network. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Money laundering is the practice of engaging in financial transactions in order to conceal the identity, source and destination of the money in question. ... In general, a nun is a female ascetic who chooses to voluntarily leave the world and live her life in prayer and contemplation in a monastery or convent. ... Monasticism (from Greek: monachos — a solitary person) is the religious practice in which one renounces worldly pursuits in order to fully devote ones life to spiritual work. ...


Robert Conrad, Jr., then head of a Justice Department task force appointed by Attorney General Janet Reno to investigate the fund-raising controversies, called on Reno in Spring 2000 to appoint an independent counsel to look into the fund-raising practices of Vice President Gore. Reno eventually rejected the request.[2] Robert James Conrad, Jr. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Janet Reno (born July 21, 1938) was the first female Attorney General of the United States (1993–2001). ... United States Office of the Independent Counsel was an independent prosecutor — distinct from the Attorney General of the United States Department of Justice — that provided reports to the Congress under Title 28 of the United States Code, Article 595. ...


Internet

Al Gore at the Ansari X Prize Executive Summit October 19, 2006
Al Gore at the Ansari X Prize Executive Summit October 19, 2006
Main article: Al Gore contributions to the internet and technology#1999 CNN interview

Al Gore was involved in the development and mainstreaming of the Internet as both Senator and Vice-President. Campbell-Kelly and Aspray note in Chapter 12 of their 1996 text, Computer: A History of the Information Machine, that up until the early 1990s public usage of the Internet was limited. They continue to state that the "problem of giving ordinary Americans network access had exercised Senator Al Gore since the late 1970s" leading him to develop legislation which would alleviate this problem. [3] Gore thus began to craft the High Performance Computing and Communication Act of 1991 (commonly referred to as "The Gore Bill" [4]) after hearing the 1988 report Toward a National Research Network[5] submitted to Congress by a group chaired by UCLA professor of computer science, Leonard Kleinrock, one of the central creators of the ARPANET (the ARPANET, first deployed by Kleinrock and others in 1969, is the predecessor of the Internet). [6] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1766x1943, 1096 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Al Gore Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1766x1943, 1096 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Al Gore Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... For other uses, see X Prize (disambiguation). ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Official portrait 1994 Al Gore, former Vice-President of the United States (1993-2001) and 2000 Democratic Party presidential nominee, has been involved in the development of the Internet and technology since the 1970s. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... The High Performance Computing and Communication Act of 1991 (HPCA) was a bill created and introduced by then Senator Al Gore (it was thus referred to as the [1]) It was passed on 09 December 1991. ... The High Performance Computing and Communication Act of 1991 (HPCA) was a bill created and introduced by then Senator Al Gore (it was thus referred to as the [1]) It was passed on 09 December 1991. ... Binomial name Ucla xenogrammus Holleman, 1993 The largemouth triplefin, Ucla xenogrammus, is a fish of the family Tripterygiidae and only member of the genus Ucla, found in the Pacific Ocean from Viet Nam, the Philippines, Palau and the Caroline Islands to Papua New Guinea, Australia (including Christmas Island), and the... Leonard Kleinrock and the first IMP. source: (http://www. ... ARPANET logical map, March 1977. ...


In 1999, various media outlets suggested that Gore claimed that he "invented the internet" [7], [8] in reference to a CNN interview in which he said, "During my service in the United States Congress I took the initiative in creating the internet. I took the initiative in moving forward a whole range of initiatives that have proven to be important to our country's economic growth and environmental protection, improvements in our educational system." [9] This article is about the year. ...


In response to this controversy, Internet pioneers Vint Cerf and Bob Kahn wrote a 2000-09-29 article (originally sent via email) which described Gore's contributions to the Internet since the 1970s, including his work on the Gore Bill:[10] Vinton Gray Cerf (born June 23, 1943) (last name pronounced just like the English word surf) is a American computer scientist who is commonly referred to as one of the founding fathers of the Internet for his key technical and managerial role, together with Bob Kahn, in the creation of... Robert E. Kahn, (born December 23, 1938), along with Vinton G. Cerf, invented the TCP/IP protocol, the technology used to transmit information on the modern Internet. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The High Performance Computing and Communication Act of 1991 (HPCA) was a bill created and introduced by then Senator Al Gore (it was thus referred to as the [1]) It was passed on 09 December 1991. ...

[A]s the two people who designed the basic architecture and the core protocols that make the Internet work, we would like to acknowledge VP Gore's contributions as a Congressman, Senator and as Vice President. No other elected official, to our knowledge, has made a greater contribution over a longer period of time. Last year the Vice President made a straightforward statement on his role. He said: "During my service in the United States Congress I took the initiative in creating the Internet." We don't think, as some people have argued, that Gore intended to claim he "invented" the Internet. Moreover, there is no question in our minds that while serving as Senator, Gore's initiatives had a significant and beneficial effect on the still-evolving Internet. The fact of the matter is that Gore was talking about and promoting the Internet long before most people were listening. We feel it is timely to offer our perspective. As far back as the 1970s Congressman Gore promoted the idea of high speed telecommunications as an engine for both economic growth and the improvement of our educational system. He was the first elected official to grasp the potential of computer communications to have a broader impact than just improving the conduct of science and scholarship. Though easily forgotten, now, at the time this was an unproven and controversial concept.

The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ...

Love Canal

On 30 November 1999, in response to a question about what students could do to involve themselves in the political process, Gore described to a New Hampshire high school his reaction in the late 1970s to a letter from a student in Toone, Tennessee, complaining about her family's poisoned well: "I called for a congressional investigation and a hearing. I looked around the country for other sites like that. I found a little place in upstate New York called Love Canal. Had the first hearing on that issue, and Toone, Tennessee — that was the one that you didn't hear of. But that was the one that started it all."[11] While the Associated Press story that covered the speech printed the quotation correctly, both the Washington Post and The Washington Times claimed that Gore had actually said: "I was the one that started it all". [12] is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... Toone is a town located in Hardeman County, Tennessee. ... This article is about the state. ... Love Canal is a neighborhood in Niagara Falls, New York, United States of America (USA). ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... ... The Washington Times[1] is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Washington, D.C., United States. ...


The Post deferred to the AP version a few days later, but the Times never did, and continued to run editorials denouncing Gore's "boasting" of having been "the whistle blower for discovering Love Canal." [13] The Republican National Committee and several conservative commentators at the time furthered the claim that Gore was attempting to take credit for discovering the toxic waste problem at Love Canal. However, Gore's supporters have argued that the context of the speech should make it clear that what had initially sparked his interest in toxic waste issues was the Toone, Tennessee situation. [13] [11] The quotation has been repeated with ", and Toone, Tennessee — that was the one that you didn't hear of. But " replaced by an ellipsis (…), which subtly alters its meaning. In October 1978, Gore did hold congressional hearings on Love Canal — however it was two months after President Jimmy Carter declared it a disaster area and the federal government offered to buy the homes. After the hearings, Gore said, "We passed a major national law to clean up hazardous dump sites. And we had new efforts to stop the practices that ended up poisoning water around the country. We've still got work to do. But we made a huge difference. And it all happened because one high school student got involved."[13] The Republican National Committee (RNC) provides national leadership for the Republican Party of the United States. ...

Gore giving his global warming talk on 7 April 2006

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (533x800, 62 KB) Summary Al gore giving his global warming talk in Mountain View, CA on 7 April 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (533x800, 62 KB) Summary Al gore giving his global warming talk in Mountain View, CA on 7 April 2006. ...

Love Story

Gore was quoted in the New York Times December 14, 1997 edition as saying "[Erich] Segal had told some reporters in Tennessee that Love Story was based on him and Tipper." The Tennessean newspaper article indeed quoted Segal as saying that Love Story was based on both the Gores. Gore's quotation is therefore accurate since Gore was referring to what the Tennessean had reported. Although Segal said that the newspaper had misquoted him, and that the novel's central story line was not based on Gore's relationship with Tipper, Segal noted that the male lead in Love Story, Oliver Barrett IV, was in fact based on Gore, as well as Gore's college roommate, actor Tommy Lee Jones. [14] The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Erich Wolf Segal (born June 16, 1937 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American author, screenwriter, and educator. ... Love Story is a 1970 romance novel by American writer Erich Segal. ... For the musician, see Tommy Lee. ...


Use of energy in home

In 2007, Gore came under criticism from the conservative think tank Tennessee Center for Policy Research.[15] The organization issued a report which said that during August 2006 Gore's household consumed 22,619 kilowatt-hours — more than twice the electricity in one month than an average American family uses in an entire year.[16] TIME stated that the Tennessee Center for Policy Research claimed to have gotten "its figures from Nashville Electric Service. But company spokeswoman Laurie Parker said the utility never got a request from the policy center and never gave it any information." [17] Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The kilowatt-hour (symbol: kW·h) is a unit for measuring energy. ... Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Nashville Electric Service - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ...


Drew Johnson, the president of the Tennessee Center for Policy Research, said in releasing the figures:

For someone in his position not to take steps to reduce his own energy consumption is disingenuous. As the spokesman of choice for the global warming movement, Al Gore has to be willing to walk (the) walk, not just talk the talk, when it comes to home energy use.[18]

In an earlier article in USA Today, Peter Schweizer argued that "according to public records, there is no evidence that Gore has signed up to use green energy in either of his large residences. When contacted Wednesday, Gore's office confirmed as much but said the Gores were looking into making the switch at both homes". [19] USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ...


Response

TIME quoted Kalee Kreider, a spokesperson for Gore, saying that the Gore family tries to buy green energy to reduce their carbon footprint. She continued to say that since the controversy, the Gore family was "in the midst of installing solar panels on their home, which will enable them to use less power." She also added, "They also use compact fluorescent bulbs and other energy efficiency measures and then they purchase offsets for their carbon emissions to bring their carbon footprint down to zero." [17] WKRN-TV reported that the Gore family obtains their power from the Nashville Electric Service's "renewable energy initiative", The Green Power Switch program [20] which depends upon "wind, solar, and methane gas." [21] The Detroit Free Press further noted that "Gore purchased 108 blocks of 'green power' for each of the past three months, according to a summary of the bills. That’s a total of $432 a month Gore paid extra for solar or other renewable energy sources. The green power Gore purchased is equivalent to recycling 2.48 million aluminum cans or 286,092 pounds of newspaper, according to comparison figures on NES’s Web site." [18] The figure of 108 blocks of green power per month corresponds[20] to 16,200 kilowatt-hours of electricity per month, Al Gore's average monthly use for 2005. A solar trough array is an example of green energy Green energy is a term describing what is thought to be environmentally friendly sources of power and energy. ... WKRN-TV channel 2 is the ABC affiliate in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Nashville Electric Service - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ... Along with The Detroit News, the Detroit Free Press is one of the two major metro Detroit newspapers. ...


Keith Olbermann at MSNBC reported that the Gore home includes offices for both Gore and his wife and 'special security measures' making it unrepresentative of what the average US home consumes. Additionally, the green power purchased by the Gores increased the cost of their electricity by "$5,893, more than 50 percent, in order to minimize carbon pollution."[22] MSNBC, a combination of MSN and NBC, is a 24-hour cable news channel in the United States and Canada, and a news website. ...


Kreider suggested in TIME that the attacks on Gore's energy use were political in nature and stated:

Sometimes when people don't like the message, in this case that global warming is real, it's convenient to attack the messenger. [17]

Chris Cillizza and Matthew Mosk in a Washington Post article quoted TCPR president Johnson as stating: "The energy he receives into his house is no different than what I receive into my house." They also noted that, "Kreider added that a renovation of the Gores' house is underway to make it more energy efficient, an update that will include the addition of solar panels." [23] ...


An article in USA Today stated, "Zoning rules in Al Gore's upscale neighborhood kept the former vice president and environmental activist from installing solar panels on his roof...New rules going into effect on April 1 will allow homeowners to install solar panels on their roofs. But there's a caveat: 'Solar panels may be installed upon the roof of a building so long as they are not visible from the street or from any adjoining property,' according to the ordinance. Gore's roof does have flat areas where the panels could be placed, Franklin said. The builders at Gore's home plan to make the application for solar panels once the new ordinance goes into effect." [24] USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ...


References

  1. ^ "Gore Admits Temple Fund-Raiser Was A 'Mistake'", CNN.com, Jan. 24, 1997
  2. ^ Fund-raising Investigation Discussion, NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, transcript, PBS, June 23, 2000, Retrieved: April 14, 2006
  3. ^ Campbell-Kelly and Aspray (1996).Computer: A History of the Information Machine. New York: BasicBooks, 298
  4. ^ "Computher History Museum Exhibits:1991", computerhistory.org, Computer History Museum. Retrieved on 2007-06-01. 
  5. ^ Kleinrock, Leonard; Bob Kahn & David Clark et al. (1988), Toward a National Research Network, <http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?isbn=NI000393>. Retrieved on 2007-06-01
  6. ^ Kleinrock, Leonard; Vint Cerf & Bob Kahn et al. (2003-12-10), A Brief History of the Internet, <http://www.isoc.org/internet/history/brief.shtml#Transition>. Retrieved on 2007-06-01
  7. ^ Agree, Phil. "Who Invented "Invented"?:Tracing the Real Story of the "Al Gore Invented the Internet" Hoax", Red Rock Eater Digest, Red Rock Eater Digest, 17 October 2000. Retrieved on 2007-06-02. 
  8. ^ Finkelstein, Seth. "Al Gore "invented the Internet" - resources", 28 April 2006. Retrieved on 2007-06-02. 
  9. ^ "Transcript: Vice President Gore on CNN's 'Late Edition'", [CNN, CNN, 09 March 1999. Retrieved on 2007-06-02. 
  10. ^ Kahn, Bob & Vint Cerf (2000-09-29), Al Gore and the Internet, <http://amsterdam.nettime.org/Lists-Archives/nettime-l-0009/msg00311.html>. Retrieved on 2007-06-02
  11. ^ a b http://www.rollingstone.com/news/story/5920188/the_press_vs_al_gore/
  12. ^ http://www.dailyhowler.com/h120899_2.shtml
  13. ^ a b c http://www.bushwatch.com/goremarch.htm
  14. ^ http://www.dailyhowler.com/h052500_1.shtml
  15. ^ Tennessee Center for Policy Research. tennesseepolicy.org. Retrieved on 2007-02-27.
  16. ^ Al Gore’s Personal Energy Use Is His Own “Inconvenient Truth". Tennessee Center for Policy Research (2007-02-26). Retrieved on 2007-02-27.
  17. ^ a b c Al Gore Draws Flak On Utility Bill. TIME (2007-02-28). Retrieved on 2007-02-27.
  18. ^ a b Critics question how green Gore really is. Detroit Free Press (2007-02-27). Retrieved on 2007-02-27.
  19. ^ http://www.usatoday.com/news/opinion/editorials/2006-08-09-gore-green_x.htm
  20. ^ a b Green Power Switch®. Nashville Electric Service. Retrieved on 2007-02-27.
  21. ^ Controversy Surrounds Al Gore's Energy Use. WKRN-TV (2007-02-27). Retrieved on 2007-02-27.
  22. ^ Media Matter Summary. Media Matters for America (2007-03-01). Retrieved on 2007-03-01.
  23. ^ http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/02/28/AR2007022801823.html
  24. ^ http://www.usatoday.com/weather/climate/globalwarming/2007-03-20-gore-solar_N.htm

is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... April 14 is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 261 days remaining. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... March 9 is the 68th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (69th in Leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Along with The Detroit News, the Detroit Free Press is one of the two major metro Detroit newspapers. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Nashville Electric Service - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... WKRN-TV channel 2 is the ABC affiliate in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Screenshot from Media Matters for America (Jan 6, 2006) Media Matters for America (or MMfA) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization founded in 2004 by journalist and author David Brock. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


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