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Encyclopedia > Akron, Ohio
City of Akron
Skyline of downtown Akron
Skyline of downtown Akron

Seal
Nickname: The Rubber Capital of the World
Location within the state of Ohio
Location within the state of Ohio
Location within Summit County, Ohio
Location within Summit County, Ohio
Coordinates: 41°4′23″N 81°31′4″W / 41.07306, -81.51778
Country United States
State Ohio
County Summit
Founded 1825
Incorporated 1835 (village)
- 1865 (city)
Government
 - Mayor Don Plusquellic (D)
Area
 - City 62.4 sq mi (161.6 km²)
 - Land 62.1 sq mi (160.8 km²)
 - Water 0.3 sq mi (0.9 km²)
Elevation 955 ft (291 m)
Population (2000)[1]
 - City 217,074
 - Density 3,497.3/sq mi (1,350.3/km²)
 - Metro 694,960
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 330/234
FIPS code 39-01000[2]
GNIS feature ID 1064305[3]
Website: http://www.ci.akron.oh.us

Akron is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Summit County.[4] In 2006, its population was estimated at 209,704. The municipality is located in northeastern Ohio on the Cuyahoga River between Cleveland to the north and Canton to the south, approximately 60 miles (96 km) west of the Pennsylvania border. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 594 pixelsFull resolution (2080 × 1544 pixels, file size: 587 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Akron City Seal File links The following pages link to this file: Akron, Ohio ... // A nickname is a name of an entity or thing that is not its proper name. ... Adapted from Wikipedias OH county maps by Catbar. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (680x1316, 31 KB)[edit] Summary Akron, Ohio Map showing location of community within Summit County, Ohio, United States. ... Summit County is a urban county located in the state of Ohio, United States. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Listed are the 88 counties of the state of Ohio. ... Summit County is a urban county located in the state of Ohio, United States. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Donald L. Plusquellic (born July 3, 1949) is the current mayor of Akron, Ohio. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... This article is about the physical quantity. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... The Eastern Standard Time Zone is a geographic region that keeps time by subtracting five hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... A telephone numbering plan is a plan for allocating telephone number ranges to countries, regions, areas and exchanges and to non-fixed telephone networks such as mobile phone networks. ... Area code 330 is a North American telephone area code serving part of Northeast Ohio, United States. ... Area code 234 is a North American telephone area code serving part of Northeast Ohio, United States. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. State. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... Summit County is a urban county located in the state of Ohio, United States. ... The Cuyahoga River (IPA pronunciation: , or kuy-a-HAW-ga, locally kie-uh-HOE-guh) is located in Northeast Ohio in the United States. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... Canton is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Stark CountyGR6. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


Akron was founded in 1825 near the Ohio and Erie Canal, and became a manufacturing center owing to its location at a staircase of locks. The locks were needed due to the higher elevation of the area, which gave rise to the name Summit County as well as Akron, which is a rough translation of summit into Greek (Stewart, pg. 233). After the decline of heavy manufacturing in the 1970s and '80s, the city's industry has since diversified into research, financial, and high tech sectors. The Ohio and Erie Canal in 1902 The Ohio and Erie Canal was constructed in the early 1800s and connected the Ohio River at Portsmouth and Lake Erie at Cleveland, Ohio. ... Canal locks in England. ...


Akron and nearby Canton are often referred to as a single region or considered twin cities. The Akron-Canton Regional Airport is one of many places near the city that is named for both places. While the U.S. Census Bureau still counts the two metropolitan areas separately, if combined, the total population of the Akron-Canton area would equal 1,101,894 people. FAA diagram of Akron-Canton Airport Akron-Canton Airport (IATA: CAK, ICAO: KCAK) is a commercial Class C airport located in southern Summit County, Ohio (a very small portion of both runways extend into Stark County,) roughly 10 miles southeast of Akron, Ohio, and roughly 10 miles northwest of Canton... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ...


Alcoholics Anonymous was founded in Akron in 1935. The city is home to The University of Akron, the Akron Aeros Double A affiliate of the Cleveland Indians, the Soap Box Derby World Championships and the Firestone Country Club, at which the PGA Tour's WGC-Bridgestone Invitational is annually played. AA meeting sign Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is an informal meeting society for recovering alcoholics. ... The University of Akron is an institution of higher learning located in Akron, Ohio. ... The Akron Aeros are a minor league baseball team based in Akron, Ohio, USA. The team, which plays in the Eastern League, is the Double-A affiliate of the Cleveland Indians major-league club. ... For other uses, see Cleveland Indians (disambiguation). ... 1984 Augusta, Georgia Champion An official Soap Box Derby racer from 1967 Senior Seifenkiste - Deutsches Seifenkisten Derby e. ... The Firestone Country Club is private golf club located in Akron, Ohio. ... The PGA Tour is an organization that operates the USAs main professional golf tours. ... The WGC-Bridgestone Invitational is one of the annual World Golf Championships for male professional golfers. ...

Contents

History

Canal years

Much of Akron's early growth was because of its location at the "summit" of the Ohio and Erie Canal (thus the name Summit County) which at one time connected Lake Erie and the Ohio River. The Ohio and Erie Canal in 1902 The Ohio and Erie Canal was constructed in the early 1800s and connected the Ohio River at Portsmouth and Lake Erie at Cleveland, Ohio. ... Lake Erie (pronounced ) is the tenth largest lake on Earth[2] and, of the five Great Lakes of North America, is the fourth largest by surface area, the southernmost, shallowest, and smallest by volume. ... View of Pittsburgh, the largest metropolitan area on the Ohio River, where the Allegheny River (left) and the Monongahela River (right) join at Point State Park to form the Ohio River Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ...


Akron started as a small village on the divide between the St. Lawrence River and the Mississippi River. The village was a 43-block square with its main intersection at Exchange and Main Streets; its northern limit was one block beyond State Street. It was renamed South Akron when Cascade, an adjacent village north of State Street and centered at Market and Howard Streets, changed its name to North Akron. The Saint Lawrence River (French fleuve Saint-Laurent) is a large west-to-east flowing river in the middle latitudes of North America, connecting the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ...


South Akron was built to serve people using the Ohio Canal. North Akron developed around a construction project originally intended to provide increased water power for industries. In 1836 the villages joined. The completion of the Cross-cut Canal along Main Street in 1839 started Akron on its climb to industrial importance. Coal, a major railroad, and manufacturing growth from the Civil War contributed to a population increase from 3,500 to 10,000 inhabitants between 1860 and 1870. Coal Example chemical structure of coal Coal is a fossil fuel formed in ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ...


Because of physical obstacles — the steep hill on West Market Street, the Little Cuyahoga Valley, and the swamp south of the City — Akron grew to the east. This encouraged the annexation of Spicertown, centered on Spicer and Exchange, and then Middlebury, which was centered where the Arlington and Market Street commercial area is now located.


The Rubber Capital of the World

Akron’s history and the history of the rubber industry are intertwined. The rubber industry transformed Akron from a small canal town into a fledgling city. The birth of the rubber industry started in the 1800s, long before America fell in love with the automobile. Akron was incorporated as a village in 1835 and as a city in 1865. In 1869, B.F. Goodrich started the first rubber company in Akron. In 1915, the area increased from 7,254 acres (29.38 km²) to 16,120 acres (65.29 km²). The population rose approximately 200% — from 69,067 in 1910 to 208,435 in 1920. General Tire was founded in 1915 by the O’Neil’s whose department store became an Akron landmark. This article is about the polymeric material. ... Categories: Companies traded on NYSE | Stub | Aerospace manufacturing companies | Fortune 500 companies | Companies based in North Carolina ... The General Tire and Rubber Company is an American manufacturer of tires for motor vehicles. ...


The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company became America's top tire manufacturer and Akron was granted the moniker of “The Rubber Capital of the World”. Goodyear's president, F.A. Seiberling, had been building homes costing around $3,500 for employees in what would become known as Goodyear Heights. Likewise, Harvey Firestone began building employee homes in what would be called Firestone Park. These leaders were responding to the housing crunch caused by the boom in the rubber business. Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company was founded in 1898 by Frank Seiberling. ... Frank Seiberling is an American inventor/founder. ...


Akron was, indeed, booming. For a time it was the fastest-growing city in the country, its population exploding from 69,000 in 1910 to 208,000 in 1920. People came for the jobs in the rubber factories from many places, including Europe. Of those 208,000, almost one-third were immigrants and their children. Among the factory workers in the early 1920s was a young Clark Gable. William Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 – November 16, 1960) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ...


In the 1950s and '60s Akron saw a surge in industry as use of the automobile took off. But while America was still using bias-ply tires, Europe had already seen the wave of the future in radial tires. Radials had almost three times the tread life of bias-ply tires, and Akron’s rubber mills were not equipped to handle the manufacturing requirements. As a result many companies tried to produce hybrid tires, which were troublesome at best. Firestone manufactured the ill-fated 500 series, which was recalled in the millions. B.F. Goodrich eventually replaced its old equipment with new machinery to enable the manufacturing of radial tires. Tires may refer to: the plural of tire the Italian name for Tiers, Italy, a town in South Tyrol, Italy Category: ... The Firestone Tire and Rubber Company was founded by Harvey Firestone in 1900 to supply pneumatic tires for wagons, buggies, and other forms of wheeled transportation common in the era. ...


In the 1970s and '80s the rubber industry experienced a major decline as a number of strikes and factory shutdowns delivered the final blows to the industry. In ten years the number of people working within the rubber industry was slashed in half. By the early '90s Goodyear was the only remaining rubber manufacturer based in Akron.

Panorama of Akron, Ohio in 1911
Panorama of Akron, Ohio in 1911

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2659x420, 372 KB) Summary 1911 panorama of Downtown in Akron, Ohio Source: American Memory Project, U.S. Library of Congress http://memory. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2659x420, 372 KB) Summary 1911 panorama of Downtown in Akron, Ohio Source: American Memory Project, U.S. Library of Congress http://memory. ...

Zeppelins and blimps

Aerial view of the Akron-Fulton airport (then NAS Akron) in the 1940s, with the Goodyear Airdock visible on the left.
Aerial view of the Akron-Fulton airport (then NAS Akron) in the 1940s, with the Goodyear Airdock visible on the left.

Beginning in the early 1910s, Goodyear began experimenting with airship development, and in 1917 created a subsidiary with the Zeppelin Company to build dirigibles in the United States. During the 1920s and 1930s, Akron and Lakehurst, New Jersey, were the American centers of dirigible research and manufacturing. The United States' largest airships, Akron, and Macon, were both built in Akron. After their tragic accidents in 1933 and 1935, and the Hindenburg Disaster in 1937, rigid airships were abandoned and Goodyear focused on the production of blimps. The US Navy used many blimps in World War II for aerial observation, and Goodyear famously began using them to advertise. Though very few new airships are built today, the Goodyear Blimps remain a popular corporate symbol. The former Goodyear Airdock, now owned by Lockheed Martin, is, along with several other airship hangars, one of the largest buildings in the world without interior supports. USS Akron (ZRS-4) in flight, November 2, 1931 An airship or dirigible is a buoyant lighter-than-air aircraft that can be steered and propelled through the air. ... Luftschiffbau Zeppelin GmbH is a German company which, during the early 20th century, was a leader in the design and manufacture of rigid airships. ... Akron in flight, 2 November 1931 An airship is a buoyant (lighter-than-air) aircraft that can be steered and propelled through the air. ... Lakehurst is a borough located in Ocean County, New Jersey. ... Dirigible can refer to : an airship -- a lighter-than-air aircraft that can be steered and propelled through the air. ... USS Akron (ZRS-4) was a rigid helium-filled airship of the United States Navy that crashed off the New Jersey coast early on April 4, 1933, killing 73 passengers and crew. ... USS Macon (ZRS-5) was a rigid frame airship built and operated by the United States Navy for scouting. ... LZ 129 Hindenburg was a German zeppelin that was destroyed by fire while landing at Lakehurst Naval Air Station in New Jersey on May 6, 1937. ... Blimp is an informal term typically applied to non-rigid airships. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Goodyear Blimp is the collective name for a fleet of blimps operated by Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company for advertising purposes and for use as a television camera platform for aerial views of sporting events. ... Lockheed/BAE/Northrop F-35 Lockheed Trident missile C-130 Hercules; in production since the 1950s, now as the C-130J Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) is an aerospace manufacturer formed in 1995 by the merger of Lockheed Corporation with Martin Marietta. ...


Akron milestones

History made in Akron This article does not cite any references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Apollo 15 space suit A spacesuit is a complex system of garments, equipment, and environmental systems designed to keep a person alive and comfortable in the harsh environment of outer space. ... Exterior of the National Inventors Hall of Fame museum, 2005 The National Inventors Hall of Fame is an organization that honors important inventors from the whole world. ... AA meeting sign Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is an informal meeting society for recovering alcoholics. ... NFL redirects here. ... The Akron Pros was a team in that played in Akron, Ohio in the National Football League from 1920-1925 and as the Akron Indians in 1926. ... Zeppelins are types of rigid airships pioneered by German Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin in the early 20th century, based in part on an earlier design by aviation pioneer David Schwarz. ...

  • One of the only Y-shaped bridges in the United States, the All-American Bridge, is located in Akron, Ohio.
  • Italian-American mobster Rosario Borgio arrived in Akron, Ohio in the early 1900's and established one of the first organized crime operations in the Midwest during the 20th century.
  • The height of Akron, Ohio's tallest building the FirstMerit Tower roof is 330 in feet which is the city's area code.
  • Thomas Edison married his 2nd wife Mina Miller Edison on February 24, 1886 in Akron, Ohio.

Akron's Awards, Rankings, and Notabilty Sojourner Truth (c. ... Aint I A Woman? is a speech by Sojourner Truth, delivered in 1851 at the Womens Convention in Akron, Ohio. ... Rosario Giuseppe Borgio (January 18, 1861 - February 21, 1919) was an early Italian-American mobster establishing one of the first organized crime operations in the Midwest during the early 20th century. ... LeBron Raymone James (born December 30, 1984) is an American professional basketball player who currently plays for the Cleveland Cavaliers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Edison redirects here. ...

  • Winner of an All-American City award in 1981.
  • Winner of an All-American City award in 1995.
  • Winner of an All-American City award in 2008.
  • Ranked ninth in the nation by Site Selection Magazine for locating new manufacturing plants in 1994.
  • Ranked ninth in the nation by Site Selection Magazine for locating new manufacturing plants in 1994.
  • Ranked 16th by Farmers Insurance Group of Companies as the Most Secure Place to Live (Large Metro Area) in June of 2005.
  • Was awarded with the Business Incubator of the year award by the National Business Incubation Association May 06, 2008.
  • Summit Data Communications took 2nd place for Outstanding Incubator Client in the technology category.
  • Once known as the "Rubber Capital of the World," now a world-renowned center for polymer research and development. There are 400 polymer related companies located in the Akron area.
  • Birthplace of Aviation.
  • President Taft and Helen Keller stayed at Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens-Former home to Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company Co-FOunder F.A. Seiberling-in Akron.

Akron in Pop Culture All-America City Program Logo The All-America City Award is given by the National Civic League annually to ten cities in the United States. ... All-America City Program Logo The All-America City Award is given by the National Civic League annually to ten cities in the United States. ... All-America City Program Logo The All-America City Award is given by the National Civic League annually to ten cities in the United States. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

  • In the television series Prison Break Micheal calls a hospital in Akron, Ohio.
  • In a Robot Chicken episode a retired fictional movie character was said to be livng in Akron.
  • One pilot for a television show called "The Virgin of Akron, Ohio" was shot in 2007.
  • The full movie "The Instructor"(1983) was shot in the city of Akron.
  • Chrissie Hynde made a song called "Downtown(Akron)" and "My city was gone" referring to the city.
  • V.E.C. smash hit "AK-Rowdy" was about north Summit county and Akron.
  • "Ak-Anthem" and "Akron Niggas Are The Hardest" made by Chino Nino talks about Akron, Ohio's ghettos life style.
  • In Ice Cube 's hit single "Today Was A Good Day" he is quoted rapping "The lights on the Goodyear blimp read Ice Cube's a pimp."
  • In Stephen King 's movie and novel "Needful Things", the supernatural mysterious Mr. Leland Gaunt claims to be from Akron, Ohio.
  • In the movie Blackout CJ wears a number 23 Lebron James jersey through the film, Akron is also credited a big part in the Northeast Blackout due to FirstEnergy not trimming trees around their high voltage lines.
  • On the bottom of LeBron James Nike Zoom LeBron 5 the map of Akron is on it and in other areas depending on shoe type.
  • On LeBron's right forearm is a "330" tattoo with a fire burning in the background.
  • The Nike Dunk Low - SVSM (Lebron James) color way green, gold and white derived from St. Vincent - St. Mary High School.
  • The Nike Dunk Low - Akron (Lebron James) was created for LeBron's family and friends, it feature a black and gold outline of Ohio and a star marking Akron's location.
  • In the hit NBC tv show "The Office", the fictional business "Dunder Mifflin" has an office located in Akron, Ohio.

Akron's sons and daughters This article is about a television series. ... AA meeting sign Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is an informal meeting society for recovering alcoholics. ... Robot Chicken is an Emmy award-winning American stop motion animated comedy television series created by Seth Green and Matthew Senreich, who are the executive producers. ... Chrissie Hynde (born Christine Ellen Hynde, 7 September 1951, Akron, Ohio) is an American rock musician, best known as the leader of the band The Pretenders. ... OShea Jackson (born June 15, 1969), better known by his stage name Ice Cube, is an American MC, songwriter, actor, screenwriter, and film director. ... Goodyear may relate to: Charles Goodyear (1800 - 1860), inventor of vulcanized rubber Goodyear Welt A shoe construction process developed by Charles Goodyears son, Charles Goodyear Jnr Gary Goodyear, Canadian politician Julie Goodyear, British television actress Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company Goodyear Inflatoplane Goodyear, Arizona This is a disambiguation page... Blimp can refer to: a non-rigid airship as opposed to a rigid airship (e. ... For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... Needful Things is a horror novel written by Stephen King in 1991. ... Jiminy Glick is a fictional character portrayed by Martin Short in the TV series Primetime Glick. ... Martin Hayter Short, CM (born March 26, 1950) is a Canadian/American comedian, actor, writer, and producer. ... The term blackout in peacetime refers to a cessation of electrical energy through electric power transmission systems. ... LeBron Raymone James (born December 30, 1984) is an American professional basketball player who currently plays for the Cleveland Cavaliers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... FirstEnergy provides power, natural gas and services to parts of Ohio, Pennsylvania and New Jersey. ... St. ...

  • poet Rita Dove
  • rock musician Chrissie Hynde
  • basketball superstar LeBron James

Geography and climate

Akron's Tallest Building, the FirstMerit Tower
Akron's Tallest Building, the FirstMerit Tower

Akron is located at 41°4′23″N, 81°31′4″W (41.073155, -81.517900)[5].


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 62.4 square miles (161.6 km²), of which, 62.1 square miles (160.8 km²) of it is land and 0.3 square miles (0.9 km²) of it (0.54%) is water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ...


Akron has a humid continental climate, with cold but changeable winters, wet, cool springs, warm (sometimes hot) and humid summers, and cool, rather dry autumns. Precipitation is fairly well-distributed through the year, but summer tends to have the most rainfall (and also, somewhat paradoxically, the most sunshine), and autumn the least. The mid-autumn through early-spring months tend to be quite cloudy, with sometimes less than 30% possible sunshine. The cloudiest month is December, and the sunniest month is usually July, which is also, somewhat ironically, the wettest month. The humid continental climate is found over large areas of land masses in the temperate regions of the mid latitudes where there is a zone of conflict between polar and tropical air masses. ... For other uses, see Winter (disambiguation). ... Spring is one of the four temperate seasons. ... For other uses, see Summer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Autumn (disambiguation). ...


Winters tend to be cold, with average January high temperatures of 32 °F (0 °C), and average January lows of 17 °F (-8 °C), with considerable variation in temperatures. During a typical January, high temperatures of over 50 °F (10 °C) are just as common as low temperatures of below 0 °F (-18 °C). Snowfall is lighter than the snowbelt areas to the north, but is still somewhat influenced by Lake Erie, generally averaging about 47.1 inches (118.7 cm) per winter. During a typical winter, temperatures drop below 0 °F (-18 °C) on about 6 occurrences, generally only during the nighttime hours. A snowbelt is a region, many of which lie downwind of the Great Lakes, where heavy snowfall is particularly common. ... Lake Erie (pronounced ) is the tenth largest lake on Earth[2] and, of the five Great Lakes of North America, is the fourth largest by surface area, the southernmost, shallowest, and smallest by volume. ... Mid-19th century tool for converting between different standards of the inch An inch is an Imperial unit of length. ... cm redirects here, alternate uses: cm (disambiguation) A centimetre (symbol cm; American spelling: centimeter) is an SI unit of length. ...


Summers are warm, sometimes hot, with average July high temperatures of 83 °F (28 °C), and average July lows of 62 °F (17 °C). Summer weather is more stable, generally humid with thunderstorms fairly common. Temperatures reach or exceed 90 °F (32 °C) about 7 times each summer, on average. In hot summers, such as 1988, however, as many as 30 days over 90 °F (32 °C) have been observed, and in cooler summers, such as the summer of 2000, the temperature may never reach 90 °F (32 °C). Temperatures over 100 °F (38 °C) are rare (about once per decade on average), most recently occurring on several occasions in the hot summer of 1988. A rolling thundercloud over Enschede, The Netherlands. ...


The all-time record high in Akron of 104 °F (40 °C) was established on August 6, 1918, and the all-time record low of −25 °F (−32 °C) was set on January 19, 1994. is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ...

Monthly Normal and Record High and Low Temperatures
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Rec High (°F) 70 72 81 88 93 100 101 98 99 86 80 76
Norm High (°F) 32.9 36.8 47.5 59 69.8 78.2 82.3 80.3 72.8 61.1 48.7 37.7
Norm Low (°F) 17.4 19.8 27.9 37.1 47.8 56.8 61.3 60.2 53.1 42.1 33.4 23.6
Rec Low (°F) -25 -13 -3 10 24 32 43 41 32 20 -1 -16
Precip (in) 2.49 2.28 3.15 3.39 3.96 3.55 4.02 3.65 3.43 2.53 3.04 2.98
Source: USTravelWeather.com [1]
See also: Akron Neighborhoods

For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... // Chapel Hill Chapel Hill is one of Akron’s two large commercial districts. ...

Demographics

Historical populations[6]
Census
year
Population Rank  %±

1850 3,266
1860 3,477 6.5%
1870 10,006 187.8%
1880 16,512 65.0%
1890 27,601 67.2%
1900 42,728 87 54.8%
1910 69,067 81 61.6%
1920 208,435 32 201.8%
1930 255,040 35 22.4%
1940 244,791 38 −4.0%
1950 274,605 39 12.2%
1960 290,351 45 5.7%
1970 275,425 52 −5.1%
1980 237,177 59 −13.9%
1990 223,019 71 −6.0%
2000 217,074 82 −2.7%
2007 210,025 80 −3.5%

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 217,074 people, 90,116 households, and 53,709 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,497.3 people per square mile (1,350.3/km²). There were 97,315 housing units at an average density of 1,567.9/sq mi (605.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 67.22% White, 28.48% African American, 0.26% Native American, 1.50% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.43% from other races, and 2.07% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.16% of the population. The top 5 largest ancestries include German (18.1%), Irish (11.5%), English (7.2%), Italian (6.8%), and American (6.4%)[2]. The Seventh Census of the United States, conducted by the Bureau of the Census, determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876 — an increase of 35. ... The United States Census of 1860 was the eighth Census conducted in the United States. ... The Ninth United States Census was taken in 1870. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 1, 1890. ... 1900 US Census The Twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census was taken in 1910. ... The Fourteenth United States Census was taken in 1920. ... The Fifteenth United States Census was taken in 1930. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census was taken in 1950. ... The Eighteenth United States Census was taken in 1960. ... The Nineteenth United States Census was taken in 1970. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... English Americans (occasionally known as Anglo-Americans) are citizens of the United States whose ancestry originates wholly or partly in England. ...


There were 90,116 households out of which 28.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 37.5% were married couples living together, 17.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.4% were non-families. 33.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 3.01. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 25.3% under the age of 18, 10.5% from 18 to 24, 30.3% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 13.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 91.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.6 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $31,835, and the median income for a family was $39,381. Males had a median income of $31,898 versus $24,121 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,596. About 14.0% of families and 17.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.7% of those under age 18 and 9.7% of those age 65 or over. Per capita income means how much each individual receives, in monetary terms, of the yearly income generated in their country. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Akron has a metropolitan population of 694,960 (U.S. Census Bureau, 2000). Akron is also part of the larger Cleveland-Akron-Elyria Combined Statistical Area, which was the 14th largest in the country with a population of over 2.9 million according to the 2000 Census.

Law, government, and crime

The city adopted a new charter of the commissioner manager type in 1920, but reverted to its old form in 1924. The current mayor of Akron is Don Plusquellic. Mayor Plusquellic is currently serving his fifth term, and was the President of the United States Conference of Mayors during 2004. He is also a member of the Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition[7], a bi-partisan group with a stated goal of "making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets." The Coalition is co-chaired by Boston, Massachusetts Mayor Thomas Menino and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg. City Commission government is a form of municipal government that was once common in the United States, but has fallen out of favor, most cities formerly governed by Commission having switched to the Council-Manager form. ... Donald L. Plusquellic (born July 3, 1949) is the current mayor of Akron, Ohio. ... The United States Conference of Mayors (USCM) is a nonpartisan organization founded in 1932. ... The Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition is a coalition of mayors from 225 different United States cities, with a stated goal of making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets. ... In a two-party system (such as in the United States), bipartisan refers to any bill, act, resolution, or any other action of a political body in which both of the major political parties are in agreement. ... Boston redirects here. ... Thomas Michael Menino (born December 27, 1942) is the current mayor of Boston, Massachusetts, United States and the citys first Italian-American mayor. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, founder of Bloomberg L.P., and the current Mayor of New York City. ...


The Akron City Council has thirteen members. Ten are elected to represent wards and three are elected at large.


In 1915, a new municipal water system was established. It also included a reservoir on the Cuyahoga River with storage capacity of 2,385,200,000 gallons (9,027,982,000 liters), a complete purification system, and a pumping station. The Cuyahoga River (IPA pronunciation: , or kuy-a-HAW-ga, locally kie-uh-HOE-guh) is located in Northeast Ohio in the United States. ... The gallon (abbreviation: gal) is a unit of volume. ... The liter (spelled liter in American English and litre in Commonwealth English) is a unit of volume. ...

See also: List of Mayors of Akron, Ohio

Akron, Ohio is a city in the northeastern part of the U.S. state of Ohio Mayors of Akron Administrators of Akron Mayors of Akron Categories: Lists of Mayors | Leaders of cities in Ohio ...

Economy

Akron is home to two Fortune 500 companies: the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company and FirstEnergy. In addition, Akron is home to a number of smaller companies such as GOJO, makers of Purell, Advanced Elastomer Systems, FirstMerit Bank, Roadway Express (a subsidiary of Yellow Roadway), Myers Industries, an international manufacturer of polymer products, Acme Fresh Market and Lockheed Martin, Maritime Systems & Sensors division. The City of Akron created the first Joint Economic Development District to promote regional commerce with neighboring suburbs. The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company was founded in 1898 by Frank Seiberling. ... FirstEnergy provides power, natural gas and services to parts of Ohio, Pennsylvania and New Jersey. ... A bottle of Purell Purell is an instant hand sanitizer which claims to kill 99. ... Roadway, headquartered in Akron, Ohio is a division of YRC Worldwide Official Web Site Yellow Transportation Official Web Site Roadway Official Web Site Reimer Official Web site USF Official Web Site New Penn Official Web Site MeridianIQ Official Web Site Category: ... Introduction Yellow Roadway Corporation is now known as YRC Worldwide to better reflect the worldwide presence that they have through the many brands that they represent. ... Acme Fresh Market is a grocery store chain with 16 locations in Northeast Ohio serving Portage, Stark, & Summit Counties. ... Lockheed/BAE/Northrop F-35 Lockheed Trident missile C-130 Hercules; in production since the 1950s, now as the C-130J Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) is an aerospace manufacturer formed in 1995 by the merger of Lockheed Corporation with Martin Marietta. ... A Joint Economic Development District (JEDD) is an arrangement in Ohio where one or more municipalities and a township agree to work together to develop township land for commercial or industrial purposes. ...


Education

The Art Deco Mayflower Manor Apartment Apartments formerly the Mayflower Hotel. Rising 207 feet, it is an Akron Landmark. Also shown is the Polsky Building. It was once Akron's flagship department store. it is now owned by the University of Akron and houses various departments for the school.
The Art Deco Mayflower Manor Apartment Apartments formerly the Mayflower Hotel. Rising 207 feet, it is an Akron Landmark. [8] Also shown is the Polsky Building. It was once Akron's flagship department store. [9] it is now owned by the University of Akron and houses various departments for the school. [10]

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1968x2992, 698 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Akron, Ohio Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1968x2992, 698 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Akron, Ohio Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Asheville City Hall. ...

Higher education

The University of Akron is home to over 23,000 students, making it the fourth largest public university in the state, and is a world leader in polymer research. While Akron continues to predominantly serve commuter students, the university has worked hard to shake off its image as a “commuter school." A $300 million dollar construction project saw the completion of nine new buildings, fourteen renovated facilities, and a freshly landscaped campus. The University also offers a combined B.S./M.D. program with the Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine. A new on-campus football stadium, built to replace the aging Rubber Bowl is slated to begin construction in the Spring of 2008. The University of Akron is an institution of higher learning located in Akron, Ohio. ... A polymer (from Greek: πολυ, polu, many; and μέρος, meros, part) is a substance composed of molecules with large molecular mass composed of repeating structural units, or monomers, connected by covalent chemical bonds. ... Northeastern Ohio Universities College Of Medicine (NEOUCOM) is a community-based, state medical school that offers a combined B.S./M.D. program that allows students to graduate with their B.S./M.D. in as few as six years. ... Summa Field at InfoCision Stadium is the name of the new multi-use, on campus stadium in Akron, Ohio, USA, that is currently in its planning stages. ... The Rubber Bowl is a stadium in Akron, Ohio. ...


Akron is also located in close proximity to several other colleges and universities including the main campus of Kent State University in nearby Kent; Hiram College in Hiram; and the College of Wooster in Wooster as well as several schools in the Cleveland area. For the events of May 4, 1970, see Kent State shootings Kent State University (also known as Kent, Kent State or KSU) is one of America’s largest university systems, the third largest university in Ohio after Ohio State University (57,748) and the University of Cincinnati (35,364), and... Nickname: The Tree City Location within the state of Ohio County Portage Mayor John Fender Area    - City 22. ... Hiram College is a liberal arts college located in Hiram, Ohio. ... Hiram is a village in Portage County, Ohio, United States. ... The College of Wooster is a liberal arts college with fewer than 2000 students located in Wooster, Ohio, in Wayne County, Ohio. ... Wayne County courthouse in downtown Wooster Wooster (IPA ) first syllable pronounced puss--like the cat--with a w is a city in Wayne County, Ohio, United States. ... Cleveland redirects here. ...


Secondary education

Elementary and secondary education is mainly provided by the Akron City Schools, which are currently going through a 15-year, $800 million rebuilding process, remodeling some schools and entirely replacing others. Some schools will be closing permanently due to a drop in enrollment. The school board could not get a levy passed to pay for its portion of the construction expense so it worked out an arrangement with the city of Akron where the city will use the money from a new income tax to pay for Community Learning Centers, which will serve as schools but be owned by the city.[11] Meanwhile the academic situation has improved recently as the city’s schools have been moved from “Academic Watch” to “Continuous Improvement” by the Ohio Department of Education. Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income...


Akron City Schools has two performing arts schools. Miller South School for the Visual and Performing Arts and Firestone High School. Miller South has grades 4-8. Most Miller-South students move on to Firestone to continue in the Visual and Performing Arts Program. They are the only two schools which specialize in visual and performing arts in Summit County, however nearby Copley High School has always been known to support an excellent arts program. Harvey S. Firestone High School is a public high school located on the northwest side of Akron, Ohio. ... Copley High School is a public high school in Copley, Ohio. ...


Private education

Akron also has many private, parochial and charter schools. Akron Public Schools made headlines in 2004 when a freshman student of Akron Digital Academy, the district’s own online charter school, was not allowed to participate in extracurricular activities, an event later covered and satirized by The Daily Show. St. Vincent - St. Mary High School, just west of Akron’s downtown, also made headlines when basketball star LeBron James was drafted by the Cleveland Cavaliers first overall after his graduation in 2003. Akron-based Summit Academy Schools is the largest system of non-profit community schools in the country which are specifically designed for students with learning disorders such as ADHD, Asperger's Syndrome, high-functioning autism and PDD-NOS. The Daily Show is a Peabody and Emmy Award-winning American satirical television program produced by and airing on Comedy Central. ... This article is about the sport. ... LeBron Raymone James (born December 30, 1984) is an American professional basketball player who currently plays for the Cleveland Cavaliers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... The Cleveland Cavaliers (also known as the Cavs) are a professional basketball team based in Cleveland, Ohio. ...


Culture and entertainment

S. Main and Bowery St.
S. Main and Bowery St.

Akron has a diverse and colorful heritage of old restaurants and shopping centers. Quaker Square, located in the heart of Akron’s downtown, was redeveloped in the early 1970's as a downtown mall, created from the old Quaker Oats factory, which originally operated at that location. The oat silos had been transformed into unique hotel rooms. Recently, the University of Akron purchased this complex for its own use—primarily as residence-hall space for its growing student body. Picture of Downtown Akron, from a overhead view File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Picture of Downtown Akron, from a overhead view File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Quaker Oats Company makes many types and flavors of oatmeal. ...


During the summer, Akron hosts the National Hamburger Festival, a tribute to the city's role in the invention of the hamburger.[3]


Highland Square, located in near West Akron and anchored by the historic Highland Theatre, is a well-known entertainment district, featuring popular local antique stores and retail shops, such as Square Records. It is also home to several unique restaurants and taverns. Other unique and historically significant Akron neighborhoods include Goodyear Heights and Firestone Park, originally developed and designed during the First World War for employees of the large Akron rubber companies. Likewise, Northwest Akron is home to a number of large mansions, many of which, like the famous Stan Hywet, were built early in the 20th century for the upper management of these companies, as well as the city's many other successful industries.


Akron also supports independent retailers, such as Acme.


Each summer Akron hosts the All American Soap Box Derby. Children from across the country race their homemade, gravity-powered race cars down the steep hill at Derby Downs in the shadow of the Lockheed Martin Airdock. 1984 Augusta, Georgia Champion An official Soap Box Derby racer from 1967 Senior Seifenkiste - Deutsches Seifenkisten Derby e. ... Derby Downs, in Akron, Ohio, has been the home track of the All American Soap Box Derby since it was built as a WPA project in the late 1930s. ...


Adjacent to the Derby Downs race hill is a 19,000-square foot outdoor skatepark. The park features concrete ramps, including two bowls going as deep as 7 feet, a snake run, two hips, a stair set with handrail, many smaller quarter pipes and a variety of grind boxes. Positioned just a few feet from the Akron Skatepark is a BMX course where organized races are often held in the warmer months.


The city is also home to several museums, including:

Akron is the hometown of Janelle Couts who was crowned Miss Ohio for 2003 and represented Ohio in the Miss America contest. She previously held the title of Miss Medina. Exterior of the National Inventors Hall of Fame museum, 2005 The National Inventors Hall of Fame is an organization that honors important inventors from the whole world. ... Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company was founded in 1898 by Frank Seiberling. ... Melanie Murphy, Miss Ohio 2006 The Miss Ohio Pageant selects the representative for the U.S. state of Ohio in the Miss America pageant. ... For the patriotically-themed comic book superheroines, see Miss America (comics). ...


Akron was designated a Tree City USA by the National Arbor Day Foundation. Tree City USA logo Tree City USA is a tree planting and tree care program sponsored by The National Arbor Day Foundation for cities and towns in the United States. ... Arbor Day is a holiday in which individuals and groups are encouraged to plant and care for trees. ...


Local start-up league the NEO Rock 'n' Roller Girls is part of the national resurgence and rebirth of roller derby.


Sports

Akron is the home to two professional sports teams:

Club Sport Year Founded League Venue Championships
Akron Aeros Baseball 1997 Eastern League Canal Park 2 (2003,2005)
Akron Racers Softball 2004 National Pro Fastpitch Firestone Stadium 1 (2005)

The Akron Aeros are a minor league baseball team based in Akron, Ohio, USA. The team, which plays in the Eastern League, is the Double-A affiliate of the Cleveland Indians major-league club. ... This article is about the sport. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... The Eastern League is a minor league baseball league which operates primarily in the northeastern United States, although it has had a team in Ohio since 1989. ... Canal Park is a baseball stadium located in Akron, Ohio that is the home of the Akron Aeros of the minor-league Eastern League, a AA affiliate of the Cleveland Indians. ... The Akron Racers are a womens softball team based in Akron, Ohio. ... Softball is a team sport popular especially in the United States. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... National Pro Fastpitch (NPF), formerly the Womens Pro Softball League (WPSL), is the only professional womens softball league in the world. ...

Media

Office Complex in Downtown Akron
Office Complex in Downtown Akron

Print media

The Akron Beacon Journal is a morning newspaper located in Akron, Ohio. ... The University of Akron is an institution of higher learning located in Akron, Ohio. ...

Radio

WZIP is an American student operated public radio station serving Akron, Ohio and the surrounding areas. ... The University of Akron is an institution of higher learning located in Akron, Ohio. ... WAPS is a non-commercial FM radio station in Akron, Ohio owned and operated by the Akron Public School System. ... WAKR is an AM radio station in Akron, Ohio, USA operating on 1590 kHz. ... WKDD FM 98. ... WHLO is an AM radio station in Akron, Ohio, USA, operating on 640 kHz, and owned by Clear Channel Communications. ... WJMP AM 1520 is an affiliate of Fox Sports Radio serving Akron, Ohio. ... Fox Sports Radio, abbreviated FSR, is an international radio network consisting of sports talk programming all day, every day. ... WKSU-FM is a non-commercial FM radio station at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio broadcasting at 89. ... NPR redirects here. ... WONE-FM is an FM radio station in Akron, Ohio operating at 97. ... WNIR FM 100. ... WSTB (88. ... WARF is an AM radio station serving the Akron, Ohio metro area, operating on 1350 kHz. ... WQMX is an FM radio station in Medina, Ohio, USA operating on 94. ...

Television

Akron is unique in that despite its size, it does not form its own television market, primarily due to being less than 40 miles (64km) from Cleveland. It is part of the Cleveland-Akron (Canton) Media market. However, four stations in the market are licensed to Akron. KM, Km, or km may stand for: Khmer language (ISO 639 alpha-2, km) Kilometre Kinemantra Meditation Knowledge management KM programming language KM Culture, Korean Movie Maker. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... NASA image of Greater Cleveland and Lake Erie Greater Cleveland is a nickname for the metropolitan area surrounding Cleveland in Ohio. ... A media market, broadcast market, media region, designated market area, DMA or simply market is a region where the population can receive the same (or similar) television and radio station offerings, and may also include other types of media including newspapers and Internet content. ...

WAOH and WEAO serve the city of Akron specifically, while WBNX and WVPX identify themselves as "Akron-Cleveland", serving the entire Northeast Ohio market. WAOH-LP (Channel 29) in Akron, Ohio and W35AX (Channel 35) in Cleveland, Ohio are low power television stations serving the Akron/Cleveland market using the brand The CAT (for Cleveland Akron Television). ... WEAO is a PBS station located in Akron, Ohio (although technically broadcasting from Kent, Ohio). ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... WVPX is the Cleveland, Ohio affiliate of the i television network (formerly known as Pax TV). ... . The initial letter is shown capitalized due to technical restrictions. ... WBNX is a WB television affiliate serving the Cleveland television market broadcasting on channel 55. ... The CW Television Network, normally abbreviated to The CW, also known as The New CW in its first season of the network, is a television network in the United States launched during the 2006 television season. ...


One common thought about television in Akron is that if another station had set up shop as a network affiliate after WVPX (Was known as WAKR/WAKC-ABC until 1996) Akron and Canton could have made their own television market. This new media market would have been in the top 100 largest markets, as well.


Infrastructure

Art Deco Apartment Building in Downtown Akron
Art Deco Apartment Building in Downtown Akron

Health

Akron has an extensive and distinguished health sector, with a large number of hospitals for a city of its size. Akron's adult hospitals are owned by two health systems, Summa Health System and Akron General Health System. Summa Health System operates Akron City Hospital and St. Thomas Hospital, an orthopedic hospital located in the North Hill neighborhood. Akron General Health System operates Akron General Medical Center. Akron Children's Hospital is an independent entity that specializes in pediatric and burn care. Both Akron City Hospital and Akron General have been on the U.S. News and World Report Magazine's list of "Best Hospitals" many times. It is worth noting that both AGMC and Summa are designated Level I Trauma Centers. By comparison, Akron's much larger urban neighbor to the north, Cleveland, has only one. Summa Health System is one of the largest HMOs in Ohio. ... Established in 1890 in Akron, Ohio, Akron Children’s Hospital is the largest pediatric care provider in Northeast Ohio. ...


Transportation

Akron's road network does not run on any grid system, and it can be confusing for out-of-town motorists. Roads frequently change name or direction without warning, or stop and continue elsewhere. In addition there are two sets of numbered roads, one in Kenmore (1st -31st Streets), and one along Arlington (1st - 9th Avenues), the rest of the city has no numbering at all. This disparity between areas is due to Akron's many annexations over the years. Akron’s transportation needs are fulfilled by two major interstates, Interstate 76 and Interstate 77. I-76, I-77, and Route 8 meet at one central interchange, which is commonly known by the same name. The central interchange divides the city into four quadrants. The Interstate 76 Eastern Expressway weaves through much of Akron’s warehouse sector and the Goodyear world headquarters is easily visible. I-76 is paired with I-77 for about two miles (3 km) west of the central interchange, and then splits off again, with I-76 later being paired with US-224 and I-77 heading north towards Cleveland. This portion of highway is currently under review by ODOT for reconstruction. The Western highway is a major route to Cleveland and Columbus, and is a near term destination to Fairlawn, a major commercial area. Route 8 has been overhauled numerous times and serves as a major entryway for the north-eastern suburbs, namely Cuyahoga Falls, Munroe Falls, Stow and Hudson. There is also one highway to the south, U.S. Highway 224, part of which is also notated as Interstate 277 (I-277 connects I-77 with I-76). The Martin Luther King Jr. Freeway, commonly known as the Innerbelt, includes part of the longer Route 59. It serves the very center of the city, and was supposed to run from the I-76 / I-77 to Route 8. However, due to poor planning, the Innerbelt was never completed and only runs to Main St./Howard St. Route 59 also lacks direct I-76W / I-77N inbound and offbound ramps, furthering its problems. Mayor Don Plusquellic has brought up the idea of tearing up the northern end of the Innerbelt in order to free land for development, although some residents have stated that they would like to see it completely connected as originally planned. Interstate 76 (abbreviated I-76) is an Interstate Highway in the United States, running 435 miles (700 km) from an interchange with Interstate 71 west of Akron, Ohio east to Interstate 295 near Camden, New Jersey. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 77 Interstate 77 (abbreviated I-77) is an interstate highway in the eastern United States. ... Ohio State Highway 8 stretches from downtown Cleveland, Ohio to Interstate 77 in downtown Akron, Ohio. ... Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company was founded in 1898 by Frank Seiberling. ... Fairlawn is an affluent suburb of Akron, OH, located in Summit County. ... Ohio State Highway 8 stretches from downtown Cleveland, Ohio to Interstate 77 in downtown Akron, Ohio. ... Nickname: The Falls, C-Town, C-Falls, Caucasian Falls, CFO Location within the state of Ohio County Summit  - Mayor Don L. Robart Area    - City 66. ... The Munroe Falls Dam Location in the state of Ohio Founded 1838 County Summit County Mayor Frank Larson Area  - Total  - Water 7. ... Location in Ohio Coordinates: Country United States State Ohio County Summit Founded 1804 [1] Government  - Mayor Karen Fritschel [2] Area  - City 17. ... Location in Ohio Location within Summit County, Ohio Coordinates: , Country State County Summit Settled 1799 Incorporated 1837 Village/Township Merger 1994 Government  - Type Council-Manager  - Council President Mike Moran  - City Manager Anthony J. Bales  - Mayor William A. Currin Area  - Total 25. ... U.S. Highway 224 is a spur of U.S. Highway 24. ... MAJOR JUNCTIONS JUNCTION EXIT # I-76 OH 1 I-77 OH 4A-B Legend BROWSE STATE HWYS Prev Next Interstate 277 (abbreviated I-277) is a 4. ... Ohio State Highway 59 is a signed route that was certified 1969. ... Ohio State Highway 8 stretches from downtown Cleveland, Ohio to Interstate 77 in downtown Akron, Ohio. ... Ohio State Highway 59 is a signed route that was certified 1969. ... Donald L. Plusquellic (born July 3, 1949) is the current mayor of Akron, Ohio. ...


Public transportation is available through the METRO RTA system, which has a fleet of over two hundred buses and trolleys, and operates local routes as well as running commuter buses into downtown Cleveland. SARTA also has a bus line running between Canton and Akron. Amtrak closed its station near Quaker Square in 2005. Airline passengers travelling to or from Akron use either the Akron-Canton Regional Airport in Green or Cleveland Hopkins International Airport. Two low-fare airlines, Frontier Airlines and AirTran Airways, have begun serving Akron-Canton in recent years, making that airport a fairly popular alternative for travellers to or from the Cleveland area. Akron Fulton Airport serves private planes and is the home of the Lockheed Martin Airdock, where the Goodyear blimps were formerly stored and maintained. The Goodyear blimps are now housed outside of Akron in a facility on the shores of Wingfoot Lake in Suffield. METRO RTA is the transit agency serving Summit County, Ohio and the city of Akron. ... SARTA, Stark Area Regional Transit Authority, is the transit agency servicing Stark County, Ohio, a county in Ohio containing Canton, Alliance, and Massillon. ... Canton is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Stark CountyGR6. ... FAA diagram of Akron-Canton Airport Akron-Canton Airport (IATA: CAK, ICAO: KCAK) is a commercial Class C airport located in southern Summit County, Ohio (a very small portion of both runways extend into Stark County,) roughly 10 miles southeast of Akron, Ohio, and roughly 10 miles northwest of Canton... Signs located at one of the entrances to Green, Ohio Green is an affluent suburban city in Summit County, Ohio, United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about Frontier Airlines that was founded in 1994. ... AirTran Airways is a low-cost airline that is a Delaware corporation with headquarters in Orlando, Florida, USA and is a subsidiary of AirTran Holdings. ...


The Towpath is a regional bike and hike trail that follows the Ohio and Erie Canal. It is not completed in downtown Akron, but stops just north of Innerbelt and just south of I-76/I-77.


Notable natives

Main category: People from Akron, Ohio
See also List of people from Akron, Ohio

The following people were all born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Akron, Ohio, and its surrounding metropolitan statistical area, including Portage County, Ohio, and Summit County, Ohio. ... Lola Albright Lola Albright (born July 20, 1925 in Akron, Ohio) is an American singer and actress. ... Raymond Walter Apple, Jr. ... Art Arfons (born February 3, 1926 in Akron) was three time the world land speed record holder. ... Joseph Arthur (born September 28, 1971) is a contemporary singer-songwriter from Akron, Ohio, known for his melodic compositions combined with swirling choruses. ... Dan Auerbach from The Black Keys Live DVD Daniel Q. Auerbach (b. ... Tom Batiuk (born 1947 in Akron, Ohio) is an American comic strip creator. ... Umar Bin Hassan (1948– ) is an African American poet born in Akron, Ohio. ... Ray C. Bliss (1907 - 1981) was one of the important national Republican party leaders of the 1960s and served as Chairman of the Republican National Committee from 1965 to 1969, during which time Richard M. Nixon was elected to his first term as president. ... William Boyett (1927-December 29, 2004) was an American actor best known for his work as the low-key but authoritative Sgt. ... Glen Edward Buxton (10 November 1947 – 19 October 1997) was a U.S. musician, and guitarist for the original Alice Cooper band. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Bob Casale (born July 14, 1952), or Bob 2 is a keyboardist and rhythm/lead guitar player for the band Devo. ... Gerald Casale: Pre Getting Laid Gerald Casale: Post Getting Laid Gerald Casale returns from the veterinarian Gerald Casale (born July 28, 1948) is the Bass Guitar/Synth Player, a vocalist, and one of the founding members (along with Mark Mothersbaugh and Bob Lewis) of the new wave band Devo. ... “If That Aint Country” redirects here. ... Stephen Curry (born in Melbourne, Victoria) is an Australian comedian and actor who has appeared in many television drama and comedy series, and in feature films. ... Keith B. Dambrot (born October 26, 1958 in Akron, Ohio) is the current mens basketball head coach of the University of Akron. ... For other uses, see John Dean (disambiguation). ... Charles William Frederick Dick (November 3, 1858 - March 13, 1945) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Rita Frances Dove (born August 28, 1952 in Akron, Ohio, USA) is an African American United States poet and author. ... Hugh Malcolm Downs (born February 14, 1921) is a retired American broadcaster, television host, producer, and author. ... Angie Everhart (born September 7, 1969) is an American actress and former fashion model. ... Shirley Fry-Irvin (June 30, 1927) was an American female tennis player who was born in Akron, Ohio, United States. ... Leon Harris on WJLA-TVs ABC 7 News in 2005. ... James Harrison is a linebacker for the Pittsburgh Steelers. ... Howard Hewett (Born: October 1st, 1955 in Akron, Ohio) is the former lead vocalist of the R&B group, Shalamar, from 1979 to 1985. ... Roger Hoover (b. ... Chrissie Hynde (born Christine Ellen Hynde, 7 September 1951, Akron, Ohio) is an American rock musician, best known as the leader of the band The Pretenders. ... James Ingram (born February 16, 1956 in Akron, Ohio) is an American soul musician, famous for his vocal performance. ... The Cramps are a band whose only permanent members have been Lux Interior (Erick Purkhiser) and Poison Ivy (Kristy Wallace), the lead singer and lead guitarist respectively. ... LeBron Raymone James (born December 30, 1984) is an American professional basketball player who currently plays for the Cleveland Cavaliers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Jim Jarmusch Jim Jarmusch (born January 22, 1953 in Akron, Ohio) is a noted American independent film director. ... David Wilkinson Jenkins (born June 29, 1936 in Akron, Ohio), an American figure skater, won the mens gold medal for figure skating during the 1960 Winter Olympics in Squaw Valley. ... American figure skater Hayes Alan Jenkins was born March 23, 1933. ... Clarence Stephen (Steve) Johnson (born November 3, 1957, in Akron, Ohio) is an American professional basketball player, who played for numerous teams. ... Melina Kanakaredes on Guiding Light, 1992 Melina Eleni Kanakaredes (born April 23, 1967) is an American actress. ... Maynard James Keenan (born James Herbert Keenan on April 17, 1964) is an American rock singer, songwriter, musician, and producer. ... Heather Kozar (b. ... Jani Lane (late 80s) Jani Lane (born John Kennedy Oswald, February 1, 1964 in Akron, Ohio) is an American rock legend who was the lead vocalist and songwriter for the glam metal band Warrant. ... Bob Lape (Robert Cable Lape) (born October 6, 1933 in Akron, Ohio) is a well-known broadcast journalist, writer, restaurant reviewer, and food critic. ... Robert Lewis Robert Curtis Lewis (born March 4, 1947, Akron, Ohio), founding member (along with Gerald Casale and Mark Mothersbaugh) of the new wave band Devo. ... Liam Lynch is the name of more than one person of note. ... Michael McKeon is a Managing Director of Mercury Public Affairs. ... Vaughn Monroe (October 7, 1911 - May 21, 1973) was a singer, trumpeter and big band leader, most popular in the 1940s and 1950s. ... Bob Mothersbaugh Jr. ... Jim Mothersbaugh (born January 18, 1956 in Akron, Ohio) was the second drummer for Devo, replacing Rod Reisman who only played for a single show. ... Mark Mothersbaugh (born May 18, 1950, in Akron, Ohio) is an American musician, composer, singer, and painter. ... Thurman Lee Munson (June 7, 1947 – August 2, 1979) was an American catcher in Major League Baseball who played with the New York Yankees from 1969 to 1979. ... Ruby Nash Curtis (born 12 November 1939) is an American singer who led the rhythm and blues group Ruby & The Romantics. ... Coondog OKarma is a competitive eating champion from Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. ... Tim Ripper Owens, born as Timothy S. Owens on September 13, 1967 in Akron, Ohio, is an American heavy metal singer who has performed in Judas Priest and Iced Earth. ... Ara Raoul Parseghian (born May 21, 1923 in Akron, Ohio) is a former collegiate football coach who served as head coach for three teams, most notably the University of Notre Dame team from 1964-1974. ... Gary Pinkel (born April 27, 1952) is the head football coach at the University of Missouri. ... Ohio States Troy Smith hands off to Antonio Pittman vs the 2006 Texas Longhorns Antonio Pittman (born December 9, 1985 in Akron, Ohio) was drafted by the New Orleans Saints in the 2007 NFL draft, and was a running back for The Ohio State University. ... Richard Quick is the head coach of the womens swim team at Stanford University, California, USA. He has been a coach for the US Olympic team for five Olympics - 1984, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000. ... Robert Quine (December 30, 1942 - May 31, 2004), a native of Akron, Ohio, was a guitarist known for his innovative guitar solos. ... W. V. Quine Willard Van Orman Quine (June 25, 1908 - December 25, 2000) was one of the most influential American philosophers and logicians of the 20th century. ... The Original Drummer for The Band DEVO. He was latter replaced by Jim Mothersbaugh. ... Hurricane111 22:30, 21 February 2006 (UTC) Category: ... Dr. Judith Arlene Resnik (April 5, 1949 – January 28, 1986) was an American astronaut who died at the age of 36 in the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster during the launch of the mission STS-51-L. Resnik was born in Akron, Ohio and attended Hebrew school. ... Butch Reynolds was a 1988 Olympic Gold medalist in the Mens 4x400 meter relay for the United States. ... Tom Sawyer Thomas Charles Sawyer, (born August 15, 1945), usually known as Tom Sawyer, is an American politician of the Democratic Party who served as a U.S. representative from Ohio from 1987 to 2003. ... Richard Errett Smalley Richard Errett Smalley (June 6, 1943 – October 28, 2005) was the Gene and Norman Hackerman Professor of Chemistry and a Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Rice University, in Houston, Texas. ... Neal Smith (born September 23, 1947 in Akron, Ohio) was the drummer for the rock group Alice Cooper from 1969 to 1974. ... It has been suggested that Equity feminism be merged into this article or section. ... Football sensation Tyrell DelShawn Sutton was born on December 19, 1986 in Akron, Ohio to Connie and Anthony Sutton, Sr. ... Rachel Sweet (born July 28, 1962 in Akron, Ohio) is an American singer and actress. ... Nathaniel Nate Thurmond (born July 25, 1941, in Akron, Ohio) is rated by many one of the best defensive centers ever to play pro basketball, feared and praised by legends including Bob Pettit, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, and Wilt Chamberlain. ... Antoine Winfield (born June 24, 1977) is a professional American football player in the NFL. He played college ball for Ohio State University and joined the NFL in 1999. ... Theodore Bevry Olson (born September 11, 1940) was the 42nd United States Solicitor General, serving from June 2001 to July 2004. ... Chris Wells (b. ... Ray Wise (born 29 August 1947) is an American actor, known for his roles in Twin Peaks as Leland Palmer, and as Leon Nash, right-hand henchmen to villain Clarence Boddicker in the sci-fi classic Robocop. ... Eugene Richard Woodling (August 16, 1922 - June 2, 2001) was a Major League Baseball outfielder (mostly left field) for the Cleveland Indians (1943, 1946), Pittsburgh Pirates (1947), New York Yankees (1949-1954), Baltimore Orioles (1955, 1958-1960), Cleveland Indians (1955-1957), Washington Senators (1961-1962}, and the New York Mets...

Sister cities

Akron has two sister cities, as designated by the Sister Cities International: Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Chemnitz (Sorbian/Lusatian Kamjenica, 1953-1990 called Karl-Marx-Stadt; Czech: Saská Kamenice) is a city in the Free State of Saxony, Germany. ... Location Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DED Capital Dresden Minister-President Georg Milbradt (CDU) Governing parties CDU / SPD Votes in Bundesrat 4 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  18,416 km² (7,110 sq mi) Population 4,252,000 (11/2006)[1]  - Density 231 /km... Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Kiryat Ekron or Qiryath Eqron is an Israeli town located on the coastal plain in the Central Region of Israel. ...

Publications

  • Akron Chamber of Commerce Year Book, (1913-14)
  • The University of Akron Press
  • Dyer, Joyce, Gum-Dipped: A Daughter Remembers Rubber Town, The University of Akron Press: Akron (2003)
  • Endres, Kathleen, Akron's Better Half: Women's Clubs and the Humanization of a City, 1825-1925, The University of Akron Press: Akron (2006)
  • Jones, Alfred Winslow, Life, Liberty, & Property: A Story of Conflict and a Measurement of Conflicting Rights, The University of Akron Press: Akron (1999)
  • Russ Musarra and Chuck Ayers, Walks around Akron, The University of Akron Press: Akron (2007)
  • S. A. Lane, Fifty Years and Over of Akron and Summit County, (Akron, 1892)
  • S. Love and David Giffels, Wheels of Fortune: The Story of Rubber in Akron, Ohio, The University of Akron Press: Akron (1998)
  • S. Love, Ian Adams, and Barney Taxel, Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens, The University of Akron Press: Akron (2000)
  • F. McGovern, Written on the Hills: The Making of the Akron Landscape, The University of Akron Press: Akron (1996)
  • F. McGovern, Fun, Cheap, and Easy: My Life in Ohio Politics, 1949-1964, The University of Akron Press: Akron (2002).

The University of Akron Press is a university press that is part of the University of Akron. ...

References

  1. ^ US Census 2000 est
  2. ^ a b American FactFinder. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ US Board on Geographic Names. United States Geological Survey (2007-10-25). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  4. ^ Find a County. National Association of Counties. Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  5. ^ US Gazetteer files: 2000 and 1990. United States Census Bureau (2005-05-03). Retrieved on 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ Gibson, Campbell. Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places in the United States: 1790 to 1990. US Census Bureau. Retrieved on 2007-10-20.
  7. ^ Mayors Against Illegal Guns: Coalition Members. Retrieved on 2007-06-12.
  8. ^ Mayflower Manor Apartments, Akron
  9. ^ Polsky
  10. ^ The University of Akron Campus Map
  11. ^ Imagine Akron Community Learning Centers (2005). What is Akron CLCs?. Retrieved October 21, 2005.

The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... InsertSLUTTY WHORES≤ non-formatted text here{| class=toccolours border=1 cellpadding=4 style=float: right; margin: 0 0 1em 1em; width: 20em; border-collapse: collapse; font-size: 95%; clear: right; |+ United States Geological Survey |- |style= align=center colspan=2| [[Image:USGS logo. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ...

Government and other public institutions

  • City of Akron
  • Akron Public Schools
  • Akron-Summit County Public Library

Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ...

History

  • History of Akron & Summit County
  • Local History Collections held by the Special Collections Division of the Akron-Summit County Public Library
  • Summit County Myths
  • Photographs of Akron, Ohio

Coordinates: 41°04′23″N 81°31′04″W / 41.073155, -81.5179 Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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The Stile Companies have built a reputation as a premier Akron Ohio new home builder, primary source for Akron apartment rentals, and exemplary property management and commercial leasing provider, through a timeless dedication to customer satisfaction.
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With over 60 years of dedication in the Akron, Ohio area the Stile Companies have been honored numerous times as an Akron home builder, developer and property manger with its homes, communities, apartments and commercial properties.
Akron, Ohio - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3528 words)
Akron was incorporated as a village in 1835, and as a city in 1865.
Akron has a humid continental climate, with cold but changeable winters, wet, cool springs, warm (sometimes hot) and humid summers, and cool, rather dry autumns.
Akron has an extensive and distinguished health sector, with a large number of hospitals for a city of its size.
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