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Encyclopedia > Aitken (crater)


General characteristics
Latitude 16.8 S
Longitude 173.4 E
Diameter 135 km
Depth Unknown
Colongitude 187 at sunrise
Eponym Robert Aitken

Aitken is a large lunar impact crater that lies on the far side of the Moon. It is located to the southeast of the Heaviside crater, and north of the unusual Van de Graaff crater formation. Attached to the southwest rim is the Vertregt crater. To the southeast is the smaller Bergstrand crater.


The inner wall of Aitken is terraced, and varies notably in width with the narrowest portion in the southwest. The crater 'Aitken Z' lies across the inner north wall. Just to the north of the rim is the small crater 'Aitken Z', which is surrounded by an ejecta blanket of lighter albedo material. The interior floor has been resurfaced in the past by a darker albedo lava flow, especially in the southern half. There are also a number of tiny crater impacts on the floor.


Satellite craters

By convention these features are identified on Lunar maps by placing the letter on the side of the crater mid_point that is closest to Aitken crater.



Aitken Latitude Longitude Diameter
A 14.0 S 173.7 E 13 km
C 14.0 S 175.8 E 74 km
G 16.8 S 174.2 E 7 km
N 17.7 S 172.7 E 7 km
Y 12.0 S 173.2 E 35 km
Z 15.1 S 173.3 E 33 km



  Results from FactBites:
 
NodeWorks - Encyclopedia: Aitken (crater) (182 words)
Aitken is a large lunar impact crater that lies on the far side of the Moon.
Attached to the southwest rim is the Vertregt crater.
To the southeast is the smaller Bergstrand crater.
South Pole-Aitken basin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (412 words)
The South Pole-Aitken basin is an impact crater on Earth's Moon.
This basin was named for the two points at the extreme ends, with Aitken crater overlaying the northern end and the southern lunar pole at the other end.
The existence of the basin was suspected as early as 1962, but global photography by the Lunar Orbiter program in the mid-1960s confirmed its existence.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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