FACTOID # 24: Looking for table makers? Head to Mississippi, with an overwhlemingly large number of employees in furniture manufacturing.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Airport" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Airport
An aerial view of the passenger terminal buildings at Incheon International Airport, Incheon, South Korea, considered a large airport.
An aerial view of the passenger terminal buildings at Incheon International Airport, Incheon, South Korea, considered a large airport.
Barra Airport, Outer Hebrides, Scotland, the world's only airport using a beach runway for scheduled services.
Barra Airport, Outer Hebrides, Scotland, the world's only airport using a beach runway for scheduled services.
Paraparaumu Airport, a medium-sized airport
Paraparaumu Airport, a medium-sized airport

An airport is a facility where aircraft such as airplanes, helicopters, and blimps take off and land. Aircraft may also be stored or maintained at an airport. An airport consists of at least one surface such as a runway, a helipad, or water for takeoffs and landings, and often includes buildings such as hangars and terminal buildings. Airport is used for the arrival and departure of aircraft. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 200 KB) geänderte Version des Bildes Image:Incheon International Airport. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 200 KB) geänderte Version des Bildes Image:Incheon International Airport. ... Incheon Airport - Entrance Incheon Airport - Departures Incheon International Airport (IIA) (IATA: ICN, ICAO: RKSI) (Korean: ) is the largest airport in South Korea, and one of the largest and busiest in Asia. ... ImageMetadata File history File links A Logan Air Twin Otter (in BA colours) lands at Barra Airport - the only airport in the world where the arrival of scheduled flights varies with the tide as planes land on the beach. ... ImageMetadata File history File links A Logan Air Twin Otter (in BA colours) lands at Barra Airport - the only airport in the world where the arrival of scheduled flights varies with the tide as planes land on the beach. ... Na h-Eileanan Siar (Western Isles) redirects here. ... This article is about the country. ... Aerial view of Paraparaumu airport in New Zealand. ... Aerial view of Paraparaumu airport in New Zealand. ... Aerial view of Paraparaumu Airport looking towards Paraparaumu Beach. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 798 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1599 × 1201 pixel, file size: 145 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) JetBlue Airways Airbus A320 Cibao Airport STI/MDST Dominican Republic File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 798 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1599 × 1201 pixel, file size: 145 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) JetBlue Airways Airbus A320 Cibao Airport STI/MDST Dominican Republic File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... For the Jet Blue database used in Exchange Server and Active Directory, see Extensible Storage Engine. ... Cibao International Airport (Spanish: ) (IATA: STI, ICAO: MDST) is an international airport located in Santiago de los Caballeros, the Dominican Republics second largest city. ... Nickname: Coordinates: , Country Province Municipality Santiago de los Caballeros Founded 1495 Government  - Mayor (Síndico) José Enrique Sued Population (2008)  - Total 1,000,000 (approx. ... Not to be confused with Dominica. ... Flying machine redirects here. ... Airplane and Aeroplane redirect here. ... For other uses, see Helicopter (disambiguation). ... “Blimp” redirects here. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... An Atlas Oryx helicopter touches down on a helipad onboard the High Speed Vessel Swift (HSV 2) ship. ... An F/A-18 Hornet takes off from the USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63). ... MyTravel Airways Airbus A320 landing Landing is the last part of a flight, where a flying animal or aircraft returns to the ground. ... A cutaway diagram of a hangar. ... An airport terminal is a building at an airport where passengers transfer from ground transportation to the facilities that allow them to board airplanes. ...


Larger airports may have a variety of facilities and infrastructure, including fixed base operator services, seaplane docks and ramps, air traffic control, passenger facilities such as restaurants and lounges, and emergency services. A military airport is known as an airbase or air station. The terms airfield, airstrip, and aerodrome may also be used to refer to airports, and the terms heliport, seaplane base, and STOLport refer to airports dedicated exclusively to helicopters, seaplanes, or short takeoff and landing aircraft. In some jurisdictions, the term airport is used where the facility is licensed as such by the relevant government organization (e.g. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Transport Canada). Elsewhere the distinction is merely one of general appearance. Yet other areas define an airport by its having the necessary customs offices etc expected of a port,[citation needed] though the more general term is airport of entry. A Fixed Base Operator (also known as Fixed Base of Operation), or FBO, is a service center at an airport that may be a private enterprise or may be a department of the municipality that the airport serves. ... A DeHavilland Single Otter floatplane in Harbour Air livery. ... For the Canadian musical group, see Air Traffic Control (band). ... Emergency services are public services that deal with emergencies and other aspects of Public Safety. ... Lajes Airbase in the Azores islands, Portugal An Airbase, sometimes referred to as a military airport or airfield, provides basing and support of military aircraft. ... Aerodrome can mean: An Austrian music festival: Aerodrome A series of aircraft constructed by Samuel Pierpont Langley. ... A STOLport or STOLPORT is an airport designed with STOL (Short Take-Off and Landing) operations in mind, normally having a short single runway. ... A Zenair CH701 STOL light aircraft Polish STOL light aircraft PZL-104M Wilga of Polish Border Guard at Radom Air Show in 2005. ... FAA redirects here. ... Transport Canada is the department within the government of Canada which is responsible for developing regulations, policies and services of transportation in Canada. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into International airport. ...

Contents

Attributes

The international public domain symbol for air transportation, created by AIGA.
The international public domain symbol for air transportation, created by AIGA.

Smaller or less-developed airports — which represent the vast majority — often have a single runway shorter than 1,000 m (3,300 ft). Larger airports for airline flights generally have paved runways 2,000 m (6,600 ft) or longer. Many small airports have dirt, grass, or gravel runways, rather than asphalt or concrete. Image File history File links 20_airtransportation_inv. ... Image File history File links 20_airtransportation_inv. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The aiga is, in traditional Samoan culture, or Faasamoa, the extended family. ... An Airbus A380 of Emirates Airline An airline provides air transport services for passengers or freight. ... For other uses, see Grass (disambiguation). ... Gravel (largest fragment in this photo is about 4 cm) Gravel is rock that is of a certain particle size range. ... The term asphalt is often used as an abbreviation for asphalt concrete. ... This article is about the construction material. ...


In the United States, the minimum dimensions for dry, hard landing fields are defined by the FAR Landing And Takeoff Field Lengths. These include considerations for safety margins during landing and takeoff. Heavier aircraft require longer runways. The Federal Aviation Regulations, or FARs, are rules prescribed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) governing all aviation activities in the United States. ...


The longest public-use runway in the world is at Qamdo Bangda Airport, in Bangda, Chamdo, Tibet Autonomous Region. It has a length of 5,500 m (18,045 ft). The world's widest paved runway is at Ulyanovsk Vostochny Airport and is 105 m (344 ft) wide. Qamdo Bangda Airport (IATA: BPX, ICAO: ZUBD) (Chinese: 昌都邦达机场, Tibetan: fill in), located in Bangda, Qamdo, Tibet, is one of the highest airports in the world, with an altitude of 4,334 meters. ... Qamdo (Tibetan:ཆབ་མདོ་རྫོང་(Chab-mdo), Mandarin Chinese:昌都(ChāngdÅ«)) is a county in Tibet. ... This article is about the administrative region of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Ulyanovsk Vostochny (also Ulyanovsk and Ulyanovsk Northeast) (IATA: ULY, ICAO: UWLW) is an airport in Russia located 28 km northeast of Ulyanovsk. ...


As of 2006, there were approximately 49,000 airports around the world, including 14,858 in the US., the U.S. having the most in the world[1]


Airport ownership and operation

Rio de Janeiro-Galeão International Airport.
Rio de Janeiro-Galeão International Airport.

Most of the world's airports are owned by local, regional, or national government bodies who then lease the airport to private corporations who oversee the airport's operation. For example, BAA Limited (BAA) operates seven of the commercial airports in the United Kingdom, as well as several other airports outside of the UK. Germany's Frankfurt Airport is managed by the quasi-private firm Fraport. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Rio de Janeiro/Galeão - Antônio Carlos Jobim International Airport (IATA: GIG, ICAO: SBGL) better known as Galeão International Airport is Rio de Janeiros major international airport. ... For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ... BAA Limited is the owner and operator of seven British airports and the operator of several other airports worldwide, making the company one of the largest transport companies in the world. ... For other uses, see Frankfurt Airport (disambiguation). ... Frankfurt International Airport (German: Flughafen Frankfurt am Main) is located in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. ...


In the US and Canada, commercial airports are generally operated directly by government entities or government-created airport authorities (also known as port authorities). An airport authority is an independant entity charged with the operation and oversight of an airport (or group of airports). ...

Many US airports still lease part or all of their facilities to outside firms, who operate functions such as retail management and parking. In the US, all commercial airport runways are certified by the FAA, but maintained by the local airport under the regulatory authority of the FAA. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 108 KB) Beschreibung: Frankfurt (Main) Airport Terminal 1 Lufthansa Boeing 747 Quelle: Fotografiert im Dezember 2004 Fotograf: Heidas Wikipedia account All pictures please use this discussion page File links The following pages link to this file: Lufthansa Metadata This file... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 108 KB) Beschreibung: Frankfurt (Main) Airport Terminal 1 Lufthansa Boeing 747 Quelle: Fotografiert im Dezember 2004 Fotograf: Heidas Wikipedia account All pictures please use this discussion page File links The following pages link to this file: Lufthansa Metadata This file... For other uses, see Frankfurt Airport (disambiguation). ... Frankfurt International Airport (German: Flughafen Frankfurt am Main) is located in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. ...


Despite the reluctance to privatize airports in the US (despite the FAA sponsoring a privatization program since 1996), the government-owned, contractor-operated (GOCO) arrangement is the standard for the operation of commercial airports in the rest of the world. List of terms, acronyms, information, related to modern armour, artillery, and related military subject matter. ...


In New Zealand, Auckland International Airport, the nation's main international airport, is fully privatised. Ownership and operation of the 1,497 hectare complex is vested entirely with Auckland International Airport Limited, a public company, with the only governmental involvement being Airways Corporation of New Zealand's operation of air traffic control systems. Similar arrangements pertain to Wellington and Christchurch airports, and most other main airports are operated by private companies. Location of the airport relative to Auckland urban area Typical scene at the international terminal at Auckland International Airport Auckland International Airport (IATA: AKL, ICAO: NZAA) is the largest and busiest international airport in New Zealand with over 12 million (some 7 million international and 6 million domestic) passengers a... An International airport is an airport where flights from other countries land and/or take off. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10 000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Wellington International Airport (IATA: WLG, ICAO: NZWN) is an international airport located on the Rongotai isthmus, 7 km southeast of central Wellington, New Zealands capital city. ... Christchurch International Airport (IATA: CHC, ICAO: NZCH) is the main airport that serves Christchurch, New Zealand. ...


In Argentina, 32 airports including the main airport Ministro Pistarini International Airport are operated by Aeropuertos Argentina 2000, a private company. On the other hand, 3 airports are operated by another company named London Supply. Ministro Pistarini International Airport (IATA: EZE, ICAO: SAEZ) serves the city of Buenos Aires, Argentina, and is the countrys largest international airport. ...


Airport structures

A terminal at Hyderabad International airport
A terminal at Hyderabad International airport
International departure level at Hyderabad
International departure level at Hyderabad
A terminalat Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport
A terminalat Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport

Airports are divided into landside and airside areas. Landside areas include parking lots, public transportation train stations, tank farms and access roads. Airside areas include all areas accessible to aircraft, including runways, taxiways, ramps and tank farms. Access from landside areas to airside areas is tightly controlled at most airports. Passengers on commercial flights access airside areas through terminals, where they can purchase tickets, clear security, check or claim luggage and board aircraft through gates. The waiting areas which provide passenger access to aircraft are typically called concourses, although this term is often used interchangeably with terminal. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3264 × 2448 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3264 × 2448 pixel, file size: 3. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mass transit redirects here. ... Passengers bustle around the typical grand edifice of Londons Broad Street station in 1865. ... An Oil Depot is an industrial facility for the storage of oil products and from which these products are usually transported to end users or further storage facilities. ... For other uses, see Road (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A taxiway is a strip of land on an airport on which aircraft can roll (taxi) to or from a hangar, terminal, runway, or other facility. ... The airport ramp or apron is part of an airport. ... An Airbus A380 of Emirates Airline An airline provides air transport services for passengers or freight. ... Gate at Nagoya Airport Entrance to gates at Hanover/Langenhagen International Airport Entrance to Gates at Asheville Regional Airport A Gate in aviation is a section at an airport terminal for transferring passengers and airline crews to an aircraft. ...


The area where aircraft park next to a terminal to load passengers and baggage is known as a ramp (or, to the media and uninitiated, "the tarmac"). Parking areas for aircraft away from terminals are called aprons A close-up view of some freshly-laid tarmac. ...


Airports can be towered or non-towered, depending on air traffic density and available funds. Due to their high capacity and busy airspace, many international airports have air traffic control located on site. The control tower at Schiphol airport. ... An non-towered airport is an airport with no operating tower, or air traffic control unit. ... Airspace means the portion of the atmosphere controlled by a particular country on top of its territory and territorial waters or, more generally, any specific three-dimensional portion of the atmosphere. ...


Airports with international flights have customs and immigration facilities. However, as some countries have agreements that allow travel between them without customs and immigrations, such facilities are not a definitive need for an international airport. International flights often require a higher level of physical security, although in recent years, many countries have adopted the same level of security for international and domestic travel. A customs duty is a tariff or tax on the import or export of goods. ...


Modern engineers and architects are developing "floating airports" which could be located several miles at sea and which would use designs such as pneumatic stabilized platform technology. A Floating airport is an airport that would be built and situated on a very large floating structure (VLFS) located many miles out at sea utilizing a floatation type of device or devices such as Pneumatic Stabilized Platform (PSP) technology. ... A Pneumatic stabilized platform (PSP) is a technology used to float a very large floating structure (VLFS). ...


Shops and food services

Duty free shopping area at Ben Gurion International Airport in Tel Aviv, Israel
Duty free shopping area at Ben Gurion International Airport in Tel Aviv, Israel
Food court and shops, Halifax International Airport
Food court and shops, Halifax International Airport

Airports have a captive audience, and consequently the prices charged for food are generally higher than are available elsewhere in the region. However, some airports, such as John F. Kennedy International Airport's Terminal 8, have no restaurants at all. Airport fees are fees paid for use of services of airports, such as in the Subic Bay International Airport. However, some airports now regulate food costs to keep them comparable to so-called "street prices". This term is misleading as prices often match the manufacturer's suggested retail price (MSRP) but are almost never discounted. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Ben Gurion International Airport (‎, Namal HaTeÅ«fa Ben GÅ«ryōn, (IATA: TLV, ICAO: LLBG), also referred to by its Hebrew acronym Natbag (‎), is the largest and busiest international airport in Israel, with about 10. ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 510 pixelsFull resolution (2486 × 1584 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 510 pixelsFull resolution (2486 × 1584 pixel, file size: 1. ... Halifax Robert L. Stanfield International Airport[5], or Halifax International Airport (IATA: YHZ, ICAO: CYHZ) is an airport in Enfield, Nova Scotia, Canada that serves the Halifax Regional Municipality and central Nova Scotia as well as adjacent areas in the neighbouring Maritime provinces. ... For the regional airport in Wisconsin, see John F. Kennedy Memorial Airport. ... Subic Bay International Airport (Filipino: Paliparang Pandaigdig ng Look ng Subic) or SBIA (IATA: SFS, ICAO: RPLB) serves as a secondary airport and a main diversion airport of the Ninoy Aquino International Airport. ... The (manufacturers) suggested retail price (MSRP or SRP), list price or recommended retail price (RRP) (originally, Monroney suggested retail price) of a product is the price the manufacturer recommends that the retailer sell it for. ...


Premium and VIP services

Several mid-large size airports also have facilities for premium passengers. In the US, these lounges are typically for international or long-haul first and business class passengers, paid members, and elite-level frequent fliers on long haul flights (regardless of what class they are in). In the rest of the world, the lounges are not open to purchase, but can be used by all premium passengers and most elite frequent fliers. Some lounges are comparatively spartan and only offer a quiet place to sit and work; other lounges include meals and massage services. // A short-haul domestic flight is commonly categorized into being no longer than 500 miles or under 1. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Business class seat in a British Airways Boeing 747-400 Business class (also known as executive class or upper class) is a high quality second-tier travel class available on some commercial airlines and rail lines. ... Membership cards of FFP This article is about airline frequent flyer programs. ...


Cargo and freight services

In addition to people, airports are responsible for moving large volumes of cargo around the clock. Cargo airlines often have their own on-site and adjacent infrastructure to rapidly transfer parcels between ground and air modes of transportation. FedEx DC-10 Cargo airlines (or airfreight carriers, and derivatives of these names) are airlines dedicated to the transport of cargo. ...


Support services

Aircraft maintenance, pilot services, aircraft rental, and hangar rental are most often performed by a fixed base operator (FBO). At major airports, particularly those used as hubs, airlines may operate their own support facilities. An airline hub is an airport that an airline uses as a transfer point to get passengers to their intended destination. ...

A international terminal, Hall 1 and Hall 1, at Houari Boumedienne Airport
A international terminal, Hall 1 and Hall 1, at Houari Boumedienne Airport

Some airports, typically military airbases, have long runways used as emergency landing sites. Many airbases have arresting equipment for fast aircraft, known as arresting gear - a strong cable suspended just above the runway and attached to a hydraulic reduction gear mechanism. Together with the landing aircraft's arresting hook, it is used in situations where the brakes would have little or no effect. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... An airport terminal is a building at an airport where passengers transfer from ground transportation to the facilities that allow them to board airplanes. ... , Houari Boumedienne Airport (Arabic: ) (IATA: ALG, ICAO: DAAG) is a public airport located 9 nautical miles (17 km) southeast of Algiers, the capital of Algeria. ... Fairey III-F aircraft landing on board British Aircraft Carrier HMS Furious circa the early 1930s; Arresting gear wires are visible above the flight deck. ... Gears on a piece of farm equipment, gear ratio 1:1. ... Many aircraft that land on aircraft carriers are equipped with a simple piece of equipment called a tailhook. ... This article is about the vehicle component. ...


Airport access

Many large airports in the world are located next to or even above railway trunk routes, for instance Frankfurt Airport, Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, London Heathrow Airport, London Gatwick Airport and London Stansted Airport. For local access, many airports have local train lines, rapid transit, light rail lines or other public transport systems, for instance the AirTrain JFK at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York and the Silver Line T at Boston's Logan International Airport by the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA). These systems are usually directly connected to the main terminals. Large airports usually have access also through freeways from which cars fed into two access roads, designed as loops, one sitting on top of the other. One level is for departing passengers and the other is for arrivals. This road concept was pioneered at Los Angeles International Airport. Heathrow redirects here. ... Gatwick Airport (IATA: LGW, ICAO: EGKK) is Londons second largest airport and the second busiest airport in the United Kingdom after Heathrow. ... London Stansted Airport (IATA: STN, ICAO: EGSS) is a large passenger airport located in the Uttlesford District of the English county of Essex about 30 miles (48 km) north-east of London. ... “Mass Transit” redirects here. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... Mass transit redirects here. ... AirTrain JFK is a 13 km (8. ... The transportation system of New York City is an unparalleled cooperation of unique, complex, and grandiose systems of infrastructure. ... Map The Silver Line is the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authoritys (MBTAs) sole Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) line, running in two, unconnected sections, from Dudley Square in Roxbury to downtown Boston, Massachusetts and from South Station to several points in South Boston and to Logan Airport in East Boston. ... Boston redirects here. ... For the Logan airport in Billings, Montana, see Billings Logan International Airport. ... The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) is a body politic and corporate, and a political subdivision of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts [2] formed in 1964 to finance and operate most bus, subway, commuter rail and ferry systems in the greater Boston, Massachusetts area. ... For specific systems, such as the Autobahns of Germany, see list of highway systems with full control of access and no cross traffic. ... LAX and KLAX redirect here. ...


Internal transport

The distances passengers need to move within a large airport can be substantial. It is common for airports to provide moving walkways and buses. The Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport has a tram that takes people through the Concourses and Baggage Claim. A moving walkway, moving sidewalk (in the US), moving pavement (elsewhere), walkalator, travelator (colloquial name, not to be confused with Trav-O-Lator, a type of moving walkway distributed exclusively by United Technologies Otis Elevator Company), or moveator is a slow conveyor belt that transports people horizontally or on an... Atlanta Airport redirects here. ...


History and development

Qantas AVRO 504K replica, first plane flown by Qantas, Sydney Airport
Qantas AVRO 504K replica, first plane flown by Qantas, Sydney Airport

The earliest airplane takeoff and landing sites were grassy fields. The plane could approach at any angle that provided a favorable wind direction. A slight improvement was the dirt-only field, which eliminated the drag from grass. However, these only functioned well in dry conditions. They would eventually be replaced by concrete surfaces that allowed all-weather landings in daylight and at night. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1920, 1623 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Qantas Kingsford Smith International Airport Avro 504 Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1920, 1623 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Qantas Kingsford Smith International Airport Avro 504 Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... This aircraft article has not been updated to WikiProject Aircrafts current standards. ... Qantas Airways Limited (IPA: ) is the national airline of Australia. ... Sydney (Kingsford Smith) International Airport, or Sydney Airport, is located in Mascot, New South Wales, and is the major airport serving Sydney, Australia. ...


The title of "world's oldest airport" is disputed, but College Park Airport in Maryland, US, established in 1909 by Wilbur Wright, is generally agreed to be the world's oldest continually operating airfield[2], although it serves only general aviation traffic. College Park Airport (IATA: CGS, ICAO: KCGS) is a public airport located 1 mile (2 km) east of College Park, in Prince Georges County, Maryland, USA. College Park Airport was established in 1909 after Wilbur Wright came to the field to train two military officers to fly in the government... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N... The Wright brothers, Orville (19 August 1871 – 30 January 1948) and Wilbur (16 April 1867 – 30 May 1912), were two Americans who are generally credited[1][2][3] with inventing and building the worlds first successful airplane and making the first controlled, powered and sustained heavier-than-air human...


Bremen Airport opened in 1913 and remains in use, although it served as an American military field between 1945 and 1949. Amsterdam Schiphol Airport opened on September 16, 1916 as a military airfield, but only accepted civil aircraft from December 17, 1920, allowing Sydney Airport in Sydney, Australia — which started operations in January 1920 — to claim to be the world's oldest continually operating commercial airport.[3]. Bremen Airport or Flughafen Bremen (IATA: BRE, ICAO: EDDW) serves the city of Bremen, Germany. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Civil airliner - Air India Boeing 747-400 Civil aviation is one of two major categories of flying, representing all non-Military aviation, both private and commercial. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sydney (Kingsford Smith) International Airport, or Sydney Airport, is located in Mascot, New South Wales, and is the major airport serving Sydney, Australia. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ...


The first known usage of the term "airport" appeared in a newspaper article in 1919, in reference to Bader Field in Atlantic City, New Jersey.[4] Bader Field (IATA: AIY, ICAO: KAIY, FAA LID: AIY), also known as Atlantic City Municipal Airport, was a municipal general aviation airport located in Atlantic City, New Jersey, approximately one mile from the terminus of U.S. Route 40 and U.S. Route 322. ... Atlantic City redirects here. ...


Increased aircraft traffic during World War I led to the construction of regular landing fields. Airplanes had to approach these from certain directions. This led to the development of aids for directing the approach and landing slope. “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


Following the war, some of these military airfields added commercial facilities for handling passenger traffic. One of the earliest such fields was Paris - Le Bourget Airport at Le Bourget, near Paris. The first international airport to open was the Croydon Airport, in South London, although an airport at Hounslow had been temporarily operating as such for nine months.[5][6] In 1922, the first permanent airport and commercial terminal solely for commercial aviation was built at Königsberg, Germany. The airports of this era used a paved "apron", which permitted night flying as well as landing heavier airplanes. Paris - Le Bourget Airport (French: ) (IATA: LBG, ICAO: LFPB) is an airport located in Le Bourget and Dugny, 12 km north-northeast (NNE) of Paris, France. ... Le Bourget is a commune of the Seine-Saint-Denis département in France. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... The control tower of Croydon Airport in 1939, with the BOAC de Havilland DH 91 Albatross Fortuna alongside Croydon Airport was an airport in South London which straddled the boundary of what are now the London Borough of Croydon and the London Borough of Sutton. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... , Hounslow is the principal town in the London Borough of Hounslow. ... Königsberg is a town in the Haßberge district, in Bavaria, Germany. ...

Airports in 2006
Airports in 2006

The first lighting used on an airport was during the later part of the 1920s; in the 1930s approach lighting came into use. These indicated the proper direction and angle of descent. The colors and flash intervals of these lights became standardized under the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). In the 1940s, the slope-line approach system was introduced. This consisted of two rows of lights that formed a funnel indicating an aircraft's position on the glideslope. Additional lights indicated incorrect altitude and direction. An approach lighting system, or ALS, is a lighting system installed on the approach end of an airport runway and consists of a series of lightbars, strobe lights, or a combination of the two that extends outward from the runway end. ... The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), an agency of the United Nations, codifies the principles and techniques of international air navigation and fosters the planning and development of international air transport to ensure safe and orderly growth. ... The Localizer station at Hanover/Langenhagen International Airport in Hanover, Germany. ...


Following World War II, airport design began to become more sophisticated. Passenger buildings were being grouped together in an island, with runways arranged in groups about the terminal. This arrangement permitted expansion of the facilities. But it also meant that passengers had to travel further to reach their plane. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


An improvement in the landing field was the introduction of grooves in the concrete surface. These ran perpendicular to the direction of the landing aircraft and served to draw off excess water in rainy conditions that could build up in front of the plane's wheels.


Airport construction boomed during the 1960s with the increase in jet aircraft traffic. Runways were extended out to 3 km (9,800 ft). The fields were constructed out of reinforced concrete using a slip-form machine that produces a continual slab with no disruptions along the length. Jet aircraft are aircrafts with jet engines. ... Reinforced concrete at Sainte Jeanne dArc Church (Nice, France): architect Jacques Dror, 1926–1933 Reinforced concrete, also called ferroconcrete in some countries, is concrete in which reinforcement bars (rebars) or fibers have been incorporated to strengthen a material that would otherwise be brittle. ...


Modern runways are thickest in the area where airplanes move slowly and are expected to have maximum load, i.e. runway ends. A common myth is that airplanes produce their greatest load during landing due to the "impact" of landing. This is untrue as much of the aircraft weight remains on the wings due to lift. Runways are constructed as smooth and level as possible.


Airport designation and naming

Main article: List of airports

Airports are uniquely represented by their International Air Transport Association airport code and ICAO airport code. International Air Transport Association (IATA) airport codes are often abbreviated forms of the common name of the airport, such as PHL for Philadelphia International Airport. Airports sometimes retain their previous IATA code when an airport's name is changed. O'Hare International Airport in Chicago retains the IATA code ORD, from its former name of Orchard Field. By IATA code: A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z By ICAO code: A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R... An IATA airport code, also known an IATA location identifier, IATA station code or simply a location identifier [1], is a three-letter code designating many airports around the world, defined by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). ... The ICAO (IPA pronunciation: ) airport code or location indicator is a four-letter alphanumeric code designating each airport around the world. ... “IATA” redirects here. ... An airport code is an acronym used to identify a specific airport. ... “PHL” redirects here. ... OHare International Airport (IATA: ORD, ICAO: KORD, FAA LID: ORD) is an airport located in Chicago, Illinois, United States, 17 miles (27 km) northwest of the Chicago Loop. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ...


The name of the airport itself can be its location, such as Hong Kong International Airport. It can be the name of a celebrity, commonly a politician, e.g. Ninoy Aquino International Airport, Indira Gandhi International Airport, Atatürk International Airport, Toronto Pearson International Airport or Charles de Gaulle International Airport. Airports may also be named after a person associated with the region it serves or prominent figures in aviation history, such as Will Rogers World Airport, Liverpool John Lennon Airport, Imam Khomeini International Airport, or more recently Belfast City Airport was renamed George Best Belfast City Airport in memory of the football star who was born in Northern Ireland. Chek Lap Kok Airport Traditional Chinese: Simplified Chinese: Hong Kong International Airport (IATA: HKG, ICAO: VHHH) is the main airport in Hong Kong. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... The Ninoy Aquino International Airport (Filipino: Paliparang Pandaigdig ng Ninoy Aquino) or NAIA, pronounced nah-eeyah, (IATA: MNL, ICAO: RPLL) is one of the two international airports serving the Metro Manila Area and the main international gateway of the Philippines. ... Check-in area of domestic departure terminal 1A Indira Gandhi International Airport (Hindi: इंदिरा गांधी अंतरराष्ट्रीय हवाई अड्डा) (IATA: DEL, ICAO: VIDP), located in New Delhi, is one of Indias main domestic and international gateways. ... Atatürk International Airport (IATA: IST, ICAO: LTBA) (Turkish: Atatürk Uluslararası Havalimanı) is the major international airport in Istanbul, Turkey. ... Toronto Airport redirects here. ... Charles de Gaulle International Airport (IATA: CDG, ICAO: LFPG) (French: ), also known as Roissy Airport (or just Roissy in French), in Paris, is one of the worlds principal aviation centres, as well as Frances main international airport. ... Will Rogers World Airport (IATA: OKC, ICAO: KOKC) is located in southwestern Oklahoma City, Oklahoma and is the primary commercial airport in Oklahoma. ... Liverpool John Lennon Airport (IATA: LPL, ICAO: EGGP) is an airport serving the English city of Liverpool. ... , For the similarly named Swedish furniture company, see IKEA. For the company IKA, see Industrias Kaiser Argentina. ... Belfast City Tower George Best Belfast City Airport (IATA: BHD, ICAO: EGAC) is an airport in Belfast, Northern Ireland. ... “Soccer” redirects here. ... This article is about the constituent country. ...


Airport names may include the word "International" reflecting their ability to handle international aviation traffic, although the airport may not actually operate any such flights, such as Texel International Airport. Some airports with international immigration facilities may also choose to drop the word from their airport names (eg. Perth Airport, Singapore Changi Airport). Skydivers walking to a Cessna 208 on Texel Airport Texel International Airport is a small airport on the island of Texel in the north of the Netherlands. ... This article is about an airport in Australia. ... Changi Airport redirects here. ...


Airport security

Main article: Airport security
Baggage is scanned using X-ray machines, passengers walk through metal detectors
Baggage is scanned using X-ray machines, passengers walk through metal detectors

Airport security normally requires baggage checks, metal screenings of individual persons, and rules against any object that could be used as a weapon. Since the September 11, 2001 attacks, airport security has been dramatically increased. Baggage is scanned using X-ray machines, passengers walk through metal detectors Baggage screening monitoring at Bangkok Suvarnabhumi Airport Airport security refers to the techniques and methods used in protecting airports and by extension aircraft from crime and terrorism. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 156 KB) Airport security from de:Bild:Flughafenkontrolle. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 156 KB) Airport security from de:Bild:Flughafenkontrolle. ... Mrs. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Inductive sensor. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...

See also: Airport security repercussions due to the September 11, 2001 attacks

Box-cutter knives were apparently used in the September 11, 2001 attacks, though such knives are not usually considered weapons. ...

Airport operations

Away from the terminal, there is a large team of people who work to ensure aircraft can land, take off, and move around quickly and safely.


Air traffic control

See also: Air traffic control

The majority of the world's airports are non-towered, with no air traffic control presence. However, at particularly busy airports, or airports with other special requirements, there is an air traffic control (ATC) system whereby controllers (usually ground-based) direct aircraft movements via radio or other communications links. This coordinated oversight facilitates safety and speed in complex operations where traffic moves in all three dimensions. Air traffic control responsibilities at airports are usually divided into at least two main areas: ground and tower, though a single controller may work both stations. The busiest airports also have clearance delivery, apron control, and other specialized ATC stations. For the Canadian musical group, see Air Traffic Control (band). ... An non-towered airport is an airport with no operating tower, or air traffic control unit. ... Controllers survey the field at Misawa Air Base, Japan. ...


Ground Control is responsible for directing all ground traffic in designated "movement areas," except the traffic on runways. This includes planes, baggage trains, snowplows, grass cutters, fuel trucks, and a wide array of other vehicles. Ground Control will instruct these vehicles on which taxiways to use, which runway they will use (in the case of planes), where they will park, and when it is safe to cross runways. When a plane is ready to take off it will stop short of the runway, at which point it will be turned over to Tower Control. After a plane has landed, it will depart the runway and be returned to Ground Control.

View of the apron from the top floor observation room, Halifax International Airport
View of the apron from the top floor observation room, Halifax International Airport

Tower Control controls aircraft on the runway and in the controlled airspace immediately surrounding the airport. Tower controllers may use radar to locate an aircraft's position in three-dimensional space, or they may rely on pilot position reports and visual observation. They coordinate the sequencing of aircraft in the traffic pattern and direct aircraft on how to safely join and leave the circuit. Aircraft which are only passing through the airspace must also contact Tower Control in order to be sure that they remain clear of other traffic. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 542 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1755 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 542 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1755 pixel, file size: 1. ... Halifax Robert L. Stanfield International Airport[5], or Halifax International Airport (IATA: YHZ, ICAO: CYHZ) is an airport in Enfield, Nova Scotia, Canada that serves the Halifax Regional Municipality and central Nova Scotia as well as adjacent areas in the neighbouring Maritime provinces. ... The control tower at Schiphol airport. ... Controlled airspace exists in areas where air traffic control is capable of providing traffic separation. ... For other uses, see Radar (disambiguation). ...


Traffic pattern

All airports use a traffic pattern (often called a traffic circuit outside the U.S.) to assure smooth traffic flow between departing and arriving aircraft. Generally, this pattern is a circuit consisting of five "legs" that form a rectangle (two legs and the runway form one side, with the remaining legs forming three more sides). Each leg is named (see diagram), and ATC directs pilots on how to join and leave the circuit. Traffic patterns are flown at one specific altitude, usually 800 or 1,000 ft (244 m or 305 m) above ground level (AGL). Standard traffic patterns are left-handed, meaning all turns are made to the left. Right-handed patterns do exist, usually because of obstacles such as a mountain, or to reduce noise for local residents. The predetermined circuit helps traffic flow smoothly because all pilots know what to expect, and helps reduce the chance of a mid-air collision. An airfield traffic pattern is a standard path followed by aircraft when taking off or landing. ... In aviation, Above Ground Level (AGL) denotes that an altitude is given above the ground. ... For other uses, see Mountain (disambiguation). ... The doomed Boeing 727, PSA Flight 182, crashes in flames after colliding with another aircraft in 1978 A mid-air collision (MAC) is an aviation accident where two or more aircraft come into unplanned contact during flight. ...


At extremely large airports, a circuit is in place but not usually used. Rather, aircraft (usually only commercial with long routes) request approach clearance while they are still hours away from the airport, often before they even take off from their departure point. Large airports have a frequency called Clearance Delivery which is used by departing aircraft specifically for this purpose. This then allows airplanes to take the most direct approach path to the runway and land without worrying about interference from other aircraft. While this system keeps the airspace free and is simpler for pilots, it requires detailed knowledge of how aircraft are planning to use the airport ahead of time and is therefore only possible with large commercial airliners on pre-scheduled flights. The system has recently become so advanced that controllers can predict whether an aircraft will be delayed on landing before it even takes off; that aircraft can then be delayed on the ground, rather than wasting expensive fuel waiting in the air.


Navigational aids

Standard Visual Approach Slope Indicator

There are a number of aids available to pilots, though not all airports are equipped with them. A Visual Approach Slope Indicator (VASI) helps pilots fly the approach for landing. Some airports are equipped with a VHF omnidirectional range (VOR) to help pilots find the direction to the airport. VORs are often accompanied by a distance measuring equipment (DME) to determine the distance to the VOR. VORs are also located off airports, where they serve to provide airways for aircraft to navigate upon. In poor weather, pilots will use an instrument landing system (ILS) to find the runway and fly the correct approach, even if they cannot see the ground. The number of instrument approaches based on the use of the Global Positioning System (GPS) is rapidly increasing and may eventually be the primary means for instrument landings. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Individual Precision Approach Path Indicator The Visual Approach Slope Indicator (VASI) is a system of lights on the side of an airport runway that provides visual descent guidance information during the approach to a runway. ... D-VOR (Doppler VOR) ground station, co-located with DME. VOR, short for VHF Omni-directional Radio Range, is a type of radio navigation system for aircraft. ... D-VOR/DME ground station DME by itself Distance Measuring Equipment (DME) is a transponder-based radio navigation technology that measures distance by timing the propagation delay of VHF or UHF radio signals. ... The Localizer station at Hanover/Langenhagen International Airport in Hanover, Germany. ... GPS redirects here. ...


Larger airports sometimes offer precision approach radar (PAR), but these systems are more common at military air bases than civilian airports. The aircraft's horizontal and vertical movement is tracked via radar, and the controller tells the pilot his position relative to the approach slope. Once the pilots can see the runway lights, they may continue with a visual landing. Precision Approach Radar (PAR) is a type of radar guidance system designed to provide lateral and vertical guidance to a pilot. ... A final approach is the last leg in an aircrafts approach to landing. ...


Guidance signs

Airport guidance signs provide direction and information to taxiing aircraft and airport vehicles. Smaller airports may have few or no signs, relying instead on airport diagrams and charts.


There are two classes of signage at airports, with several types of each: Signage is any kind of graphics created to display information to a particular audience, typically wayfinding information on streets, outside and inside of buildings. ...


Operational guidance signs

Line up of taxiing aircraft at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport
Line up of taxiing aircraft at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport
  • Location signs - yellow on black background. Identifies the runway or taxiway currently on or entering.
  • Direction/Runway Exit signs - black on yellow. Identifies the intersecting taxiways the aircraft is approaching, with an arrow indicating the direction to turn.
  • Other - Many airports use conventional traffic signs such as stop and yield signs throughout the airport.

PHX redirects here. ... This article is about the color. ... Unused traffic signs in Austria Most countries post signage, known as traffic signs or road signs, at the side of roads to impart information to road users. ... Stop sign used in English-speaking countries, as well as in most European countries, including Russia A stop sign is a traffic sign, usually erected at road junctions, that instructs drivers to stop and then to proceed only if the way ahead is clear. ... In road transport, a yield (Canada, Ireland, and the United States) or give way (United Kingdom and many Commonwealth countries) traffic sign indicates that a driver of a vehicle must slow down and prepare to stop if necessary (usually while merging into traffic on another road) but does not need...

Mandatory instruction signs

Mandatory instruction signs are white on red. They show entrances to runways or critical areas. Vehicles and aircraft are required to stop at these signs until the control tower gives clearance to proceed. For other uses, see Red (disambiguation). ...

  • Runway signs - White on a red. These signs simply identify a runway intersection ahead.
  • Frequency Change signs - Usually a stop sign and an instruction to change to another frequency. These signs are used at airports with different areas of ground control.
  • Holding Position signs - A single solid yellow bar across a taxiway indicates a position where ground control may require a stop. If two solid yellow bars and two dashed yellow bars are encountered, this indicates a holding position for a runway intersection ahead; runway holding lines must never be crossed without permission. At some airports, a line of red lights across a taxiway is used during low visibility operations to indicate holding positions.

Lighting

Many airports have lighting that help guide planes using the runways and taxiways at night or in rain or fog. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... An approach lighting system, or ALS, is a lighting system installed on the approach end of an airport runway and consists of a series of lightbars, strobe lights, or a combination of the two that extends outward from the runway end. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Fog (disambiguation). ...


On runways, green lights indicate the beginning of the runway for landing, while red lights indicate the end of the runway. Runway edge lighting consists of white lights spaced out on both sides of the runway, indicating the edge. Some airports have more complicated lighting on the runways including lights that run down the centerline of the runway and lights that help indicate the approach (an Approach Lighting System, or ALS). Low-traffic airports may use Pilot Controlled Lighting to save electricity and staffing costs. Runway Edge Lights are used to outline the edges of runways during periods of darkness or restricted visibility conditions. ... An approach lighting system, or ALS, is a lighting system installed on the approach end of an airport runway and consists of a series of lightbars, strobe lights, or a combination of the two that extends outward from the runway end. ... Pilot Controlled Lighting (PCL), also known as Aircraft Radio Control of Aerodrome Lighting (ARCAL) or Pilot Activated Lighting (PAL), is a technical system by which aircraft pilots can control the lighting of an airport or airfields runways and taxiways via radio. ...


Along taxiways, blue lights indicate the taxiway's edge, and some airports have embedded green lights that indicate the centerline.


Weather observations

See also: Surface weather observation, Automated airport weather station, and Automatic weather station

Weather observations at the airport are crucial to safe take-offs and landings. In the US and Canada, the vast majority of airports, large and small, have some form of automated airport weather station, whether an AWOS, ASOS or AWSS.[citation needed] Most larger airports also have human observers to provide additional observations to supplement the automated station. These weather observations are available over the radio, through Automatic Terminal Information Service (ATIS) or via the ATC. ASOS sensors, located at Salinas, CA Automated airport weather stations are automated sensor suites which are designed to serve aviation and meteorological observing needs for safe and efficient aviation operations and weather forecasting. ... An AWS in Antarctica An automatic weather station (AWS) is an automated version of the traditional weather station, either to save human labour or to enable measurements from remote areas. ... A technician examines a weather stations anemometer. ... Automatic Terminal Information Service, or ATIS, is a continuous broadcast of recorded noncontrol information in busier terminal (i. ...


Planes take-off and land into the wind in order to achieve maximum performance. Because pilots need instantaneous information during landing, a windsock is also kept in view of the runway. A windsock is a large, conical, open-ended tube designed to indicate wind direction and relative wind speed. ...


Safety management

Air safety is an important concern in the operation of an airport, and almost every airfield includes equipment and procedures for handling emergency situations. Commercial airfields include one or more emergency vehicles and their crew that are specially equipped for dealing with airfield accidents, crew and passenger extractions, and the hazards of highly flammable aviation fuel. The crews are also trained to deal with situations such as bomb threats, hijacking, and terrorist activities. Air safety is a broad term encompassing the theory, investigation and categorization of flight failures, and the prevention of such failures through appropriate regulation, as well as through education and training. ... An emergency vehicle is any vehicle that responds to an emergency. ... A railing accidentally collapses at a college football game, spilling fans onto the sidelines An accident is something going wrong unexpectedly. ... An aviation fuel truck. ... Bomb threat hoax post on the 4chan imageboard by Jake Brahm, dated September 18, 2006. ... Hijackers inside flightdeck of TWA Flight 847 Aircraft hijacking (also known as skyjacking and aircraft piracy) is the take-over of an aircraft, by a person or group, usually armed. ... Terrorist redirects here. ...

An Airservices Australia fire appliance travelling beside the runway at Sydney Airport on 5 January 2008.
An Airservices Australia fire appliance travelling beside the runway at Sydney Airport on 5 January 2008.
NASA air safety experiment (CID project)
NASA air safety experiment (CID project)

Potential hazards to aircraft include debris, nesting birds, and reduced friction levels due to environmental conditions such as ice, snow, or rain. Part of runway maintenance is airfield rubber removal which helps maintain friction levels. The fields must be kept clear of debris using cleaning equipment so that loose material doesn't become a projectile and enter an engine duct (see foreign object damage). In adverse weather conditions, ice and snow clearing equipment can be used to improve traction on the landing strip. For waiting aircraft, equipment is used to spray special deicing fluids on the wings. A fire engine of the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service, England. ... Sydney (Kingsford Smith) International Airport, or Sydney Airport, is located in Mascot, New South Wales, and is the major airport serving Sydney, Australia. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1702x1350, 702 KB) NASA photo ID: ECN-28307 Crash test dummys loaded in the Boeing 720 that is to be destroyed in the Controlled Impact Demonstration. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1702x1350, 702 KB) NASA photo ID: ECN-28307 Crash test dummys loaded in the Boeing 720 that is to be destroyed in the Controlled Impact Demonstration. ... Practice approach Pre-impact Post-impact 1 Post-impact 2 The Controlled Impact Demonstration (or jokingly Crash In the Desert) was a joint project between NASAs Dryden Flight Research Center and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to test the impact of a Boeing 720 aircraft using standard fuel with... For other uses, see Bird (disambiguation). ... This article is about water ice. ... For other uses, see Snow (disambiguation). ... This article is about precipitation. ... For the song by Green Day, see Dookie FOD damage to the compressor blades of a Honeywell LTS101 turboshaft engine on a Bell 222, caused by a small bolt that passed through the protective inlet screen. ... An American Airlines MD-80 aircraft being de-iced at Syracuse Hancock International Airport De-icing is the process of removing ice from a surface. ...


Many airports are built near open fields or wetlands. These tend to attract bird populations, which can pose a hazard to aircraft in the form of bird strikes. Airport crews often need to discourage birds from taking up residence. A subtropical wetland in Florida, USA, with an endangered American Crocodile. ... F-16 canopy after a bird strike A bird strike (sometimes birdstrike, bird hit, or BASH [bird aircraft strike hazard]) in aviation, is a collision between an airborne animal (most often a bird, but also sometimes another species) and a man made vehicle, especially aircraft. ...


Some airports are located next to parks, golf courses, or other low-density uses of land. Other airports are located near densely-populated urban or suburban areas. In the 1980s, a conflict arose in San Jose, California, when a plane attempting to land at Reid-Hillview Airport (built in the 1930s) collided with a Macy's department store at the Eastridge shopping mall. Many local residents tried to get the airport shut down, even though it had been there for fifty years: their neighborhoods (and the mall) were about a decade old.[citation needed] For other uses, see San José. Nickname: Location of San Jose within Santa Clara County, California Location of San Jose with the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County Santa Clara Pueblo founded November 29, 1777 Incorporated March 27, 1850 Government  - Type charter city, mayor-council  - Mayor Chuck Reed  - Vice... Reid-Hillview Airport of Santa Clara County (IATA: RHV, ICAO: KRHV) is located in the southern part of San Jose, south of San Francisco Bay, in Santa Clara County, California, USA. The airport is primarily a general aviation airport; no scheduled flights by commercial carriers arrive and depart at this... This article is about the R. H. Macy & Co. ... The interior of a typical Macy*s department store. ...


An airport can have areas where collisions between airplanes on the ground tend to occur. Records are kept of any incursions where airplanes or vehicles are in an inappropriate location, allowing these "hot spots" to be identified. These locations then undergo special attention by transportation authorities (such as the FAA in the US) and airport administrators. A runway incursion as defined by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) on April 27, 2006 is: The United States Federal Aviation Administration defines it as: http://www. ...


During the 1980s, a phenomenon known as microburst became a growing concern due to accidents caused by microburst wind shear. (For example, see Delta Air Lines Flight 191.) Microburst radar was developed as an aid to safety during landing, giving two to five minutes warning to aircraft in the vicinity of the field of a microburst event. A photograph of the surface curl soon after an intense microburst impacted the surface A microburst is a very localized column of sinking air, producing damaging divergent and straight-line winds at the surface that are similar to but distinguishable from tornadoes which generally have convergent damage. ... A railing accidentally collapses at a college football game, spilling fans onto the sidelines An accident is something going wrong unexpectedly. ... For the Marvel Comics character, see Windshear (comics). ... This article is about a crash in 1985. ...


Some airfields now have a special surface known as soft concrete at the end of the runway that behaves somewhat like styrofoam, bringing the plane to a relatively rapid halt as the material disintegrates. These surfaces are useful when the runway is located next to a body of water or other hazard, and prevent the planes from overrunning the end of the field. Styrofoam is a trademark name for polystyrene thermal insulation material, manufactured by Dow Chemical Company. ...


Airport ground crew

An aircraft tow tractor moving a KLM boeing 777
An aircraft tow tractor moving a KLM boeing 777

Most airports have ground crew handling the loading and unloading of passengers, crew, baggage and other services.[citation needed] Some ground crew are linked to specific airlines operating at the airport. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 2048 pixel, file size: 647 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) KLM Boeing 777 being pushed back from the gate at Narita International Airport. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 2048 pixel, file size: 647 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) KLM Boeing 777 being pushed back from the gate at Narita International Airport. ... Ground Support Equipment Ground Support Equipment is found on an airport, usually on the ramp (servicing area by terminal). ...


Environmental concerns

The traffic generated by airports both in the air and on the surface can be a major source of aviation noise and air pollution which may interrupt nearby residents' sleep and produce other noise health effects. The construction of new airports, or addition of runways to existing airports, is often resisted by local residents because of the effect on the countryside, historical sites, local flora and fauna. Due to the risk of collision between birds and airplanes, large airports undertake population control programs where they frighten or shoot birds. Aircraft noise is defined as sound produced by any aircraft on run-up, taxiing, take off, over flying or landing. ... Air pollution is the modification of the natural characteristics of the atmosphere by a chemical, particulate matter, or biological agent. ... Roadway noise is the main source of exposure Noise health effects, the collection of health consequences of elevated sound levels, constitute one of the most widespread public health threats in industrialized countries. ... Simplified schematic of an islands flora - all its plant species, highlighted in boxes. ... Fauna is a collective term for animal life of any particular region or time. ...


The construction of airports has been known to change local weather patterns. For example, because they often flatten out large areas, they can be susceptible to fog in areas where fog rarely forms. In addition, because they generally replace trees and grass with pavement, they often change drainage patterns in agricultural areas, leading to more flooding, run-off and erosion in the surrounding land. For other uses, see Weather (disambiguation). ... The coniferous Coast Redwood, the tallest tree species on earth. ... Drainage is the natural or artificial removal of surface and sub-surface water from a given area. ... Flooding near Key West, Florida, United States from Hurricane Wilmas storm surge in October 2005 For other uses, see Flood (disambiguation). ... For morphological image processing operations, see Erosion (morphology). ...


Some of the airport administrations prepare and publish annual environmental reports in order to show how they consider these environmental concerns in airport management issues and how they protect environment from airport operations. These reports contains all environmental protection measures performed by airport administration in terms of water, air, soil and noise pollution, resource conservation and protection of natural life around the airport. The historic Blue Marble photograph, which helped bring environmentalism to the public eye. ...


Military airbase

Main article: Airbase

An airbase, sometimes referred to as a military airport or airfield, provides basing and support of military aircraft. Some airbases provide facilities similar to their civilian counterparts. For example, RAF Brize Norton in Oxfordshire, England has a terminal which caters to passengers for the Royal Air Force's scheduled Tristar flights to the Falkland Islands. Military airbases may also be co-located with civilian airports, sharing the same tower/air traffic control facilities, runways, taxiways and emergency services, but with separate terminals, parking areas, hangars and shelter areas. Examples of this are Bardufoss Airport/Bardufoss Air Station and Gardermoen Airport/Gardermoen Air Station, both in Norway. A special variant of a military airfield is the aircraft carrier. Lajes Airbase in the Azores islands, Portugal An Airbase, sometimes referred to as a military airport or airfield, provides basing and support of military aircraft. ... Military aircraft are airplanes used in warfare. ... RAF Brize Norton is a Royal Air Force station in Oxfordshire about 50 miles west of London, England, United Kingdom. ... Oxfordshire (abbreviated Oxon, from the Latinised form Oxonia) is a county in the South East of England, bordering on Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, Gloucestershire, and Warwickshire. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... RAF redirects here. ... The Lockheed L-1011 TriStar, commonly referred to as just L-1011 (pronounced ell-ten-eleven), was the third widebody passenger jet airliner to enter operation, following the Boeing 747 and the McDonnell Douglas DC-10. ... A Hardened Aircraft Shelter (HAS), or Protective Aircraft Shelter (PAS), is a structure which houses and protects military aircraft from enemy attack. ... Bardufoss Airport (IATA: BDU, ICAO: ENDU) (Norwegian: Bardufoss lufthavn) is situated in the municipality of MÃ¥lselv in Troms, far north in Norway. ... -1... The large check-in hall Oslo Airport, Gardermoen (IATA: OSL, ICAO: ENGM) (Norwegian: Oslo lufthavn, Gardermoen) is located in Gardermoen in Ullensaker, Norway, 48 km north of Oslo. ... Gardermoen Air Station is the militarized part of Oslo Airport, Gardermoen (Norways main airport) situated just north of Oslo, the capital of Norway. ... Four aircraft carriers, (bottom-to-top) Principe de Asturias, amphibious assault ship USS Wasp, USS Forrestal and light V/STOL carrier HMS Invincible, showing size differences of late 20th century carriers An aircraft carrier is a warship designed to deploy and recover aircraft, acting as a sea-going airbase. ...


Aircraft carriers

Main article: Aircraft carrier

An aircraft carrier is a warship that functions as a floating airport for military aircraft. Aircraft carriers allow a naval force to project air power great distances without having to depend on local bases for land-based aircraft. After their development in World War I, aircraft carriers replaced the battleship as the centrepiece of a modern fleet during World War II. Unescorted carriers are considered vulnerable to missile or submarine attacks and therefore travel as part of a carrier battle group that includes a wide array of other ships with specific functions. Four aircraft carriers, (bottom-to-top) Principe de Asturias, amphibious assault ship USS Wasp, USS Forrestal and light V/STOL carrier HMS Invincible, showing size differences of late 20th century carriers An aircraft carrier is a warship designed to deploy and recover aircraft, acting as a sea-going airbase. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Naval redirects here. ... Aerial warfare is the use of military aircraft and other flying machines in warfare, including military airlift of cargo to further the national interests as was demonstrated in the Berlin Airlift. ... For other uses, see Battleship (disambiguation). ... A rare occurance of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. ... For other uses, see Missile (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Submarine (disambiguation). ... The Abraham Lincoln battle group during the 2000 RIMPAC exercises A carrier battle group (CVBG) consists of an aircraft carrier (CV) and its escorts. ...


Airports in entertainment

Airports have played major roles in motion pictures and television programs due to being transportation hubs, but also because of their characteristics. One such example of this is the movie The Terminal, a film about a man who becomes permanently grounded in an airport terminal and must survive only on the food and shelter provided by the airport. Movies such as Airplane!, Airport, Die Hard 2, Soul Plane, Jackie Brown, Get Shorty, Home Alone, Liar Liar, Passenger 57, Final Destination, Unaccompanied Minors, Catch Me if You Can, Rendition and The Langoliers, as well as television series like Lost,America's Next Top Model Cycle 10' also have significant parts of their story set within airports. This article is about motion pictures. ... A television program (US), television programme (UK) or simply television show is a segment of programming in television broadcasting. ... This section contains a list of trivia items. ... Airplane! is an American comedy film, first released on 27 June 1980, produced, directed, and written by David Zucker, Jim Abrahams, and Jerry Zucker. ... Die Hard 2, sometimes marketed under the title Die Hard 2: Die Harder, is a 1990 film, the second in the Die Hard series. ... Soul Plane is a comedy motion picture from MGM, released in the United States on May 28, 2004 (see 2004 in film). ... Jackie Brown is a 1997 motion picture written and directed by Quentin Tarantino. ... European book cover Get Shorty is a novel by American novelist Elmore Leonard, first published in 1990, and a movie adaptation of the same name, released in 1995. ... Home Alone is a 1990 comedy film written and produced by John Hughes and directed by Chris Columbus. ... Liar Liar (1997) is an American comedy film starring Jim Carrey. ... Passenger 57 is a 1992 action film starring Wesley Snipes and Bruce Payne. ... Final Destination is a 2000 horror film about a group of teenagers who cheat death by avoiding a plane crash when one has a premonition of their deaths, but soon after, they begin dying one by one in mysterious freak accidents. ... Unaccompanied Minors (also called: Grounded: Unaccompanied Minors) is a 2006 film directed by Paul Feig and starring Lewis Black, Wilmer Valderrama, Tyler James Williams, Dyllan Christopher, Brett Kelly, Gina Mantegna, and Quinn Shephard. ... Catch Me If You Can is a 2002 motion picture set in the 1960s. ... Rendition is a legal term meaning surrender or turn over, particularly from one jurisdiction to another, and applies to property as well as persons. ... The Langoliers is one of four novellas published in the Stephen King book Four Past Midnight in 1990. ... LOST redirects here. ...


Several computer simulation games put the player in charge of an airport. These include Airport Tycoon and the sequels; Airport Tycoon 2 and Airport Tycoon 3. There is also a Japanese series of games called Air Traffic Controller. Airport Tycoon (Not to be confused with Airline Tycoon) is a simulation tycoon computer game, released for Windows 95/98 in 2000. ... Airport Tycoon 2 is the sequel to Airport Tycoon in which the player builds and manages an airport. ... Airport Tycoon 3 is the sequel to Airport Tycoon and Airport Tycoon 2 in which the player builds and manages an airport. ...


Airport directories

See also: Civil Aviation Authority and Aeronautical Information Service

Each national aviation authority has a source of information about airports in their country. This will contain information on airport height, airport lighting, runway information, communications facilities and frequencies, hours of operation, nearby NAVAIDs and contact information where prior arrangement for landing is necessary. The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) is the name for the national body governing civil aviation in a number of countries. ... Aeronautical Information Service also known as AIS, is an important support role to the Convention on International Civil Aviation as defined by Annex 15 of the International Civil Aviation Organization, ICAO. The purpose of the Aeronautical Information Service is to ensure the flow of information necessary for the safety, regularity...

  • Germany
    Provided by the Federal Office for Civil Aviation of Germany.
  • France
    Aviation Generale Delage edited by Delville and published by Breitling.
  • A comprehensive, consumer/business directory of commercial airports in the world (primarily for airports as businesses, rather than for pilots) is organized by the trade group Airports Council International.

Airservices Australia is an Australian Federal (Commonwealth) Government agency, responsible for providing safe and environmentally sound air traffic control management and related airside services to the aviation industry (ie: air traffic control, airways navigation and communication facilities, and airport rescue and fire-fighting services within the Australian Flight Information Region. ... The Canada Flight Supplement with its current blue cover since Nav Canada took over publication. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The European Organisation for the Safety of Air Navigation (EUROCONTROL) is an international organisation whose primary objective is the development of a seamless, pan-European Air Traffic Management (ATM) system. ... Aeronautical Information Publication (or AIP) is defined by ICAO as a publication issued by or with the authority of a state and containing aeronautical information of a lasting character essential to air navigation. ... An aeronautical chart is a map designed to assist in navigation of aircraft, much as nautical charts do for watercraft, or a roadmap for drivers. ... NOTAM or NoTAM is the quasi-acronym for a Notice To Airmen. NOTAMs are created and transmitted by government agencies under guidelines specified by Annex 15: Aeronautical Information Services of the International Convention on Civil Aviation. ... The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) is the public corporation which oversees and regulates all aspects of aviation in the UK. It was established in 1972. ... National Air Traffic Services Ltd. ... An Air Navigation Service Provider (ANSP) is a body that manages aviation related traffic in a block of airspace on behalf of a company, region or country. ... Public-private partnership (PPP) is a system in which a government service or private business venture is funded and operated through a partnership of government and one or more private sector companies. ... The Airport/Facility Directory (abbreviated A/FD), in the U.S., is a pilot’s manual that provides comprehensive information on airports, large and small, and other aviation facilities and procedures. ... Airports Council International (ACI) is the leading international trade group of the worlds commercial aviation industry, based in Geneva, Switzerland. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

A Domestic airport is an airport which handles only domestic flights or flights within the same country. ... By IATA code: A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z By ICAO code: A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R... Accidents and incidents in aviation ADF Adverse Yaw Aerobatics Aerodynamics Aeronautical chart Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM) Aeronautics Aerospace Aerospace engineering Aileron Airband Aircraft Aircraft engine controls Aircraft Maintenance Technician (AMT) Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (AME) Aircraft Registration Airfield Airfield traffic zone (ATZ, and MATZ) Airfoil Airline Airliner Airline Transport Pilot License... // Houari Boumedienne Airport Air Algérie Tassili Airlines Quatro de Fevereiro Airport TAAG Angola Airlines Bole International Airport Ethiopian Airlines OR Tambo International Airport South African Airways Cape Town International Airport South African Airways ambouli international airport future doraleh international airport djibouti airlines Beijing Capital International Airport Air China China... A new trend among airplane model collectors is to build model airports. ... An airport is a typical example of a NIMBY complex: it benefits a city economically, but no-one wants it near them because of the noise, pollution and traffic it generates. ... For other uses, see Port (disambiguation). ... A regional airport is an airport serving traffic within a relatively small geographical area. ... Total Airport Management System is an integerated airport management system which is now being used in Kuala Lumpur International Airport. ... Worlds busiest airport is a claim that is fiercely fought over by the owners of the worlds largest airports. ...

References

  1. ^ CIA World Factbook
  2. ^ College Park Airport
  3. ^ Airport history
  4. ^ Atlantic City airport, where 'air-port' coined, closing
  5. ^ Croydon Airport
  6. ^ History of Croydon Airport

External links

  • Airports Council International (ACI) — industry group representing over 1,600 major airports.
  • ACI 2006 annual report (PDF) — includes airport traffic information and forecasts.
  • International Air Transport Association (IATA) — representing the world's major airlines.
  • History of aircraft landing aids

Aviation encompasses all the activities relating to airborne devices created by human ingenuity, generally known as aircraft. ... This is a timeline of aviation history. ... This list of aircraft is sorted alphabetically, beginning with the name of the manufacturer (or, in certain cases, designer). ... This is a list of aircraft manufacturers (in alphabetic order). ... List of aircraft engines: // Two- and four-stroke rotary, radial, inline. ... This is a list of aircraft engine manufacturers both past and present. ... This is a list of airlines in operation (by continents and country). ... This is a list of air forces, sorted alphabetically by country, followed by a list of former countries air forces. ... This is an incomplete list of aircraft weapons, past and present. ... Below is a list of (links to pages on) missiles, sorted alphabetically by name. ... A Boeing 720 being flown under remote control as part of NASAs Controlled Impact Demonstration The following is a list of Unmanned aerial vehicles developed and operated by various countries around the world. ... This is a list of experimental aircraft. ... The SR-71 Blackbird is the current record holder. ... Flight distance records without refueling. ... These are the records set for going the highest in the atmosphere from the age of ballooning onward. ... The flight endurance record is the amount of time spent in the air. ... Aircraft with a production run greater than 5,000 aircraft. ... This is a list of airlines in operation (by continents and country). ... This is a list of airlines in operation that offer regular (usually scheduled) service to paying passengers from the general public. ... “IATA” redirects here. ... The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), an agency of the United Nations, codifies the principles and techniques of international air navigation and fosters the planning and development of international air transport to ensure safe and orderly growth. ... The International Society of Transport Aircraft Trading (abbreviated ISTAT) is an industry organization founded to create standards for the purchase of aircraft. ... An airline alliance is an agreement between two or more airlines to cooperate for the foreseeable future on a substantial level. ... For other uses, see Oneworld (disambiguation). ... All Nippon Airways Aircraft with Star Alliance livery seen in 2006 South African Airways aircraft with Star Alliance livery, seen in 2006 US Airways Express (Republic Airlines) Embraer 170 at Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport in Star Alliance livery Star Alliance is the largest airline alliance, with the following points of... SkyTeam is the second largest airline alliance in the world — behind Star Alliance — partnering fourteen carriers from four continents, with two pending members. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Ticket (admission). ... Airline timetables are booklets that many airlines worldwide use to inform passengers of several different things, such as schedules, fleet, security, in-flight entertainment, food menu, restriction and phone contact information. ... A Boarding Pass is a document provided by an airline allowing you to actually board an aircraft. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A continent pass (usually called something like Europe (air)pass, Pacific pass or American (air)pass) is a product and service of an airline alliance. ... “E-ticket” redirects here. ... Membership cards of FFP This article is about airline frequent flyer programs. ... A government contract flight is a type of charter airline operation contracted with a government agency. ... An open-jaw ticket is an airline ticket in which the traveler returns from a city other than the one he or she arrived at, or in which the final destination is not the same as the original departure city. ... A red-eye flight is a flight operated by an airline late at night or very early in the morning, during the period from 9:00 p. ... An example of traveling the world using a RTW ticket. ... On most modern airlines, flying standby occurs when a passenger travels on a flight without a ticket for that specific flight. ... An airline hub is an airport that an airline uses as a transfer point to get passengers to their intended destination. ... The lounge at ZRH, Switzerland An airport lounge is a lounge owned by a particular airline (or jointly operated by several carriers). ... A Domestic airport is an airport which handles only domestic flights or flights within the same country. ... An International airport is an airport where flights from other countries land and/or take off. ... A regional airport is an airport serving traffic within a relatively small geographical area. ... Bag tags, also known as baggage tags, baggage checks or luggage tickets, have traditionally been used by airlines to route passenger luggage that is checked in to the final destination. ... A Baggage carousel is the name given to a device, generally at an airport, that delivers checked luggage to the passengers at the baggage claim area at their final destination. ... Baggage claim area at the Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. ... Unloading baggage from a bag belt In the airline industry, a baggage handler is a person who loads and unloads baggage (suitcases or luggage), and other cargo (airfreight, mail, counter-to-counter packages) for transport via aircraft. ... A bag is a container that is usually used for storing or holding something. ... “Left-luggage” redirects here. ... The name given to the built in staircase found in the rear underbelly of a Boeing 727 jet airliner. ... Check-in counters of Thai Airways International at Suvarnabhumi Airport, Bangkok Overview of the check-in facilities (same site) Check-In of luggage (same site) Airport Check-in are service counter found at commercial airports handling commercial air travel. ... Baggage is scanned using X-ray machines, passengers walk through metal detectors Baggage screening monitoring at Bangkok Suvarnabhumi Airport Airport security refers to the techniques and methods used in protecting airports and by extension aircraft from crime and terrorism. ... Boarding an easyJet Airbus A319 at Bristol International Airport, Bristol, England for a flight to Rome, Italy. ... Gate at Nagoya Airport Entrance to gates at Hanover/Langenhagen International Airport Entrance to Gates at Asheville Regional Airport A Gate in aviation is a section at an airport terminal for transferring passengers and airline crews to an aircraft. ... Business class seat in a Lufthansa Boeing 747-400 Control screen fixed to the back side of an economy class airline seat (Airbus), the tray is stowed Airline seats are chairs on an airliner in which passengers are accommodated for the duration of the journey. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Business class seat in a British Airways Boeing 747-400 Business class (also known as executive class or upper class) is a high quality second-tier travel class available on some commercial airlines and rail lines. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A travel class is a quality of accommodation on public transport. ... Lunch at Garuda Indonesia (long haul, economy class); Japanese style, with teriyaki beef and rice, dorayaki, buckwheat noodles, and a beverage An airline meal is a meal served to passengers on a commercial airliner. ... An airsickness bag (also known as a barf bag, airsick bag, sick bag, or motion sickness bag) is a bag made of paper and usually lined with plastic to make it water-proof, although all-plastic bags are now in common use. ... In-flight entertainment (IFE) refers to the entertainment available to aircraft passengers during a flight. ... Flight attendant in an Embraer ERJ 145 LR of PBair, Thailand In aviation, flight attendants — also known as Cabin Crew, stewards, air hosts/hostesses, or stewardesses, — are members of a flight crew employed by airlines to ensure the safety and comfort of the passengers aboard commercial flights. ... For other uses, see Aviator (disambiguation). ... For the Canadian musical group, see Air Traffic Control (band). ... A Qantas aircraft safety card for Boeing 737-400 aircraft. ... Airline security refers to a set of procedures as well as infrastructure designed to avoid security problems aboard aircraft. ... The Airport Authority (AA) is the statutory body of Hong Kongs government responsible for the operations of the Hong Kong International Airport. ... The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) is the name for the national body governing civil aviation in a number of countries. ... An example of a FDR (Flight Data Recorder). ... In-flight safety demonstration (Lufthansa Flight attendant) The in-flight safety demonstration (also known as a pre-flight briefing or simply the safety video) is a detailed explanation given before takeoff to airline passengers about the safety features of a commercial aircraft. ... Overwing exits are found on passenger aircraft to provide a means of passenger evacuation onto the wing, where they either continue off the trailing edge by sliding down the extended flaps or by using an evacuation slide that deploys when the exit is opened. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Airport - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4306 words)
Despite the reluctance to privatize airports in the United States (despite the FAA sponsoring a privatization program since 1996), the government-owned/commercially operated (GOCO) arrangement is the standard for the operation of commercial airports in the rest of the world.
Airports have a captive audience, and consequently the prices charged for food is generally higher than are available elsewhere in the region.
Airports may also be named after a person associated with the region it serves or prominent figures in aviation history, such as Liverpool John Lennon Airport or Kingsford Smith International Airport, named for the Australian aviation pioneer.
AirPort - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1259 words)
AirPort is a local area wireless networking system from Apple Computer based on the IEEE 802.11b standard (also known as Wi-Fi) and certified as compatible with other 802.11b devices.
AirPort and AirPort Extreme in common usage can refer to the protocol (802.11b and 802.11g, respectively), the expansion card or the base station.
AirPort Extreme allows theoretical peak data transfer rates of up to 54 Mbit/s, and is fully backwards-compatible with existing 802.11b wireless network cards and base stations.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m