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Encyclopedia > Airborne forces

Airborne

Military parachuting form of insertion.

Purpose

Delivering personnel, equipment, or supplies.

Origins

Attributed to Italian troops on November 1927.

Basic Parachutist Badge awarded by the United States Army to those who complete Airborne School.
Basic Parachutist Badge awarded by the United States Army to those who complete Airborne School.

Airborne forces are military units, usually light infantry, set up to be moved by aircraft and 'dropped' into battle. Thus they can be placed behind enemy lines, and have an ability to deploy almost anywhere with little warning. The formations are limited only by the number and size of their aircraft, so given enough capacity a huge force can appear "out of nowhere" in minutes, an action referred to as vertical envelopment. Basic parachutist badge given by the United States Army to those who complete Airborne School. ... Basic parachutist badge given by the United States Army to those who complete Airborne School. ... The Parachutist Badge is a military badge awarded by the Armed Forces of most countries in the world to soldiers who receive the proper parachute training and accomplish the required number of jumps. ... The United States Army is one of the armed forces of the United States and has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Airborne School is an advanced Infantry School for training of airborne infantry. ... Traditionally light infantry (or skirmishers) were soldiers whose job was to provide a skirmishing screen ahead of the main body of infantry, harassing and delaying the enemy advance. ... An Airbus A380, currently the worlds largest passenger airliner An aircraft is any vehicle or craft capable of atmospheric flight. ...


Conversely, airborne forces typically lack the supplies and equipment for prolonged combat operations, and are therefore more suited for airhead operations than long-term occupation; furthermore, parachute operations are particularly sensitive to adverse weather conditions. Advances in helicopter technology since World War II have brought increased flexibility to the scope of airborne operations, and helicopters have largely replaced large-scale parachute operations. Due to the limited range of helicopters and the limited number of troops that can be transported by them many countries retain Paratroopers as a valuable strategic asset. The first military to actually use airborne forces in combat was Russia. This article is about a military term. ... The Bell 206 of Canadian Helicopters Robinson Helicopter Company (USA) R44, a four seat development of the R22 A helicopter is an aircraft which is lifted and propelled by one or more horizontal rotors consisting of two or more rotor blades. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Apollo 15 capsule landed safely despite a parachute failure. ... An American Paratrooper using a MC1-B series parachute Paratroopers are soldiers trained in parachuting and generally operate as part of an airborne force. ...

Contents

General information

Paratroopers from the 82nd Airborne Division jump from a C-17 Globemaster at Ft. Bragg, N.C., during Exercise Joint Forcible Entry in April 2005.
Paratroopers from the 82nd Airborne Division jump from a C-17 Globemaster at Ft. Bragg, N.C., during Exercise Joint Forcible Entry in April 2005.

Airborne forces can be divided into three categories: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1960x1618, 906 KB) http://www4. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1960x1618, 906 KB) http://www4. ... The 82nd Airborne Division of the United States Army was formed originally as the 82nd Infantry Division on August 25, 1917, at Camp Gordon, Georgia. ... C17 or C-17 may refer to: C-17 Globemaster III, a strategic airlifter used by the United States Air Force and Royal Air Force. ... Fort Bragg is a census-designated place and a major United States Army fort, in Cumberland County, North Carolina, USA, near Fayetteville. ...

  • Paratroopers — landed by parachute from aircraft,
  • Airlanding troops — landed by aircraft (usually glider),
  • Air assault troops or airmobile infantry — transported to the battle by helicopter or by aircraft.

The basic premise of the Airborne is that they can arrive with such speed that a coherent defence cannot be mounted against them for some time. It is assumed that this tactical advantage cannot be sustained for very long, so effective Airborne missions require the rapid advance of ground based troops in support. An American Paratrooper using a MC1-B series parachute Paratroopers are soldiers trained in parachuting and generally operate as part of an airborne force. ... Glider infantry (sometimes referred to as Airlanding infantry) were a short-lived innovation in military tactics, used during World War II. // Early History During their rearmament prior to the War, the Germans formed large numbers of gliding clubs and schools, to train future pilots for their Luftwaffe. ... Gliders built by the military of various countries were used for carrying troops and heavy equipment, mainly during the Second World War. ... A US Army UH-1 Huey seen offloading troops during the Vietnam War Air Assault (or air mobile, in the U.S. Air Cavalry) is the movement of forces by helicopter or aircraft to engage and destroy enemy forces or to seize and hold key terrain. ...


Early history

The idea of "Sky Soldiers" is by no means a recent thought; Benjamin Franklin envisioned a time when soldiers would be delivered from the sky, with a crude, rudimentary understanding of parachutes. The first modern consideration of the use of what we now call a paratroop force dates back to 1918. Towards the end of World War I, Brigadier General Billy Mitchell suggested dropping elements of the United States 1st Infantry Division behind German lines near Metz. The war ended before such an attack could be seriously planned. It's somewhat unclear how this was to be achieved given the state of development of both the parachute and aircraft at the time. Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ... Year 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Combatants Allied Powers: Russian Empire France British Empire Italy United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary German Empire Ottoman Empire Bulgaria Commanders Nicholas II Aleksei Brusilov Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Ferdinand Foch Robert Nivelle Herbert Henry Asquith Sir Douglas Haig Sir John Jellicoe Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna Armando Diaz Woodrow... Brigadier General Billy Mitchell, United States Army Air Service William L. (Billy) Mitchell (December 28, 1879 – February 19, 1936) was an American general who is regarded as the father of the U.S. Air Force. ... The 1st Infantry Division of the United States Army —nicknamed “The Big Red One” after its shoulder patch—is the oldest continuously serving division in the United States Army. ... For other uses of Metz, see Metz (disambiguation) City motto: Si paix dedans, paix dehors (French: If peace inside, peace outside) City proper (commune) Région Lorraine Département Moselle (57) Mayor Jean-Marie Rausch Area 41. ...


The first true paratroop drop was carried out by Italy in November 1927. Within a few years several battalions had been raised and were eventually formed into the two elite Folgore and Nembo divisions. Although these would go on to fight with distinction in World War II, they were never used in a parachute drop. 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


At about the same time the Soviet Union was also experimenting with the idea, planning to eventually drop entire units complete with vehicles including light tanks. To train enough experienced jumpers, parachute clubs were set up all over Russia with the aim of being able to transfer skilled members (or at least the men) into the armed forces if needed. Planning and organization progressed to the point that Corps-size drops were demonstrated to foreign observers in the Kiev military district maneuvers of 1936. By the late 1930s, the USSR possessed the largest Airborne forces in the world, but development stagnated prior to WW2 as a result of the Great Purge. 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Great Purge From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from Purges) Jump to: navigation, search The Great Purge (Russian: Большая чистка, transliterated Bolshaya chistka) is the name given to campaigns of political repression and persecution in the Soviet Union orchestrated by Joseph Stalin during the late 1930s. ...


One of the observing parties, Germany, was particularly interested. In 1936, Major Immans was ordered to set up a parachute school and was given a number of Junkers Ju 52 aircraft to train on. The military had already purchased large numbers of Junkers Ju 52 aircraft which were now modified (slightly) for use as paratroop transports in addition to their other duties. 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Junkers Ju 52 (nicknamed Tante Ju - Auntie Ju - and Iron Annie) was a transport aircraft and bomber manufactured 1932 – 1945 by Junkers. ...


Other nations, including Japan, also organized airborne units around this time.


World War II

German operations

Several groups within the German armed forces attempted to raise their own paratroop formations, resulting in confusion. As a result, Luftwaffe General Kurt Student was put in overall command of developing a paratrooper force to be known as the Fallschirmjäger. This does not cite its references or sources. ... Kurt Student Kurt Student (May 12, 1890-July 1, 1978) was a German Luftwaffe General who fought as a pilot on the Eastern Front during the First World War and as the commander of the German parachute troops during the Second World War. ... Fallschirmjäger photo taken from The Hague, Bezuidenhout during the invasion of the Low Countries, morning of May 10, 1940 , often rendered Fallschirmjager in English, is the German word for paratrooper. ...


During the invasion of Norway and Denmark in Operation Weserübung the Luftwaffe dropped paratroopers on several locations. In Denmark a small unit was dropped on the Masnedøfort on the small island of Masnedø to seize the Storstrøm Bridge linking the islands of Falster and Zealand. A paratroop detachment was also dropped at the airfield of Aalborg which was crucial for the Luftwaffe for operations over Norway. In Norway a company of paratroopers was dropped at Oslo's undefended airstrip. Over the course of the morning and early afternoon of April 9, 1940, the Germans flew in sufficient reinforcements to move into the capital in the afternoon, but by that time the Norwegian government had fled. Operation Weserübung was the German codename for Nazi Germanys assault on Denmark and Norway during World War II and the opening operation of the Norwegian Campaign. ... Masnedø is a Danish island between Zealand and Falster. ... Storstrøm Bridge (Danish, Storstrømsbroen) is a road and railway arch bridge that crosses Storstrømmen between the islands of Falster and Masnedø in Denmark. ... Falster is a Danish island. ... Map showing location of Zealand within Denmark. ... Aalborg Air Base (Danish: Flyvestation Aalborg) is a military base for the Danish Air Force. ... April 9 is the 99th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (100th in leap years). ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ...


In the Battle of France, members of the Brandenburg Regiment were dropped by Fieseler Fi 156 Storch light reconnaissance planes on the bridges immediately to the south of the 10th Panzer Division's route of march through the southern Ardennes. In Belgium a small group of German glider-borne troops landed on top of the Belgian fortress of Eben Emael on the morning of May 10, 1940 and it was captured in a matter of hours. This opened up Belgium to attack by the German Army Group B. Combatants France United Kingdom Canada Czechoslovakia Poland Belgium Netherlands Luxembourg Germany Italy Commanders Maurice Gamelin, Maxime Weygand (French) Lord Gort (British Expeditionary Force) H.G. Winkelman (Dutch) Gerd von Rundstedt (Army Group A) Fedor von Bock (Army Group B) Wilhelm von Leeb (Army Group C) H.R.H. Umberto di... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Brandenburger Regiment. ... The Fieseler Fi 156 Storch (stork) was a small liaison aircraft built by Fieseler before and during World War II, and production continued in other countries into the 1950s for the private market. ... Panzer Division is the German term for armored division. ... The Ardennes (pronounced ar-DEN) (Dutch: Ardennen) is a region of extensive forests and rolling hill country, primarily in Belgium and Luxembourg, but stretching into France (lending its name to the Ardennes département and the Champagne-Ardenne région). ... ... May 10 is the 130th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (131st in leap years). ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ...


Two simultaneous airborne operations were made during the invasion of the Netherlands. German paratroopers landed at an airport near The Hague, hoping to seize the Dutch government. But they were driven out of the airport before they were reinforced by troops brought in by Ju-52s. This was one of the few occasions where an airfield captured by paratroops has been recaptured. Simultaneously the Germans dropped small packets of paratroopers to seize the crucial bridges that led directly across the Netherlands and into the heart of the country. They opened the way for the 10th Panzer Division. Within a day the Dutch position was hopeless. Nevertheless, Dutch forces inflicted a high loss of transportation aircraft on the Germans. Combatants Kingdom of the Netherlands Germany Commanders Henry G. Winkelman, Jan Joseph Godfried baron van Voorst tot Voorst Fedor von Bock (Army Group B) Strength 9 divisions, 676 guns, 1 tank (inoperational), 124 aircraft Total: 350,000 men 22 divisions, 1,378 guns, 759 tanks, 1150 aircraft Total: 750,000... Arms of The Hague Flag of The city of The Hague. ... The Junkers Ju 52 nicknamed Tante Ju (Auntie Ju) and Iron Annie was a civilian airliner and military transport aircraft and bomber manufactured between 1932 and 1945 by Junkers. ...


The Fallschirmjäger's greatest victory and greatest losses were suffered during the Battle of Crete. The Ultra enabled the British to wait on each German drop zone, yet despite compromised secrecy, surviving German paratroops and airlanded mountain troops pushed the Commonwealth forces off the island in part by unexpected fire support from LG40 recoilless rifles. However, the losses were so great that Hitler forbade their use in such operations in the future. He felt that the main power of the paratroop was novelty, and now that the British had clearly figured out how to defend against them, there was no real point to using them any more. Combatants Greece United Kingdom New Zealand Australia Germany Italy Commanders Bernard Freyberg Kurt Student Strength United Kingdom: 15,000 Greece: 11,000 Australia: 7,100 New Zealand: 6,700 Total: 40,000 (10,000 without fighting capability. ... Ultra (sometimes capitalized ULTRA) was the name used by the British for intelligence resulting from decryption of German communications in World War II. The term eventually became the standard designation in both Britain and the United States for all intelligence from high-level cryptanalytic sources. ... Adolf Hitler Adolf Hitler (April 20, 1889 – April 30, 1945, standard German pronunciation in the IPA) was the Führer (leader) of the National Socialist German Workers Party (Nazi Party) and of Nazi Germany from 1933 to 1945. ...


There was one notable exception to this and that was the use of airborne forces in special operations. On September 12, 1943, Otto Skorzeny led a daring glider-based assault on the Gran Sasso Hotel, high in the Apennines mountains, and rescued Benito Mussolini from house arrest with very few shots being fired. September 12 is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years). ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... Otto Skorzeny Otto Skorzeny (June 12, 1908 - July 5, 1975) was an Obersturmbannführer in the German Waffen-SS during World War II. After fighting on the Eastern Front, he is known as the commando leader who rescued Benito Mussolini from imprisonment after his overthrow. ... Gran Sasso (Italian for great stone), a massif located in the Abruzzo region of central Italy, is the highest of the Apennines and the centerpiece of a national park (established 1991). ... This is about the terrestrial mountain range. ... Benito Amilcare Andrea Mussolini (July 29, 1883 – April 28, 1945) was the prime minister and dictator of Italy from 1922 until 1943, when he was overthrown. ...


Allied operations

The actual heavy German casualties during the Battle of Crete were hidden from allied planners.[citation needed] Ironically, the battle that ended Germany's paratrooper operations had the opposite effect on the Allies. Convinced of the effectiveness of airborne assaults, the Allies hurried to organize their own airborne units.


A fundamental decision was whether to create small Airborne units to be used in coup-de-main type operations, or to organize entire Airborne Divisions for larger operations. Many of the early, successful Airborne operations were coups-de-main carried out by very small units. The Allies eventually formed two British and five US Airborne Divisions: the British 1st Airborne Division and 6th Airborne Division, and the US 11th Airborne Division, 13th Airborne Division, 17th Airborne Division, 82nd Airborne Division, and 101st Airborne Division. By 1944 the British Divisions were grouped in the 1st Airborne Corps under General Frederick Browning, while US Divisions in the ETO (the 17th, 82nd, and 101st) were organized into the XVIII Airborne Corps under Gen Matthew Ridgway. Both Corps fell under the First Allied Airborne Army under US General Lewis Brereton. (Redirected from 1st Airborne Division) The British 1st Airborne Division was a military unit that fought in World War II. It suffered terrible casualties, especially in Operation Market Garden. ... The 6th Airborne Division was an airborne unit of the British Army during World War II. Formation The division was formed in the United Kingdom on 3 May 1943, during the Second World War. ... (Redirected from 11th Airborne Division) Shoulder sleeve patch of the 11th Airborne Division. ... (Redirected from 13th Airborne Division) Shoulder sleeve patch of the 13th Airborne Division. ... (Redirected from 17th Airborne Division) Shoulder sleeve patch of the 17th Airborne Division. ... The 82nd Airborne Division of the United States Army was formed originally as the 82nd Infantry Division on August 25, 1917, at Camp Gordon, Georgia. ... The 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault)—nicknamed the “Screaming Eagles”—is an airborne division of the United States Army primarily trained for air assault operations. ... Sir Frederick Arthur Montague Browning, KBE, CB, DSO (December 20, 1896 - March 14, 1965) was a British military officer. ... Patch of the XVIII Airborne Corps. ... Matthew Bunker Ridgway (March 3, 1895–July 26, 1993) was a United States Army general. ... Badge of the First Allied Airborne Army The First Allied Airborne Army was part of the Allied Expeditionary Force in North West Europe in 1944 and 1945. ... Lewis Hyde Brereton was an military aviation pioneer and US Army Air Force general in the Second World War. ...


Early commando raids

Operation Colossus: the raid on the Tragino Aqueduct

Britain’s first airborne assault took place on February 10, 1941, when No. 2 Commando introduced themselves to the enemy by jumping into Italy and blowing up an aqueduct in a daring raid named Operation Colossus. February 10 is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ... The British Commandos were first formed by the Army in June 1940 during World War II as a well-armed but unregimented raider force employing unconventional and irregular tactics to assault, disrupt and reconnoitre the enemy in mainland Europe and Scandinavia. ... During World War II, Operation Colossus was an experimental raid by thirty-eight of the five hundred men of No. ...


In some official circles Commandos were termed Special Service troops, and for this raid the men of No.2 Commando were termed "II Special Air Service", (the 'II' being the Roman numeral for '2' though generally thereafter corrupted to be 'eleven') This was the first time the term 'SAS' was used and when it was soon realised that far more than 500 paratroops were needed, the men of No.2 Commando became the foundation of the Parachute Regiment. The Special Air Service Regiment (SAS) is the principal special forces unit of the British Army. ... The Parachute Regiments display team, the Red Devils at an American airshow The Parachute Regiment is the main body of elite airborne troops of the British Army. ...


Operation Biting: The Bruneval raid

A Wuerzburg radar on the coast of France was attacked by British Paratroopers in Operation Biting on February 27, 1942. The electronics of the system were brought back to Britain for examination so that counter measures could be devised. The Wuerzburg radar was the primary ground-based gun laying radar for both the Luftwaffe and Wehrmacht during World War II. Inital development took place before the war, entering service in 1940. ... RAF photo-reconnaissance picture of the Bruneval Wuerzburg (the dish-shaped object in the left-foreground) The Bruneval Wuerzburg from another angle, showing the equipment in profile During World War II, Operation Biting was a Combined Operations raid to capture components of a German Wuerzburg radar set at Bruneval, France...


Mediterranean

Operation Torch: North Africa

The first major United States paratroop drop occurred during Operation Torch in North Africa. The U.S. 509th Parachute Infantry Battalion flew 1500 miles from Britain, over Spain, intending to drop near Oran and capture two airfields. The drop was a fiasco. Navigation and communications problems scattered the forces from Gibraltar to Tunisia. The 509th was not a factor in the initial invasion. Combatants United States United Kingdom Free French Forces Germany Vichy France Commanders Dwight Eisenhower Andrew Cunningham Erwin Rommel François Darlan Strength 73,500 - Casualties 479+ dead 720 wounded 1346+ dead 1997 wounded Operation TORCH (initially called Operation GYMNAST) was the British-American invasion of French North Africa in World...


The 509th had several additional drops during the North Africa campaign.


Operation Husky: Sicily

As part of Operation Husky four airborne operations were carried out, landing during the night of the 9/10 July; two were British and two American. The American troops were the U.S. 82nd Airborne Division, making their first combat parachute jump. The strong winds blew the dropping aircraft off course and scattered them widely; the result was that around half the US paratroops failed to make it to their rallying points. British glider-landed troops fared little better; only 12 out of 144 gliders landing on target, many landing in the sea. Nevertheless the scattered airborne troops maximised their opportunities, attacking patrols and creating confusion wherever possible. Some reserve 82nd paratroops dropped later during the campaign. This resulted in heavy friendly-fire casualties when U.S Navy landing craft shot down 23 of the transports as they flew over the beachhead. Husky was also the codename of Australian military support to Sierra Leone ending in February 2003. ... July 9 is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 175 days remaining. ... July 10 is the 191st day (192nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 174 days remaining. ... The 82nd Airborne Division of the United States Army was constituted in the National Army as the 82nd Division on August 5, 1917, and was organized on August 25, 1917, at Camp Gordon, Georgia. ... The Apollo 15 capsule landed safely despite a parachute failure. ... Gliders or Sailplanes are heavier-than-air aircraft primarily intended for unpowered flight. ... For other uses, see Friendly Fire (disambiguation). ...


The First Air Landing Brigade captured the Ponte Grande Bridge and before the Germans counter attack, the beach landings took place unopposed and the First Air Landing Brigade were relieved by the 8th Army as it swept inland and north towards Catania and Messina. For more details on this action see the article on The Staffordshire Regiment. The Staffordshire Regiment (Prince of Wales) or Staffords is an infantry regiment of the British Army, part of the Prince of Wales Division. ...


On July 13, 1943, more than 112 aircraft and 16 gliders carrying 1,856 men, took off from North Africa. Their initial target was to capture the Primosole bridge and the high ground around it, providing a pathway for the 8th Army, but heavy anti-aircraft fire shot down many of the Dakotas before they reached their target. Only 295 officers and men were dropped close enough to carry out the assault on the bridge. They captured the bridge but the German 4th Parachute Brigade recaptured it. They held the high ground until relived by the 8th army, but the mission had been a failure. July 13 is the 194th day (195th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 171 days remaining. ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ...


The Allied command was forced to reassess the use of airborne forces after the many misdrops and the deadly friendly fire incident. However, improved training and some tactical changes kept Airborne units in the war, eventually in much-increased numbers. For other uses, see Friendly Fire (disambiguation). ...


Operation Giant II

Operation Giant II was a planned drop of the 82nd Airborne on the outskirts of Rome, with the objective of seizing the Italian capital alongside four Italian divisions that were presumed to be friendly to the Allied cause. The Division Commander (Matthew Ridgway) and 5th Army Commander (Mark Clark) strenuously objected to this unrealistic plan. The artillery commander of the 82nd, (Maxwell Taylor, future commander of the 101st) was sent on a personal reconnaissance mission to Rome to assess the prospects of Italian participation. His report via radio caused the operation to be cancelled only hours before launch. Nickname: The Eternal City Motto: SPQR: Senatus PopulusQue Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban... Matthew Bunker Ridgway (March 3, 1895–July 26, 1993) was a United States Army general. ... Mark Wayne Clark was an American general during World War II and the Korean War. ... General Maxwell Davenport Taylor (August 26, 1901 – April 19, 1987) was an American soldier and diplomat of the mid-20th century. ...


Italy

US airborne forces were held in reserve during the initial invasion of Italy at Salerno, called Operation Avalanche. A few days later, during the German counter attacks, 5000 paratroopers from the 82nd Airborne and 509th PIB dropped to help secure the beachhead. Salerno is a town and a province capital in Campania, south-western Italy, located on the gulf of the same name on the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


In April 1945 Operation Herring, an Italian commando-style airborne drop aimed at disrupting German rear area communications and movement over key areas in Northern Italy, took place. 1945 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Operation Herring (Herring 1) was the last World War II airborne combat drop in Europe. ... In military science, the term commando can refer to an individual, a military unit or a raiding style of military operation. ... Northern Italy encompasses nine of the countrys 20 autonomous regions: Emilia-Romagna Friuli-Venezia Giulia Liguria Lombardia Piemonte Toscana Trentino-Alto Adige Valle dAosta Veneto Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Trentino-Alto Adige and Valle dAosta are regions with a special statute. ...


Western Europe

The Allies had learned better tactics and logistics from their earlier airborne drops, and these lessons were applied for the assaults along the Western Front. Western Front was a term used during the First and Second World Wars to describe the contested armed frontier between lands controlled by Germany to the East and the Allies to the West. ...


Operation Overlord: D-Day

One of the most famous of airborne operations was Operation Overlord on D-Day June 6, 1944. The task of the airborne forces was to secure the flanks of the landing beaches in Normandy. The British glider transported troops and paratroopers secured the Eastern flank in Operation Tonga of which Pegasus Bridge is the best remembered objective. Another objective was the Merville gun battery. The American 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions, though widely scattered by poor weather and unmarked landing zones, secured the western flank in Operation Chicago and Operation Detroit with heavy casualties. The Battle of Normandy was fought in 1944 between the German forces occupying Western Europe and the invading Allies. ... Land on Normandy In military parlance, D-Day is a term often used to denote the day on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. ... June 6 is the 157th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (158th in leap years), with 208 days remaining // 1508 - Maximilian I, Holy Roman Emperor, is defeated in Friulia by Venetian forces; he is forced to sign a three-year truce and cede several territories to Venice 1513... U.S. paratroopers jump into Australia on a military training exercise. ... Operation Tonga: Pathfinders synchronising their watches in front of an Armstrong Whitworth Albemarle. ... Pegasus Bridge before its replacement Pegasus was the name given to a bridge over the Caen canal, near the town of Ouistreham. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault)—nicknamed the “Screaming Eagles”—is an airborne division of the United States Army primarily trained for air assault operations. ... During World War II, Operation Chicago was carried out by the Allies in 1944. ... During World War II, Operation Detroit was the glider insertion of the U.S. 82nd Airborne Division into Normandy on the night of 6 June 1944 as part of Operation Overlord. ...


Southern France

On August 15, 1944, parachute units, which included the 4th, 5th and 6th Para battalions and lst Indian Army Pathfinders, dropped into Southern France between Frejus and Cannes as part of Operation Dragoon. Their objective was to capture the area, destroy all enemy positions and hold the ground until the US Seventh Army came ashore. Once they had captured their initial targets, they were reinforced by three thousand soldiers and critical equipment carried in over three hundred gliders in an operation code named Dove. The drop was almost unopposed and within days the British parachute group was withdrawn by sea to Italy in readiness for future operations. August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... A group of native Indian muslim soldiers posing for volley firing orders. ... One version of the patch worn on the uniforms of American pathfinders who served during World War II. During World War II, the pathfinders were a group of volunteers selected within the Airborne units who were specially trained to operate navigation aids to guide the main airborne body to the... Roman ruins, aquaduct Fréjus is a French city, in the Var département. ... For the annual festival, see Cannes Film Festival. ... Combatants United States1 Free France, United Kingdom Germany Commanders Jacob L. Devers Johannes Blaskowitz Strength 250,000 (approx) 230,000 (approx) Casualties 4,500 American, 4,500+ French 125,000+ (approx) Monument to the landings of Allied troops under General Patch on the beach of St Tropez, France. ... The Seventh United States Army, also known as USAREUR, is the main American force in Europe. ... In World War II, Operation Dove (Allies, 1944) was the glider-borne assault conducted as part of the invasion of southern France (Operation Dragoon) on 15 August 1944. ...


US airborne forces dropped over 5000 airborne troops during this operation. They were called the "1st Airborne Task Force", comprised of several unattached units, including the 509th and 551st PIBs and the 517th Parachute Regimental Combat Team. 517th PIR Logo 460th PFAB Logo 596th PCEC Logo The 517th Parachute Regimental Combat Team (517th PRCT), one of the U.S. Armys first elite combat units, began its existence in March of 1943, training at Camp Toccoa in the backwoods of Georgia. ...


Operation Market Garden: "A Bridge Too Far"

Operation Market Garden of September 1944, involved 35,000 troops dropped up to 100 miles behind the German front lines in an attempt to capture a series of bridges over the Maas, Waal and Rhine rivers, ultimately enabling the Allies to outflank German fortifications and penetrating into Germany. The operation was hastily planned and many key planning tasks were inadequately completed. Three complete airborne divisions, the British 1st Airborne Division, and the US 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions, plus the Polish 1st Independent Parachute Brigade, were dropped at various points along Highway 69, or "Hell's Highway", in order to create a "carpet" over which the British XXX Corps could rapidly advance. It was a daylight drop, with little initial opposition, and most units achieved high accuracy on drop zones. In the end, after strong German counterattacks, the overall plan failed: the British 1st Airborne division was all but destroyed at Arnhem, and the final Rhine bridge remained in German hands. Combatants United Kingdom United States Canada Poland Germany Commanders Bernard Montgomery Walter Model Strength 35,000 20,000 Casualties 17,000 dead or wounded 4,000 - 8,000 dead or wounded Operation Market Garden (September 17-September 25, 1944) was an Allied military operation in World War II. Its tactical... The Meuse (Maas) at Maastricht Meuse near Grave The Meuse (Dutch & German Maas) is a major European river, rising in France and flowing through Belgium and the Netherlands before draining into the North Sea. ... Edited Satellite image of the Rhine-Waal fork, showing the beginning of river Waal (green). ... The River Rhine (Dutch: ; French: ; German: ; Italian: ; Romansh: ) is one of the longest and most important rivers in Europe at 1,320 kilometres (820 miles), with an average discharge of more than 2,000 cubic meters per second. ... The British 1st Airborne Division was a military unit that fought in World War II. It suffered terrible casualties, especially in Operation Market Garden. ... Official force name 1 Samodzielna Brygada Spadochronowa Other names 1st Independent Polish Parachute Brigade 1 SBS Branch Polish Army Chain of Command Directly subordinate to Polish Government in Exile In 1944 transferred under British command Description Airborne force, rapidly deployable aeromobile infantry force. ...


Operation Varsity: the Rhine Crossing

Operation Varsity was a two-Division daylight drop conducted as part of the British 21st Army Group's crossing of the Rhine. With the lessons of Market Garden behind them, the Airborne units were dropped only a few thousand yards forward of friendly positions, enabling a fast linkup between heavy units and the British 6th and US 17th Airborne Divisions. Resistance to the main crossing was light, but casualties in the Airborne Divisions were heavy. The British historian Max Hastings has labeled the operation both costly and unnecessary. Operation Varsity was an airborne operation towards the end of World War II, intended to gain a foothold across the River Rhine. ... (Redirected from 17th Airborne Division) Shoulder sleeve patch of the 17th Airborne Division. ... Sir Max Hastings is a British journalist, editor, historian and author. ...


Pacific Theater

Less famous are these airborne operations against the Japanese.


South West Pacific
September 5, 1943. C-47 transport planes, silhouetted against clouds of smoke created to provide cover, drop a battalion of the U.S. 503d Parachute Regiment at Nadzab, New Guinea, during the Battle of Lae. A battalion dropped minutes earlier is landing in the foreground.
September 5, 1943. C-47 transport planes, silhouetted against clouds of smoke created to provide cover, drop a battalion of the U.S. 503d Parachute Regiment at Nadzab, New Guinea, during the Battle of Lae. A battalion dropped minutes earlier is landing in the foreground.

In September 1943, in New Guinea, the U.S. 503rd Parachute Infantry Regiment made a highly successful, unopposed drop at Nadzab, during the Salamaua-Lae campaign. This was the first Allied airborne assault in the Pacific Theater. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Douglas DC-3 VH-AES at Avalon in 2003. ... Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO military graphic symbols A battalion is a military unit usually consisting of between two and six companies and typically commanded by a Lieutenant Colonel. ... The 503rd Parachute Infantry Regiment (PIR) is an airborne unit in the United States military. ... Combatants Australia United States Empire of Japan Commanders Douglas MacArthur Hatazô Adachi Strength ~30,000 ~10,000 Casualties  ?  ? The Salamaua-Lae campaign was a series of actions in the New Guinea campaign of World War II. Australian and United States forces sought to capture two major Japanese bases, one in... 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... The Regiments 1st and 2nd Battalions were formed at Fort Benning, GA, from the 503d and 504th Parachute Battalions, respectively. ... Combatants Australia United States Empire of Japan Commanders Douglas MacArthur Hatazô Adachi Strength ~30,000 ~10,000 Casualties  ?  ? The Salamaua-Lae campaign was a series of actions in the New Guinea campaign of World War II. Australian and United States forces sought to capture two major Japanese bases, one in... Combatants Republic of China (from 1937) Chinese Communist Party (from 1937) U.S.A. (from 1941) U.K. (from 1941) British India (1941) Australia (1941) Free France (1941) Philippines (1941) Netherlands (1941) New Zealand (1941) Canada (1941) U.S.S.R. (from 1945) Mongolia (from 1945) Empire of Japan Nanjing...


In July of 1944, the 503rd jumped again, onto Noemfoor Island, off Dutch New Guinea. 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Dutch New Guinea was a common name of western New Guinea while it was a colonial possession of the Netherlands. ...


The 503rd's most famous operation was a landing on Corregidor ("The Rock") in February 1945, during the Philippines campaign of 1944-45. Combatants United States Japan Commanders George M. Jones Edward M. Postlethwait Rikichi Tsukada Strength 7,000 U.S. troops 6,700 Japanese troops Casualties 207 killed 684 wounded 6,600 killed 50 wounded 19 prisoners The Battle for the Recapture of Corregidor, from 16 February to 26 February 1945, by... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The U.S. 11th Airborne Division saw a great deal of action in the Philippines as a ground unit. The 511th Parachute Regiment, made the division's first jump near Tagaytay Ridge, 3 February 1945, meeting no resistance at the drop zone. The division also jumped to liberate 2,000 Allied civilians interned at Los Baños, 23 February 1945. The final operation of the Division was conducted on 23 June 1945, in conjunction with an advance by U.S. ground forces in northern Luzon. A task force from the 11th was formed and jumped on Camalaniugan Airfield, south of Aparri. The 11th Airborne Division of the US Army was activated on the 25 February 1943. ... Tagaytay City is a 3rd class city in the province of Cavite, Philippines. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Los Baños is a 1st class urban municipality in the province of Laguna, Philippines. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday. ... June 23 is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 191 days remaining. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Map of Cagayan showing the location of Aparri Aparri is a 2nd class municipality in the province of Cagayan, Luzon, Philippines. ...


Burma

A large British force, known as Chindits, operated behind Japanese lines during 1944. Most of the units were flown into landing grounds which had been seized by glider infantry. The Chindits (Officially in 1942 77th Indian Infantry Brigade and in 1943 3rd Indian Infantry Division) were a British jungle Special Forces unit that served in Burma from 1943 until 1945 as part of the Fourteenth Army during the Burma Campaign in World War II. They were formed into long... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Glider infantry (sometimes referred to as Airlanding infantry) were a short-lived innovation in military tactics, used during World War II. // Early History During their rearmament prior to the War, the Germans formed large numbers of gliding clubs and schools, to train future pilots for their Luftwaffe. ...


For Operation Dracula, a parachute battalion secured Japanese coastal defences, which allowed the seaborne occupation of Rangoon to proceed without opposition. The Burma Campaign was a campaign in the South-East Asian Theatre of World War II. It was fought primarily between Commonwealth, Chinese and American forces against the Empire of Japan. ... Yangôn, formerly Rangoon, population 4,504,000 (2001), is the capital of Myanmar. ...


Japanese operations

The Japanese used troops with parachute training in several battles in the Dutch East Indies campaign of 1941-42. Before the Pacific War began, the Imperial Japanese Army formed Teishin Dan ("Raiding Brigades") and Imperial Japanese Navy trained marine (Rikusentai) paratroopers. The Netherlands East Indies campaign was the shortlived defence of the Netherlands East Indies by Allied forces, against invasion by the Empire of Japan in 1941-42. ... Combatants Republic of China (from 1937) Chinese Communist Party (from 1937) U.S.A. (from 1941) U.K. (from 1941) British India (1941) Australia (1941) Free France (1941) Philippines (1941) Netherlands (1941) New Zealand (1941) Canada (1941) U.S.S.R. (from 1945) Mongolia (from 1945) Empire of Japan Nanjing... The Imperial Japanese Army (: 大日本帝國陸軍 Shinjitai: 大日本帝国陸軍 Dai-Nippon Teikoku Rikugun) was the official ground based armed force of Japan from 1867 to 1945 when it was Imperial Japan. ... Teishin Shudan (Raiding Group) was a Japanese special forces/airborne unit during World War II. The word teishin may be literally translated as dash forward, and is usually translated as raiding. It may also be regarded as similar to the commando designation in the terminology of other armies. ... The Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) (: 大日本帝國海軍 Shinjitai: 大日本帝国海軍   or 日本海軍 Nippon Kaigun), officially Navy of Empire of Greater Japan, also known as the Japanese Navy or Combined Fleet was the Navy of Empire of Japan from 1869 until 1947, when it was dissolved following Japans constitutional renunciation of the use of force... The Imperial Japanese Navy fielded marine paratroopers during World War II. The troops were officially part of the Special Naval Landing Forces (SNLF or Rikusentai), the navys marine corps. ...


Rikusentai airborne troops were first dropped at the Battle of Menado, Celebes in January 1942, and then near Kupang, during the Timor campaign, in February 1942. Teishin made a jump at the Battle of Palembang, on Sumatra in February 1942. Japanese airborne units suffered heavy casualties during the Dutch East Indies campaign, and were rarely used as parachute troops afterwards. Combatants Netherlands Empire of Japan Commanders B. F. A. Schilmöller Ibo Takahashi Strength 1,500 infantry 2,500 naval infantry 500 paratroopers Casualties  ?  ? The Battle of Manado was a battle of the Pacific theatre of World War II. It occurred at Manado, at Minahasa peninsula on the northern island... Map of Sulawesi pictures by Julianto Halim Sulawesi (or Celebes) is a large Indonesian island. ... Kupang is the capital of the Indonesian province East Nusa Tenggara. ... The Battle of Timor (1942–43) occurred on the island of Timor, in the Pacific theatre of World War II. It involved forces from the Empire of Japan, which invaded on February 20, 1942, on one side and Allied personnel, predominantly from Australia and the Netherlands, on the other. ... Combatants Britain Netherlands Australia New Zealand United States Empire of Japan Commanders Air Cdre H. J. F. Hunter (bombers) Air Cdre S. F. Vincent (fighters) Lt. ... Sumatra (also spelled Sumatera) is the sixth largest island of the world (approximately 470,000 km²) and is the largest island entirely in Indonesia (two larger islands, Borneo and New Guinea, are partially in Indonesia). ...


On 6 December 1944, a 750-strong detachment from Teishin Shudan ("Raiding Division") and the Giretsu special forces unit, attacked U.S. airbases in the Burauen area on Leyte, in The Philippines. The force destroyed some planes and inflicted casualties, but was wiped out. December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... The Imperial Japanese Army Giretsu special forces unit was active in 1944 and 1945. ... Burauen is a 2nd class municipality in the province of Leyte, Philippines. ... Leyte can refer to several things: Leyte, an island in the Phillipines, site of a major World War II battle Leyte Gulf, also in the Phillipines, and site of a WW II battle Leyte province, a province of the Phillipines, including most of Leyte island Southern Leyte, a province of... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


Soviet Operations

The Soviets mounted no large-scale Airborne operations in WW2, despite their early leadership in the field in the 1930s. The largest drop was Brigade-sized, and was not successful. However, Airborne formations were used as elite Infantry units and played a critical role in several battles. For example, at the Battle of Kursk, the defense of the eastern 'shoulder' of the southern penetration by Guards Airborne units was critical to holding back the German penetration. Combatants Germany Soviet Union Commanders Erich von Manstein Hans von Kluge Hermann Hoth Walther Model Georgiy Zhukov Konstantin Rokossovskiy Nikolay Vatutin Ivan Konyev Strength 2,700 tanks 800,000 infantry, 2,000 aircraft 3,600 tanks 1,300,000 infantry, 2,400 aircraft Casualties German Kursk : 50,000 dead, wounded...


Post World War II

The 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team ("Rakkasans") made two combat jumps in Korea during the Korean War. The first combat jump was made on October 20, 1950 at Sunchon and Sukchon, North Korea. The missions of the 187th were to cut the road north going to China, preventing North Korean leaders from escaping from Pyongyang; and to rescue American prisoners of war. Korea (Korean: 한국 or ì¡°ì„ , see below) is a geographic area, civilization, and former state situated on the Korean Peninsula in East Asia. ... Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea  Australia  Belgium  Luxembourg  Canada  Colombia  Ethiopia  France  Greece  Luxembourg  Netherlands  New Zealand  Philippines  South Africa  Thailand  Turkey  United Kingdom  United States Medical staff:  Denmark  Australia  Italy  Norway  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea  Peoples Republic of China  Soviet Union Commanders... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Sunchŏn is a city in South Pyongan province, North Korea. ... Not to be confused with PyeongChang. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ...


The second combat jump was made on Easter Sunday, 1951 at Munsan-ni, South Korea. The mission was to get behind Chinese forces and block their movement north. 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... Munsan is an eup in Paju City, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea. ...


The 187th served in six campaigns in Korea. The unit was deactivated as a combat team in 1956. The 187th Infantry is now with the 101st Airborne Division as an Air Assault Unit. A US Army UH-1 Huey seen offloading troops during the Vietnam War Air Assault (or air mobile, in the U.S. Air Cavalry) is the movement of forces by helicopter or aircraft to engage and destroy enemy forces or to seize and hold key terrain. ...


First Indochina War

The French used paratroops extensively during their 1946-54 war against the Viet Mihn. Colonial, French Foreign Legion and local Vietnamese units took part in numerous operations which were to culminate in the disastrous siege of Dien Bien Phu. Legionnaire (film) The French Foreign Legion (French: Légion étrangère) is a unique elite unit within the French Army established in 1831. ... Dien Bien Phu (Điện Biên Phủ) is a small town in northwestern Vietnam in the province of Điện Biên. ...


Operation Musketeer: Suez crisis

During the Suez Crisis, Operation Musketeer needed the element of total surprise to succeed, and all 660 men had to be on the ground at El Gamil airfield and ready for action within four and a half minutes. At 04.15 hours on November 5, 1956, British 3rd Battalion, Parachute Regiment jumped in and although opposition was heavy, casualties were few. Combatants Israel United Kingdom France Egypt Commanders Moshe Dayan Charles Keightley Pierre Barjot Gamal Abdel Nasser Strength 175,000 Israeli 45,000 British 34,000 French 70,000 Casualties 197 Israeli KIA 56 British KIA 91 British WIA 10 French KIA 43 French WIA 650 KIA 2,900 WIA 2... Military history records no less than three plans, all called Operation Musketeer: Musketeer was a four-phased plan during World War II to liberate the Philippine Islands developed by General Douglas MacArthur’s staff as part of the larger Reno V plan. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Parachute Regiment is the Airborne Infantry element of the British Army. ...


The landings from the sea the next day saw the first large-scale heliborne assault, as 45 Commando, Royal Marines were landed by helicopters in Port Said from ships offshore. The Royal Marines (RM), are the Royal Navys light infantry. ... Port Said (postcard around 1915) Port Said (31. ...


Israeli paratroopers led by Ariel Sharon dropped into the important Mitla Pass to cut off and engage Egyptian forces. This was the IDF's first and only combat parachute operation in its entire history up to present day.   (Hebrew: , also known by his diminutive Arik אָרִיק) (born February 27, 1928) is a former Israeli politician and general. ... The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) (Hebrew: ‎  , [Army] Force for the Defense of Israel), often abbreviated with the Hebrew acronym צהל Tsahal, alternative English spelling Tzahal, is the name of Israels military forces, comprising the Israeli Army, the Israeli Air Force and the Israeli Sea Corps. ...


Indo-Pakistani War of 1965

For the first time in a combat in South Asia, paratroopers were used in the subcontinent during the Second Kashmir War of 1965. A covert operation was launched by Pakistan Army with the intention of infiltrating Indian airbases and sabotaging them. The SSG (Special Services Group) commandos numbering close to 200 were parachuted into Indian territory. Indian sources however claim as many as 800-900 attempted the landing. Given that most of the Indian targets (Halwara, Pathankot and Adampur) were deep into enemy territory only a dozen or so commandos made it back alive and the stealth operation proved ineffective. Of the remaining, 136 were taken prisoners, 22 were killed in encounters with the army, local police or the civilians. The daring attempt proved to be a disaster with the Commander of the operations, Major Khalid Butt too being arrested. This article is about the geopolitical region in Asia. ... Satellite image of the Indian subcontinent Map of South Asia (see note) This article deals with the geophysical region in Asia. ... The 1965 war between India and Pakistan, also known as the Second Kashmir War, was the culmination of a series of skirmishes that occurred between April 1965 and September 1965. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... Military manpower Military age 16 years of age Availability 39,028,014 (2005) Males ages 16-49 Reaching military age males: 1,969,055 (2005) Active troops 620,000 (Ranked 9th) Military expenditures Dollar figure $3. ... In military science, the term commando can refer to an individual, a military unit or a raiding style of military operation. ... Halwara is a city in Punjab state in India. ... Pathankot is a small city in the state of Punjab. ... Adampur is a city and a municipal council in Jalandhar district in the state of Punjab, India. ...


Indo-Pakistani War of 1971

Main article: Indo-Pakistani War of 1971

In 1971, the Indian Para Regiment fought numerous actions both in the Eastern and Western Theatres. On 11 December, India airdropped Para Bn Gp 130 in what is now famous as the Tangail airdrop. The Paratroop unit was instrumental in denying the retreat and regrouping of the Pakistani army, and contributed substantially to collapse of Dacca. The Para Commandos also proved their unmatched skills in spectacular lightening raids into Chachro (Sindh, Pakistan) and Mandhol (Jammu and Kashmir). The Regiment earned battle honours Poongli Bridge, Chachro and Defence of Poonch during these operations. Combatants India Pakistan Commanders Sam Manekshaw J.S. Aurora A. A. K. Niazi # Strength 500,000+ troops[] 400,000+ troops[] Casualties 3,843 killed[1] 9,851 wounded[1] c. ... The Tangail airdrop was an operation mounted on 11 December 1971 by the 2nd Parachute Battalion of the Indian Army during the Indo-Pakistani War of 1971. ... Pakistan Army Coat of Arms Pakistan Army is the branch of the Pakistan Military responsible for land based military operations. ... SasquatchTC 06:40, July 22, 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... District Poonch,popularly known as mini Kashmir, is the smallest in area and the remotest district of Jammu and Kashmir, India. ...


Vietnam War

The use of helicopter-borne airmobile troops by the United States in Vietnam was widespread, and became an iconic image featuring in newsreels and movies about the conflict.


In February of 1967 Operation Junction City was launched, it would be the largest operation the Coalition Force would assemble. During this operation, 845 members of the 2nd Battalion, 503rd PIR, 319th Artillery, and elements of H&H company of the 173rd Airborne Brigade made the only combat jump in Vietnam. Operation Junction City was one of the largest airborne operations since Market Garden in the latter half of World War II, and one of the largest operations of the Vietnam conflict. ... Shoulder sleeve patch of the 173rd Airborne Brigrade. ...


Soviet VDV

The Soviet Union maintained the world's largest airborne force during the Cold War, consisting of seven air assault divisions. The VDV was a semi-independent branch of the army and was a 'prestige service' for Russia. Recruits were almost exclusively Slavic, and received much more rigorous training than ordinary Soviet units. Although a light infantry force, the paratroops were the recipients of several pieces of specifically-designed equipment, such as the BMD-1 and ASU-85 self-propelled gun. During the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, it was the VDV who spearheaded the assault and formed the bulk of the counter-insurgency forces, though mainly using helicopters than aircraft. As an elite force, the VDV developed two distinctive items of clothing: the telnyaskha, or striped shirt, and the famous blue beret. For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... VDV flag. ... The BMD-1 is a Soviet airborne infantry fighting vehicle, which was introduced in 1969 and first seen by the West in 1970. ... The ASU-85 was a Soviet self-propelled gun based on the PT-76 tank chassis, and was equipped with an 85mm gun. ... A self-propelled gun is an armored fighting vehicle which primarily based on and serves to transport the gun with which its equipped. ... A Soviet soldier on guard in Afghanistan in 1988. ...


Operation Meghdoot

Operation Meghdoot was the name given to the preemptive strike launched by the Indian Military to capture most of the Siachen Glacier, in the disputed Kashmir region. Launched on April 13, 1984, this military operation was unique as it was the first assault launched in the world's highest battlefield. The military action was quite successful as Indian troops managed to gain two-thirds of the glacier with the rest remaining under Pakistani control. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Preventative war. ... Military branches: Indian Army, Indian Navy (including naval air arm), Air Force, various security or paramilitary forces (includes Border Security Force, Assam Rifles, Rashtriya Rifles, National Security Guards, Indo-Tibetan Border Police, Special Frontier Force, Central Reserve Police Force, Defense Security Corps and several other units) and the Strategic Forces... The Siachen Glacier is marked in orange The Siachen Glacier is located in the East Karakoram/Himalaya, at approximately . ... Kashmir (or Cashmere) may refer to: Kashmir region, the northwestern region of the Indian subcontinent India, Kashmir conflict, the territorial dispute between India, Pakistan, and the China over the Kashmir region. ... April 13 is the 103rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (104th in leap years). ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Planning, calculating, or the giving or receiving of information. ... Battlefield may refer to: the location of a battle, the Battlefield televised documentary series, shown on the Discovery Channel, which explores battles of World War 2, the Battlefield Vietnam televised documentary series, shown on the Military Channel, which gives detail explanations of Vietnam War, (1945-1975), battles. ... A glacier is a large, long-lasting river of ice that is formed on land and moves in response to gravity and undergoes internal deformation. ...


Recent history

With the advantages of helicopter use, airborne forces have dwindled in numbers in recent years. Their strategic capabilities have ensured that Airborne forces are still a part of armies today with the 82nd Airborne Division being the largest formation of paratroopers in the world.[citation needed] The 82nd Airborne Division of the United States Army was constituted in the National Army as the 82nd Division on August 5, 1917, and was organized on August 25, 1917, at Camp Gordon, Georgia. ...

1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants United States Antigua and Barbuda Barbados Dominica Jamaica Saint Lucia Saint Vincent Grenada Cuba Strength 7,300 Grenada: 1,500 regulars Cuba: 600 (mostly engineers)[1] Casualties 19 killed; 116 wounded[2] Grenada: 45 military and at least 24 civilian deaths; 358 wounded. ... The 75th Ranger Regiment —also known as the United States Army Rangers— is a light infantry special operations force of the United States Army Special Operations Command (USASOC); with headquarters in Fort Benning, Georgia. ... Combatants United States Panama Commanders Carl W. Stiner Manuel Noriega Strength 27,684+ 16,000+ Casualties 24 Dead, 325 Wounded 450 Military, 514-4,000 Civilian Rangers from Charlie Company, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment prepare to take La Comandancia in the El Chorrillo neighborhood of Panama City, December 1989. ... The 82nd Airborne Division of the United States Army was constituted in the National Army as the 82nd Division on August 5, 1917, and was organized on August 25, 1917, at Camp Gordon, Georgia. ... Combatants United States Canada Australia United Kingdom Netherlands Philippines (in the Philippines theatre only) Northern Alliance GUAM Poland Italy Visegrad Group Hungary Ethiopia Somalia Estonia Latvia Lithuania Slovakia Vilnius group Croatia Albania Macedonia Romania Bulgaria Taliban al-Qaeda Abu Sayyaf Jemaah Islamiyah Islamic Courts Union Commanders General Tommy Franks Brig. ... The 3d Ranger Battalion was organized October 3, 1943 in the Army of the United States in the China-Burma-India Theater of Operations of World War II as an element of the 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional). ... Shoulder sleeve patch of the 173rd Airborne Brigrade. ... Combatants Coalition Forces: United States United Kingdom South Korea Australia Poland Romania others. ...

Other meanings of the word Airborne:

In the United States Air Force, the term refers to Airmen (other than pilots, navigators and weapon system officers) performing duties in aerial flight, such as the operations crew on the E-3 Sentry. The United States Air Force (USAF) is the aerial-warfare branch of the United States armed forces and one of the seven uniformed services. ... The E-3 Sentry is a military airborne warning and control system (AWACS) aircraft that provides all-weather surveillance, command, control and communications, to the United States, NATO and other air defense forces. ...


101st Airborne March

The “101st Aiborne March” was composed by Daniel Bourdelès, Norman composer, for the celebration of the liberation of Carentan, in june 1994. This march is extracted from the CD "Carentan, the sky memory" (1994), produced by the town. It is steadily used as a musical illustration for the Normandy liberation films on France3 regional TV. You can hear it here : http://magene.chez-alice.fr/airborne.html


Cultural References

The 1984 movie Red Dawn became a huge cult classic. It featured a massive Soviet airdrop of airborne forces in the opening scenes of the movie. Approximate map of the events described in the movie Red Dawn is a 1984 film by John Milius about an invasion of the United States by the Soviet Union and Cuba, and the resulting guerrilla actions of a group of American high school students in the town of Calumet, Colorado. ...


See also

An American Paratrooper using a MC1-B series parachute Paratroopers are soldiers trained in parachuting and generally operate as part of an airborne force. ... Airborne guns are airborne artillery pieces, designed for use by paratroopers. ... This article is about a military term. ... HALO and HAHO are acronyms that describe methods of delivering personnel, equipment, and supplies from a transport aircraft at a high altitude via free-fall parachute insertion. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Jegerkompaniet / ISTAR is the Norwegian Armys northern-most unit. ... One version of the patch worn on the uniforms of American pathfinders who served during World War II. During World War II, the pathfinders were a group of volunteers selected within the Airborne units who were specially trained to operate navigation aids to guide the main airborne body to the...

References

  • Mohammed Musa Khan (1983). My Version: India-Pakistan War 1965. Wajidalis. 
  • Enemy Air-Borne Forces, Military Intelligence Service, Special Series No. 7, December 2, 1942

General Musa Khan Hazara was the Chief of Pakistans Army Staff. ...

External links

  • Guerrero De Sombra Academia
  • Royal Engineers Museum - Airborne Sappers
  • Israeli Airborne Special Forces at isayeret.com
  • germanairborne.de - German Fallschirmjaeger-Community with News, Informations, Pictures, Board
  • Canadian Airborne Regiment, information, pictures, stories and forum
  • Russian airborne forces website (Russian)
  • another Russian airborne forces website (also in Russian)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Airborne forces - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3110 words)
Conversely, airborne forces typically lack the supplies and equipment for prolonged combat operations, and are therefore more suited for airhead operations than long-term occupation; furthermore, parachute operations are particularly sensitive to adverse weather conditions.
The Allied command was forced to reconsider their use of airborne forces after the many misdrops and the deadly friendly fire incident.
Their strategic capabilities have ensured that Airborne forces are still a part of armies today with the 82nd Airborne Division being the largest formation of paratroopers in the world.
Airborne forces - definition of Airborne forces in Encyclopedia (1952 words)
Airborne forces are military units set up to be moved by aircraft and dropped into battle behind enemy lines.
Conversely, airborne forces typically lack the supplies and equipment for prolonged combat operations, and are therefore more suited for spearhead operations than long-term occupation; furthermore, parachute operations are particularly sensitive to adverse weather conditions.
The British 1st Airborne Division was landed by sea near the port of Taranto in the 'heel' of Italy (Operation Slapstick).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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