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Encyclopedia > Air Force
An air force operates several types of aircraft including fighter aircraft. Shown here are Indian Air Force's SEPECAT Jaguar in V-formation.

An air force, in some countries called an air army, is a military or armed service that primarily conducts aerial warfare. It typically consists of a combination of fighters, bombers, helicopters, transport planes and other aircraft. Many air forces are also responsible for operations of military space, intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBM), and communications equipment. Some air forces may command and control other air-defense assets such as antiaircraft artillery, surface-to-air missiles, or anti-ballistic missile warning networks and defensive systems. This is a list of air forces, sorted alphabetically by country, followed by a list of former countries air forces. ... Air Force is a 1943 Academy-Award-winning movie directed by Howard Hawks. ... Image File history File links IAF Jaguars at the Republic Day Military Parade, New Delhi. ... Image File history File links IAF Jaguars at the Republic Day Military Parade, New Delhi. ... An A-10 Thunderbolt II, F-86 Sabre, P-38 Lightning and P-51 Mustang fly in formation during an air show at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. ... The Indian Air Force (भारतीय वायु सेना : Bharatiya Vayu Sena) is the air-arm of the Armed Forces of India and has the prime responsibility of conducting aerial warfare and securing the Indian airspace. ... The SEPECAT Jaguar is an Anglo-French ground attack aircraft still in service with several export customers, notably the Indian Air Force and the Royal Air Force of Oman. ... Canadian geese in V formation. ... Aerial warfare is the use of military aircraft and other flying machines in warfare, including military airlift of cargo to further the national interests as was demonstrated in the Berlin Airlift. ... An A-10 Thunderbolt II, F-86 Sabre, P-38 Lightning and P-51 Mustang fly in formation during an air show at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. ... For other uses, see Bomber (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Helicopter (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Minuteman III ICBM test launch from Vandenberg AFB, California, United States. ... Akash Missile Firing French Air Force Crotale battery Bendix Rim-8 Talos surface to air missile of the US Navy A surface-to-air missile (SAM) is a missile designed to be launched from the ground to destroy aircraft. ... An anti-ballistic missile (ABM) is a missile designed to counter ballistic missiles. ...

Contents

Organization

Many nations' militaries have air forces that are independent - that is, it is neither part of the army nor the navy. This however does not stop armies and especially navies from possessing air arms to support their land or sea operations. In some forces, such as those of Canada and formerly in some other countries, all military aircraft are operated by the air force, even when they are attached to - and even under the operational command of - other services. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The multinational Combined Task Force One Five Zero (CTF-150) The British Grand Fleet, the supreme naval force of World War I A rare occurrence of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. ...


Air forces typically operate numerous types of aircraft. These may include

Air forces also operate numerous types of satellites. These satellites provide services such as: An A-10 Thunderbolt II, F-86 Sabre, P-38 Lightning and P-51 Mustang fly in formation during an air show at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. ... For other uses, see Bomber (disambiguation). ... Mixed reconnaissance patrol of the Polish Home Army and the Soviet Red Army during Operation Tempest, 1944 Reconnaissance is the military term for the active gathering of information about an enemy, or other conditions, by physical observation. ... // Electronic warfare (EW) is the use of the electromagnetic spectrum to effectively deny the use of this phenomena by an adversary, while optimizing its use by friendly forces. ... United States Air Force E-3 Sentry An Airborne Early Warning (AEW) system is a radar system carried by an aircraft which is designed to detect other aircraft. ... Maritime patrol is the task of monitoring large areas of water. ... A tanker is an aircraft used for in-flight refuelling. ... For other uses, see Helicopter (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

  • Secure and unsecure communications
  • Position, navigation and timing
  • Missile warning
  • Weather data
  • Intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR)

Some air forces such as the British Royal Air Force (RAF) have a unique rank structure loosely based on naval ranks; other air forces such as the United States Air Force (USAF) have a rank structure on the Enlisted side that is unique, but the Officer corps uses Army-style rank. Finally, there are air forces such as Soviet Air Force that use Army-style ranks for both Enlisted and Officer corps. Most (but not all) wear blue-grey uniforms ('air force', as opposed to 'navy', blue), a practice pioneered by the Royal Air Force. The organization structures of the air forces also vary: some air forces (such as the USAF and RAF) are divided into commands, groups and squadrons; others (such as the Soviet Air Force) have an Army-syle organizational structure. “RAF” redirects here. ... Air forces of most of the countries use ranking system simular to Armies. ... “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... Other Ranks (OR 1 - 9) See also NATO Ranks and insignia of NATO Ranks and insignia of NATO Armies Officers Ranks and insignia of NATO Armies Enlisted Ranks and insignia of NATO Air Forces Officers Ranks and insignia of NATO Air Forces Enlisted Ranks and insignia of NATO Navies Officers... No equivalent General Generalløjtnant Generalmajor Brigadegeneral Oberst Oberstløjtnant Major Kaptajn Premierløjtnant Greece (Edit) No equivalent Pterarchos Antipterarchos Ypopterarchos Taxiarchos Sminarchos Antisminarchos Episminagos Sminagos Yposminagos Anthiposminagos  Iceland (Edit) No Air Force No Air Force No Air Force No Air Force No Air Force No Air Force No Air... The Soviet Air Force, also known under the abbreviation VVS, transliterated from Russian: ВВС, Военно-воздушные силы (Voenno-Vozdushnye Sily), formed the official designation of the air force of the Soviet Union. ... Air Force Blue is a very light shade of the colour blue. ... Navy blue is an especially dark shade of the color blue. ... The Royal Air Force uniform is the standardized military dress worn by members of the Royal Air Force. ... A command in military organization is a collection of units or a group of personnel under the control of a single officer. ... Group is a term used by different air forces for an element of military organization. ... A Squadron is a small unit or formation of cavalry, aircraft (including balloons), or naval vessels. ...


Pilots make up only a small portion of an air force's personnel. For every pilot, there is a flight crew who supports the aircraft, a maintenance group, communications crew, satellite operators, administrative personnel, and medical personnel; in some air forces, there are officers responsible for strategic nuclear weapons such as intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs). Although the majority of the senior leadership of most air forces are pilots, the majority of the personnel are not. Some air forces operate anti-aircraft artillery (now with radars and missiles), and a few air forces have their own paratroopers, or ground defence personnel charged with defending Air Bases, their supply lines and surrounding areas from hostile ground forces, such as the British RAF Regiment or the French Fusiliers Commandos de l'Air. Some Air Forces also include their own Special Forces, which may include aircrews and aircraft tasked with special missions such as surveillance or insertion operations, or ground-based personnel such as the American Air Force Special Tactics or the Malaysian PASKAU units, who provide support to Air Force or Special Forces operations by performing functions such as pilot rescue and forward air control. Given the pilots' special status, they often wear special insignia in the form of a vol or "wings". Other air crews might wear variations of such insignia. A Minuteman III missile soars after a test launch. ... American troops man an anti-aircraft gun near the Algerian coastline in 1943 Anti-aircraft, or air defense, is any method of combating military aircraft from the ground. ... For other uses, see Radar (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Missile (disambiguation). ... An American USMC Paratrooper using a MC1-B series parachute Paratroopers are soldiers trained in parachuting and generally operate as part of an airborne force. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... (French for Fusilier Commandos of the Air) These personnel of Frances Armée de lAir are equivalent to the United Kingdoms RAF Regiment or the USAFs Air Commandos. ... For other uses, see Special forces (disambiguation). ... Air Force Special Tactics are special operations personnel of the United States Air Force under the Air Force Special Operations Command or AFSOC, a branch of the United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM). ... Pasukan Khas Udara (PASKAU) - Specials Operations Team of RMAF, is an Elite force selected from Royal Malaysian Air Force regiments. ... A forward air controller (FAC) is a qualified individual who, from a forward position on the ground or in the air, directs the action of military aircraft engaged in close air support of land forces. ... A vol (French for flight) is a once-obscure heraldic symbol consisting of a pair of outstretched, usually plumed birds wings, which are connected together at their shoulders without having any birds body in the middle. ... In the Royal Air Force and British Army, an aircrew brevet is the badge worn on the left breast, above any medal ribbons, by qualified aircrew. ...


History

Main article: Aerial warfare Aerial warfare is the use of military aircraft and other flying machines in warfare, including military airlift of cargo to further the national interests as was demonstrated in the Berlin Airlift. ...


The first aviation force in the world was the Aviation Militaire of the French Army formed in 1910, which eventually became L'Armée de l'Air. (Balloonist army detachments of previous centuries, notably the French and American ones, do not really count.) During World War I France, Germany, Italy and the British Empire all possessed significant aviation forces of bombers and fighters, the latter produced numerous flying aces. The French Air Force, officially the Armée de lAir (Army of the Air), is the air force branch of the French Armed Forces. ... The French Army, officially the Armée de Terre (Army of the land), is the land-based component of the French Armed Forces and the largest. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The familiar French military aviation roundel gave rise to similar roundels for air forces all over the world, including that of the United Kingdom (RAF), which reversed the colors on the French roundel. ... A hot air balloon is prepared for flight by inflation of the envelope with propane burners A hot air balloon takes off The balloon has just landed and is being pulled nearer to a road for deflation A balloon is a type of aircraft that remains aloft due to its... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Bomber (disambiguation). ... An A-10 Thunderbolt II, F-86 Sabre, P-38 Lightning and P-51 Mustang fly in formation during an air show at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The first independent air force in the world, however, is The Finnish Air Force,[dubious ] founded on 6 March 1918. [1] The Royal Air Force (United Kingdom) came into existence on April 1, 1918. The Finnish Air Force (FAF) (Finnish: Ilmavoimat) is one of the branches of the Finnish Defence Forces. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... The Royal Air Force (often abbreviated to RAF) is the air force branch of the UK Armed Forces. ...


After the war, Germany had been banned by the Versailles Treatyfrom having an air force, but the Luftwaffe was brought into existence in 1935. Italy's Regia Aeronautica became an independent force back in 1923, while France's L'Armée de l'Air gained independence only in the mid-1930s. The Soviet Air Force had been more or less autonomous since 1924, while the United States Army Air Corps gained semi-independent status only with the creation of the United States Army Air Force in 1941, a few months before Pearl Harbor was attacked by Japanese aircraft. Woodrow Wilson with the American Peace Commissioners The Treaty of Versailles of 1919 is the peace treaty created as a result of six months of negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 which put an official end to World War I between the Allies and Central Powers. ... Insignia applied with a decal on the tail of the Règia Aeronautica aircraft (reconstruction). ... The familiar French military aviation roundel gave rise to similar roundels for air forces all over the world, including that of the United Kingdom (RAF), which reversed the colors on the French roundel. ... The Soviet Air Force, also known under the abbreviation VVS, transliterated from Russian: ВВС, Военно-воздушные силы (Voenno-Vozdushnye Sily), formed the official designation of the air force of the Soviet Union. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... The United States Army Air Forces, or USAAF, was a part of the U.S. military during World War II. The direct precursor to the U.S. Air Force, the USAAF formally existed between 1941 and 1947. ... This article is about the harbor in Hawaii. ...


The air force's role of strategic bombing against enemy infrastructures was developed during the 1930s by the Japanese in China and by the Germans during the Spanish Civil War. This role for the bomber was perfected during World War II, when "Thousand Bomber Raids" were not uncommon. The need to intercept these bombers, both on day and at night, accelerated fighter aircraft developments. The war ended when United States Army Air Force Boeing B-29 Superfortress bombers dropped two atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan in August 1945. The city heart of Rotterdam after being terror bombed by Germany in 1940, the ruin of the (now restored) Laurens Kerk is the only building that reminds people of Rotterdams medieval architecture. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish Civil War of 1820-1823. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The United States Army Air Forces, or USAAF, was a part of the U.S. military during World War II. The direct precursor to the U.S. Air Force, the USAAF formally existed between 1941 and 1947. ... The Boeing B-29 Superfortress was a four-engine heavy bomber propeller aircraft flown by the United States Army Air Forces in World War II and other military organizations afterwards. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... For other uses, see Hiroshima (disambiguation). ... Nagasaki ) ( ) is the capital and the largest city of Nagasaki Prefecture in Japan. ...


The United States Air Force finally became an independent service in 1947. As the Cold War began, both the USAF and the Soviet Air Force built up their nuclear-capable strategic bomber forces. Several technological advances were widely introduced during this time: the jet engine; the missile; the helicopter; and in-flight re-fuelling. “The U.S. Air Force” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... A Pratt and Whitney turbofan engine for the F-15 Eagle is tested at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, USA. The tunnel behind the engine muffles noise and allows exhaust to escape. ... For other uses, see Missile (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Helicopter (disambiguation). ...


Communist China has also developed a large air force (which, contrary to popular belief, is in fact quite independent from the ground force), initially with aid from the Soviet Union, and later on its own. Both the US and the USSR supplied large numbers of aircraft, technical advice and training to their allied nations.


During the 1960s, Canada took the unusual step of merging the Royal Canadian Air Force with the army and the navy to form the unified Canadian Forces, with a green uniform for everyone. This proved very unpopular[citation needed], and recently the air force (and the navy) have re-adopted their distinct identities (although structurally they remained a unified force). Perhaps the latest air force to become "independent" is the Irish Air Corps, which changed its uniform from army green to blue in the 1990s. The Canadian Forces (French: Forces canadiennes), abbreviated as CF (French: FC), are the unified armed forces of Canada. ... The Irish Air Corps (in Irish: Aer Chór na hÉireann) provides the air defence function of Oglaigh na hÉireann (the Irish Defence Forces), in support of the Army and Naval Service, together with such other roles as may be assigned by the Government (e. ...


Air Armies

Several countries title their military aviation Air Army, notably France. In such countries the army is officially called the Land Army, although in common usage "army" retains its meaning of a land force.


See also

This is a list of air forces, sorted alphabetically by country, followed by a list of former countries air forces. ... Aerial warfare is the use of military aircraft and other flying machines in warfare, including military airlift of cargo to further the national interests as was demonstrated in the Berlin Airlift. ... For other meanings, see life support (disambiguation) Life support, or aircrew life support, in aviation, is the field centered on, and related technologies used in, ensuring the safety of aircrew, particularly military aviation. ... // Balloons as first air-war mechanism Montgolfier balloons The first successfully flown balloons were made in France by the Montgolfier Brothers, around 1793. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.ilmavoimat.fi/index_en.php?id=600

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Air force - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (364 words)
An Air force is a military or armed service that primarily conducts aerial warfare.
Some air forces such as the British Royal Air Force (RAF) have a unique rank structure; other air forces such as the United States Air Force (USAF) have a rank structure on the Enlisted side that is unique, but the Officer corps uses Army-style rank.
Some air forces also operate anti-aircraft artillery (now with radars and missiles), and a few air forces even have their own paratroopers.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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