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Encyclopedia > Agrippa II

Agrippa II (AD 27100), son of Agrippa I, and like him originally named Marcus Julius Agrippa. He was the brother of Berenice and Drusilla (second wife of the Roman procurator Antonius Felix). He is sometimes also called Herod Agrippa II. Events The Emperor Tiberius retires to Capri, leaving the praetorian prefect Sejanus in charge of both Rome and the Empire. ... -1... Front and back of a Judean coin from the reign of Agrippa I. Agrippa I also called the Great (10 BCE - 44 CE), King of the Jews, the grandson of Herod the Great, and son of Aristobulus IV and Berenice. ... Berenice (b. ... Marcus Antonius Felix was the Roman procurator of Judaea 52-60 AD, in succession to Ventidius Cumanus. ...

Coins from the reign of Agrippa II.
Coins from the reign of Agrippa II.

Having grown up in the court of the emperor Claudius, Agrippa inherited, on the death of his uncle Herod of Chalcis, the oversight of the Temple in 48; Claudius later invested him with the tetrarchy of Chalcis around 49/50. In 53, he was deprived of that kingdom by Claudius, who made him governor over the tetrarchy of Philip and Lysanias (Acts 25:13; 26:2, 7). During the First Jewish-Roman War of 66–73, Agrippa sent 2,000 men to support Vespasian, by which it appears that, although a Jew in religion, he was yet entirely devoted to the Romans. He died at Rome in the third year of Trajan. Image File history File links Agrippa_II.jpg‎ Coins from the reign of Agrippa II, king of Bashan, Chalcis, Galilee, and Peraea, and guardian of the Temple of Jerusalem. ... Image File history File links Agrippa_II.jpg‎ Coins from the reign of Agrippa II, king of Bashan, Chalcis, Galilee, and Peraea, and guardian of the Temple of Jerusalem. ... For other uses, see Claudius (disambiguation). ... The Temple in Jerusalem or the Holy Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Bet HaMikdash) was built in ancient Jerusalem in c. ... Events Rome Roman Emperor Claudius invests Agrippa II with the office of superintendent of the Temple in Jerusalem. ... For other uses, see number 53. ... Herod Philip (4 BC–AD 34), or Philip the tetrarch, was son of Herod the Great and his fifth wife Cleopatra of Jerusalem and half-brother of Herod Antipas and Herod Archelaus. ... Lysanias, tetrarch of Abilene, according to Luke 3:1, in the time of John the Baptist. ... The Acts of the Apostles (Greek Praxeis Apostolon) is a book of the Bible, which now stands fifth in the New Testament. ... The first Jewish-Roman War (66–73 CE), sometimes called the Great Jewish Revolt, was the first of three major rebellions by the Jews of Iudaea Province against the Roman Empire (the second was the Kitos War in 115–117, the third was Bar Kokhbas revolt, 132–135). ... Imperator Caesar Vespasianus Augustus (November 17, 69 – June 23, 79), known originally as Titus Flavius Vespasianus and usually referred to in English as Vespasian, was emperor of Rome from 69 to 79. ... The Roman Empire was a phase of the ancient Roman civilization characterized by an autocratic form of government. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) coordinates: 41°54′N 12°29′E Time Zone: UTC+1 Administration Subdivisions 19 municipi Province Rome Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni ( The Union ) Characteristics Area 1,285 km² Population 2,547,677 (2005 estimate) Density 1983... Marcus Ulpius Nerva Traianus (September 18, 53 – August 9, 117), Roman Emperor (98-117), commonly called Trajan, was the second of the Five Good Emperors of the Roman Empire. ...


Agrippa II was the seventh and last king of the family of Herod the Great, thus last of the Herodians. It was before him and his sister Berenice that Paul of Tarsus pleaded his cause at Caesarea Palaestina (Acts 26), in 59. Agrippa II supplied Josephus with information for his history. Hordos הוֹרְדוֹס, also known as Herod I or Herod the Great, was a Roman client-king of Judaea (c. ... The Herodians were a sect or party mentioned in Scripture as having on two occasions--once in Galilee, and again in Jerusalem--manifested an unfriendly disposition towards Jesus (Mark iii. ... Berenice (b. ... Paul of Tarsus, also known as Saul, Paulus, and Saint Paul the Apostle (AD 3–14 — 62–69),[1] is widely considered to be central to the early development and spread of Christianity, particularly westward from Jerusalem. ... Caesarea Palaestina Caesarea Palaestina, also called Caesarea Maritima, a town built by Herod the Great about 25 –13 BC, lies on the sea-coast of Israel about halfway between Tel Aviv and Haifa, on the site of a place previously called Pyrgos Stratonos (Strato or Stratons Tower, in Latin... For other uses, see number 59. ... Josephus (c. ...


Roman procurators

Procurators appointed by Claudius to rule Iudaea Province after the death of Agrippa I in 44 included: Iudaea Province in the 1st century Iudaea was a Roman province that extended over Judaea (Palestine). ...

These procurators were "corrupt and cruel", helping to spark the Jewish Revolt of 66. Patricians were originally the elite caste in ancient Rome. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Marcus Antonius Felix was the Roman procurator of Judaea 52-60 AD, in succession to Ventidius Cumanus. ... Porcius Festus was procurator of Judea from about 58 to 62 AD, succeeding Antonius Felix. ... Gessius Florus was the Roman procurator of Judea from AD 64 till 66. ... The first Jewish-Roman War (66–73 CE), sometimes called the Great Jewish Revolt, was the first of three major rebellions by the Jews of Iudaea Province against the Roman Empire (the second was the Kitos War in 115–117, the third was Bar Kokhbas revolt, 132–135). ...


References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
  • This entry incorporates text from the public domain Easton's Bible Dictionary, originally published in 1897.
  • Yohanan Aharoni & Michael Avi-Yonah, "The MacMillan Bible Atlas", Revised Edition, p. 156 (1968 & 1977 by Carta Ltd.).

Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... Eastons Bible Dictionary generally refers to the Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition, by Matthew George Easton M.A., D.D. (1823-1894), published three years after Eastons death in 1897 by Thomas Nelson. ...

External links

  • Jewish Encyclopedia: Agrippa II

  Results from FactBites:
 
Julius Marcus Agrippa (896 words)
Julius Marcus Agrippa was born in 27 or 28 in Rome was the son of the Jewish prince Herod Agrippa and his wife Cyprus.
Agrippa hastened home in the first weeks of 70, at the right moment to be present when Titus, who had succeeded his father as commander, attacked Jerusalem.
In 75, Agrippa was back in Rome, where he must have been present when Vespasian inaugurated the Forum of Peace (a public garden in the center of Rome), must have met his wife Berenice, and received new territories in Syria: Arca, east of modern Tripoli.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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