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Encyclopedia > Agrigento
Comune di Agrigento
Coat of arms of Comune di Agrigento
Municipal coat of arms
Country Flag of Italy Italy
Region Flag of Sicily Sicily
Province Agrigento (AG)
Mayor
Elevation 230 m
Area 244 km²
Population
 - Total (as of 2004) 59,031
 - Density 217/km²
Time zone CET, UTC+1
Coordinates 37°19′N, 13°35′E
Gentilic Agrigentine, Girgintan
Dialing code 0922
Postal code 92100
Frazioni Fontanelle, Giardina Gallotti, Monserrato, Montaperto, San Leone, Villaggio La Loggia, Villaggio Mosè, Villaggio Peruzzo, Villaseta
Patron St. Gerlando
 - Day 24 February
Website: www.comune.agrigento.it
Archaeological Area of Agrigentoa
UNESCO World Heritage Site
Temple of Concord
State Party Flag of Italy Italy
Type Cultural
Criteria i, ii, iii, iv
Identification #831
Regionb Europe and North America

Inscription History Image File history File links Agrigento-Stemma. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... Image File history File links Flag_of_Sicily. ... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... In Italy, the province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of an intermediate level, between municipality (comune) and region (Regione). ... Agrigento (It. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries not observing summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with ethnonym. ... Here are a list of area codes in Italy. ... A frazione, in Italy, is the name given in administrative law to a type of territorial subdivision of a comune; for other subdivisions, see municipio, circoscrizione, quartiere. ... February 24 is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Image File history File links Agrigent-web. ... As of 2006, there are a total of 830 World Heritage Sites located in 138 State Parties. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... This is a list of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Europe. ...

Formal Inscription: 1997
21st Session

a Name as officially inscribed on the WH List
b As classified officially by UNESCO
A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State...

San Lorenzo.
San Lorenzo.

Agrigento (Girgenti in Sicilian) is a town on the southern coast of Sicily, Italy, capital of the province of Agrigento. The city is renowned as the site of the ancient Greek city of Akragras (also Acragas, Agrigentum in Latin, Kerkent in Arabic), one of the leading cities of Magna Graecia. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (768x1024, 504 KB) Author : ~~ Description : chiesa di San Lorenzo (San Lorenzo Church), Agrigento, Sicily Body : Canon Powershot A80 Date : August, 2005 File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (768x1024, 504 KB) Author : ~~ Description : chiesa di San Lorenzo (San Lorenzo Church), Agrigento, Sicily Body : Canon Powershot A80 Date : August, 2005 File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed... Sicilian (, Italian: ) is a Romance language. ... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Agrigento (It. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... Magna Graecia around 280 b. ...

Contents

History

The city was founded on a plateau overlooking the sea, with two nearby rivers, the Hypsas and the Akragas, and a ridge to the north offering a degree of natural fortification. Its establishment took place around 582-580 BCE and is attributed to Greek colonists from Gela, who named it Akragas. The meaning of the word is unclear, though the stock commonplace referred to an eponymous legendary founder, an Akragante, apparently no more than a retrospective etiology of an obscure name. Hypsas is the old name of a river today called San’Anna River, near Agrigento, Sicily. ... Map of central Mediterranean Sea, showing location of Agrigentum (modern Agrigento). ... Gela is a city in the province of Caltanissetta in the south of Sicily, Italy. ... An eponym is the name of a person, whether real or fictitious, who has (or is thought to have) given rise to the name of a particular place, tribe, discovery, or other item. ...


Akragas grew rapidly, becoming one of the richest and most famous of the Greek colonies of Magna Graecia. It came to prominence under the sixth-century tyrants Phalaris and Theron, and became a democracy after the overthrow of Theron's son Thrasydaeus. Although the city remained neutral in the conflict between Athens and Syracuse, its democracy was overthrown when the city was sacked by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE. Akragas never fully recovered its former status, though it revived to some extent under Timoleon in the latter part of the fourth century. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For the genus of grass, see Phalaris (grass). ... Theron can mean:- Charlize Theron is a South African actress. ... Athens (Greek: Αθήνα - Athína) is the largest city and capital of Greece, located in the Attica periphery of Southern Greece. ... Syracuse (Italian, Siracusa, ancient Syracusa - see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a city on the eastern coast of Sicily and the capital of the province of Syracuse, Italy. ... Carthage (Greek: , from the Phoenician Kart-hadasht meaning new town, Arabic: ‎, Latin: ) refers both to an ancient city in North Africa located in modern day Tunis and to the civilization that developed within the citys sphere of influence. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC - 400s BC - 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC 350s BC Years: 411 BC 410 BC 409 BC 408 BC 407 BC - 406 BC - 405 BC 404 BC... Timoleon (c. ...


The city was sacked by both the Romans and the Carthaginians in the third century— the Romans in 262 BCE and the Carthaginians in 255 BCE. It suffered badly during the Second Punic War (218-201 BCE) when both Rome and Carthage fought to control it. The Romans eventually captured Akragas in 210 and renamed it Agrigentum, although it remained a largely Greek-speaking community for centuries thereafter. It became prosperous again under Roman rule and its inhabitants received full Roman citizenship following the death of Julius Caesar in 44 BCE. Area under Roman control  Roman Republic  Roman Empire  Western Empire  Eastern Empire Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a city-state founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 310s BC 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC - 260s BC - 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC Years: 267 BC 266 BC 265 BC 264 BC 263 BC - 262 BC - 261 BC 260 BC... (Redirected from 255 BCE) Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 300s BC 290s BC 280s BC 270s BC 260s BC - 250s BC - 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC 210s BC 200s BC Years: 260 BC 259 BC 258 BC 257 BC 256 BC - 255 BC... Combatants Image:SPQR-Stone. ... Gaius Julius Caesar [1] (Latin pronunciation ; English pronunciation ; July 12 or July 13, 100 BC or 102 BC – March 15, 44 BC), was a Roman military and political leader and one of the most influential men in classical antiquity. ... Centuries: 2nd century BC - 1st century BC - 1st century Decades: 90s BC 80s BC 70s BC 60s BC 50s BC - 40s BC - 30s BC 20s BC 10s BC 0s BC 0s Years: 49 BC 48 BC 47 BC 46 BC 45 BC 44 BC 43 BC 42 BC 41 BC...


After the fall of the Roman Empire, the city passed into the hands of the Byzantine Empire. During this period the inhabitants of Agrigentum largely abandoned the lower parts of the city and moved up to the former acropolis, at the top of the hill. The reasons for this move are unclear but were probably related to the destructive coastal raids of the Saracens, Berbers and other peoples around this time. In 828 CE the Saracens captured the diminished remnant of the city and renamed it Kerkent in Arabic; it was thus Sicilianized as "Girgenti". It retained this name until 1927, when Mussolini's government reintroduced an Italianized version of the Latin name. The Roman Empire is not the Holy Roman Empire (843-1806). ... Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent c. ... Acropolis of Athens from the south-west with the Propylaea and the Temple of Nike (left centre) and the theatre of Herodes Atticus (below left) Acropolis (Gr. ... For the rugby club Saracens see Saracens (rugby club) The term Saracen comes from Greek sarakenoi. ... The Berbers (also called Imazighen, free men, singular Amazigh) are a predominantly Muslim ethnic group indigenous to the Maghreb, speaking the Berber languages of the Afroasiatic family. ... Events Egbert became first King of England Alcamo was founded by the Muslim commander al-Kamuk. ... Sicilian (, Italian: ) is a Romance language. ... Benito Mussolini created a fascist state through the use of propaganda, total control of the media and disassembly of the working democratic government. ...


Agrigento was captured by the Normans under Count Roger I in 1087, who established a Latin bishopric there. The population declined during much of the medieval period but revived somewhat after the 18th century. In 1860, the inhabitants enthusiastically supported Giuseppe Garibaldi in his campaign to unify Italy (the Risorgimento). The city suffered a number of destructive bombing raids during the Second World War. Norman conquests in red. ... Roger I (1031 – June 22, 1101), Norman ruler of Sicily, was the youngest son of Tancred of Hauteville. ... Events May 9 - The remains of Saint Nicholas were brought to Bari. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... Garibaldi in 1866. ... Italian unification, also known as Risorgimento (resurrection), was a historical process by which the Kingdom of Sardinia (ruled by the Savoy dynasty with Turin as its capital) gradually conquered the Italian peninsula, including the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, the Duchy of Modena, the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, the Duchy... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...

Map of central Mediterranean Sea, showing location of Agrigentum (modern Agrigento).
Map of central Mediterranean Sea, showing location of Agrigentum (modern Agrigento).

Image File history File links Agrigento_location. ... Composite satellite image of the Mediterranean Sea. ...

Economy

Agrigento is a major tourist center due to its extraordinarily rich archaeological legacy. It also serves as an agricultural centre for the surrounding region. Sulphur and potash have been mined locally since Roman times and are exported from the nearby harbour of Porto Empedocle (named after the philosopher Empedocles who lived in ancient Akragas). However, it is one of the poorest towns in Italy on a per capita income basis and has a long-standing problem with organised crime, particularly involving the Mafia and the smuggling of illegal drugs. For the chemical element see: sulfur. ... Potash Potash (or carbonate of potash) is an impure form of potassium carbonate (K2CO3) mixed with other potassium salts. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... For the volcano, see Empedocles (volcano). ... Organized crime is crime carried out systematically by formal criminal organizations. ... The Mafia (also referred to as Cosa Nostra or the Mob), is a criminal secret society which first developed in the mid-19th century in Sicily. ... Retail selling Street selling is the bottom of the chain and can be accomplished through purchasing from prostitutes, through cloaked retail stores or refuse houses for users in the act located in red-light districts which often also deal in paraphernalia, dealers marketing merriment at night clubs and other events...


Main sights

Ancient Akragas covers a huge area— much of which is still unexcavated today— but is exemplified by the famous "Valley of the Temples" (a misnomer, as it is a ridge, rather than a valley). This comprises a large sacred area on the south side of the ancient city where seven monumental Greek temples in the Doric style were constructed during the sixth and fifth centuries BCE. Now excavated and partially restored, they constitute some of the largest and best preserved ancient Greek buildings outside of Greece itself. They are listed as a World Heritage Site. The uncompleted Doric temple at Segesta, Sicily, has been waiting for finishing of its surfaces since 430 - 420 BC The Doric order was one of the three orders or organizational systems of Ancient Greek or classical architecture; the other two orders were the Ionic and the Corinthian. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State...


The best preserved of the temples are two very similar buildings traditionally attributed to the goddesses Juno Lacinia and Concordia (though archaeologists believe this attribution to be incorrect). The latter temple is remarkably intact, due to its having been converted into a Christian church in 597 CE. Both were constructed to a peripteral hexastyle design. The area around the "Temple of Concordia" was later re-used by early Christians as a catacomb, with tombs hewn out of the rocky cliffs and outcrops. IVNO REGINA (Queen Juno) on a coin celebrating Julia Soaemias. ... In Roman mythology, Concordia was the goddess of agreement, understanding, and marital harmony. ... St Francis Xavier converting the Paravas: a 19th-century image of the docile heathen The historical phenomenon of Christianization, the conversion of individuals to Christianity or the conversion of entire peoples at once, also includes the practice of converting pagan practices, pagan religious imagery, pagan sites and the pagan calendar... Events Saint Augustine is created Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Bahut a dwarf-wall of plain masonry, carrying the roof of a cathedral or church and masked or hidden behind the balustrade. ... Look up Hexastyle in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Hexastyle is an architectural term given to a temple in the portico of which there are six columns in front. ... The word catacomb comes from Greek kata kumbas (L. ad catacumbas), near the low place and originally it meant a certain burial district in Rome. ...

Temple of the Dioscuri
Temple of the Dioscuri

The other temples are much more fragmentary, having been toppled by earthquakes long ago and quarried for their stones. The largest by far is the Temple of Olympian Zeus, built to commemorate the Battle of Himera in 480 BCE: it is believed to have been the largest Doric temple ever built. Although it was apparently used, it appears never to have been completed; construction was abandoned after the Cathaginian invasion of 406 BCE. The remains of the temple were extensively quarried in the eighteenth century to build the jetties of Porto Empedocle. Temples dedicated to Hephaestus, Heracles and Asclepius were also constructed in the sacred area, which includes a sanctuary of Demeter and Persephone (formerly known as the Temple of Castor and Pollux); the marks of the fires set by the Carthaginians in 406 BCE can still be seen on the sanctuary's stones. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1181x778, 509 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Agrigento ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1181x778, 509 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Agrigento ... An earthquake is the result from the sudden release of stored energy in the Earths crust that creates seismic waves. ... Remains of the Temple of Olympian Zeus, Agrigento The Temple of Olympian Zeus (or Olympeion; known in Italian as the Tempio di Giove) in Agrigento, Sicily was the largest Doric temple ever constructed, although it was never completed. ... The Battle of Himera (480 BC), supposedly fought on the same day as the more famous Battle of Salamis (according to Herodotus 7. ... The uncompleted Doric temple at Segesta, Sicily, has been waiting for finishing of its surfaces since 430–420 BC The Doric order was one of the three orders or organizational systems of Ancient Greek or classical architecture; the other two orders were the Ionic and the Corinthian. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Hephaestus, Greek god of forging, riding a Donkey; Greek drinking cup (skyphos) made in the 5th century B.C. Hephaestus (IPA pronunciation: or ; Greek Hêphaistos) is the Greek god whose approximate Roman equivalent is Vulcan; he is the god of technology including, specifically blacksmiths, craftsmen, artisans, sculptors, metals and... Hercules, a Roman bronze (Louvre Museum) For other uses, see Heracles (disambiguation). ... Asclepius (Greek also rendered Aesculapius in Latin and transliterated Asklepios) was the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology, according to which he was born a mortal but was given immortality as the constellation Ophiuchus after his death. ... Greek Temenos ([1], from the Greek verb to cut) (plural = temene) is a piece of land cut off and assigned as an official domain, especially to kings and chiefs, or a piece of land marked off from common uses and dedicated to a god, a sanctuary, holy grove or holy... Ceres (Demeter), allegory of August: detail of a fresco by Cosimo Tura, Palazzo Schifanoia, Ferrara, 1469-70 Demeter was a god of the ancient greeks. ... Proserpine by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, 1874) (Tate Gallery, London In Greek mythology, Persephone (Greek Περσεφόνη, Persephónē) was the Queen of the Underworld, the Kore or young maiden, and the daughter of Demeter— and Zeus, in the Olympian version. ... Castor (or Kastor) and Polydeuces (sometimes called Pollux), were in Greek mythology the twin sons of Leda and the brothers of Helen of Troy and Clytemnestra. ... In Greek mythology, Pollux was the nickname of Polydeuces, the son of Zeus and Leda and twin brother of Castor. ...


Many other Hellenistic and Roman sites can be found in and around the town. These include a pre-Hellenic cave sanctuary near a Temple of Demeter, over which the Church of San Biagio was built. A late Hellenistic funerary monument erroneously labelled the "Tomb of Theron" is situated just outside the sacred area, and a first century CE heroon (heroic shrine) adjoins the thirteenth-century Church of San Nicola a short distance to the north. A sizeable area of the Greco-Roman city has also been excavated, and several classical necropolises and quarries are still extant. The northwest heroon at Sagalassos, Turkey A heroon (plural heroa, also called a heroum) was a shrine dedicated to an ancient Greek or Roman hero and was used for the commemoration or worship of the hero. ... For the record label, see Necropolis Records. ...


Much of present-day Agrigento is modern but it still retains a number of medieval and Baroque buildings. These include the fourteenth century cathedral and the thirteenth century Church of Santa Maria dei Greci ("Our Lady of the Greeks"), again standing on the site of an ancient Greek temple (hence the name). The town also has a notable archaeological museum displaying finds from the ancient city. Adoration, by Peter Paul Rubens. ...


Famous inhabitants

Luigi Pirandello (June 28, 1867 – December 10, 1936) was an Italian dramatist, novelist, and short story writer awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1934. ...

Sister cities

Calgary,Canada Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Nickname: Cigar City, The Big Guava Location in Hillsborough County and the state of Florida. ...


References

  • "Acragas" The Concise Oxford Companion to Classical Literature. Ed. M.C. Howatson and Ian Chilvers. Oxford University Press, 1996.
  • "Agrigento", The Columbia Encyclopedia. Columbia University Press, 2004
  • "Agrigento" Concise Dictionary of World Place-Names. John Everett-Heath. Oxford University Press 2005
  • "Agrigento" Encyclopædia Britannica, 2006moomoo cow lalal lol crazyness random milk

External links

  • (English) Map of Italy identifying the location of Agrigento
  • [http://www.thesicilysite.com TheSicilySite.com has pictures of Agrigento and some of the towns in the province of Agrigento
  • The Valley of the Temples. A visitor's guide to the Valley of the Temples and Agrigento
  • Welcome to the Valley of the Temples!
  • Agrigento on Best of Sicily
  • Tours and travel itineraries in the Agrigento area. Sicilytravel.net
  • ItalianVisits.com
  • Agrigento Photos
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  Results from FactBites:
 
Agrigento Travel History - Best of Sicily - Agrigento (817 words)
Located on a plateau overlooking Sicily's southern coast, Agrigento was founded as Akragas around 582 BC by a group of colonists from Gela, who themselves were the immediate descendants of Greeks from Rhodes and Crete.
Agrigento was destroyed several times during the Punic Wars, suffering particularly extensive damage during a siege by Roman forces in 261 BC, but always rebuilt.
Agrigento's importance declined under the Byzantines and Saracens, who encouraged settlement of the medieval city (present-day Agrigento) several kilometers from the Valley of the Temples.
Hotels in Agrigento (417 words)
Agrigento, AG This rustic, three-floor villa-style property lies on the southern coast of Sicily, three kilometres from the beach and seven kilometres from downtown...
Agrigento, AG Housed in an 18th-century villa with views over the ancient Valley of the Temples, 100 metres from the Temple of Concord.
Agrigento, a calm city, is situated on top of a hill with a commanding view of the Meditteranean sea.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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