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Encyclopedia > Agnes Scott College

Agnes Scott College

Image File history File links ASClogo. ...

Motto "Now add to your faith virtue; and to virtue knowledge." (2 Peter 1:5)
Established 1889
Type liberal arts women's college
Endowment $286 million
President Elizabeth Kiss
Faculty 82
Undergraduates 914
Location Decatur, Georgia, United States
Campus Suburban
Colors Purple and white
Mascot Scottish Terrier
Affiliations Presbyterian Church (USA)
Website agnesscott.edu
Buttrick Hall
Looking across the quad
McCain Library at dusk

Agnes Scott College is a private liberal arts women's college in Decatur, Georgia, near Atlanta. The college currently enrolls 914 students. Agnes Scott is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (USA). The undergraduate school offers 30 majors and 25 minors. Students who graduate from Agnes Scott receive a Bachelor of Arts degree. 87% of the faculty are full-time, and 100% of the tenure-track faculty hold terminal degrees. The student-to-faculty ratio is 10:1.[1] A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The Second Epistle of Peter is a book of the New Testament of the Bible. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... Womens colleges in the United States in higher education are American undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institutions, often liberal arts colleges, whose student populations are comprised exclusively or almost exclusively of women. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... For the south-western Georgia county, see Decatur County, Georgia. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Image File history File links ASCsportslogo. ... The Scottish Terrier (also known as the Aberdeen Terrier), popularly called the Scottie, is a breed of dog best known for its distinctive profile. ... Emblem of the PC(USA) The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) or PC(USA) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States. ... A website (alternatively, Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on a Web server, usually accessible via the Internet or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML, that is almost always accessible via HTTP, a... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 864 KB) Summary Buttrick Hall at Agnes Scott College. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 864 KB) Summary Buttrick Hall at Agnes Scott College. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 1138 KB) Summary Looking across the quad at Agnes Scott College. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2500x1667, 1138 KB) Summary Looking across the quad at Agnes Scott College. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2100x1400, 890 KB) Summary McCain Library, Agnes Scott College, Decatur, Georgia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2100x1400, 890 KB) Summary McCain Library, Agnes Scott College, Decatur, Georgia. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... Womens colleges in the United States in higher education are American undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institutions, often liberal arts colleges, whose student populations are comprised exclusively or almost exclusively of women. ... For the south-western Georgia county, see Decatur County, Georgia. ... Hotlanta redirects here. ... Emblem of the PC(USA) The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) or PC(USA) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States. ...


It is considered one of the Seven Sisters of the South. The Seven Sisters of the South refers to a group of highly regarded American womens colleges in the Southern United States. ...

Contents

History

The college was founded in 1889 as Decatur Female Seminary by Presbyterian minister Frank H. Gaines. In 1890, the name was changed to Agnes Scott Institute to honor the mother of the college's primary benefactor, Col. George Washington Scott. The name was changed again to Agnes Scott College in 1906. Agnes Scott (Main) Hall, the oldest building on campus, was built in 1891 and once housed the entire school. Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar). ... George Washington Scott (February 22, 1829 – October 3, 1903) was a noted Florida businessman, plantation owner, and military officer in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Agnes Scott is considered the first higher education institution in the state of Georgia to receive regional accreditation. The current president is Elizabeth Kiss, the founding director of Duke University's Kenan Institute for Ethics. An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. ...


Undergraduate campus life

Students at Agnes Scott are known as "Scotties." The school colors of Agnes Scott are purple and white, while the mascot is Irvine, a Scottish Terrier. Each incoming class is assigned a class color out of red, yellow, blue, or green and votes on a class mascot that correlates with that color. The colors and mascots are intended to establish class pride, particularly during one week of fun-filled activities called Black Cat. Black Cat occurs every fall and culminates in a series of skits written, directed, and performed by the junior class. If there is dissatisfaction with a class mascot, the class is given the option to revote and choose a different mascot their second year. The Scottish Terrier (also known as the Aberdeen Terrier), popularly called the Scottie, is a breed of dog best known for its distinctive profile. ...


Class mascots are often popular culture icons:

The class ring is given to students during the spring of their sophomore year in a special ceremony. The ring design, with its rectangular engraved black onyx stone, has remained essentially the same since its introduction in the 1920s with minor choices (metal, size, and antiquing) emerging in recent years. Pogo as drawn by Walt Kelly. ... For the British comic strip of the same name, see Dennis the Menace (UK). ... A low-key character created by Tex Avery at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in 1943--essentially the polar opposite of his other famous character, loud, whacky Screwy Squirrel. ... Casper the Friendly Ghost is the main character of the Famous Studios theatrical animated cartoon series of the same name. ... Charles Charlie Brown is a character in the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. ... Eloise is a mischievous 6-year-old who lives at the Plaza Hotel of New York, principal character in books by Kay Thompson. ... Yogi Bear Yogi Bear is a fictional anthropomorphic bear who appears in animated cartoons created by Hanna-Barbera Productions. ... Winnie the Pooh Winnie-the-Pooh is a fictional bear created by A. A. Milne. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The cover to the original 1939 Madeline childrens book. ... Statue of Peter Pan in Bowring Park, St. ... For other uses, see Popeye (disambiguation). ... Raggedy Ann meets Raggedy Andy for the first time; illustrated by Johnny Gruelle Raggedy Ann is a fictional character created by writer Johnny Gruelle (1880-1938) in a series of books he wrote and illustrated for young children. ... Christopher Robin is a character in the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Huckleberry Hound Huckleberry Hound is a fictional cartoon character created by Hanna-Barbera, and the star of the late 1950s animated series The Huckleberry Hound Show, Hanna-Barberas second series made for television after The Ruff & Reddy Show. ... Lil Abner was a comic strip in United States newspapers, featuring a fictional clan of hillbillies in the town of Dogpatch. ... Mickey Mouse is an Academy Award-winning comic animal cartoon character who has become an icon for The Walt Disney Company. ... Image from Howes Historical Collection Johnny Appleseed, born John Chapman (September 26, 1774–March 18, 1845), was an American pioneer nurseryman, and missionary for the Church of the New Jerusalem, which is based on the theological writings of Emanuel Swedenborg. ... Casper the Friendly Ghost is the main character of the Famous Studios theatrical animated cartoon series of the same name. ... The Keystone Kops in a typical pose. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... Peppermint Patty Patricia Peppermint Patty Reichardt is a fictional character featured in Charles M. Schulzs comic strip Peanuts. ... The Girl Scouts of the United States of America (GSUSA) is a youth organization for girls in the United States and American girls living abroad. ... A bag of Frito-Lays Cracker Jack, featuring Sailor Jack and his dog Bingo. ... Harry Longabaugh (1867-?), also known as the Sundance Kid, was an outlaw and member of Butch Cassidys Wild Bunch, in the Wild West. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP or Mounties; French, Gendarmerie royale du Canada, GRC) is both the federal police force and the national police of Canada. ... The Blues Brothers: Dan Aykroyd (left) and the late John Belushi The Blues Brothers is the name of a blues band fronted, incognito, by comedians Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi. ... Woodstock is a fictional character in Charles M. Schulzs comic strip Peanuts. ... The Cat in the Hat is a fictional cat created by Dr. Seuss. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... Solid Gold was an American syndicated television series which ran from 1980 to 1988. ... Wonder Woman is a fictional DC Comics superheroine co-created by William Moulton Marston and wife Elizabeth Holloway Marston. ... The United States Army Special Forces—or simply Special Forces (capitalized)—is an elite Special Operations Force of the United States Army trained for unconventional warfare and special operations. ... Miss Piggy on The Muppet Show, as the Queen of Hearts The Queen of Hearts is a character from the book Alices Adventures in Wonderland by the mathematician Lewis Carroll. ... For other uses of Poison ivy, see Poison ivy (disambiguation). ... The Siren, by John William Waterhouse(circa 1900 In Greek mythology the Sirens or Seirenes (Greek Σειρήνες or Acheloides) were sea deities who lived on an island called Sirenum scopuli. ... 007 refers to either James Bond or Korean Airlines Flight 007 which was shot down in 1983 over Soviet airspace. ... This page is about the proposed lunar spacecraft. ... A person, most often a woman, who is romantically involved with someone else solely for their money. ... The phoenix from the Aberdeen Bestiary. ... A class ring (also known as a graduate, or grad, ring) is a ring worn by students and alumni to commemorate their graduation, generally for a high school, college, or university. ... Onyx is a banded variety of chalcedony, a cryptocrystalline form of quartz. ...


The honor code is held in high regard among Agnes Scott students and faculty. At the beginning of every academic year, new students must sign the honor code and recite a pledge promising to uphold the high academic and social standards of the institution. Those students who uphold the code are allowed to take unproctored class tests and take-home examinations. An honor code or honor system is a set of rules or principles governing a community based on a set of rules or ideals that define what constitutes honorable behavior within that community. ...


Agnes Scott's NCAA Division III sports teams include basketball, cross country, soccer, softball, swimming, tennis, and volleyball.


Special curricula

Coeducational graduate programs:

  • Master of Arts in teaching secondary English
  • Master of Arts in teaching secondary math and science
  • Post-baccalaureate pre-medical program

Undergraduate programs:

Washington University in St. ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly known as Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational research university, part of the University System of Georgia, and located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia, Metz, France and Singapore. ... Founded in 1852 and established in Oakland, California, in 1871, Mills College is an independent liberal arts womans college, with graduate programs for women and men. ... For other universities known as American University, see American University (disambiguation). ... Non-traditional students is an American English term referring to students at higher education institutions (undergraduate college or university) who generally fall into two categories: Students who are older than the typical undergraduate college student (usually aged 17-23) and interupted their studies earlier in life Students typical of age...

Rankings

In April 2007, Kiplinger named Agnes Scott as one of the top 50 private liberal arts colleges.


According to the 2007 US News and World Report, Agnes Scott is ranked the 61st best liberal arts college in the country. It is the highest ranked women's college in the southeast. The report also ranked Agnes Scott as No. 28 for "Great School, Great Price." Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Princeton Review's 2007 The Best 361 Colleges ranks the college as follows:
No. 4 for "Most Beautiful Campus"
No. 8 for "Dorms Like Palaces"
No. 11 for "Diverse Student Population"
No. 13 for "Students Happy with Financial Aid"
The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in...


Notable achievements

  • New York Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton, herself a graduate of Wellesley College, delivered Agnes Scott's May 2005 commencement address. At the ceremony, she and playwright Marsha Norman received the first honorary degrees conferred by the college.
  • The 2004 edition of US News and World Report's rankings for best liberal arts colleges placed Agnes Scott as tied for number 50 in the country, and that year promotional information and school merchandise advertised the college's place among the "top 50."
  • In 2004, the college ranked second among women's colleges, seventh among national liberal arts colleges, and 27th overall in endowment per full-time enrolled student.
  • Agnes Scott's $125 million building program has led to the creation of a new parking facility, Public Safety office, planetarium, student campus center, science building, tennis courts, and improved landscaping and the renovation of the dining hall, observatory, and library. $1.6 million was spent on renovating three Victorian homes for student housing. Renovation of the Alumnae House and creation of a new chapel, office space, residence hall, theatre, and dance facilities have also been planned.
  • In 1995, approximately 600 students were enrolled at Agnes Scott. In fall 2004, for the first time in the school's history, enrollment reached 1,000 students.

Hillary Rodham Clinton (born Hillary Diane Rodham on October 26, 1947) is the Biggest loser/retard these united states have seen from New York. ... Wellesley College is a womens liberal arts college that opened in 1875, founded by Henry Fowle Durant and his wife Pauline Fowle Durant. ... Marsha Norman was awarded the 1983 Pulitzer Prize, Susan Smith Blackburn Prize, Hull-Warriner, and Drama Desk Awards for Night, Mother, which received its world premiere at the A.R.T. in 1982. ... Colleges That Change Lives (Penguin, 2000) is a best-selling book by nationally renowned college advisor Loren Pope. ... Loren Pope is a nationally renown college advisor with several national publicatons on colleges and universities in the United States. ...

Notable alumnae

Mary Brown Bullock was the seventh president of Agnes Scott College in Decatur, GA from 1995 to August 1, 2006. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Katherine Harris (born April 5, 1957, Key West, Florida) is a Floridian Republican politician. ... In most Protestant churches, a minister is a member of the ordained clergy who leads a congregation or participates in a role in a parachurch ministry; such a person may also be called a Pastor, Preacher, Bishop, Chaplain or Elder. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... West Bank Story is a 2005 comedy short, directed by Ari Sandel, co-written by Sandel and Kim Ray, and featuring choreography by Ramon Del Barrio. ... Ann Taylor (NYSE: ANN) is an American group of specialty apparel retail chain stores for women, headquartered in New York City, (7 Times Square Tower, New York, NY 10036). ... Michelle Malone (born in Atlanta, Georgia) is an American folk-rock singer/songwriter. ... Biography Catherine Marshall was a Christian author and the wife of well-known Presbyterian minister Peter Marshall. ... Christy was a brief family television series drama which aired on CBS from 1994 to 1995, for twenty-one episodes. ... Tatum Beatrice ONeal (born November 5, 1963 in Los Angeles, California) is an Academy Award-winning American actress best known for her film work as a child actress in the 1970s. ... A Mecury Records publicity photo of Jennifer Nettles. ... Marsha Norman was awarded the 1983 Pulitzer Prize, Susan Smith Blackburn Prize, Hull-Warriner, and Drama Desk Awards for Night, Mother, which received its world premiere at the A.R.T. in 1982. ... The Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) is an independent agency of the United States Government, created by Congress in 1974. ... The Phi Beta Kappa Key The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an academic honor society with the mission of fostering and recognizing excellence in the undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... The philosopher Socrates about to take poison hemlock as ordered by the court. ... A Phrenological mapping of the brain. ... Agnes White Sanford (1897-1982) is considered to be the founder of the Inner Healing Movement. ... A promotional photograph of Sengbloh. ... Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ... Jean Hoefer Toal was the first woman to serve as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of South Carolina. ... The South Carolina Supreme Court is the highest court in the state of South Carolina. ...

Trivia

  • According to a 2006 study conducted by the Atlanta Regional Council for Higher Education, approximately 4,000 alumnae living in Georgia earn an estimated $143.9 million annually.
  • The college's science building contains a three-story rendering of part of the nucleotide sequence from Agnes Scott's mitochrondrial DNA. The DNA came from a blood sample of an ASC alumna who is a direct descendant of the college's namesake.
  • American poet Robert Frost was an annual visitor at Agnes Scott from 1945 to his death in 1962. During his visits, he would read poetry in Presser Hall. A statue of the poet sculpted by George W. Lundeen sits in the alumnae gardens. A collection of Frost's poetry and letters can be viewed at McCain Library.
  • The college was featured in Scream 2, Bobby Jones: Stroke of Genius, and A Man Called Peter, as well as several TV shows and made-for-TV-movies filmed in the Atlanta area.
  • Tradition dictates that students who get engaged are thrown into the alumnae pond by their classmates.
  • Seniors at Agnes Scott traditionally ring the bell in Agnes Scott Hall's bell tower upon acceptance to graduate school or a job offer. This tradition dates from the '80s when the tower acquired its bell during the administration of President Ruth Schmidt. Students who ring the bell sign their names on the walls of the tower.
  • The Bradley Observatory at Agnes Scott houses the Beck Telescope, a 30 inch Cassegrain reflector, as well as a modern planetarium with 70-seat capacity and a radio telescope.

Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ... Scream 2 (1997 released in 1998 in the UK) is the second part of the Scream trilogy, which was concluded by Scream 3. ... The Forststernwarte Jena 50cm Cassegrain telescope. ...

References

  • Earnshaw, Rebecca Lee. Students at Agnes Scott College During the 1930s. Decatur, GA: Agnes Scott College, 1988.
  • McNair, Walter Edward. Lest We Forget: An Account of Agnes Scott College. Decatur, GA: Agnes Scott College, 1983.
  • Noble, Betty Pope Scott. The Story of George Washington Scott, 1829-1903: A Family Memoir. Decatur, GA: Agnes Scott College, 2002.
  • Pope, Loren. "Agnes Scott College." In Colleges That Change Lives. New York: Penguin, 2000.
  • Sayrs, M. Lee. A Full and Rich Measure: 100 Years of Educating Women at Agnes Scott College, 1889-1989. Atlanta, GA: Susan Hunter, Inc., 1990.

External links

  • Agnes Scott keeps its mission to educate women - Atlanta Journal Constitution
  • US News and World Report 2007 rankings
  • Kiplinger rankings
  • "Agnes Scott Facts", Agnes Scott, 2007-01-05. Retrieved on 2007-01-05. 

  Results from FactBites:
 
Agnes Scott College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1026 words)
Agnes Scott is considered the first higher education institution in the state of Georgia to receive regional accreditation.
Students at Agnes Scott are known as "Scotties." The school colors of Agnes Scott are purple and white, while the mascot is Irvine, a Scottish Terrier.
Agnes Scott's $125 million building program has led to the creation of a new parking facility, Public Safety office, planetarium, student campus center, science building, tennis courts, and improved landscaping and the renovation of the dining hall, observatory, and library.
New Georgia Encyclopedia: Agnes Scott College (1001 words)
Agnes Scott has dual degree programs with Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, and with the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, as well as cross-registration with eighteen Atlanta-area colleges and universities.
Agnes Scott was one of the first colleges in the nation to establish a center fully devoted to improving and enhancing students' writing and speaking skills.
Agnes Scott is one of the International 50, the liberal arts colleges and universities most active in international education and scholarship.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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