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Encyclopedia > Aghlabid
An Aghlabid cistern in Kairuan
An Aghlabid cistern in Kairuan

The Aghlabid dynasty of emirs, members of the Arab tribe of Bani Tamim, ruled Ifriqiya (northern Africa), nominally on behalf of the Abbasid Caliph, for about a century, until overthrown by the new power of the Fatimids. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (978x614, 121 KB) Summary Aghlabid cistern in Kairuan. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (978x614, 121 KB) Summary Aghlabid cistern in Kairuan. ... The Arabs (Arabic: عرب ) are a large and heterogeneous ethnic group found throughout the Middle East and North Africa. ... The Bani Tamim is a large and powerful Arab tribe primarily located in Najd, central and southern Iraq and the Iranian province of Khuzestan. ... In medieval history, Ifriqiya or Ifriqiyah (Arabic: إفريقية) was the area comprising the coastal regions of what are today western Libya, Tunisia, and eastern Algeria. ... Abbasid provinces during the caliphate of Harun al-Rashid Abbasid (Arabic: العبّاسيّون Abbāsīyūn) was the dynastic name generally given to the caliphs of Baghdad, the second of the two great Sunni dynasties of the Islamic empire, that overthrew the Umayyad caliphs. ... Caliph is the term or title for the Islamic leader of the Ummah, or community of Islam. ... The Fatimids or Fatimid Caliphate (Arabic الفاطميون) is the Ismaili Shiite dynasty that ruled much of North Africa from A.D. 5 January 910 to 1171. ...


In 800, the Abbasid Caliph Harun al-Rashid appointed Ibrahim I ibn al-Aghlab as hereditary Emir of Ifriqiya as a response to the anarchy that had reigned in that province following the fall of the Muhallabids. He was to control an area that encompassed eastern Algeria, Tunisia and Tripolitania. Although independent in all but name, his dynasty never ceased to recognise Abbasid overlordship. Events December 25, Rome, coronation of Charles the Great (Charlemagne) as emperor by Pope Leo III. Celtic monks begin work on the Book of Kells on the Island of Iona. ... Persian miniature depicting Hārūn ar-Rashīd. ... Ibrahim I ibn al-Aghlab (756-812) was the first Emir of the Aghlabids in Ifriqiya (800-812) He was the son of al-Aghlab, who successully quelled the revolt of the Kharijites in Ifriqiya at the end of the 8th century. ... Entrance to the emirs palace in Bukhara. ... The Muhallabids were a dynasty of governers in Ifriqiya under the Abbasid Caliphate (771-793) Although subject to the Abbasids, they enjoyed a great deal of autonomy and were able to maintain Arab rule in the face of revolts by the Berbers. ... Tripolitania is a historic region of western Libya, centered around the coastal city of Tripoli. ...


A new capital al-Abbasiyya was founded outside Kairuan, partly to escape the opposition of the Malikite jurists and theologians, who condemned what they saw as the godless life of the Aghlabids, and disliked the unequal treatment of the Muslim Berbers. Additionally, border defenses (Ribat) were set up in Sousse and Monastir. Mosque of Oqba Kairouan (Arabic القيروان ) (variations include Kairwan, Kayrawan, Al Qayrawan) is a Muslim holy city in Tunisia, about 160 kilometres south of Tunis. ... The Maliki madhab (Arabic مالكي) is one of the four schools of Fiqh or religious law within Sunni Islam. ... The Berbers (also called Imazighen, free men, singular Amazigh) are a predominantly Muslim ethnic group indigenous to the Maghreb, speaking the Berber languages of the Afroasiatic family. ... View from the Ribat tower over the Medina on the Kasbah. ... The Ribat in Monastir. ...


Under Ziyadat Allah I (817-838) came the crisis of a revolt of Arab troops in 824, which was not quelled until 836 with the help of the Berbers. The conquest of Byzantine Sicily from 827 under Asad ibn al-Furat was an attempt to keep the unruly troops under control - it was only achieved slowly, and only in 902 was the last Byzantine outpost taken. Plundering raids into mainland Italy took place until well into the 10th century. Gradually the Aghlabids lost control of the Arab forces in Sicily and a new dynasty, the Kalbids, emerged there. Ziyadat Allah I (d. ... Events Louis the Pious divides his empire among his sons. ... Events At Hingston Down, Egbert of Wessex beats the Danish and the West Welsh. ... Events Iñigo Arista revolts against the Franks and establishes the kingdom of Navarre (approximate date). ... Events Abbasid caliph al-Mutasim establishes new capital at Samarra, Iraq. ... Byzantine Empire (Greek: Βυζαντινή Αυτοκρατορία) is the term conventionally used since the 19th century to describe the Greek-speaking Roman Empire during the Middle Ages, centered at its capital in Constantinople. ... Sicilian redirects here. ... Events Succession of Pope Valentine, then Pope Gregory IV. Arabs invade Sicily. ... Asad ibn al-Furat (759-828) was an important jurist and theologian in Ifriqiya, who began the Muslim conquest of Sicily. ... The Aghlabid dynasty of emirs ruled Ifriqiya (northern Africa), nominally on behalf of the Abbasid Caliph, for about a century, until overthrown by the new power of the Fatimids. ... The Kalbids were a Muslim dynasty in Sicily, which ruled from 948 to 1053. ...


The Aghlabid kingdom reached its high point under Ahmad ibn Muhammad (856-863). Ifriqiya was a significant economic power thanks to its fertile agriculture, aided by the expansion of the Roman irrigation system. It became the focal point of trade between the Islamic world and Byzantium and Italy, especially the lucrative slave trade. Kairuan became the most important centre of learning in the Maghreb, most notably in the field of Theology and Law, and a gathering place for poets. Events Year of the Fire Rat begins in January. ... Events Constantine I succeeds as king of Scotland. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... Marrakesh, Morocco, in front of Atlas Mountains in Maghreb The Maghreb (المغرب العربي ; also rendered Maghrib (or rarely Moghreb), meaning western in Arabic, is the region of Africa north of the Sahara Desert and west of the Nile — specifically, coinciding with the Atlas Mountains. ... Theology is reasoned discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, word or reason). It can also refer to the study of other religious topics. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ...


The decline of the dynasty began under Ibrahim II ibn Ahmad (875-902). Control over Calabria was lost to Byzantium, an attack by the Tulunids of Egypt had to be repelled and a revolt of the Berbers put down with much loss of life. In addition, in 893 there began amongst the Kutama Berbers the movement of the Shiite Fatimids, through the mission of Ubaydalla Said, which in 909 led to the overthrow of the Aghlabids. It is possible to see an account of the Aghlabid invasion of Sicily from 827 in al-Nuwayri's book Kitab nihayat l'adab (the book of the ultimate goal in the art of humanities), his work is highly gobbetable. Al-Nuwayri's work can also be cross referenced with the 'Cambridge Chronicle', an account of the Aghlabid invasion of Sicily by an unknown Christian author. The 'Cambridge Chronicle' is also, highly gobbetable. Abu Ishaq Ibrahim II (d. ... Events December 29 - Charles the Bald, king of west Danes capture Lindisfarne and arrive in Cambridge. ... Events Births Deaths Categories: 902 ... Calabria, formerly Brutium, is a region in southern Italy which occupies the toe of the Italian peninsula south of Naples. ... The Tulunids were the first independent dynasty in Islamic Egypt (868-905). ... Events Simeon I succeeds Vladimir as king of Bulgaria. ... The Kutama were a Berber tribe, a member of the great Sanhaja confederation of the Maghreb. ... Shi‘as (the adjective in Arabic is شيعى shi‘i; English has traditionally used Shiite) which mean follower in Arabic make up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%-35% of all Muslim. ... The Fatimid Empire or Fatimid Caliphate ruled North Africa from A.D. 909 to 1171. ... This article is for the year 909. ...


Aghlabid rulers


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Aghlabid at AllExperts (543 words)
The Aghlabid dynasty of emirs, members of the Arab tribe of Bani Tamim, ruled Ifriqiya (northern Africa), nominally on behalf of the Abbasid Caliph, for about a century, until overthrown by the new power of the Fatimids.
Gradually the Aghlabids lost control of the Arab forces in Sicily and a new dynasty, the Kalbids, emerged there.
It is possible to see an account of the Aghlabid invasion of Sicily from 827 in al-Nuwayri's book Kitab nihayat l'adab (the book of the ultimate goal in the art of humanities), his work is highly gobbetable.
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