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Encyclopedia > Agamemnon
The so-called 'Mask of Agamemnon'. Discovered by Heinrich Schliemann in 1876 at Mycenae. Whether it represents an individual, and who, remains unknown.

Agamemnon (Greek: Ἀγαμέμνων "very resolute") is one of the most distinguished of the Greek heroes. He is the son of King Atreus of Mycenae and Queen Aerope, and brother of Menelaus. Because of the antiquity of the sources, it is not clear whether Agamemnon is a historical or mythical figure. The name Agamemnon has a number of uses: Agamemnon - one of the most distinguished of the Greek heroes, was the son of King Atreus of Mycenae (or Argos) and Queen Aerope, and brother of Menelaus. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1457x1472, 793 KB) de: Â»Maske des Agamemnon« von Leo2004 fotografiert. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1457x1472, 793 KB) de: Â»Maske des Agamemnon« von Leo2004 fotografiert. ... The Mask of Agamemnon The Mask of Agamemnon is an artifact discovered at Mycenae in 1876 by Heinrich Schliemann. ... Portrait of Heinrich Schliemann. ... Year 1876 Pick up Sticks(MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A clay tablet with writing in Linear B from Mycenae. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... In Greek mythology, King Atreus (Greek: Ατρεύς, Atreús) (fearless) of Mycenae was the son of Pelops and Hippodamia and father of Agamemnon and Menelaus. ... A clay tablet with writing in Linear B from Mycenae. ... In Greek mythology, Aerope was the wife of King Atreus of Mycenae. ... Menelaus regains Helen, detail of an Attic red-figure crater, ca. ...


In alternative traditions Agamemnon is said to be the son of Pleisthenes (son of Atreus) and Aerope, or of Pleisthenes and Cleolla, daughter of Dias, making him the grandson, rather than the son, of Atreus. [1] In Greek mythology, Pleisthenes was the a son of Pelops. ... In Greek mythology, Pleisthenes was the a son of Pelops. ...

Contents

Early life

Atreus was murdered by Aegisthus and his wife, who took possession of the throne of Mycenae and ruled jointly with his own father Thyestes. During this period Agamemnon and his brother, Menelaus, took refuge with Tyndareus, king of Sparta. There they respectively married Tyndareus' daughters Clytemnestra and Helen. Agamemnon and Clytemnestra had five children: four daughters, Iphigeneia, Electra, Chrysothemis, and Iphianissa and one son, Orestes. In Greek mythology, Aegisthus (goat strength, also transliterated as Aegisthos or Aigísthos) was the son of Thyestes and his daughter, Pelopia. ... In Greek mythology, Thyestes was the son of Pelops, King of Mycenae, and Hippodamia and father of Pelopia and Aegisthus. ... Menelaus regains Helen, detail of an Attic red-figure crater, ca. ... In Greek mythology, Tyndareus (or Tyndareos) was a Spartan king, son of Oebalus (or Perieres) and Gorgophone (or Bateia), husband of Leda and father of Helen, Polydeuces (Pollux), Castor, Clytemnestra, Timandra, Phoebe and Philonoe. ... For modern day Sparta, see Sparti (municipality). ... After the murder (1882 painting) Clytemnestra (or Clytaemestra) ‘‘(Eng. ... Helen of Troy redirects here. ... 112 Iphigenia is an asteroid. ... Electra at the Tomb of Agamemnon In Greek mythology, Electra was daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra. ... In Greek mythology, Chrysothemis was a daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra. ... In Greek mythology Iphianissa, a minor figure, was one of the daughters of Agamemnon, king of Mycenae, overlord of the Achaeans, and of Clytemnestra of Sparta. ... The Remorse of Orestes by William-Adolphe Bouguereau For other uses, see Orestes (disambiguation). ...


Menelaus succeeded Tyndareus in Sparta, while Agamemnon, with his brother's assistance, drove out Aegisthus and Thyestes to recover his father's kingdom. He extended his dominion by conquest and became the most powerful prince in Greece.


Agamemnon's family history, dating back to legendary king Pelops, had been marred by pederastic rape, murder, incest, and treachery. The Greeks believed this violent past brought misfortune upon the entire House of Atreus. In Greek mythology, Pelops (Greek Πέλοψ, from pelios: dark; and ops: face, eye) was venerated at Olympia, where his cult developed into the founding myth of the Olympic Games, the most important expression of unity, not only for the Peloponnesus, land of Pelops, but for all Hellenes. ... Pederasty or paederasty (literally boy-love, see Etymology below) refers to an intimate or erotic relationship between an adolescent boy and an adult male outside his immediate family. ... Incest is defined as sexual intercourse between closely related persons. ... In law, treason is the crime of disloyalty to ones nation. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Atreus. ...


The Trojan War

The sacrifice of Iphigenia.
Main article: Trojan War

Agamemnon gathered the reluctant Greek forces to sail for Troy. Preparing to depart from Aulis, which was a port in Boeotia, Agamemnon's army incurred the wrath of the goddess Artemis. There are several reasons throughout myth for such wrath: in Aeschylus' play Agamemnon, Artemis is angry for the young men who will die at Troy, whereas in Sophocles' Electra, Agamemnon has slain an animal sacred to Artemis, and subsequently boasted that he was Artemis' equal in hunting. Misfortunes, including a plague and a lack of wind, prevented the army from sailing. Finally, the prophet Calchas announced that the wrath of the goddess could only be propitiated by the sacrifice of Agamemnon's daughter Iphigeneia. Classical dramatizations differ on how willing either father or daughter were to this fate, some include such trickery as claiming she was to be married to Achilles, but Agamemnon did eventually sacrifice Iphigeneia. Her death appeased Artemis, and the Greek army set out for Troy. Several alternatives to the human sacrifice have been presented in Greek mythology. Other sources claim that Agamemnon was prepared to kill his daughter, but that Artemis accepted a deer in her place, and whisked her to Taurus in Crimea. Hesiod said she became the goddess Hecate. The sacrifice of Iphigenia. ... The sacrifice of Iphigenia. ... 112 Iphigenia is an asteroid. ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... In Greek mythology, Aulis was a daughter of King Ogyges and Thebe. ... Boeotia or Beotia (//, (Greek Βοιωτια; see also list of traditional Greek place names) was the central area of ancient Greece. ... For other uses, see Artemis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the ancient Greek playwright. ... The Oresteia is a trilogy of tragedies about the end of the curse on the House of Atreus, written by Aeschylus. ... This article is about the Greek tragedian. ... Electra or Elektra is a Greek tragic play by Sophocles. ... In Greek mythology, Kalchas Thestórides (son of Thestor), or Calchas (brazen) for short, a loyal Argive, was a powerful seer, a gift of Apollo: as an augur, Calchas had no rival in the camp (Iliad i, E.V. Rieu translation) Calchas prophesized that in order to gain a favourable... 112 Iphigenia is an asteroid. ... For other uses, see Achilles (disambiguation). ... Motto Процветание в единстве(Russian) Protsvetanie v edinstve(transliteration) Prosperity in unity Anthem Нивы и горы твои волшебны, Родина(Russian) Nivy i gory tvoi volshebny, Rodina(transliteration) Your fields and mounts are wonderful, Motherland Location of Crimea (red) with respect to Ukraine (light blue). ... Roman bronze bust, the so-called Pseudo-Seneca, now identified by some as possibly Hesiod Hesiod (Hesiodos, ) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC. Hesiod and Homer, with whom Hesiod is often paired, have been considered the earliest Greek poets whose work has survived... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Agamemnon was the commander-in-chief of the Greeks during the Trojan War. During the fighting, Agamemnon killed Antiphus. Agamemnon's teamster, Halaesus, later fought with Aeneas in Italy. The Iliad tells the story of the quarrel between Agamemnon and Achilles in the final year of the war. Agamemnon took an attractive slave and spoil of war Briseis from Achilles. Achilles, the greatest warrior of the age, withdrew from battle in revenge and nearly cost the Greek armies the war. In Greek mythology, one of these people: In the Iliad, Antiphus, or Ántiphos, a Trojan ally, the son of Talaemenes and a nymph. ... A teamster was a person who drove a team of oxen, a horse-drawn or mule-drawn wagon or a muletrain (in the latter case, he was also known as a muleteer or muleskinner). ... In Greek mythology, Halaesus was Agamemnons teamster during the Trojan War. ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... In Greek mythology, BrisÄ“is (Greek Βρισηίς) was a Trojan widow (from Lyrnessus) who was abducted during the Trojan War by Achilles upon the death of her three brothers and husband, King Mynes of Lyrnessus, in the fight. ...


Although not the equal of Achilles in bravery, Agamemnon was a dignified representative of kingly authority. As commander-in-chief, he summoned the princes to the council and led the army in battle. He took the field himself, and performed many heroic deeds until he was wounded and forced to withdraw to his tent. His chief fault was his overwhelming haughtiness. An over-exalted opinion of his position led him to insult Chryses and Achilles, thereby bringing great disaster upon the Greeks. Chryses attempting to ransom his daughter Chryseis from Agamemnon, Apulian red-figure crater by the Athens 1714 Painter, ca. ...


After the capture of Troy, Cassandra, doomed prophetess and daughter of Priam, fell to Agamemnon's lot in the distribution of the prizes of war. For other uses, see Cassandra (disambiguation). ... King Priam killed by Neoptolemus, son of Achilles, detail of an Attic red-figure amphora In Greek mythology, Priam (Greek Πρίαμος, Priamos) was the king of Troy during the Trojan War, and youngest son of Laomedon. ...


Return to Greece

The return of Agamemnon, from an 1879 illustration from Stories from the Greek Tragedians by Alfred Church.

After a stormy voyage, Agamemnon and Cassandra landed in Argolis or were blown off course and landed in Aegisthus' country. Clytemnestra, Agamemnon's wife, had taken a lover, Aegisthus, and they invited Agamemnon to a banquet at which he was treacherously slain. According to the account given by Pindar and the tragedians, Agamemnon was slain by his wife alone in a bath, a piece of cloth or a net having first been thrown over him to prevent resistance. Clytemnestra also killed Cassandra. Her wrath at the sacrifice of Iphigenia, her jealousy of Cassandra, and the possibility of going to war for Helen's affection are said to have been the motives for her crime. Aegisthus and Clytemnestra then ruled Agamemnon's kingdom for a time, but the murder of Agamemnon was eventually avenged by his son Orestes with the help of his daughter Electra. The Return of Agamemnon - Project Gutenberg eText 14994 - http://www. ... The Return of Agamemnon - Project Gutenberg eText 14994 - http://www. ... Year 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Argolis (Greek, Modern: Αργολίδα Argolida, Ancient/Katharevousa: Αργολίς -- still the official, formal name) is one of the fifty-one prefectures of Greece. ... After the murder (1882 painting) Clytemnestra (or Clytaemestra) ‘‘(Eng. ... In Greek mythology, Aegisthus (goat strength, also transliterated as Aegisthos or Aigísthos) was the son of Thyestes and his daughter, Pelopia. ... Pindar (or Pindarus) (probably born 522 BC in Cynoscephalae, a village in Boeotia; died 443 BC in Argos), was perhaps the greatest of the nine lyric poets of ancient Greece. ... The Remorse of Orestes by William-Adolphe Bouguereau For other uses, see Orestes (disambiguation). ... Electra at the Tomb of Agamemnon In Greek mythology, Electra was daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra. ...


Other stories

Athenaeus tells a story of Argynnus, an eromenos of Agamemnon: "Agamemnon loved Argynnus, so the story goes, having seen him swimming in the Cephisus river; in which, in fact, he lost his life (for he constantly bathed in this river). Agamemnon was struck with great grief. He buried him, honored him with a tomb and a shrine, and founded there a temple of Aphrodite Argynnis." (The Deipnosophists of Athenaeus of Naucratis, Book XIII Concerning Women, p.3) This episode is also found in Clement of Alexandria (Protrepticus II.38.2), in Stephen of Byzantium (Kopai and Argunnos), and in Propertius, III with minor variations. Athenaeus (ca. ... In the pederastic tradition of Classical Athens, the eromenos (Greek ἐρόμενος, pl. ... Cephissus (Greek Κήφισσος: Kifissós, Kephissós, or Kêphissos) or Cephisus (Greek Κήφισος: Kêphisos) the name of several rivers in Greece: Cephissus (Boeotia), a river arising in Phocis and flowing through northern Boeotia into Lake... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... Clement of Alexandria (Titus Flavius Clemens), was the first member of the Church of Alexandria to be more than a name, and one of its most distinguished teachers. ... Stephanus Byzantinus (Stephanus of Byzantium, fl. ... Sextus Aurelius Propertius was a Latin elegiac poet born between 57 BC and 46 BC in or near Mevania, who died in around 12 BC. Like Virgil and Ovid, Propertius was also a member of the poetic circle of neoteric poets which collected around Mæcenas. ...


The fortunes of Agamemnon have formed the subject of numerous tragedies, ancient and modern, the most famous being the Oresteia of Aeschylus. In the legends of the Peloponnesus, Agamemnon was regarded as the highest type of a powerful monarch, and in Sparta he was worshipped under the title of Zeus Agamemnon. His tomb was pointed out among the ruins of Mycenae and at Amyclae. For other uses, see Tragedy (disambiguation). ... The Oresteia is a trilogy of tragedies about the end of the curse on the House of Atreus, written by Aeschylus. ... This article is about the ancient Greek playwright. ... Peloponnesos (Greek: Πελοπόννησος, sometime Latinized as Peloponnesus or Anglicized as The Peloponnese) is a large peninsula in Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Isthmus of Corinth. ... For modern day Sparta, see Sparti (municipality). ... A clay tablet with writing in Linear B from Mycenae. ... // Historical population Amykles or Amikles (Greek: Αμύκλες, older form, polytonic: Ἀμύκλαι, monotonic: Αμύκλαι), older forms: Amyklai, Amykle, Amiklai and Amikle, Latin: Amyclae, is a village and an archaeological site located southwest of Sparta. ...


Another account makes him the son of Pleisthenes (the son or father of Atreus), who is said to have been Aerope's first husband. In Greek mythology, Pleisthenes was the a son of Pelops. ... In Greek mythology, King Atreus (Greek: Ατρεύς, Atreús) (fearless) of Mycenae was the son of Pelops and Hippodamia and father of Agamemnon and Menelaus. ...


In works of art there is considerable resemblance between the representations of Zeus, king of the gods, and Agamemnon, king of men. He is generally characterized by the sceptre and diadem, the usual attributes of kings. For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... For the record label, see Scepter Records. ... Look up Diadem in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Agamemnon in fiction

Writers of time travel and historical novels often attempt to show the Trojan War "as it really happened", based on the archeological evidence of Mycenaean civilization. Such authors frequently use Agamemnon as the archetypical Mycenaean king, bringing life to old artifacts by dressing a familiar face in them. Mycenaean Greece, the last phase of the Bronze Age in ancient Greece, is the historical setting of the epics of Homer and much other Greek mythology. ...


Of particular interest is S. M. Stirling's time-travel trilogy Island in the Sea of Time, Against the Tide of Years and On the Oceans of Eternity, where the fate that befalls the House of Atreus is every bit as horrific as that traditionally portrayed. The horror is arranged by a time-travelling villain who is very well aware of traditional accounts. Stephen Michael Stirling is an American science fiction and fantasy author. ... Stephen Michael Stirling is a Canadian-American science fiction and fantasy author. ...


The noble Atreides family of the science fiction series Dune by Frank Herbert trace their lineage back to Agamemnon (note that the surname, Atreides, is derived from Agamemnon's father's name, Atreus). An important Atreides ancestor also adopts the name Agamemnon in the series' back-story. Nobility is a traditional hereditary status (see hereditary titles) that exists today in many countries (mainly present or former monarchies). ... Emblem of House Atreides from Emperor: Battle for Dune For the novel of the same name, see Dune: House Atreides. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Dune is a science fiction novel written by Frank Herbert and published in 1965. ... Frank Patrick Herbert (October 8, 1920 – February 11, 1986) was a critically acclaimed and commercially successful American science fiction author. ... In Greek mythology, King Atreus (Greek: Ατρεύς, Atreús) (fearless) of Mycenae was the son of Pelops and Hippodamia and father of Agamemnon and Menelaus. ... The Titans are a group of fictional characters in the Legends of Dune series of novels, written by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson and set in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... In narratology, a back-story (also back story or backstory) is the history behind the situation extant at the start of the main story. ...


Agamemnon makes an appearance in the film Time Bandits, played by Sean Connery, although his depiction in the film seems more reminiscent of Odysseus. Masks very similar to the famous Mask of Agamemnon are also used in the film. This article is about the 1981 motion picture. ... Sir Thomas Sean Connery (born 25 August 1930) is a retired Scottish actor and producer who is perhaps best known as the first actor to portray James Bond in cinema, starring in seven Bond films. ... For other meanings, see Odysseus (disambiguation) Ulysses redirects here. ... The Mask of Agamemnon The Mask of Agamemnon is an artifact discovered at Mycenae in 1876 by Heinrich Schliemann. ...


He also appeared in the 2004 film Troy, played by Scottish actor Brian Cox. Troy departs from the traditional accounts in numerous places; in the case of Agamemnon, he is portrayed as power-mad, and is killed for his rapaciousness during the fall of Troy. Troy is a movie released on May 14, 2004 about the Trojan War, which is described in Homers Iliad and other Greek myths as having taken place in Anatolia (modern Turkey) around the 13th or 12th century BC. It stars, among others: Brad Pitt as Achilles, Eric Bana as... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the actor. ...


Agamemnon also appears in the Shakespearean play Troilus and Cressida. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For the Chaucer poem, see Troilus and Criseyde. ...


Agamemnon appears in Microsoft Game Studios' Age of Mythology. His role in the game broadly reflects his role in the Trojan War. Age of Mythology (commonly abbreviated as AoM), is a popular mythology-based, real-time strategy computer game developed by Ensemble Studios, and published by Microsoft Game Studios. ...


Agamemnon appears as a character in the novels Ilium and Olympos by Dan Simmons, in the future replaying of the Trojan War. For other uses, see Ilium. ... Dan Simmons novel Olympos, published in 2005, is the sequel to Ilium and final part of Ilium/Olympus duology. ... Dan Simmons (born April 4, 1948 in Peoria, Illinois) is an American author most widely known for his Hugo Award-winning science fiction novel Hyperion and its sequel The Fall of Hyperion. ...


In his book Where Troy Once Stood, Dutch-born writer Iman Wilkens links Argos and Agamemnon with the Biblical Gog and Magog. Where Troy Once Stood is a book by Iman Wilkens that deals with basic belief in Classical History: the assumption that Troy was in Turkey and that the Iliad and Odyssey are of Greek origin. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... Gog and Magog redirect here. ...


In Christine Brooke-Rose's novel Amalgamemnon, she uses the world of Greek mythology to demonstrate a character oppressed by a male dominated society. As she feels confinied by many male conventions, the term "amalga" is added to the name, in order to signify an amalgamation of oppression. Christine Frances Evelyn Brooke-Rose (born January 16, 1923) is a British writer and literary critic, known principally for her later, experimental novels. ...


David Gemmell in his recent Troy trilogy (see Troy series: Characters) takes the legends and myths of Troy portraying them in a realistic manner, allowing for the reader to see a golden grain of truth within the legend. Agamemnon in which is a devious character, hell bent on creating an empire of his own in the face of the Hittite and Egypto power. Using any excuse he can he rallies the Greeks in order to win back the subsidory character of Helen due to her ellope with Paris and ignorance of his command. By sackin the city of Troy he also takes the glory of Priam, the king of the greatest 'Golden City' on The Green. David Andrew Gemmell (August 1, 1948–July 28, 2006) was a popular UK fantasy writer and occasional historical fictionalist. ... For other uses of Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ...


See also

The title of Terence Rattigan's Play "The Browning Version" (1948) was a reference to Robert Browning's translation of the Greek tradgedy, Agamemnon. The Play was made into a Film for Television in 1951. It starred Michael Redgrave as the unhappy schoolmaster, Andrew Crocker-Harris. In his youth Crocker-Harris himself had started a rather free translation of the great work, in rhyming couplets. His accidental discovery of the unfinished text, at a difficult time in his life many years later, forms part of the plot for this most poignant of stories. Façade of the National Archaeological museum of Athens. ... A clay tablet with writing in Linear B from Mycenae. ... For other uses of Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ...


References

This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain. Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

Wikisource has the text of the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica article Agamemnon.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Agamemnon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1258 words)
Agamemnon's father Atreus was murdered by Aegisthus, who took possession of the throne of Mycenae and ruled jointly with his father Thyestes.
Agamemnon was the commander-in-chief of the Greeks during the Trojan War.
Agamemnon is also said to have been the ancient ancestor or relative of the noble family the Atreides of the classic science fiction series Dune by Frank Herbert (Note that the surname, Atreides is derived from Agamemnon's father's name, Atreus).
The Oresteia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1926 words)
Eventually, for reasons that are still heavily debated, Clytemnestra does convince Agamemnon to enter the oikos, where she kills him in the bath: she ensnares him in a robe and as he struggles to free himself she hacks him with three strokes of a pelekus.
Agamemnon is murdered in much the same way as an animal killed for sacrifice with three blows, the last strike accompanied by a prayer to a god.
Orestes is tormented by the Furies, chthonic deities that avenge patricide and matricide.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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