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Encyclopedia > Aga Khan III

Sir Sultan Mahommed Shah, The Aga Khan III (Persian: آغا خان الثالث), GCSI, GCMG, GCIE, GCVO, PC, (November 2, 1877July 11, 1957) was the 48th Imam of the Shia Ismaili Muslims. He was one of the founders and the first president of the All-India Muslim League, and served as President of the League of Nations from 1937-38. Image File history File links Aga_Khan_III.jpg Licensing This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Image File history File links Aga_Khan_III.jpg Licensing This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This article is about the hereditary title. ... Persian (Local names: فارسی Fârsi or پارسی Pârsi)* is an Indo-European language spoken in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan as well as by minorities in Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, India, Pakistan, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Southern Russia, neighboring countries, and elsewhere. ... Insignia of a Knight Grand Commander of the Order of the Star of India. ... On the Orders insignia, St Michael is often depicted subduing Satan. ... The Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire is an order of chivalry founded by Victoria in 1877. ... Queen Victoria founded the Royal Victorian Order. ... This article concerns the British Sovereigns Privy Council. ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... July 11 is the 192nd day (193rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 173 days remaining. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... The Shia Imam is considered by the Shia sect of Islam to be the rightful successor to Muhammad, and is similar to the Caliph in Sunni Islam. ... Shiʻa Islam (Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite) makes up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%–35% of all Muslim. ... The IsmāʿīlÄ« (Urdu: اسماعیلی IsmāʿīlÄ«, Arabic: الإسماعيليون al-IsmāʿīliyyÅ«n; Persian: اسماعیلیان Esmāʿīliyān) branch of Islam is the second largest part of the ShÄ«a community, after the Twelvers (Ithnāʿashariyya). ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Muhammed Ali Jinnah, the Great Leader of the Muslim League The All India Muslim League was a political party in British India was the driving force behind the creation of a Muslim state on the Indian subcontinent. ... The League of Nations was an international organization founded as a result of the Paris Peace Conference in 1919-1920. ...

Contents

Early life

He was born in Karachi (then British India, now Pakistan) to Aga Khan II and his second wife, Nawab A'lia Shamsul-Muluk, who was a granddaughter of Fath Ali Shah of Persia (Qajar dynasty). Karachi (Urdu: كراچى, Sindhi: ڪراچي) is the capital of the province of Sindh, and the most populated city in Pakistan. ... Shah Aly Shah Aga Khan II (~1830 - 1885) is known to Ismaili Muslims as Imam Shah Aly Shah. ... Fath Ali Shah was the second Qajar King of Persia. ... The Qajar dynasty ( ) (Persian: ‎ - or دودمان قاجار - Qâjâr) was the ruling family of Persia from 1781 to 1925. ...


Under the care of his mother, he was given not only that religious and oriental education which his position as the religious leader of the Ismailis made indispensable, but a sound European training, a boon denied to his father and paternal grandfather. This blending of the two systems of education produced the happy result of fitting this Muslim chief in an eminent degree both for the sacerdotal functions which pertained to his spiritual position, and for those social duties required of a great and enlightened leader which he was called upon to discharge by virtue of his position. He also attended Eton and Cambridge University.[1] The Ismaili ( اسماعيلي, Persian Esmaaili) branch of Islam is the second-largest Shia community, after the Twelvers who are dominant in Iran. ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. It is located in Eton, Berkshire, near Windsor in England, situated north of Windsor... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ...


Career

Part of a series on Shī‘a Islam
Ismailism
Shiʻa Islam (Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite) makes up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%–35% of all Muslim. ... The IsmāʿīlÄ« (Urdu: اسماعیلی IsmāʿīlÄ«, Arabic: الإسماعيليون al-IsmāʿīliyyÅ«n; Persian: اسماعیلیان Esmāʿīliyān) branch of Islam is the second largest part of the ShÄ«a community, after the Twelvers (Ithnāʿashariyya). ...

Branches

NizariDruzeMustaali
The Ismāʿīlī (Urdu: اسماعیلی Ismāʿīlī, Arabic: الإسماعيليون al-Ismāʿīliyyūn; Persian: اسماعیلیان Esmāʿīliyān) branch of Islam is the second largest part of the Shīa community, after the Twelvers (Ithnāʿashariyya). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 150 × 120 pixelsFull resolution (150 × 120 pixel, file size: 9 KB, MIME type: image/gif) It was found here http://www. ... A sub-sect of the Sevener Shia Muslim Ismaili sect. ... Religions Druzism Scriptures Languages Arabic, Hebrew The Druze (Arabic: درزي, derzī or durzī, plural دروز, durūz; Hebrew: , Druzim; also transliterated Druz or Druse) are a Middle Eastern religious community whose traditional religion began as an offshoot of the Ismaili sect of Islam, but is unique in its incorporation of Gnostic, neo... This group is named Mustaali because they follow Imam Mustalli, after Imam Mustansir Billah, and not Nazaar whom the Aga Khan group consider as their Imam. ...

Pillars

WalayahSalah
ZakahSawmHajjJihad
TaharahShahada Shia Ismaili Seven Pillars of Islam have three doctrines that are not included in the Sunni Five Pillars of Islam: Walayah, Taharah and Jihad. ... Guardianship is a Ismaili and Druze pillar of Islam. ... Salat redirects here. ... This is a sub-article of Islamic economical jurisprudence. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Hajj (Arabic: , transliteration: ; Turkish: ; Ottoman Turkish: حاج, Hāc; Malay: , Bosnian: ) is the Pilgrimage to Mecca in Islam. ... Flag used by Muslims Army during early Islam Jihad, sometimes spelled Jahad, Jehad, Jihaad, Jiaad, or Cihad, (Arabic: IPA: ) as an Islamic term, is sometimes referred to as the sixth pillar of Islam, although it occupies no official status as such in Sunni Islam. ... Purity is a Ismaili pillar of Islam. ... There is also a town called Shāhāda, which is now in Nandurbār district (formerly in Dhule district) in the northwest corner of Maharashtra state in India. ...

Concepts

The Qur'anThe Ginans
ReincarnationPanentheism
ImamPir • Da'i al-Mutlaq
AqlNumerologyTaqiyya
Niranjan Nirakar Swaroop
ZahirBatin An esoteric interpretation of the Qur’an is an interpretation of the Qur’an which includes attribution of esoteric or mystic meanings to the text by the interpretater and in this aspect its method is different from the conventional exegesis of the Qur’an called tafsir. ... The Ginans are Nizari Ismaili religious texts. ... Reincarnation exists in both the Druze and Nizari branches of Ismailism. ... With the exception of the Mustaali Ismaili, most Ismaili believe in panentheism, meaning God is both reality and transcendent of it. ... This is a sub-article to Imamah (Shia doctrine). ... A Pir (Persian: پیر) meaning Old Man. ... The term Dāˤī al-Mutlaq (Arabic: الداعي المطلق) literally means the absolute or unrestricted missionary. In Ismāīlī Islām, the term dāˤī has been used to refer to important religious leaders other than the hereditary Imāms and the Daˤwa or Mission is a clerical-style organisation. ... Shias believe that the souls of the Prophets and the Imams are derived from the first light in the universe which was created by Allah, the light of Aql, which in Arabic roughly translates as knowledge. ... Ismailis believe that numbers have religious meanings. ... Within Islamic tradition, the concept of Taqiyya (التقية - fear, guard against)[1] refers to a controversial dispensation allowing believers to conceal their faith when under threat, persecution or compulsion. ... This article should appear in one or more categories. ... The exterior or apparent meaning of the Quran. ... The interior or hidden meaning of the Quran. ...

History

All ImamsFatimid Empire
Hamza ibn Ali • ad-Darazi
Hassan-i-SabbahHashashin
DawoodiSulaimaniAlavi
HafiziTaiyabiAinsarii
SevenersQarmatians
SadardinSatpanth This is a list of the Imams recognized by the Ismaili Shiites and their sub-branches. ... The Fatimid Empire or Fatimid Caliphate ruled North Africa from A.D. 909 to 1171. ... Hamza ibn-Ali ibn-Ahmad was an 11th century Muslim preacher, and is counted among the founders of the Druze. ... Muhammad bin Ismail Nashtakin ad-Darazi (Arabic: ) was a 11th century Ismaili preacher and early leader of Druze. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Hashshashin (also Hashishin, Hashashiyyin or Assassins) was a religious sect of Ismaili Muslims from the Nizari sub-sect. ... Dawoodi Bohras (Arabic: داؤدی بوہرہ, Hindi: दवूदि बोह्रा) are the main branch of the Bohras, a Mustaˤlī subsect of Ismāīlī Shīˤa Islām, and are based in India. ... Sulaimani Bohra are a subsect of Ismaili Mustaali. ... Alavi Bohra (Arabic: علوی بوہرہ) are a subsect of Ismaili Mustaali. ... The Mustaˤlī (Arabic: مستعلي) group of Ismāīlī Muslims are so named because they accepted al-Mustaˤlī as the ninth Fatimid caliph and the legitimate successor to his father, al-Mustansir. ... A branch of Mustaali Ismailism that split with the Fatimid supporting Hafizi branch by believing Tayyab Abī l-Qāsim was the rightful Imam. ... The Ainsarii were a sect of the Ismaili Assassins who survived the destruction of the stronghold of Alamut. ... Seveners are a branch of Ismaili Shiism. ... The Qarmatians (from Arabic qaramita قرامطة, also spelled Carmathians, Qarmathians, Karmathians etc. ... Pir Sadardin or Pir Sadruddin was a fourteenth century spiritual leader and is regarded as the founder of Khoja Ismaili sect otherwise known as Satpanth. ... // The people of the Satpanth are originally from the Indian states of Punjab and Rajasthan. ...

Early Imams

AliHasanHusayn
al-Sajjadal-Baqiral-Sadiq
IsmailMuhammad
Ahmadat-Taqiaz-Zaki
al-Mahdi • al-Qa'im • al-Mansur
al-Muizz • al-Aziz • al-Hakim
az-Zahir • al-Mustansir • Nizar
al-Musta'li • al-Amir • al-Qasim
This is a sub-article to Imamah (Shia doctrine). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Al-Hasan ibn Ali ibn Abi Talib ()‎ (c. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Ali ibn Husayn (also spelled Ali ibn Hussain or Hussein) (Arabic: علي بن حسين زين العابدين) (658 - 713) is the fourth Shia Imam. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Muhammad al-Baqir Imam Muhammad al-Baqir (676 - January 31, 743) was the fifth Shia Imam. ... ... Ismail bin Jafar (Arabic: إسماعيل بن جعفر) was the eldest son of the sixth Shia Imam, Jafar as-Sadiq. ... Muhammad ibn Ismail was the son of Ismail bin Jafar and an Ismaili Imam. ... The eighth Ismaili Imam, surnamed al-Wafi. ... The ninth Ismaili Imam. ... The tenth Ismaili Imam, surnamed az-Zaki. ... Ubayd Allah al-Mahdi Billah a. ... Muhammad al-Qaim Bi-Amrillah (893 - 17 May 946) (Arabic: محمد القائم بأمر الله) was the second Caliph of the Fatimids in Ifriqiya and ruled from 934 to 946. ... Isma`îl al-Mansûr (913 - 953) was the third Caliph of the Fatimids in Ifriqiya and ruled from 946 to 953. ... Was the fourth Fatamid caliph. ... Al-Aziz (* 955; † 996) was the fifth Caliph of the Fatimids (975-996). ... Tāriqu l-Ḥakīm, called bi Amr al-Lāh (Arabic الحاكم بأمر الله Ruler by Gods Command), was the sixth Fatimid Caliph in Egypt, ruling from 996 to 1021. ... ˤAlī az-Zāhir (20 June 1005 – 13 June 1036) (Arabic: الظاهر بالله) was the Seventh Caliph of the Fātimids (1021 - 1036). ... Al-Mustansir (July 2, 1029 - January 10, 1094), was born in Cairo on 16th Jamada II, 420/ and eight months afterwards was declared to succeed his father. ... Abu Mansur al-Nizar, (who was surnamed al-Mustapha al-dinillah, meaning the chosen for Gods religion) is a Nizari Ismaili Imam. ... Ahmad al-Mustali (d 1101) was the ninth Fatimid Caliph. ... Al-Amir (b. ... The 21st Fatimid Imam and son of the 20th Fatimid Imam Mansur al-Amir Bi-Ahkamillah. ...

Contemporary Leaders

Prince Karim Aga Khan IV
Mohammed Burhanuddin
Taiyeb Ziyauddin Saheb
Asghar Ali Engineer
Mowafak Tarif
The Āgā Khān IV, or His Highness Prince Karīm al-Hussaynī Āgā Khān IV, KBE, CC, GCC, (Arabic: سمو الأمیر شاہ کریم الحسیني آغا خان الرابع) -- (born December 13, 1936) is the current (49th) Imām of the Shia Imami Ismaili Muslims. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Saiyedna Abu Haatim Taiyeb Ziyauddin Saheb (born August 6, 1932) is the forty fourth and current Dai-e-Mutlaq (Spiritual & Temporal Head) of the Taiyebi Alavi Dawat community, in succession from the first Dai-e-Mutlaq, Saiyedna Zoeb bin Moosa. ... Asghar Ali Engineer, The Laaentie was born in Bohra priestly family (amils family) on 10th March, 1939 in Salumbar, Rajasthan (near Udaipur) where Qurban Husain, his father, was an amil at that time. ... Shaykh Muwaffak Tarīf (موفق طريف) is the current spiritual leader of the Druze community in Israel. ...

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In 1885, at the young age of 7, he succeeded his father as Imam of the Shi'a Isma'ili Muslims. The Shia Imam is considered by the Shia sect of Islam to be the rightful successor to Muhammad, and is similar to the Caliph in Sunni Islam. ... Shia Islam ( Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite or Shiite) is the second largest Islamic denomination; some 20-25% of all Muslims are said to follow a Shia tradition. ... The Ismaili (Persian: اسماعیلیان Esmâiliyân) branch of Islam is the second largest Shia community, after the Twelvers who are dominant in Iran. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ...


The Aga Khan travelled in distant parts of the world to receive the homage of his followers, and with the object either of settling differences or of advancing their welfare by pecuniary help and personal advice and guidance. The distinction of a Knight Commander of the Indian Empire was conferred upon him by Queen Victoria in 1897 (and later Knight Grand Commander in 1902 by Edward VII) and he received like recognition for his public services from the German emperor, the sultan of Turkey, the shah of Persia and other potentates. The Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire is an order of chivalry founded by Victoria in 1877. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 May 1876, until her death on 22 January 1901. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India. ... Motto (official) Esteqlāl, āzādÄ«, jomhÅ«rÄ«-ye eslāmÄ« 1(Persian) Independence, freedom, Islamic Republic (national) Anthem SorÅ«d-e MellÄ«-e Īrān 2 Capital (and largest city) Tehran Official languages Persian Demonym Iranian Government Islamic Republic  -  Supreme Leader  -  President Establishment  -  Proto-Elamite Period 8000 BCE   -  Middle...


In 1906, the Aga Khan was a founding member and first president of the All India Muslim League. Muhammed Ali Jinnah, the Great Leader of the Muslim League The All India Muslim League was a political party in British India was the driving force behind the creation of a Muslim state on the Indian subcontinent. ...


In 1934 he was made a member of the Privy Council and served as a member of the League of Nations (1934-37), becoming the President of the League of Nations in 1937. Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... The League of Nations was an international organization founded as a result of the Paris Peace Conference in 1919-1920. ...


He was made a Knight of the Indian Empire by Queen Victoria, a Grand Commander of the Indian Empire by Edward VII (1902), and a Knight Grand Commander of the Indian Empire by George V (1912).


Race horse owner

He was an owner of thoroughbred racing horses, including five winners of the Epsom Derby. Epsom Derby, Théodore Géricault, 1821. ...


Marriages and children

  • He married, in 1908 (Mutah form of marriage) and 1923 (legally), Cleope Teresa Magliano (1888-1926), a dancer with the Ballet Opera of Monte Carlo. They had two sons: Giuseppe Mahdi Khan (d. February 1911) and Ali Solomone Khan (1911-1960)[2]
  • He married, on 7 December 1929 (civil), in Aix-les-Bains, France, and 13 December 1929 (religious), in Bombay, India, Andrée Joséphine Carron (1898 - 1976). A former saleswoman in a candy store and a co-owner of a hat shop, she became known as Princess Andrée Aga Khan. She did not convert to Islam.[3] By this marriage, he had one son, Prince Sadruddin Aga Khan, in 1933.[4] The couple were divorced in 1943.[5]
  • He married, on 9 October 1944, in Geneva, Switzerland, Yvonne Blanche Labrousse (February 1906 - 1 July 2000).[6] The daughter of a tram conductor and a dressmaker, she was working as the Aga Khan's social secretary at the time of their marriage. She had been "Miss Lyon 1929" and "Miss France 1930".[7] She converted to Islam and became known as Umm Habiba (Little Mother of the Beloved). In 1954, her husband named her "Mata Salamat" (Spiritual Mother)[8]

November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... Pune, formerly called Poona, is the second largest city (after Mumbai) in the state of Maharashtra, India. ... Aga Khan I (Arabic: ‎) (1800 1881) was the title accorded by general consent to Hasan Ali Shah (born in Persia, 1800), when, in early life, he first settled in Bombay under the protection of the British government. ... It has been suggested that Mutta marriage be merged into this article or section. ... Prince Ali Solomone Khan (June 13, 1911 – May 12, 1960), known as Aly Khan, was a vice president of the United Nations General Assembly representing Pakistan, for which he served as U.N. ambassador (1958-1960). ... December 7 is the 341st day (342nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Aix-les-Bains is a spa town of eastern France, near the Lac du Bourget, and 9 m. ... December 13 is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... , “Bombay” redirects here. ... Prince Sadruddhin Aga Khan (January 17, 1933 – May 12, 2003) was the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees from 1965 to 1977. ... October 9 is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Geneva (pronunciation //; French: Genève //, German:   //, Italian: Ginevra //, Romansh: Genevra) is the second most populous city in Switzerland (after Zürich), and is the most populous city of Romandy (the French-speaking part of Switzerland). ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Death and succession

The Aga Khan's will bypassed his sons Aly Khan and Sadruddin Aga Khan, in favour of his grandson Karim Aga Khan, to succeed him as 'Aga Khan' and Imam of the Ismaili Muslims. It was the first time in the Ismaili sect's 1,300-year-history that such a generational skip had taken place. At the time of his death on July 11, 1957, his family members were in Geneva. A solicitor brought the will of the Aga Khan III from London to Geneva and read it before the family: Prince Aly Khan (June 13, 1911 - May 12, 1960), an international playboy, was vice president of the United Nations General Assembly and was the son of Aga Khan III (1877-1957) and his second wife, Teresa Ginetta Magliano (1888-1926). ... Prince Sadruddhin Aga Khan (January 17, 1933 – May 12, 2003) was the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees from 1965 to 1977. ... The Ä€gā Khān IV, or His Highness Prince KarÄ«m al-HussaynÄ« Ä€gā Khān IV, KBE, CC, GCC, (Arabic: سمو الأمیر شاہ کریم الحسیني آغا خان الرابع) -- (born December 13, 1936) is the current (49th) Imām of the Shia Imami Ismaili Muslims. ... The Shia Imam is considered by the Shia sect of Islam to be the rightful successor to Muhammad, and is similar to the Caliph in Sunni Islam. ... The IsmāʿīlÄ« (Urdu: اسماعیلی IsmāʿīlÄ«, Arabic: الإسماعيليون al-IsmāʿīliyyÅ«n; Persian: اسماعیلیان Esmāʿīliyān) branch of Islam is the second largest part of the ShÄ«a community, after the Twelvers (Ithnāʿashariyya). ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ...

"Ever since the time of my ancestor Ali, the first Imam, that is to say over a period of thirteen hundred years, it has always been the tradition of our family that each Imam chooses his successor at his absolute and unfettered discretion from amongst any of his descendants, whether they be sons or remote male issue and in these circumstances and in view of the fundamentally altered conditions in the world in very recent years due to the great changes which have taken place including the discoveries of atomic science, I am convinced that it is in the best interest of the Shia Muslim Ismailia Community that I should be succeeded by a young man who has been brought up and developed during recent years and in the midst of the new age and who brings a new outlook on life to his office as Imam. For these reasons, I appoint my grandson Karim, the son of my own son, Aly Salomone Khan to succeed to the title of Aga Khan and to the Imam and Pir of all Shia Ismailian followers."

He is buried in Aswan, Egypt at the Mausoleum of Aga Khan. Aswan (Arabic: أسوان Aswān) (, population 200,000) is a city in the south of Egypt, the capital of the Aswan Governorate. ...


See also

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Aga Khan III

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... The Fatimid Empire or Fatimid Caliphate ruled North Africa from A.D. 909 to 1171. ... A sub-sect of the Sevener Shia Muslim Ismaili sect. ... This article is about the hereditary title. ... The Aga Khan Palace, Pune was built in 1892 by Sultan Mahommed Shah, Aga Khan III, as an act of charity to provide employment for people hit by famine in the neighboring regions. ...

References

  1. ^ "Aga Khan, Fashionable Londoner, Holds Enormous Power in Islam", The New York Times, 8 July 1923, p. XX5.
  2. ^ According to "Memoirs of Aga Khan: World Enough and Time" (London: Cassel & Company, 1954), "In the year One thousand nine hundred and eight I was married to CLEOPE TERESA MAGLIANO according to the Muta form of marriage...". According to Anne Edwards' history of the Aga Khans ("Throne of Gold: The Lives of the Aga Khans", NY: William Morrow, 1996), Ali Solomone Khan's birth certificate states that his mother was considered single at the time of his birth, which was recorded as illegitimate. However, Islamic law states that a child born from a Muta marriage is considered legitimate. According to the Aga Khan's memoirs, he legally married Teresa Magliano in 1923, after the death of his first wife. Teresa, who reportedly had converted to Islam prior to the legal wedding in North Africa and was known as Princess Aga Khan, died in 1926, following an operation on 1 December 1926 ("Aga Khan's Wife Dies As He Buys Big Gem", The New York Times, 2 December 1926, p. 2).
  3. ^ "Aga Khan Marries Former Shopgirl", The New York Times, 8 December 1929, p. 3.
  4. ^ "Aga Khan Again a Father", The New York Times, 18 January 1933, p. 9.
  5. ^ "Princess Andrée", The New York Times, 30 December 1976, p. 19.
  6. ^ According to an interview she gave to an Egyptian journalist, her first name was Yvonne, though she is referred to as Yvette in most published refererences. In the same interview, she explained that she had been involved with the Aga Khan since 1935, nine years prior to their marriage. "Mata Salamat, The Begum Aga Khan -- Faithful to the Man and the Place", Al-Ahram Weekly, 23 April-29 April 1992.
  7. ^ "The Aga Khan Marries", The New York Times, 10 October 1944, p. 20.
  8. ^ "The Begum Aga Khan III", Daily Telegraph, Issue 45115, 3 July 2000.

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Additional reading

  • Daftary, F., "The Isma'ilis: Their History and Doctrines" Cambridge University Press, 1990.
  • Naoroji M. Dumasia, A Brief History of the Aga Khan (1903).
  • Aga Khan III, "Memoirs of Aga Khan: World Enough and Time", London: Cassel & Company, 1954; published same year in the United States by Simon & Schuster.
  • Anne Edwards, "Throne of Gold: The Lives of the Aga Khans", NY: William Morrow, 1996

External links

  • Video Clip from the History Channel website
Preceded by
Aga Khan II
Aga Khan
1885–1957
Succeeded by
Aga Khan IV

  Results from FactBites:
 
Aga Khan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (363 words)
Aga Khan (Persian: اغا خان) is the hereditary title of the Imam (spiritual and general leader), of the Nizari sect (result of the 1094 split from the Mustalis) within the Ismaili branch of Islam (Nizari Ismaili).
Aga Khan I = Aga Hasan Ali Shah = HH Shah Hasan Ali Shah Mehalatee Aga Khan I (1800-1881), 46th Imam (1817-1881)
Aga Khan IV = Karim Aga Khan = HH Prince Aga Khan IV = Prince Karim Al Husseini (b.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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