FACTOID # 19: Cheap sloppy joes: Looking for reduced-price lunches for schoolchildren? Head for Oklahoma!
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > African Methodist Episcopal
Jump to: navigation, search

The African Methodist Episcopal Church, usually called the "AME Church", is a Christian denomination founded by Bishop Richard Allen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1816. File links The following pages link to this file: African Methodist Episcopal Church ... Richard Allen (14 February 1760 - 26 March 1831) was born a slave of Benjamin Chew at Germantown, Pennsylvania (now a part of Philadelphia), but his family was soon sold to Stockley Sturgis whose plantation was near Dover, Delaware. ... Philadelphia is a village located in Jefferson County, New York. ... Jump to: navigation, search State nickname: The Keystone State Other U.S. States Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Governor Ed Rendell (D) Senators Arlen Specter (R) Rick Santorum (R) Official languages None Area 119,283 km² (33rd)  - Land 116,074 km²  - Water 3,208 km² (2. ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...

Contents


Church Name

Part of the series on
Methodism
John Wesley

Background
Christianity
Protestantism
Pietism
Anglicanism
Arminianism The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Arminianism Methodism United Methodist Church George Whitefield John Wesley Francis Asbury Charles Wesley Pietism African Methodist Episcopal Church Thomas Coke (Methodist) Prevenient Grace Christian perfection Atonement (Governmental view) List of Methodist theologians Imparted righteousness World Methodist Council Template:Methodism Methodist Church... Jump to: navigation, search For entries on other people named John Wesley, see John Wesley (disambiguation). ... Jump to: navigation, search Christianity is a monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament writings of his early followers. ... Jump to: navigation, search Protestantism is a movement within Christianity, representing a split from within the Roman Catholic Church during the mid-to-late Renaissance in Europe —a period known as the Protestant Reformation. ... Pietism was a movement, in the Lutheran Church, lasting from the late-17th century to the mid-18th Century. ... Jump to: navigation, search The term Anglican (from the Angles meaning English) describes the people and churches that follow the religious traditions developed by the established Church of England. ... Jump to: navigation, search For the Armenian nationality, see Armenia or the Armenian language. ...

Doctrinal distinctives
Articles of Religion
Prevenient Grace
Governmental Atonement
Imparted righteousness
Christian perfection
The Articles of Religion are an official doctrinal statement of American Methodism. ... Jump to: navigation, search Prevenient Grace is a Christian theological concept embraced primarily by Arminian Christians who are influenced by the theology of John Wesley and who are part of the Methodist movement. ... The Governmental view of the atonement (also known as the moral government theory) is a doctrine in Christian theology related to the meaning and effect of the death of Jesus Christ and has been traditionally taught in Arminian circles. ... Imputed righteousness, in Methodist theology, is that gracious gift of God given at the moment of the new birth which enables a Christian disciple to strive for holiness and sanctification. ... Christian Perfection is a controversial Christian doctrine which maintains that after conversion but before death a Christians soul may be cleansed from the stain of original sin. ...

People
Charles Wesley
George Whitefield
Thomas Coke
Francis Asbury
Richard Allen
Albert C. Outler Charles Wesley (12 December 1707 - 29 March 1788) was a leader of the Methodist movement, the younger brother of John Wesley. ... George Whitefield was a minister in the Church of England and one of the leaders of the Methodist movement. ... Thomas Coke (1747-1814) was born in the Welsh town of Brecon, the son of a wealthy apothecary. ... Francis Asbury (1745-1816) was born at Handsworth, near Birmingham, England of Methodist parents. ... Richard Allen (14 February 1760 - 26 March 1831) was born a slave of Benjamin Chew at Germantown, Pennsylvania (now a part of Philadelphia), but his family was soon sold to Stockley Sturgis whose plantation was near Dover, Delaware. ... Albert Cook Outler (1908-1989) was a 20th century American Methodist theologian and philosopher. ...

Largest groups
World Methodist Council
United Methodist Church
AME Church
British Methodist Church The World Methodist Council is a group composed of most of the worlds Wesleyan / Methodist denominations, working toward mission and unity. ... The United Methodist Church is the largest Methodist, and the second-largest Protestant, denomination in the United States. ... The Methodist Church of Great Britain or British Methodist Church is the largest Wesleyan / Methodist body in Great Britain. ...

Related movements
Holiness movement
Salvation Army
Personalism
Pentecostalism The holiness movement is composed of people who believe and propagate the belief that the carnal nature of man can be cleansed through faith and by the power of the Holy Spirit if one has had his sins forgiven through faith in Jesus. ... The Salvation Army is a Evangelist Christian denomination, a charity and a social services organization. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Pentecostal movement within protestant Christianity places special emphasis on the gifts of the Holy Spirit. ...

The word African means that the church was organized by people of African descent and heritage. It does not mean that the church was founded in honduras, or that it was for persons of African descent only.


The church's roots are of the family of Methodist churches. Methodism provides an orderly system of rules and regulations and places emphasis on a plain and simple gospel.


Episcopal refers to the form of government under which the church operates. The chief executive and administrative officers of the African Methodist Episcopal denomination are the Bishops of the church.


Motto

"God Our Father, Christ Our Redeemer, Man Our Brother"


Derived from Bishop Daniel Payne (1811-1893) See "God Our Father, Christ Our Redeemer, Man Our Brother: A Theological Interpretation of the AME Church." By Dr. James H. Cone, Ph. D. AME Church Review, Volume CVI, No. 341 (1991), page 25.


History

The African Methodist Episcopal Church has a unique history in that it is the first major religious denomination in the Western World that had its origin over sociological rather than theological beliefs and differences, and the first African-American organized and incorporated denomination in the US. The AME church is also the church that sponsored the first independent historical black college, Wilberforce University. The church was born in protest against slavery—against dehumanization of African people, brought to the American continent as cheap labor. Wilberforce University, located in Wilberforce, Ohio, was founded in 1856. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... World map showing location of Africa A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second_largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ...


The AMEC grew out of the Free African Society (FAS) which Richard Allen, Absalom Jones, and others established in Philadelphia in 1787. The church was organized by African-American members of St. George's Methodist Episcopal Church. The incident that led to this was the removal of Absalom Jones (1746–1818) from St. George's by the trustees while he was in the act of prayer. The congregation supported the act of the trustees, and Allen and Jones led the African-American members to form the Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in 1793. In general, they adopted the doctrines and form of government of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Jump to: navigation, search An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black), is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... The Methodist Episcopal Church, sometimes referred to as the M.E. Church, officially began at the Baltimore Christmas Conference in 1784. ... Absalom Jones Absalom Jones (1746 - February 13, 1818), was an African American abolitionist and clergyman. ... The Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church was founded in 1793 by Richard Allen, and African_American, at Sixth and Lombard Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Methodist Episcopal Church, sometimes referred to as the M.E. Church, officially began at the Baltimore Christmas Conference in 1784. ...


When officials at St. George’s MEC pulled blacks off their knees while praying, FAS members discovered just how far American Methodists would go to enforce racial discrimination against African Americans. Hence, these members of St. George’s made plans to transform their mutual aid society into an African congregation. Although most wanted to affiliate with the Protestant Episcopal Church, Allen led a small group who resolved to remain Methodists. In 1794 Bethel AME was dedicated with Allen as pastor. To establish Bethel’s independence from interfering white Methodists, Allen, a former Delaware slave, successfully sued in the Pennsylvania courts in 1807 and 1815 for the right of his congregation to exist as an independent institution. Because black Methodists in other middle Atlantic communities encountered racism and desired religious autonomy, Allen called them to meet in Philadelphia to form a new Wesleyan denomination, the AME.


While the AME is doctrinally Methodist, clergy, scholars, and lay persons have written important works which demonstrate the distinctive theology and praxis which have defined this Wesleyan body. Bishop Benjamin W. Arnett, in an address to the 1893 World’s Parliament of Religions, reminded the audience of the presence of blacks in the formation of Christianity. Bishop Benjamin T. Tanner wrote in 1895 in The Color of Solomon – What? that biblical scholars wrongly portrayed the son of David as a white man. In the post civil rights era theologians James Cone, Cecil W. Cone, and Jacqueline Grant who came out of the AME tradition critiqued Euro-centric Christianity and African American churches for their shortcomings in fully impacting the plight of those oppressed by racism, sexism, and economic disadvantage. Praxis is the customary use of knowledge or skills, distinct from theoretical knowledge. ... James Hall Cone (August 5, 1938 - ) is an African-American Christian theologian in the Methodist tradition. ...


Beliefs

The Motto "God Our Father, Christ Our Redeemer, Man Our Brother" is a great summary of what the African Methodist Episcopal Church believes. AME Anvil This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ...


Apostles' Creed

I believe in God the Father Almighty, Maker of heaven and earth, and in Jesus Christ his only son our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. The third day he arose from the dead. He ascended into heaven and sitteth at the right hand of God the Father Almighty; from thence he shall come to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the Church Universal+, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body and the life everlasting. Amen. The Apostles Creed is an early statement of Christian belief, probably from the first or second century. ...


+In the Catholic version of the apostle's creed, this part reads "The Holy Catholic Church." Since the word catholic means universal, many protestant versions of the apostle's creed read in a similar manner to the one employed by the AME Church. There are other differences between denominations as well, mainly based on accepted doctrines; however, the creed itself in all its forms is based on the Nicene Creed established by Emperor Constantine at the Council of Nicaea in AD 325. The Nicene Creed, or the Icon/Symbol of the Faith, is a Christian statement of faith accepted by the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, and most Protestant churches. ... Constantine. ... Council of Nicaea can refer to: First Council of Nicaea in AD 325 Second Council of Nicaea in AD 787 This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Church Mission

The Mission of the African Methodist Episcopal Church is to minister to the spiritual, intellectual, physical, emotional, and environmental needs of all people by spreading Christ's liberating gospel through word and deed. At every level of the Connection and in every local church, the African Methodist Episcopal Church shall engage in carrying out the spirit of the original Free African Society, out of which the A.M.E. Church evolved: that is, to seek out and save the lost, and serve the needy through a continuing program of (1) preaching the gospel, (2) feeding the hungry, (3) clothing the naked, (4) housing the homeless, (5) cheering the fallen, (6) providing jobs for the jobless, (7) administering to the needs of those in prisons, hospitals, nursing homes, asylums and mental institutions, senior citizens' homes; caring for the sick, the shut-in, the mentally and socially disturbed, and (8) encouraging thrift and economic advancement. [1]


Colleges, Seminaries & Universities

Wilberforce University, located in Wilberforce, Ohio, was founded in 1856. ... Morris Brown College is a historically black college university (HBCU) located in the West-End Community in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Shorter College is a four year, liberal arts Southern Baptist-affiliated college located in Rome, Georgia. ... Paul Quinn College is the oldest African-American liberal arts college in Texas. ... Campbell College is a public school (that is, an independent secondary school that charges tuition) in Belfast, Northern Ireland, in legal terminology it is a voluntary grammar school and educates boys from ages 11_18. ...

Structure

The General Conference

The General Conference is the supreme body of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. It is composed of the Bishops, as ex-officio presidents, according to the rank of election, and an equal number of ministerial and lay delegates, elected by each of the Annual Conferences and the lay Electoral Colleges of the Annual Conferences. Other ex-officio members are: the General Officers, College Presidents, Deans of Theological Seminaries; Chaplains in the Regular Armed Forces of the U.S.A. The General Conference meets quadrennialy (every four years), but may have extra sessions in certain emergencies. Jump to: navigation, search This page lists direct English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations, such as i. ...


Council of Bishops

The Council of Bishops is the Executive Branch of the Connectional Church. It has the general oversight of the Church during the interim between General Conferences. The Council of Bishops shall meet annually at such time and place as the majority of the Council shall determine and also at such other times as may be deemed necessary in the discharging its responsibility as the Executive Branch of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. The Council of Bishops shall hold at least two public sessions at each annual meeting. At the first, complaints and petitions against a Bishop shall be heard, at the second, the decisions of the Council shall be made public. All decisions shall be in writing.


Board of Incorporators

The Board of Incorporators, also known as the General Board of Trustees, has the supervision, in trust, of all connectional property of the Church and is vested with authority to act in behalf of th Connectional Church wherever necessary.


The General Board

The General Board is in many respects the administrative body and is comprised of various departmental Commissions made up of the respective Secretary-Treasurer, the General Secretary of the A.M.E,. Church the General Treasurer and the members of the various Commissions and one Bishop as presiding officer with the other Bishops associating.


Judicial Council

The Judicial Council is the highest judicatory body of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. It is an appellate court, elected by the General Conference and is amenable to it.


Overview

The AME church estimates around 5,000,000 members, 9000 ministers, and 7000 congregations in more than 30 nations in North and South America, Africa, and Europe . Twenty bishops and 12 general officers comprised the leadership of the denomination


The AME Church is a member of the National Council of Churches of Christ in the USA (NCC), and the World Council of Churches. Jump to: navigation, search The National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA (or National Council of Churches USA, NCC) is religious organization currently (2005) consisting of 35 Protestant, Anglican, and Orthodox Christian denominations. ... The World Council of Churches (WCC) is the principal international Christian ecumenical organization. ...


It is not the same as the U.A.M.E. Church founded in Delaware by Peter Spencer in 1813, or the AME Zion Church, founded in New York. The Union American Methodist Episcopal Church, which is usually called the U.A.M.E. Church, was formally organized as a separate denomination in 1865 by some congregations of the African Union Church founded by Peter Spencer in 1813. ... Jump to: navigation, search State nickname: The First State Other U.S. States Capital Dover Largest city Wilmington Governor Ruth Ann Minner (D) Senators Joe Biden (D) Thomas Carper (D) Official languages None Area 6,452 km² (49th)  - Land 5,068 km²  - Water 1,387 km² (21. ... Categories: Stub | 1782 births | 1843 deaths ... History The African Methodist Episcopal Zion church, or AME Zion Church, was officially formed in 1848, but operated for a number years before then. ... Jump to: navigation, search State nickname: The Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York City Governor George Pataki (R) Senators Charles Schumer (D) Hillary Rodham Clinton (D) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² or 54,556 square miles (27th)  - Land...


Bishops

Richard Allen (14 February 1760 - 26 March 1831) was born a slave of Benjamin Chew at Germantown, Pennsylvania (now a part of Philadelphia), but his family was soon sold to Stockley Sturgis whose plantation was near Dover, Delaware. ... William Paul Quinn (1788-1873) was the fourth bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. ...

Active Bishops

  • E. Earl McCloud, Jr.
  • Richard Franklin Norris
  • Adam Jefferson Richardson, Jr.
  • Robert Vaughn Webster
  • Phillip Robert Cousin, Sr.
  • John Richard Bryant
  • William Phillips DeVeaux, Sr.
  • Preston Warren Williams, II
  • Cornal Garnett Henning, Sr.
  • Theodore Larry Kirkland
  • Gregory Gerald McKinley Ingram
  • McKinley Young
  • Richard Allen Chappelle, Sr.
  • Vashti Murphy McKenzie
  • David Rwhynica Daniels, Jr
  • Samuel Lawrence Green, Sr.
  • Carolyn Tyler Guidry
  • Paul J. M. Kawimbe
  • Sarah Frances Davis
  • James Levert Davis
  • Wilfred Jacobus Messiah

See also

Churches Uniting in Christ (CUIC) brings together nine mainline American denominations (including both predominantly white and predominantly black churches), and was inaugurated on January 20, 2002. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ...

External links

Select District Websites

References

  • Encyclopedia of Religion in the South, Samuel S. Hill, editor
  • The Doctrine and Discipline of the African Methodist Episcopal Church 2000
  • The AMEC Book of Worship
  • History of the AME Church: The Black Church in Action, Howard D. Gregg, Ph.D.

Notes

  1. ^ The Doctrine and Discipline of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. (2000). p. 13.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Encyclopedia: African Methodist Episcopal Church (2687 words)
George Whitefield was a minister in the Church of England and one of the leaders of the Methodist movement.
The chief executive and administrative officers of the African Methodist Episcopal denomination are the Bishops of the church.
The Union American Methodist Episcopal Church, which is usually called the U.A.M.E. Church, was formally organized as a separate denomination in 1865 by some congregations of the African Union Church founded by Peter Spencer in 1813.
African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (318 words)
The African Methodist Episcopal Zion church, or AME Zion Church, was officially formed in 1848, but operated for a number years before then.
These early churches were still part of the Methodist church, although the congregations remained separate.
The AME Zion Church is different from the African Methodist Episcopal Church.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m