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Encyclopedia > Aeson

In Greek mythology, Aeson (or Aison) was the son of Tyro and Cretheus, father of Jason and Promachus. He had a brother, Pheres, and two half-brothers, Pelias and Neleus. Greek mythology consists of an extensive collection of narratives detailing the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines, which were first envisioned and disseminated in an oral-poetic tradition. ... In Greek mythology, Tyro was the daughter of Salmoneus and mother of Pelias and Neleus. ... In Greek mythology, Cretheus, or Krêtheus was the king and founder of Iolcus. ... Jason (Greek: Ίασων, Etruscan: Easun) is a hero of Greek mythology who led the Argonauts in the search of the Golden Fleece. ... In Greek mythology, Promachus (who leads in battle) referred to several different people. ... In Greek Mythology, Pheres son of Cretheus was the founder of Pherae in Thessaly. ... King Pelias was the father of Acastus, Pisidice, Alcestis in Greek mythology. ... Neleus was the son of Poseidon and Tyro, brother of Pelias. ...


Pelias was power-hungry and he wished to gain dominion over all of Thessaly. To this end, he banished Neleus and Pheres and locked Aeson in the dungeons in Iolcus. While in there, Aeson married and had several children with Alcimede, most famously, Jason. Aeson sent Jason to Chiron to be educated while Pelias, paranoid that he would be overthrown, was warned by an oracle to beware a man wearing one sandal. Map showing Thessaly periphery in Greece Thessaly (Θεσσαλια; modern Greek Thessalía; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is one of the 13 peripheries of Greece, and is further sub-divided into 4 prefectures. ... Iolcos (also known as Iolkos or Iolcus, Greek: Ιώλκος) was an ancient city in Thessaly, central-eastern Greece (near the modern city of Volos). ... In Greek mythology, Alcimede (mighty cunning) was one of the matrilineal Minyan daughters, the daughter of Clymene, Minyas daughter. ... In Greek mythology, Chiron (hand) — sometimes spelled Cheiron or Kiron — was held as the superlative centaur over his brethren. ... An oracle is a person or agency considered to be a source of wise counsel or prophetic opinion; an infallible authority, usually spiritual in nature. ...


Many years later, Pelias was holding the Olympics in honor of Poseidon when Jason, rushing to Iolcus, lost one of his sandals in a river while helping someone cross. When Jason entered Iolcus, he was announced as a man wearing one sandal. Paranoid, Pelias asked him what he (Jason) would do if confronted with the man who would be his downfall. Jason responded that he would send that man after the Golden Fleece. Pelias took that advice and sent Jason to retrieve the Golden Fleece. For months before the Olympic Games, runners relay the Olympic Flame from Olympia to the opening ceremony. ... In Greek mythology, the ram with the Golden Fleece (Okros Satsmisi in Georgian) was given to Nephele of Thessaly by Hermes for her to transport her children, Helle and Phrixus, away from Ino. ...


During Jason's absence, Pelias thought the Argo had sunk, and this was what he told Aeson and Promachus, who committed suicide by drinking poison, or killed them directly. In Greek mythology, Argo was the ship on which Jason and the Argonauts sailed from Iolcus to retrieve the Golden Fleece. ... In Greek mythology, Promachus (who leads in battle) referred to several different people. ...


Alternatively, he survived until Jason and his new wife, Medea, came back to Iolcus. She slit Aeson's throat, then put his corpse in a pot and Aeson came to life as a young man. She then told Pelias' daughters she would do the same for their father. They slit his throat and Medea refused to raise him, so Pelias stayed dead. Sarah Bernhardt in Euripides Medea, poster by Alfons Mucha In Greek mythology, Medea was the daughter of King Aeetes of Colchis (now a territory of modern Georgia), niece of Circe, and later wife to Jason. ... Iolcos (also known as Iolkos or Iolcus, Greek: Ιώλκος) was an ancient city in Thessaly, central-eastern Greece (near the modern city of Volos). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Aeson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (310 words)
In Greek mythology, Aeson (or Aison) was the son of Tyro and Cretheus, father of Jason and Promachus.
Aeson sent Jason to Chiron to be educated while Pelias, paranoid that he would be overthrown, was warned by an oracle to beware a man wearing one sandal.
She slit Aeson's throat, then put his corpse in a pot and Aeson came to life as a young man. She then told Pelias' daughters she would do the same for their father.
Jason, Greek Mythology Link. (2753 words)
Jason's father Aeson was himself the son of Cretheus 1, the founder of Iolcus, a city in Thessaly on the coast of the Gulf of Pagasae.
Aeson was son of Cretheus 1, son of Aeolus 1.
It is said that Aeson, threatened to death by Pelias 1, drank freely of a bull's blood and died.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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