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Encyclopedia > Aeolus
Aeolus
Aeolus

(Αἴολος), Latinized as Æolus, Eolus, Æolos, Aeolus, or Aiolus, was the name of three personages in Greek Mythology. Aeolus is the god of the winds. These three personages are often difficult to tell apart, and even the ancient mythographers appear to have been perplexed about which Æolus was which. Diodorus made an attempt to define each of these three (although it is clear he also became muddled), and his opinion is followed here. Briefly, the first Æolus was a son of Hellen and founder of the Æolian race; the second was a son of Poseidon, who led a colony to the Tyrrhenian Sea; and the third Æolus was a son of Hippotes who is mentioned in the Odyssey as Keeper of the Winds in Greek Mythology. All three men named Æolus appear to be connected genealogically, although the precise relationship is often ambiguous. The traditions regarding the second and third Æolus are especially entangled. Image File history File linksMetadata Aeolus1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Aeolus1. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... The Oricoli bust of Zeus, King of the Gods, in the collection of the Vatican Museum. ... Note: Hellen was not the same person as Helen of Troy, or Helenus, son of King Priam of Troy. ... Neptune reigns in the city centre, Bristol, formerly the largest port in England outside London. ... Tyrrhenian Sea. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Odysseus and Nausicaä - by Charles Gleyre The Odyssey (Greek: , Odusseia) is one of the two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the poet Homer. ... Zephyrus, the Greek god of the west wind, and the goddess Flora, from an 1875 painting by William-Adolphe Bouguereau In Greek mythology, the Anemoi (Άνεμοι — in Greek, Winds) were wind gods who were each ascribed a cardinal direction, from which their respective winds came, and were each associated with various... The Oricoli bust of Zeus, King of the Gods, in the collection of the Vatican Museum. ...

Aeolus by Alexander Jacovleff
Aeolus by Alexander Jacovleff

Image File history File links Yakovlev_Eoles. ... Image File history File links Yakovlev_Eoles. ...

Æolus (son of Hellen)

This Æolus was son of Hellen and the nymph Orseis, and a brother of Dorus, Xuthus and Amphictyon. He is described as the ruler of Aeolia (later called Thessaly) and held to be the founder of the Aeolic branch of the Greek/Hellenic nation. Æolus married Enarete, daughter of Deimachus (otherwise unknown). Æolus and Enarete had many children, although the precise number and identities of these children vary from author to author in the ancient sources. Those listed as the sons of Æolus and Enarete include Cretheus, Sisyphus, Deioneus, Salmoneus, Athamas, Perieres, Cercaphas and perhaps Magnes (who is usually regarded as a brother of Macedon). Another son is named Mimas, who provides a link to the bugagagagaagaga --70.95.91.252 07:29, 28 January 2007 (UTC)--70.95.91.252 07:29, 28 January 2007 (UTC)--70.95.91.252 07:29, 28 January 2007 (UTC)--70.95.91.252 07:29, 28 January 2007 (UTC)third Æolus (see below) in a genealogy that seems very contrived. Calyce, Peisidice, Perimele and Alcyone were counted among the daughters of Æolus and Enarete. This Aeolus also had an illegitimate daughter named Arne, begotten on Melanippe, daughter of the Centaur Cheiron. This Arne became the mother of the second Æolus, by the god Poseidon. Aeolus is often described as god of Wind. In Greek mythology, Dorus is the name of several individuals: Dorus was a son of Hellen and founder of the Dorian nation. ... In Greek mythology, Xuthus was a son of Hellen and Orseis and founder (through his sons) of the Achaean and Ionian nations. ... Amphictyon, in Greek mythology, was the second son of Deucalion and Pyrrha, although there was also a tradition that he was autochthonous (born from the earth). ... Aeolis (Aiolis) or Aeolia (Aiolia) was an area in west and northwest Asia Minor, mostly along the coast and offshore islands (particularly Lesbos), where the Aeolian Greek city_states were located. ... Map showing Thessaly periphery in Greece Thessaly (Θεσσαλια; modern Greek Thessalía; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is one of the 13 peripheries of Greece, and is further sub-divided into 4 prefectures. ... Linguists use the term Aeolic to describe a set of rather archaic Greek sub-dialects, spoken mainly in Boeotia (a region in Central Greece), in Lesbos (an island close to Asia Minor) and in other Greek colonies. ... In Greek mythology, Enarete was the wife of Aeolus and ancesstress of the Aeolians. ... In Greek mythology, Cretheus, or Krêtheus was the king and founder of Iolcus. ... Sisyphus (Greek Σίσυφος; transliteration: Sísuphos; IPA: ), in Greek mythology, was a sinner punished in the underworld by being set to roll a huge rock up a hill throughout eternity. ... In Greek mythology, Deioneus is either of two different people. ... In Greek mythology, Salmoneus was the son of Aeolus and Enarete, the brother of Athamas and the father of Tyro. ... The king of Orchomenus in Greek mythology, Athamas (rich harvest) was married first to the goddess Nephele with whom he had the twins Phrixus and Helle. ... In Greek mythology, Perieres or Perieris, was a son of Aeolus and husband of Gorgophone. ... Macarius Magnes Judah L. Magnes (Yehuda Magnes, Yehudah Magnes, Yehuda L. Magnes, Yehudah L. Magnes, Jehuda L. Magnes, Jehudah L. Magnes, Juda L. Magnes, Judah L. Magnes, Yehuda Leon Magnes, Yehudah Leon Magnes, Jehuda Leon Magnes, Jehudah Leon Magnes, Juda Leon Magnes, Judah Leon Magnes) Judah L. Magnes Museum This... Macedons regions and towns Macedon or Macedonia (from Greek ; see also List of traditional Greek place names) was the name of an ancient kingdom in the northern-most part of ancient Greece, bordering the kingdom of Epirus on the west and the region of Thrace to the east. ... Mimas may refer to: Mimas, son of Gaia in Greek mythology, was one of the Giants slain by Heracles. ... A calyx is a component of a flower. ... Alcyone was a Greek demi-goddess, sometimes regarded as one of the Pleiades. ... In Greek mythology, Arne was mother of Aeolus. ... In Greek mythology, Melanippe referred to several different people. ... In astronomy, 2060 Chiron is an object discovered in 1977 by Charles Kowal. ...


Æolus (son of Poseidon)

This Æolus was a son of Poseidon by Arne, daughter of Æolus. He had a twin brother named Boeotus. Arne confessed to her father that she was with child by the god Poseidon; her father, however, did not believe her, and handed her over to a man named Metapontus, King of Icaria. When Bœotus and Æo­lus were born, they were raised by Meta­pontus; but their stepmother (Autolyte, wife of Metapontus) quarrelled with their mother Arne, prompting Bœotus and Æolus to kill Autolyte and flee from Icaria. Bœotus (accompanied by Arne) went to southern Thessaly, and founded Boeotia; but Æolus went to a group of islands in the Tyrrhenian sea, which received from him the name of the Aeolian Islands; accord­ing to some accounts this Æolus founded the town of Lipara. Although his home has been traditionally identified as one of the Æolian Islands (there is little consensus as to which), near Sicily, an alternative location has been suggested at Gramvousa off the northwest coast of Crete. Æolus had six sons and six daughters, and the family lived happily together - that is until the day Æolus learned that one of his sons, named Macareus, had committed incest with his sister Canace. Horrified, Æolus expelled Macareus (Canace killed herself in shame) and threw the child borne of this incestuous union to the dogs. (Other accounts claim that the child, a daughter named Amphissa, was rescued and later beloved by Apollo.) Boeotia or Beotia (//, (Greek Βοιωτια; see also list of traditional Greek place names) was the central area of ancient Greece. ... The Aeolian Islands. ... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian, Latin, Sicilian and Spanish, Σικελία in Greek) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,700 km² and 5 million inhabitants. ... For the famous World War II battle, see: Battle of Crete For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Macar (also Macareus) was the son of Aeolus and Enarete, brother of Canace. ... In Greek mythology, Canace was a daughter of Aeolus and Enarete, and the beloved of Poseidon. ... Amphissa redirects here, for the ancient town near todays Roccella Ionica, see Amphissa, Italy Amfissa (Greek: Άμφισσα), other form: Amfissa, Latin: Amphissa is a town and the capital of the Phokida prefecture and the Parnassida province with the population around 10,000. ... Lycian Apollo, early Imperial Roman copy of a fourth century Greek original (Louvre Museum) In Greek and Roman mythology, Apollo (Ancient Greek , Apóllōn; or , Apellōn), the ideal of the kouros, was the archer-god of medicine and healing, light, truth, archery and also a bringer of death...


Æolus (son of Hippotes)

This Æolus is most frequently conflated with Æolus, the son of Poseidon. It is difficult to delineate this Æolus from the second Æolus, as their identities seem to have been merged by many ancient writers. The father of this third Æolus is given as Mimas, a son of the first Æolus (son of Hellen). According to some accounts, Mimas married the same Melanippe who was the mother of Arne! This Æolus lived on the floating island of Aeolia and was visited by Odysseus and his crew in the Odyssey. He gave hospitality for a month and provided for a west wind to carry them home. Unfortunately he also provided a gift of a bag containing each of the four winds, which Odysseus's crew members opened just before their home was reached. They were blown back to Aeolia, where Æolus refused to provide any further help. (Odyssey X, 2; Virgil I, 52). This Æolus was perceived by later authors (i.e., after Homer) as a god, rather than as a mortal and simple Keeper of the Winds (as in the Odyssey). Aeolis (Aiolis) or Aeolia (Aiolia) was an area in west and northwest Asia Minor, mostly along the coast and offshore islands (particularly Lesbos), where the Aeolian Greek city_states were located. ... Head of Odysseus from a Greek 2nd century BC marble group representing Odysseus blinding Polyphemus, found at the villa of Tiberius at Sperlonga Odysseus (Greek Odusseus), pronounced /oʊˈdɪs. ... Aeolis (Aiolis) or Aeolia (Aiolia) was an area in west and northwest Asia Minor, mostly along the coast and offshore islands (particularly Lesbos), where the Aeolian Greek city_states were located. ... Odysseus and Nausicaä - by Charles Gleyre The Odyssey (Greek: , Odusseia) is one of the two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to the poet Homer. ... A sculpture of Virgil, probably from the 1st century AD.  It should be possible to replace this fair use image with a freely licensed one. ...


In the Aeneid by Virgil, Juno offers Aeolus the nymph Deiopea as a wife if he will release his winds upon the fleet of Aeneas. The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos): is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BC (between 29 and 19 BC) that tells the legendary story of Aeneas, a Trojan who travelled to Italy where he... A sculpture of Virgil, probably from the 1st century AD.  It should be possible to replace this fair use image with a freely licensed one. ... // Juno may refer to: Juno (mythology), a major Roman goddess June, the month named after Juno Juno (band), an American indie rock band Juno (musical), a Broadway musical with score by Marc Blitzstein based on Sean OCaseys play Juno and the Paycock Juno Reactor, a trance music project... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Aeolus - LoveToKnow 1911 (159 words)
AEOLUS, in Greek mythology, according to Homer the son of Hippotes, god and father of the winds, and ruler of the island of Aeolia.
According to Virgil, Aeolus dwells on one of the Aeolian islands to the north of Sicily, Lipara or Strongyle (Stromboli), where he keeps the winds imprisoned in a vast cavern (Virgil, Aen.
Another genealogy makes him the son of Poseidon and Arne, granddaughter of Hippotes, and a descendant of Aeolus, king of Magnesia in Thessaly, the mythical ancestor of the tribe of the Aeolians (Diodorus iv.
Aeolus 2, Greek Mythology Link. (921 words)
Aeolus 2 was king of the Aeolian Islands, and was appointed by Zeus to be the Ruler of the Winds, both to calm them and to arouse them.
Aeolus 2 then presented him with the leather bag in which he had imprisoned the forces of all the winds, and this bag the Ruler of the Winds tightly secured with a silver wire to Odysseus' ship.
She could be the daughter of Aeolus 1, or also of Desmontes, who is said to have blinded her daughter for giving birth to two sons, and to have given orders to throw the children to the wild beasts.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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