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Encyclopedia > Aeneas
Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598.
Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598.
Aeneas carrying Anchises, black-figured oinochoe, ca. 520-510 BC, Louvre (F 118)
Aeneas carrying Anchises, black-figured oinochoe, ca. 520-510 BC, Louvre (F 118)

This article is about the Roman hero. For other uses, see Aeneas (disambiguation). Download high resolution version (1050x729, 119 KB)Federico Barocci, Aeneas Flight from Troy 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus... Download high resolution version (1050x729, 119 KB)Federico Barocci, Aeneas Flight from Troy 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus... Annunciation (1592-96) Oil on canvas, Santa Maria degli Angeli, Perugia. ... Events January 7 - Boris Godunov seizes the throne of Russia following the death of his brother-in-law, Tsar Feodor I. April 13 - Edict of Nantes - Henry IV of France grants French Huguenots equal rights with Catholics. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 733 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2073 × 1695 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 733 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2073 × 1695 pixel, file size: 1. ... Aeneas Bearing Anchises from Troy, by Carle van Loo, 1729 (Louvre) In Greek mythology, Anchises was a son of Capys and Themiste (daughter of Ilus, son of Tros) or Hieromneme, a naiad. ... An oenochoe, also spelt oinochoe, is a wine jug and a key form of Greek pottery. ... This article is about the museum. ... Aeneas was a Trojan hero and important figure in Virgils Aeneid and Homers Iliad. ...


In Greek mythology, Aeneas [pronounce[1]] (Greek: Αἰνείας, Aineías) was a Trojan hero, the son of prince Anchises and the goddess Aphrodite (Venus in Roman sources). His father was also the cousin of King Priam of Troy. The journey of Aeneas from Troy, (led by Aphrodite his mother) which led to the founding of the city Rome, is recounted in Virgil's Aeneid. He is considered an important figure in Greek and Roman legend and history. Aeneas is a character in Homer's Iliad and Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida. For other uses of Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... Aeneas Bearing Anchises from Troy, by Carle van Loo, 1729 (Louvre) In Greek mythology, Anchises was a son of Capys and Themiste (daughter of Ilus, son of Tros) or Hieromneme, a naiad. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... Marble Venus of the Capitoline Venus type, Roman (British Museum) Venus was a major Roman goddess principally associated with love and beauty, the rough equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. ... King Priam killed by Neoptolemus, son of Achilles, detail of an Attic red-figure amphora In Greek mythology, Priam (Greek Πρίαμος, Priamos) was the king of Troy during the Trojan War, and youngest son of Laomedon. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos) is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BC (between 29 and 19 BC) that tells the legendary story... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... For the Chaucer poem, see Troilus and Criseyde. ...

Contents

Mythology

In the Iliad, Aeneas is the leader of the Dardanians (allies of the Trojans), and a principal lieutenant of Hector, son of the Trojan king Priam. In the poem, Aeneas's mother Venus frequently comes to his aid on the battlefield: he a favorite of Apollo. Venus and Apollo rescue Aeneas from combat with Diomedes of Argos, who nearly kills him, and carry him away to Pergamos for healing. Even Poseidon, who normally favors the Greeks, comes to Aeneas's rescue when the latter falls under the assault of Achilles, noting that Aeneas, though from a junior branch of the royal family, is destined to become king of the Trojan people. The terms Dardan and Dardanian in classical writings were synonymous with the term Trojan, the Dardans being Trojans, an ancient people of Troas in northwestern Anatolia. ... See List of King Priams children Hector brought back to Troy. ... King Priam killed by Neoptolemus, son of Achilles, detail of an Attic red-figure amphora In Greek mythology, Priam (Greek Πρίαμος, Priamos) was the king of Troy during the Trojan War, and youngest son of Laomedon. ... Marble Venus of the Capitoline Venus type, Roman (British Museum) Venus was a major Roman goddess principally associated with love and beauty, the rough equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... Diomēdēs or Diomed (Gk:Διομήδης - God-like cunning or advised by Zeus) is a hero in Greek mythology, mostly known for his participation in the Trojan War. ... This article is about the city in Greece. ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... For other uses, see Achilles (disambiguation). ...


As seen in the first books of the Aeneid, Aeneas is one of the few Trojans who were not killed in battle or enslaved when Troy fell. When Troy was sacked by the Greeks, Aeneas, after being commanded by the gods to flee, gathered a group, collectively known as the Aeneads, who then traveled to Italy and became progenitors of the Romans. The Aeneads included Aeneas's trumpeter Misenus, his father Anchises, his friends Achates, Sergestus and Acmon, the healer Iapyx, his son Ascanius, and their guide Mimas. He carried with him the Lares and Penates, the statues of the household gods of Troy, and transplanted them to Italy. Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos) is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BC (between 29 and 19 BC) that tells the legendary story... Looting (which derives via the Hindi lut from Sanskrit lung, to rob), sacking, plundering, or pillaging is the indiscriminate taking of goods by force as part of a military or political victory, or during a catastrophe or riot, such as during war,[1] natural disaster,[2] or rioting. ... In Roman mythology, the Aeneads were the friends, family and companions of Aeneas, with whom they fled from Troy after the Trojan War. ... The ancient quarters of Rome. ... In Greek mythology, there were two people called Misenus. ... Aeneas Bearing Anchises from Troy, by Carle van Loo, 1729 (Louvre) In Greek mythology, Anchises was a son of Capys and Themiste (daughter of Ilus, son of Tros) or Hieromneme, a naiad. ... In Roman mythology, Achates was a close friend of Aeneas. ... In Roman mythology, Sergestus was a friend of Aeneas. ... In Greek mythology, Acmon is one of the Dactyls, associated with the anvil. ... In Greek mythology, Iapyx, son of Daedalus or Lycaon, was Aeneas healer during the Trojan War. ... Ascanius Hunting the Stag of Silvia, by Claude Lorrain (1682). ... Mimas may refer to: Mimas, son of Gaia in Greek mythology, was one of the Giants slain by Heracles. ... Lares (pl. ... In Roman mythology, the Di Penates or briefly Penates were originally patron gods (really geniuses) of the storeroom, later becoming household gods guarding the entire household. ...

Aeneas tells Dido about the fall of Troy, by Pierre-Narcisse Guérin.
Aeneas tells Dido about the fall of Troy, by Pierre-Narcisse Guérin.

(From here on, the Greek myths make room for the Roman mythology, so the Roman names of the gods will be used). After a brief, but fierce storm sent up against the group at Juno's request, Aeneas and his fleet made landfall at Carthage. Aeneas had a brief affair with the Carthaginian queen known as Dido, who proposed that the Trojans settle in her land and that she and Aeneas reign jointly over their peoples. Once again, this was in favour of Juno, who was told of the fact that her favorite city would eventually be defeated by the Trojans' descendants. However, the messenger god Mercury was sent by Jupiter and Venus to remind Aeneas of his journey and his purpose, thus compelling him to leave secretly and continue on his way. When Dido learned of this, she ordered a funeral pyre to be constructed for herself; and standing on it, she uttered a curse that forever would pit Carthage against Rome. She then committed suicide by stabbing herself and falling on the pyre. When Aeneas later traveled to Hades, he called to her ghost but she neither spoke nor acknowledged him. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 597 pixelsFull resolution (1256 × 937 pixel, file size: 137 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 597 pixelsFull resolution (1256 × 937 pixel, file size: 137 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... IVNO REGINA (Queen Juno) on a coin celebrating Julia Soaemias. ... Roman Carthage with former military harbor Carthage (Greek: , Latin: , from the Phoenician meaning new town; Arabic: ) refers both to an ancient city in Tunisia and to the civilization that developed within the citys sphere of influence. ... This article is about the ancient city-state of Carthage in North Africa. ... Aeneas recounting the Trojan War to Dido. ... A sculpture of the Roman god Mercury by 17th-century Flemish artist Artus Quellinus. ... For the planet see Jupiter. ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ...


The company stopped on the island of Sicily during the course of their journey. After the first trip, before the Trojans went to Carthage, Achaemenides, one of Odysseus' crew who had been left behind, traveled with them. After visiting Carthage, the Trojans returned to Sicily where they were welcomed by Acestes, king of the region and son of the river Crinisus by a Dardanian woman. Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... In Greek mythology, Achaemenides was one of Odysseus crew who stayed on Sicily with Polyphemus until Aeneas arrived and took him with him. ... For other meanings, see Odysseus crater, 1143 Odysseus “Ulysses” redirects here. ... In Roman mythology, Acestes (pleasing goat) was son the river Crinisus by a Dardanian woman. ... Categories: Move to Wiktionary | Mythology stubs ... Dardania in Greek mythology is the name of a city founded on Mount Ida by Dardanus from which also the region and the people took their name. ...


Soon after arriving in Italy, Aeneas made war against the city of Falerii. Latinus, king of the Latins, welcomed Aeneas's army of exiled Trojans and let them reorganize their life in Latium. His daughter Lavinia had been promised to Turnus, king of the Rutuli, but Latinus received a prophecy that Lavinia would be betrothed to one from another land — namely, Aeneas. Latinus heeded the prophecy, and Turnus consequently declared war on Aeneas at the urging of Juno, who was aligned with King Tarchon of the Etruscans and Queen Amata of the Latins. Aeneas' forces prevailed. Turnus was killed and his people were captured. According to Livy Aeneas was victorious but Latinus died in the war. Aeneas founded the city of Lavinium, named after his wife. He later welcomed Dido's sister, Anna Perenna, who then committed suicide after learning of Lavinia's jealousy. Falerii (now Cività Castellana), one of the twelve chief cities of Etruria, situated about one mile west of the ancient Via Flaminia, 32 miles north Rome. ... Latinus or Latinos in Greek mythology, in Hesiods Theogony, was the son of Odysseus and Circe who ruled the Tyrsenoi, that is the Etruscans, with his brothers Agrius and Telegonus. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... Latium (Lazio in Italian) is a region of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzo, Marche, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... In Roman mythology, Lavinia was the daughter of Latinus and Amata. ... In Vergils Aeneid , Turnus was the King of the Rutuli, and the chief antagonist of the hero Aeneas. ... The Rutuli were members of a legendary Italian tribe. ... IVNO REGINA (Queen Juno) on a coin celebrating Julia Soaemias. ... In Etruscan mythology, Tarchon and his brother, Tyrrhenus were culture heroes who founded the Etruscan Federation of twelve cities. ... Extent of Etruscan civilization and the twelve Etruscan League cities. ... In Roman mythology, Amata was the wife of King Latinus of the Latins. ... The Latins were an ancient Italic people who migrated to central Italy, (Latium Vetus - Old Latium), in the 2nd millennium B.C., maybe from the Adriatic East Coast and Balkanic Area, perhaps from pressures by Illyrian peoples. ... A portrait of Titus Livius made long after his death. ... Lavinium was an ancient Roman city of the Latium, said to have been named by Aeneas in honor of Lavinia, daughter of Latinus, king of the Latins, and his wife, Amata. ... Anna Perenna was an old Roman deity of the circle or ring of the year, as the name (per annum) clearly indicates. ...


After his death, his mother, Venus asked Jupiter to make her son immortal. Jupiter agreed and the river god Numicius cleansed Aeneas of all his mortal parts and Venus anointed him with Ambrosia and Nectar, making him a god. Aeneas was recognized as the god Jupiter Indiges. Inspired by the work of James Frazer, some have posited that Aeneas was originally a life-death-rebirth deity.Hi mom Marble Venus of the Capitoline Venus type, Roman (British Museum) Venus was a major Roman goddess principally associated with love and beauty, the rough equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. ... For the planet see Jupiter. ... For the planet see Jupiter. ... The Numicus was a river of ancient Latium which flowed into the sea between the towns of Lavinium and Ardea. ... Marble Venus of the Capitoline Venus type, Roman (British Museum) Venus was a major Roman goddess principally associated with love and beauty, the rough equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. ... According to the Roman historian Livy, Jupiter Indiges is the name given to the deified hero Aeneas. ... Sir James George Frazer (January 1, 1854, Glasgow, Scotland – May 7, 1941), was a Scottish social anthropologist influential in the early stages of the modern studies of mythology and comparative religion. ... The category life-death-rebirth deity also known as a dying-and-rising god is a convenient means of classifying the many divinities in world mythology who are born, suffer death or an eclipse or other death-like experience, pass a phase in the underworld among the dead, and are...


Family and legendary descendants

Aeneas had an extensive family tree. His wet-nurse was Caieta, and he is the father of Ascanius with Creusa, and of Silvius with Lavinia. The former, also known as Iulus (or Julius), founded Alba Longa and was the first in a long series of kings. According to the mythology outlined by Virgil in the Aeneid, Romulus and Remus were both descendants of Aeneas through their mother Rhea Silvia, making Aeneas progenitor of the Roman people. Some early sources call him their father or grandfather [1], but, considering the commonly accepted dates of the fall of Troy (1184 BC) and the founding of Rome (753 BC), this seems unlikely. The Julian family of Rome, most notably Julius Cæsar and Augustus, traced their lineage to Ascanius and Aeneas, thus to the goddess Venus. Through the Julians, the Palemonids also make this claim. The legendary kings of Britain also trace their family through a grandson of Aeneas, Brutus. A wet nurse is a woman who breast feeds a baby that is not her own. ... In Roman mythology, Caieta was the wet-nurse of Aeneas. ... Ascanius Hunting the Stag of Silvia, by Claude Lorrain (1682). ... In Greek mythology, four people had the name Creusa. ... Silvius has several meanings: In Roman mythology, Silvius was the son of Aeneas and Lavinia. ... In Greek and Roman mythology, Ascanius was a son of Aeneas and Creusa. ... Alba Longa (in Italian sources occasionally written Albalonga) was an ancient city of Latium, in the Alban Hills founder and head of the Latin Confederation; it was destroyed by Rome around the middle of the 7th century BC. // Legendary history According to legend Alba Longa was founded by Ascanius or... This page describes the ancient heroes who founded the city of Rome. ... (Redirected from 1184 BC) Centuries: 13th century BC - 12th century BC - 11th century BC Decades: 1230s BC 1220s BC 1210s BC 1200s BC 1190s BC - 1180s BC - 1170s BC 1160s BC 1150s BC 1140s BC 1130s BC Events and Trends April 24 1184 BC - Traditional date of the fall of... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Centuries: 9th century BC - 8th century BC - 7th century BC Decades: 800s BC 790s BC 780s BC 770s BC 760s BC - 750s BC - 740s BC 730s BC 720s BC 710s BC 700s BC Events and Trends 756 BC - Founding of Cyzicus. ... Julius (fem. ... Gaius Julius Caesar (Latin: IMP·C·IVLIVS·CAESAR·DIVVS¹) (b. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... Coat of Arms of Palemonids and Gediminids Palemonids was a legendary dynasty of Grand Princes of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and Ruthenia that reigned from the 10th to the 14th century. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and to make a clear distinction between fact and fiction, this article may require cleanup. ... Brutus of Troy, also of Britain (Welsh: Bryttys), was the legendary founding king of Britain and great grandson of Aeneas, according to Italy for the accidental killing of his natural father Silvius, Brutus liberated a group of Trojans living in slavery in Greece and led them forth, received a vision...


Classical sources

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Aeneas
Wikisource has an original article from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica about:
Aeneas

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... Apollodorus was a common name in ancient Greece. ... The Bibliotheke was renowned as the chief work of Greek historian and scholar. ... Apollodorus was a common name in ancient Greece. ... An epitome (Greek epitemnein—to cut short) is a summary or miniature form, also used as a synonym for embodiment. ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos) is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BC (between 29 and 19 BC) that tells the legendary story... For other uses, see Ovid (disambiguation) Publius Ovidius Naso (March 20, 43 BC – 17 AD) was a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid who wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... // Cover of George Sandyss 1632 edition of Ovids Metamorphosis Englished The Metamorphoses by the Roman poet Ovid is a poem in fifteen books that describes the creation and history of the world in terms according to Greek and Roman points of view. ... For other uses, see Ovid (disambiguation) Publius Ovidius Naso (March 20, 43 BC – 17 AD) was a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid who wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... Heroides (The Heroines) or Epistulae Heroidum (Letters of Heroines) was a work composed by Ovid in 5 BC. It is composed of fifteen fictional letters as if written by mythological heroines of antiquity grieving over their lovers mistreatment or neglect. ... A portrait of Titus Livius made long after his death. ...

Medieval literature

In the Divine Comedy Dante sees the shade of Aeneas among other Roman worthies in the section of Limbo reserved for "virtuous pagans". Dante shown holding a copy of The Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory and the city of Florence, in Michelinos fresco. ...

  • Roman d'Enéas

The Roman dEnéas is a roman of Medieval French literature, dating to ca. ...

Aeneas's Route

http://www.idst.vt.edu/thbecker/1124/aeneid.jpeg


In modern culture

  • Turks, Basques, North Africans, and some Irish population believe that he was their ancestor.
  • A Chinese electric company use Aeneas as a brand-name.
  • A hotel name in Cyprus
  • A character in Soul Calibur 3
  • A character in the best-selling Troy series by late author David Gemmell

Soul Calibur III is the fourth installment in the Soul series of fighting games. ... David Andrew Gemmell (August 1, 1948–July 28, 2006) was a popular UK fantasy writer and occasional historical fictionalist. ...

Family tree

 
 
 
Zeus/Jupiter
 
Electra
 
Teucer
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dardanus
 
 
 
Batea
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ilus
 
 
Erichthonius
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tros
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ilus
 
 
 
Assaracus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Laomedon
 
Themiste
 
Capys
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Priam
 
 
 
Anchises
 
Aphrodite/Venus
 
Latinus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Creusa
 
 
 
 
 
Aeneas
 
 
 
Lavinia
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ascanius
 
 
 
 
 
Silvius
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Silvius
 
 
 
Aeneas Silvius
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Brutus of Britain
 
 
Latinus Silvius
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alba
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Atys
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Capys
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Capetus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tiberinus Silvius
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Agrippa
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Romulus Silvius
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Aventinus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Procas
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Numitor
 
Amulius
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rhea Silvia
 
Ares/Mars
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hersilia
 
Romulus
 
Remus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Kings of Rome

For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... For the planet see Jupiter. ... The Pleiade, or Oceanid, Electra of Greek mythology was one of the seven daughters of Atlas and Pleione. ... In Greek mythology, King Teucer (also Teucrus) was said to have been the son of the river Scamander and of the nymph Idaea. ... In Greek mythology, Dardanus (burner up) was a son of Zeus by Electra, daughter of Atlas, and founder of the city of Dardania on Mount Ida in the Troad. ... Batea (also spelled Bateia) is a figure in Greek mythology said to be the daughter or (less commonly) the aunt of King Teucer, ruler of a tribe known as the Teucrians (Teucri). ... Ilus is the name of several mythological/homeric persons associated directly or indirectly with Troy. ... The mythical King Erichthonius of Dardania and Batia (died c. ... In Greek mythology, King Tros of Dardania, son of Erichthonius from whom he inherited the throne and the father of three named sons: Ilus, Assaracus, and Ganymedes. ... Ilus is the name of several mythological/homeric persons associated directly or indirectly with Troy. ... In Greek mythology, Assaracus was the second son of King Tros of Dardania. ... In Greek mythology, Laomedon was a Trojan king and father of Ganymedes, Priam, Astyoche, Lampus, Hicetaon, Clytius, Cilla, Aethylla, and Hesione. ... Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Stub ... In Greek mythology, Capys was a son of Assaracus and Aigesta or Themiste or Clytodora (daughter of Laomedon) and father of Anchises and so grandfather of Aeneas. ... King Priam killed by Neoptolemus, son of Achilles, detail of an Attic red-figure amphora In Greek mythology, Priam (Greek Πρίαμος, Priamos) was the king of Troy during the Trojan War, and youngest son of Laomedon. ... Aeneas Bearing Anchises from Troy, by Carle van Loo, 1729 (Louvre) In Greek mythology, Anchises was a son of Capys and Themiste (daughter of Ilus, son of Tros) or Hieromneme, a naiad. ... The Birth of Venus, (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, 1485 For other uses, see Aphrodite (disambiguation). ... Marble Venus of the Capitoline Venus type, Roman (British Museum) Venus was a major Roman goddess principally associated with love and beauty, the rough equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. ... Latinus or Latinos in Greek mythology, in Hesiods Theogony, was the son of Odysseus and Circe who ruled the Tyrsenoi, that is the Etruscans, with his brothers Agrius and Telegonus. ... In Greek mythology, four people had the name Creusa. ... In Roman mythology, Lavinia was the daughter of Latinus and Amata. ... Ascanius Hunting the Stag of Silvia, by Claude Lorrain (1682). ... Silvius has several meanings: In Roman mythology, Silvius was the son of Aeneas and Lavinia. ... Aeneas Silvius was the third descndant of Aeneas and third king of Alba Longa, the site of Rome. ... Brutus of Troy, also of Britain (Welsh: Bryttys), was the legendary founding king of Britain and great grandson of Aeneas, according to Italy for the accidental killing of his natural father Silvius, Brutus liberated a group of Trojans living in slavery in Greece and led them forth, received a vision... Latinius Silvius was the fourth descendant of Aeneas and fourth king of Alba Longa (according to Livy). ... Alba in roman mythology is a son of Latinus Silvius and the fifth king of Alba Longa (Ovid, Metamorphoses, ХIV 612; Livy, І, 3). ... In Greek mythology, Capys was a son of Assaracus and Aigesta or Themiste or Clytodora (daughter of Laomedon) and father of Anchises and so grandfather of Aeneas. ... Capetus was a descendant of Aeneas. ... Tiberinus Silvius (the Tibers child born in the woods) was the ninth in the legendary king-list of the city Alba Longa in Lazio. ... Agrippa was a descendant of Aeneas and therefore a king of Alba Longa. ... Romulus Silvius was a descendant of Aeneas, and because of this a king of Alba Longa. ... Aventinus, one of the mythical kings of Alba Longa, who was buried on the Aventine Hill later named after him. ... In Roman mythology, King Procas of Alba Longa was the father of Amulius and Numitor. ... In Roman mythology, King Numitor of Alba Longa, son of Procas, was the father of Rhea Silvia. ... In Roman mythology, Amulius was the brother of Numitor and son of Procas. ... Rhea Silvia (also written as Rea Silvia), and also known as Ilia, was the mythical mother of the twins Romulus and Remus, who founded the city of Rome. ... This article is about the ancient Greek god; for other uses, see Ares (disambiguation). ... Mars was the Roman god of war, the son of Juno and a magical flower (or Jupiter). ... In Roman mythology, Hersilia was the wife of Romulus. ... This page describes the ancient heroes who founded the city of Rome. ... This page describes the ancient heroes who founded the city of Rome. ... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law The King of Rome (Latin: rex, regis) was the chief magistrate of the Roman Kingdom. ...

Notes

  1. ^ The name Aeneas is pronounced, in the English manner, as "ay-Nay'-uhs" or in the Greek manner, as "ay-Nee-us" depending on regional accent.
Roman mythology series
Major deities
Apollo | Ceres | Diana | Juno | Jupiter | Mars | Mercury | Minerva | Venus | Vulcan
Divus Augustus | Divus Julius | Fortuna | Lares | Pluto | Quirinus | Sol | Vesta
Heroes and legendary mortals
Aeneas | Hercules | Romulus and Remus | Seven Kings of Rome

  Results from FactBites:
 
Aeneas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (934 words)
Aeneas (Greek: Αινείας, Aineías) was a Trojan hero, the son of prince Anchises and the goddess Aphrodite (Venus in Roman sources).
Aeneas is a character in Homer's Iliad and Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida.
In the Iliad, Aeneas is the leader of the Dardans (allies of the Trojans), and a principal lieutenant of Hector, son of the Trojan king Priam.
Aeneas - definition of Aeneas in Encyclopedia (635 words)
Aeneas, or Aineas was a famous Trojan hero, son of Anchises and Aphrodite, father of Ascanius with Creusa, and one of the most important figures in Greek and Roman legendary history.
Aeneas was then eneveloped in a cloud by Apollo, who took him to Pergamos, a sacred spot in Troy.
His daughter Lavinia had been promised to Turnus, king of the Rutuli, but Latinus preferred to offer her to Aeneas, because of recent omens; Turnus consequently declared war on Aeneas (at the urging of Hera), who was allied with King Tarchon of the Etruscans and Queen Amata of the Rutulians.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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