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Encyclopedia > Aemilianus
Aemilianus celebrating peace-maker Mars god of war.
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Aemilianus celebrating peace-maker Mars god of war.
Cornelia Supra (or Supera), was the wife of Aemilianus, and of African origin.
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Cornelia Supra (or Supera), was the wife of Aemilianus, and of African origin.

Marcus Aemilius Aemilianus (ca. 207 - 253), was Roman emperor for about three months in 253. Image File history File links Aemilianus. ... Image File history File links Aemilianus. ... Mars was the Roman god of war, the son of Juno and a magical flower (or Jupiter). ... Image File history File links Antoninianus-Cornelia_Supra-RIC_0030. ... Image File history File links Antoninianus-Cornelia_Supra-RIC_0030. ... Events Sun Quan battles Huang Zu at Xiakou Births Liu Shan, last emperor of the Kingdom of Shu Deaths Guo Jia, brilliant military advisor to Cao Cao Ling Cao, a general under Sun Quan Categories: 207 ... For the book see 253 (book). ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation) The Roman Empire is the term conventionally used to describe the Ancient Roman polity in the centuries following its reorganization under the leadership of Octavian (better known as Augustus), until its radical reformation in what was later to be known as the Byzantine...


Aemilianus was born into an obscure family from the Roman province of Africa. He was married to a Cornelia Supra but other details of his early life are unknown. In 251, the governor of Moesia Superior, Trebonianus Gallus, was acclaimed emperor following the death of Trajan Decius and his two sons. Aemilianus was sent to replace him, serving as governor for both Moesia and Pannonia. His primary responsibility was to assure peace along the Danube frontier, which had been harassed in the previous years by the Goths led by king Cniva. Map of the Roman Empire, with the provinces, after 120 AD. In Ancient Rome, a province (Latin, provincia, pl. ... Categories: Historical stubs | Ancient Roman provinces ... Events July 1 – In the Battle of Abrittus, the Goths defeat the Romans; emperors Decius and Herennius Etruscus are killed. ... In ancient geography, Moesia was a district inhabited chiefly by Thracian peoples. ... Trebonianus Gallus on a coin celebrating Aeternitas. ... Gaius Messius Quintus Trajanus Decius (201-251), Roman emperor (249 - 251), the first of the long succession of distinguished men from the Illyrian provinces, was born at Budalia near Sirmium in lower Pannonia. ... Position of the Roman province of Pannonia Pannonia is an ancient country bounded north and east by the Danube, conterminous westward with Noricum and upper Italy, and southward with Dalmatia and upper Moesia. ... The Danube (Donau in German; Dunaj in Slovak; Duna in Hungarian; Dunav in Croatian; Дунав/Dunav in Serbian; Дунав in Bulgarian; Dunăre in Romanian; Дунай (Dunay) in Ukrainian; Danuvius in Latin) is Europes second-longest river (after the Volga). ... Gothic woman, trad style, with spikes and piercings This article is about the contemporary goth/gothic subculture. ... Cniva (flourished mid-3rd century) was the Gothic king who defeated and killed Decius and his older son, Herennius Etruscus, at the Battle of Abrittus in 251. ...


Gallus secured the throne and controlled the outbreak of plague that devastated the city of Rome. However, he was not a popular with the army, mainly due to the humiliating treaties signed in 251 with the Goths and to the attack of king Shapur I of Persia against Syria. Aemilianus personified this discontent and refused to pay the tribute due to Cniva in 253. The Goths then invaded the Roman provinces to demand reparation but Aemilianus inspired his troops to defeat them early that summer. The army was satisfied to see the Roman honour restored and acclaimed Aemilianus as emperor. In order to make the claim real, he abandoned his provinces and marched into Italy. Gallus and his co-emperor and son Volusianus gathered an army, ordered reinforcements from the Rhine border and prepared to defend the throne from usurpation. Aemilianus was not impressed and continued his march, trusting in the value of his veteran legions. A battle was never fought because Gallus' soldiers, anticipating defeat, assassinated him and his son and declared for Aemilianus. Doctor Schnabel von Rom (English: Doctor Beak of Rome) engraving by Paul Fürst (after J Columbina). ... A coin of Shapur I Shapur I, son of Ardashir I, was king of Persia from 241 to 272. ... Volusianus protrait on a tetradrachm. ... Usurpers were a common feature of the late Roman Empire, especially from the so-called crisis of the third century onwards, when political instability became the rule. ...


The Roman senate readily accepted this new emperor and confirmed the title of Augustus for Aemilianus and of Augusta for his wife, Cornelia Supera. However, Valerian, the governor of the Rhine provinces, still loyal to the now dead Gallus, was on his way southwards to re-enforce, and now revenge, his former Emperor. When the two armies faced each other near Spoletium that September, Aemilianus, like Gallus before him, was assassinated by his own troops when they saw Valerian's army would be impossible to beat. The Roman Senate (Latin, Senatus) was a deliberative body which was important in the government of both the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire. ... The famous statue of Octavian at the Prima Porta Caesar Augustus (Latin:IMP·CAESAR·DIVI·F·AVGVSTVS) ¹ (23 September 63 BC–19 August AD 14), known to modern historians as Octavian for the period of his life prior to 27 BC, is considered the first and one of the most... // Augusta as a place name Augusta, derived from Augustus the emperor, is also part of the original Latin names of many ancient places. ... Valerian on a coin celebrating goddess Fortuna, associated with health and wealth. ...


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Preceded by:
Trebonianus Gallus and Volusianus
Roman Emperor
253
Succeeded by:
Valerian

  Results from FactBites:
 
Aemilianus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (434 words)
Aemilianus was born into an obscure family from the Roman province of Africa.
Aemilianus was sent to replace him, serving as governor for both Moesia and Pannonia.
Aemilianus was not impressed and continued his march, trusting in the value of his veteran legions.
Roman Emperors - DIR Aemilius Aemilianus (2058 words)
Aemilianus, commander of the Pannonian legions, did his best to encourage his troops, who did not dare resist the successful barbarians, and reminded them of their Roman honor.
Indeed, Aemilianus could never have contemplated investing Rome, and, given what had just transpired in Moesia, it seems doubtful that he would have chosen to leave that province denuded of defenders or that his troops would have acquiesced in such a move.
The epigraphic and numismatic evidence for Aemilianus' reign is unremarkable.
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