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Encyclopedia > Aegeus

In Greek mythology comprises the collected legends of Greek gods and goddesses and ancient heroes and heroines, originally created and spread within an oral-poetic tradition. Our surviving sources of mythology are literary reworkings of this oral tradition, supplemented by interpretations of iconic imagery, sometimes modern ones, sometimes ancient ones, as... Greek mythology, Aegeus, also Aigeus, Aegeas or Aigeas, was the father of Theseus (Θησευς) was a legendary king of Athens, son of Aegeus (or of Poseidon). Theseus was considered by Athenians as the great reformer. His name comes from the same root as θεσμoς -- thesmos, Greek for institution. them fit into it... Theseus and an Before the Athenian democracy, the tyrants, and the archons, Athens was ruled by kings. Most of these are probably mythical or only semi-historical. This list is based on that given by Eusebius. Earliest kings These two kings were supposed to have ruled before the flood of the Deucalion story... Athenian King. He was the son of Pandion can have several meanings. In Greek mythology, Pandion was the name of two kings of Athens. See Pandion I and Pandion II. In biology, Categories: Disambiguation ... Pandion and a brother of Pallas Athena. Roman copy of Greek statue. Click for more information about this image. In Greek mythology, Pallas was a son of Crius and Eurybia, husband of Styx. He was the father of Zelus, Nike, Cratos, and Bia (and sometimes, Eos or Selene). Pallas was the god of wisdom. Pallas... Pallas, In Greek mythology, Nisos was one of the four sons of Pandion. Upon the death of Pandion, Nisos and his brothers (Aegeas, Pallas, and Lykos) took control of Athens from Metion, who had seized the throne from Pandion. They divided the government in four but Aegeas became king. Categories: Stub... Nisos, and In Greek mythology, Lycus, or Lykos, referred to several people. Son of Poseidon and Celaeno Son of Dascylus of Mysia. He was hospitable towards the Argonauts and Heracles, who conquered the land of the Bebryces (Heraclea). Son of Hyrieus. He became the guardian of Labdacus and Laius. Brother of Nycteus... Lykos.


Upon the death of Pandion, Aegeus and his brothers took control of The Acropolis in central Athens, one of the most important landmarks in world history. The Parthenon, the main monument on the site, was built in favour of goddess Athena, the patron of the city Athens ( Greek: Αθήνα , plural for Athena), and in the 19th century this... Athens from In Greek mythology, Metion was a son of King Erechtheus of Athens or of Eupalamus son of King Erechtheus. He fades into obscurity but his sons later drove King Pandion II out of Athens into exile. Among these sons are listed Eupalamus, Sicyon, and Daedalus who are also given other... Metion, who had seized the throne from Pandion. They divided the government in four but Aegeas became king. His first wife was Meta can refer to: A prefix derived from Greek, see Meta- Meta, Colombia, a department of Colombia. Meta, Missouri; a town in Missouri Meta, Kentucky; a town in Kentucky The first wife of Aegeas in Greek mythology, who bore him no heirs. Wikipedia itself. Categories: Disambiguation ... Meta and the second was Chalciope was a princess in Greek mythology, daughter of King Aeetes of Colchis, sister of Medea and wife of Phrixus. Phrixus, son of Athamus and Nephele, along with his twin Helle, were hated by their stepmother, Ino. Ino hatched a devious plot to get rid of the twins, roasting all... Chalciope.


Still without a male heir, Aegeus asked the , to speak. In classical Greece, the pre-eminent oracle – the Sibyl (or Pythia) – operated at the temple of Apollo at Delphi. This oracle exerted considerable influence throughout Hellenic culture; the Greeks consulted her prior to all major undertakings: wars, the founding of colonies, and so forth. The semi... Oracle at View of Delphi, looking down from the theater. Delphi (Greek Δελφοί , the centre of the universe. Location Delphi is located in a plateau on the side of Mt. Parnassus. This semicircular spur is known as Phaedriades; it overlooks the Pleistos Valley. Southwest of Delphi, about... Delphi for advice. Her cryptic words were "Do not loosen the bulging mouth of the wineskin until you have reached the height of Athens."


Aegeus (king of Athens) went to Troezena and met with In Greek mythology, Aethra was a daughter of King Pittheus of Troezena and, with Aegeas, mother of Theseus. Aegeas (King of Athens) went to Troezena (a city located SW of Athens) and met with Aethra, daughter of Troezenas king, Pittheus. They had sex and then, in some versions, Aethra... Aethra, daughter of Troezena's king In Greek mythology, Pittheus was a son of Pelops and father of Aethra. He was the King of Troezen. He was a wise man and understood the words of Aegeus prophesy when no one else did. Ovid VIII, 622, Categories: Greek mythological people ... Pittheus. Pittheus understood the prophesy and introduced Aegeas to his daughter, Aethra, when he was drunk. They had sex and then, in some versions, Aethra waded out to the sea to Sphairia and had sex with . to give) - thus Poseidon would mean something like distribution-lord or husband of the distributor, to mathc Damater distribution-mother. Given Poseidons connection with horses as well as the sea, and the landlocked situation of the likely Indo-European homeland, some scholars have proposed that Poseidon was originally an... Poseidon). When she fell pregnant, Aegeus decided to go back to Athens. Before leaving, he covered his sandals, shield and sword under a huge rock and told her that when their son grew up, he should move the rock and bring the weapons back.


Theseus, the child, grew up and became a brave young man. He managed to move the rock and took his father's arms. His mother then told him the truth about who his father was and how he should take the weapons back to him. Theseus decided to go to Athens and had the choice of going by sea, which was the safe way or by land, following a dangerous path with thieves and bandits all the way. Young, brave and ambitious, Theseus decided to go to Athens by land.


When Theseus arrived, he did not reveal his true identity. He was welcomed by Aegeas, who was suspicious about the stranger who came to Athens. Aegeas' wife, Medea by Evelyn De Morgan In Greek mythology Medea was the daughter of King Aeetes (Georgian . But for all its self-consciousness and researched archaic vocabulary, the late epic was based on very old, scattered materials. Medeas role began after Jason arrived from Iolcus in Colchis to claim the... Medea (who had fled from the wrath of Jason,ΙΑΣΩΝ in Greek, is a hero of Greek mythology. His father was Aeson, the rightful king of Iolcus. His real name was Diomedes and he changed it to Jason (which means healer or doctor) after having studied therapeutic herbs under the guidance of centaur Cheiron... Jason and had one son, In Greek mythology, Medus was the son of Medea. His father is generally agreed to be Aegeas, although Hesiod states that Jason fathered him and Cheiron raised him. Medus was driven from Athens to Colchis with his mother. Medeas father Aeetes was the former king of Colchis, and Aeetes... Medus, with Aegeus), tried to have Aegeas kill Theseus by asking him to capture the In Greek mythology, the Cretan Bull was either the bull that carried away Europa or the bull Pasiphae fell in love with. Capture by Herakles Herakles was compelled to capture the bull as his seventh task. He sailed to Crete, whereupon the King of Crete, Minos, gave Herakles permission to... Marathonian Bull, but Theseus succeeded. She tried to poison him but at the last second, Aegeas recognized the sandals, shield and sword and knocked the wine glass out of Theseus' hand. Father and son were reunited.


King In Greek mythology, Minos was a semi-legendary king of Crete, son of Zeus and Europa. The Minoan civilization has been named after him. By his wife, Pasiphae, he was the father of Ariadne, Androgeus, Deucalion, Phaedra, Glaucus, Catreus and many others. Minos, along with his brothers, Rhadamanthus and Sarpedon... Minos' son, In Greek mythology, Androgeus was the father of Sthenelus and a son of Minos and Pasiphae. Aegeus, King of Athens, killed Androgeus because he won every prize during a feast. As punishment, the Athenians had to send several youths every year to be devoured by the Minotaur. This continued until... Androgeus, lost every game in a contest to Aegeus of Athens. Alternatively, the other contests were jealous of Androgeus and killed him. Minos was angry and declared war on Athens. He offered the Athenians peace if, every year, they sent him seven young men and seven young women to feed to the In Greek mythology, the Minotaur was a creature that was half man and half bull. It dwelt in the Labyrinth, which was an elaborate maze constructed by King Minos of Crete and designed by the architect Daedalus to hold the Minotaur. The Minotaur was eventually killed by Theseus. Minotaur is... Minotaur, a vicious monster. This continued until Theseus killed the Minotaur with the help of Ariadne, Minos' daughter.


Aegeus had told Theseus, before he left, to put up the white sails when he left Crete, if he had been successful in killing the Minotaur. Theseus forgot and Aegeus jumped into the sea when he saw the black sails coming into Athens, in the mistaken belief that his son had been slain. Henceforth, this sea was known as the Greece and the Aegean Sea The Aegean sea in Greece as seen from the island of Santorini The Aegean Sea (Greek: Αιγαίον Πέλαγος, Aigaion Pelagos; Turkish: Ege denizi) is an arm of the Mediterranean Sea, located between the... Aegean Sea.


See also: Apollodorus was a popular name in the ancient world. Apollodorus, an Athenian painter, flourished at the end of the 5th century B.C. He is said to have introduced great improvements in perspective and chiaroscuro. Apollodorus of Athens, an Athenian grammarian, lived about 140 B.C. He was a prolific... Apollodorus. The and is the single most valuable source on Greek mythology. However, the text itself dates back to the century between 100 and 200 A.D., which means that although Apollodorus is cited, the text must have been composed by someone else. The Bibliotheke was the 9th century work of... Bibliotheke; Gaius Valerius Catullus (c. 84 BCE - c. 54 BCE) was one of the most influential Roman poets of the 1st century BCE. Of Catullus life little is known for sure. Most sources agree ( Suetonius) that he was born in or near Verona, though the Palatine hill of Rome has been... Catullus, LXIV; Mestrius Plutarch (c.45-c.120) was a Greek historian, biographer, and essayist. Born in the small town of Chaeronea, in the Greek region known as Boeotia, probably during the reign of the Roman Emperor Claudius, Mestrius Plutarch travelled widely in the Mediterranean world, including twice to Rome. He had... Plutarch. Theseus (Θησευς) was a legendary king of Athens, son of Aegeus (or of Poseidon). Theseus was considered by Athenians as the great reformer. His name comes from the same root as θεσμoς -- thesmos, Greek for institution. them fit into it... Theseus.



Preceded by:
Pandion II was son and heir of Cecrops II, King of Athens. He was exiled from Athens by the sons of Metion who sought to put him on the throne. Pandion fled to Megara where he married Pylia, daughter of King Pylas. Later, Pylas went into voluntary exile to Messenia... Pandion II
Before the Athenian democracy, the tyrants, and the archons, Athens was ruled by kings. Most of these are probably mythical or only semi-historical. This list is based on that given by Eusebius. Earliest kings These two kings were supposed to have ruled before the flood of the Deucalion story... King of Athens
Succeeded by:
Theseus (Θησευς) was a legendary king of Athens, son of Aegeus (or of Poseidon). Theseus was considered by Athenians as the great reformer. His name comes from the same root as θεσμoς -- thesmos, Greek for institution. them fit into it... Theseus



  Results from FactBites:
 
Aegeus 1, Greek Mythology Link. (1730 words)
Aegeus 1 was born in Megara (the city on the Isthmus of Corinth), where his father, the Athenian Pandion 4, had settled after being expelled from Athens by the sons of Metion 1.
Aegeus 1 then left for Athens, and in time a boy Theseus was born to Aethra 2, who did exactly as Aegeus 1 had instructed her, when Theseus was sixteen years old.
Aegeus 2 was the son of Oeolycus, son of Theras, a descendant of Cadmus.
Aegeus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (545 words)
Upon the death of Pandion, Aegeus and his brothers took control of Athens from Metion, who had seized the throne from Pandion.
Aegeus (king of Athens) went to Troezena and met with Aethra, daughter of Troezena's king Pittheus.
Aegeus had told Theseus, before he left, to put up the white sails when he left Crete, if he had been successful in killing the Minotaur.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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