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Encyclopedia > Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
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For the ship Aegean Sea, see Aegean Sea (oil spill)

The Aegean Sea (Greek: Αιγαίο Πέλαγος, Aigaío Pélagos; Turkish: Ege Denizi) is a sea arm of the Mediterranean Sea located between the southern Balkan and Anatolian peninsulas, i.e., between the mainlands of Greece and Turkey respectively. In the north, it is connected to the Marmara Sea and Black Sea by the Dardanelles and Bosporus. The Aegean Islands are within the sea and some bound it on its southern periphery, including Crete and Rhodes. The sea was traditionally known as the Archipelago (Greek: Αρхιπέλαγος), the general sense of which has since changed to refer to the Aegean Islands and, generally, to any island group because the Aegean Sea is remarkable for its large number of islands. Image File history File links Location_Aegean_Sea. ... Image File history File links Aegean_with_legends. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Sea as seen from jetty in Frankston, Australia Look up maritime in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For the landmasses surrounding the Mediterranean Sea, see Mediterranean Basin. ... Balkan peninsula with northwest border Isonzo-Krka-Sava The Balkans is the historic and geographic name used to describe a region of southeastern Europe. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A peninsula in Croatia A peninsula (from the latin words paene insula, almost island) is a geographical landform consisting of an extension of a body of land from a larger body of land, surrounded by water on three sides. ... The Sea of Marmara (Turkish: Marmara denizi, Modern Greek: Μαρμαρα̃ Θάλασσα or Προποντίδα) (also known as the Sea of Marmora or the Marmara Sea) is an inland sea... Map of the Black Sea. ... Map of the Dardanelles The Dardanelles (Turkish: Çanakkale BoÄŸazı, Greek: Δαρδανέλλια, Dardanellia), formerly known as the Hellespont (Greek: Eλλήσποντος, Hellespontos), is a narrow strait in northwestern Turkey connecting the Aegean Sea to the Sea of Marmara. ... Bosporus - photo taken from International Space Station. ... The Aegean Islands (Greek: Αιγαίον Πέλαγος, Aigaíon Pélagos; Turkish: Ege Adaları) are a group of islands in the Aegean Sea, with mainland Greece to the west and north and Turkey to the east; the island of Crete delimits the sea to the south. ... For the famous World War II battle, see: Battle of Crete For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... Location map of Rhodes Rhodes (Greek: Ρόδος (pron. ... The Mergui Archipelago An archipelago is a landform which consists of a chain or cluster of islands. ...

Contents

Etymology

In ancient times there were various explanations for the name Aegean. It was said to have been named after the town of Aegae, or Aegea, a queen of the Amazons who died in the sea, or Aigaion, the "sea goat", another name of Briareus, one of the archaic Hecatonchires, or, especially among the Athenians, Aegeus, the father of Theseus, who drowned himself in the sea when he thought his son had died. The entrance to the Great Tumulus Museum at Vergina Vergina (in Greek Βεργίνα; also spelled Verghína and Veryína) is a small town in northern Greece, located at coordinates , in the prefecture of Imathia in the region of Central Macedonia. ... Aegea is a back-formation from Aegean, the sea that was named for an eponymous Aegeus in early levels of Greek mythology. ... The Amazons () were an ancient nation of female warriors, or a society dominated by women, at the edges of Scythia in Sarmatia (Herodotus). ... The Hecatonchires, or Hekatonkheires, were three gargantuan figures of Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Aegeus, also Aigeus, Aegeas or Aigeas, was the father of Theseus and an Athenian King. ... Theseus (Greek ) was a legendary king of Athens, son of Aethra, and fathered by Aegeus and Poseidon, with whom Aethra lay in one night. ...


A possible etymology is a derivation from the Greek word αἶγες (aiges) "waves" (Hesychius; metaphorical use of αἴξ (aix) "goat"), hence "wavy sea", cf. also αἰγιαλός (aigialos) "coast". page of Marc. ...


History

In ancient times the sea was the birthplace of two ancient civilizations – the Minoans of Crete, and the Mycenean Civilization of the Peloponnese. Later arose the city-states of Athens and Sparta among many others that constituted the Hellenic Civilization. Plato described the Greeks living round the Aegean "like frogs around a pond". The Aegean Sea was later invaded by Persians and the Romans, and inhabited by the Byzantine Empire, the Venetians, the Seljuk Turks, and the Ottoman Empire. The Aegean was the site of the original democracies, and it allowed for contact between several diverse civilizations of the Eastern Mediterranean. The Minoans (Greek: Μυκηναίοι; Μινωίτες) were a pre-Hellenic Bronze Age civilization in Crete in the Aegean Sea, flourishing from approximately 2700 to 1450 BC when their culture was superseded by the Mycenaean culture, which drew upon the Minoans. ... For the famous World War II battle, see: Battle of Crete For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... Mycenaean Greece, the last phase of the Bronze Age in ancient Greece, is the historical setting of the epics of Homer and much other Greek mythology. ... The Peloponnese or Peloponnesus (Greek: Πελοπόννησος Peloponnesos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a large peninsula in southern Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Gulf of Corinth. ... Nickname: City of Athena or Cradle of Democracy Location of the city of Athens (red dot) within the Prefecture of Athens and Periphery of Attica Coordinates: Country Greece Peripheries Attica Prefecture Athens Founded circa 2000 BC Mayor Nikitas Kaklamanis Area    - City 38. ... Coordinates 37°4′ N 22°26′ E Country Greece Periphery Peloponnese Prefecture Laconia Population 18,184 source (2001) Area 84. ... Ancient Greece is the term used to describe the Greek-speaking world in ancient times. ... The Persian Empire was a series of historical empires that ruled over the Iranian plateau, the old Persian homeland, and at times extending into central and mid-east Asia. ... See also Roman Republic (18th century) and Roman Republic (19th century). ... Byzantine Empire at its greatest extent c. ... Venice (Italian: Venezia, Venetian: Venexia) is the capital of region Veneto, and has a population of 271,663 (census estimate January 1, 2004). ... The Seljuk coat of arms was a double headed eagle The Seljuk Turks (also Seldjuk, Seldjuq, Seljuq; in modern Turkish Selçuklular; in Persian سلجوقيان SaljÅ«qiyān; in Arabic سلجوق SaljÅ«q, or السلاجقة al-Salājiqa) were a major branch of the Oghuz Turks and a dynasty that ruled parts of... Motto: دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem: Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299-1326) Bursa (1326-1365) Edirne (1365-1453) Constantinople (Istanbul) (1453-1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–1922 Mehmed VI...


Geography

Satellite Image
Satellite Image

The Aegean Sea covers about 214 000 square kilometres in area, and measures about 610 kilometres longitudinally and 300 kilometres latitudinally. The sea's maximum depth is 3 543 metres, east of Crete. The Aegean Islands are found within its waters, with the following islands delimiting the sea on the south (generally from west to east): Kythera, Antikythera, Crete, Karpathos, and Rhodes. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1608x1648, 572 KB) Sattelite image of the Aegean Sea Source:NASA File links The following pages link to this file: Aegean Sea Aegean dispute ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1608x1648, 572 KB) Sattelite image of the Aegean Sea Source:NASA File links The following pages link to this file: Aegean Sea Aegean dispute ... For the famous World War II battle, see: Battle of Crete For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... The Aegean Islands (Greek: Αιγαίον Πέλαγος, Aigaíon Pélagos; Turkish: Ege Adaları) are a group of islands in the Aegean Sea, with mainland Greece to the west and north and Turkey to the east; the island of Crete delimits the sea to the south. ... Kythira, also seen as Kythera, Cythera or Tsirigo, is an island, one of the Ionian Islands. ... Antikythera (Αντικύθηρα) is a Greek island with a land mass of 20 square kilometers, 38 kilometers south-east of Kythira. ... Karpathos (Greek: Κάρπαθος, Turkish : Kerpe, Italian :Scarpanto, Latin :Carpathus; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is the second largest of the Greek Dodecanese islands, in southeast Aegean sea. ... Location map of Rhodes Rhodes (Greek: Ρόδος (pron. ...


The Aegean Islands can be simply divided into seven groups: the Northeastern Aegean Islands, Euboea, the Northern Sporades, the Cyclades, the Saronic Islands (or Argo-Saronic Islands), the Dodecanese (or Southern Sporades), and Crete. The word archipelago was originally applied specifically to the Aegean Sea and its islands. Many of the Aegean Islands, or chains of islands, are actually extensions of the mountains on the mainland. One chain extends across the sea to Chios, another extends across Euboea to Samos, and a third extends across the Peloponnese and Crete to Rhodes, dividing the Aegean from the Mediterranean. Many of the islands have safe harbours and bays, but navigation through the sea is generally difficult. Many of the islands are volcanic, and marble and iron are mined on other islands. The larger islands have some fertile valleys and plains. There are two islands of considerable size belonging to Turkey on the Aegean Sea: Bozcaada (Greek: Τένεδος Tenedos) and Gökçeada (Greek: Ίμβρος Imvros). This is a list of Aegean Islands. ... Euboea or Negropont (Modern Greek: Εύβοια Evia, Ancient Greek Εúβοια Eúboia; see also List of traditional Greek place names), is the largest island of the Greek archipelago. ... This is a list of some of the 3000 islands of Greece: Chrysi Crete Dia Euboea Gavdos Koufonisi Ydra The Cyclades Amorgos Anafi Andros Antiparos Anydro Delos Donoussa Folegandros Gyaros Ios Irakleia Kea Keros Kimolos Kithnos Makronisos Milos Mykonos (Mikonos) Naxos Paros Pholegandros Santorini (also called Thira) Serifos Sifnos Sikinos... The Cyclades (Greek Κυκλάδες) are a Greek island group in the Aegean Sea, south-east of the mainland of Greece; and an administrative prefecture of Greece. ... The Saronic Islands are so named because they lie in the Saronic Gulf just off the Greek mainland. ... Argo-Saronic Islands is a term combining the islands in the neighboring Saronic Gulf and Argolic Gulf, both of which open into the Aegean Sea. ... The Dodecanese (Greek: Δωδεκάνησα, Dodekánisa, meaning twelve islands; see also List of traditional Greek place names) are a group of Greek islands in the Aegean Sea, off the southwest coast of Turkey. ... The Mergui Archipelago An archipelago is a landform which consists of a chain or cluster of islands. ... Chios (Greek: , alternative transliterations Khios and Hios, see also List of traditional Greek place names; Ottoman Turkish: صاقيز Sakız; Genoese: Scio) is a Greek island in the Aegean Sea five miles off the Turkish coasts. ... Euboea or Negropont (Modern Greek: Εύβοια Evia, Ancient Greek Εúβοια Eúboia; see also List of traditional Greek place names), is the largest island of the Greek archipelago. ... Samos (Greek Σάμος) is a Greek island in the Eastern Aegean Sea, located between the island of Chios to the North and the archipelagic complex of the Dodecanese islands to the South and in particular the island of Patmos and off the coast of Turkey, on what was formely known as... The Peloponnese or Peloponnesus (Greek: Πελοπόννησος Peloponnesos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a large peninsula in southern Greece, forming the part of the country south of the Gulf of Corinth. ... For the famous World War II battle, see: Battle of Crete For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... Location map of Rhodes Rhodes (Greek: Ρόδος (pron. ... Volcano 1. ... Venus de Milo, front. ... General Name, Symbol, Number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Atomic mass 55. ... Gökçeada and Bozcaada are two islands in the Aegean Sea which are part of Canakkale Province in Turkey. ... Gökçeada and Bozcaada are two islands in the Aegean Sea which are part of Canakkale Province in Turkey. ... Part of the Venetian fortress on Bozcaada island Gökçeada and Bozcaada are two islands in the Aegean Sea which are part of Çanakkale Province in Turkey. ... Gökçeada and Bozcaada are two islands in the Aegean Sea which are part of Canakkale Province in Turkey. ...


The bays in gulfs counterclockwise includes on Crete, the Mirabelli, Almyros, Souda and Chania bays or gulfs, on the mainland the Myrtoan Sea to the west, the Saronic Gulf northwestward, the Petalies Gulf which connects with the South Euboic Sea, the Pagasetic Gulf which connects with the North Euboic Sea, the Thermian Gulf northwestward, the Chalkidiki Peninsula including the Cassandra and the Singitic Gulfs, northward the Strymonian Gulf and the Gulf of Kavala and the rest are in Turkey; Saros Gulf, Edremit Gulf, Dikili Gulf, Çandarlı Gulf, İzmir Gulf, Kuşadası Gulf, Gökova Gulf, Güllük Gulf. For the famous World War II battle, see: Battle of Crete For other uses, see Crete (disambiguation). ... Souda Bay is a bay and natural harbour on the northwest coast of the Greek island of Crete. ... The lighthouse in the Venetian harbour, a landmark of Chania Chania (IPA , Greek: Χανιά, also transliterated as Hania, older form Chanea and Venetian: Canea, Godart and Olivier abbreviation: KH) is the second largest city of Crete and the capital of the Chania Prefecture. ... The Myrtoan Sea is often unmarked on modern maps. ... The Saronic Gulf or Gulf of Aegina in Greece forms part of the Aegean Sea and defines the eastern side of the isthmus of Corinth. ... The Petalies Gulf (Greek: Κόλπος Πεταλιών), also the South Evvian Gulf or the South Euboean Gulf is a gulf that connects with the South Evian Gulf]] near Agia Marina and to the to the north. ... Map Categories: Greece geography stubs | Mediterranean | Seas ... The Thermaic Gulf (or Thermian Gulf, Thermaikos Gulf) is a gulf of the Aegean Sea located immediately south of Thessaloniki, east of Pieria and Imathia, and west of Chalkidiki (prefectures of Greece). ... Categories: Greece geography stubs ... Edremit is a Turkish city on the west coast of Asia Minor, not far from the Greek island Lesbos. ... Ä°zmir (Ottoman Turkish: إزمير Ä°zmir, Greek: Σμύρνη SmýrnÄ“, Armenian: Ô»Õ¦Õ´Õ«Ö€, Italian: Smirne, Ladino: Izmir, without the Turkish dotted I) is the third most populous city of Turkey and the countrys largest port after Ä°stanbul. ... KuÅŸadası is a town on the Aegean coast of Turkey, near the ancient city of Ephesus, 90 km south of Ä°zmir and a short distance across from the island of Samos. ...

  • Aegean (Greek and Turkish) Islands

See also

Wikisource has an original article from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica about:


Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... Aegean civilization is a general term for the Bronze Age civilizations of Greece and the Aegean. ... The Aegean Islands (Greek: Αιγαίον Πέλαγος, Aigaíon Pélagos; Turkish: Ege Adaları) are a group of islands in the Aegean Sea, with mainland Greece to the west and north and Turkey to the east; the island of Crete delimits the sea to the south. ... The Aegean Sea The term Aegean dispute refers to a set of interrelated controversial issues between Greece and Turkey over sovereignty and related rights in the area of the Aegean Sea. ... This is a list of traditional Greek place names. ...

Topics about Ancient Greece edit
Places: Aegean Sea | Hellespont | Macedon | Sparta | Athens | Corinth | Thermopylae | Antioch | Alexandria | Pergamon | Miletus | Delphi | Olympia | Troy
Life: Agriculture | Art | Cuisine | Economy | Law | Medicine | Pederasty | Pottery | Prostitution | Slavery
Philosophy: Pythagoras | Heraclitus | Parmenides | Protagoras | Empedocles | Democritus | Socrates | Plato | Aristotle | Zeno | Epicurus
Literature: Homer | Hesiod | Pindar | Aeschylus | Sophocles | Euripides | Aristophanes | Herodotus | Thucydides | Xenophon | Polybius
Buildings: Parthenon | Temple of Artemis | Acropolis | Ancient Agora | Arch of Hadrian | Statue of Zeus | Colossus of Rhodes | Temple of Hephaestus | Samothrace temple complex
Chronology: Aegean civilization | Mycenaean civilization | Greek dark ages | Ancient Greece | Hellenistic Greece | Roman Greece

Coordinates: 39°15′34″N, 24°57′09″E Ancient Greece is a period in Greek history that lasted for around one thousand years. ... The Helespont/Dardanelles, a long narrow strait dividing the Balkans (Europe) along the Gallipoli peninsula from Asia Anatolia (Asia Minor). ... Macedons regions and towns Macedon or Macedonia (from Greek ; see also List of traditional Greek place names) was the name of an ancient kingdom in the northern-most part of ancient Greece, bordering the kingdom of Epirus on the west and the region of Thrace to the east. ... Coordinates 37°4′ N 22°26′ E Country Greece Periphery Peloponnese Prefecture Laconia Population 18,184 source (2001) Area 84. ... Nickname: City of Athena or Cradle of Democracy Location of the city of Athens (red dot) within the Prefecture of Athens and Periphery of Attica Coordinates: Country Greece Peripheries Attica Prefecture Athens Founded circa 2000 BC Mayor Nikitas Kaklamanis Area    - City 38. ... Corinth, or Korinth (Greek: Κόρινθος, Kórinthos; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a Greek city-state, on the Isthmus of Corinth, the narrow stretch of land that joins the Peloponnesus to the mainland of Greece. ... Thermopylae - thurMAH-puh-ly, thuhr-MOP-uh-lee (Ancient & Katharevousa Greek Θερμοπύλαι, Demotic Θερμοπύλες) is a mountain pass in Greece. ... Antioch on the Orontes (Greek: Αντιόχεια η επί Δάφνη, Αντιόχεια η επί Ορόντου or Αντιόχεια η Μεγάλη; Latin: Antiochia ad Orontem, also Antiochia dei Siri), the Great Antioch or Syrian Antioch was an ancient city located on the eastern side (left bank) of the Orontes River about 30 km from the sea and its port, Seleucia Pieria. ... This article is about the city in Egypt. ... Acropolis of Pergamon as seen from above Sketched reconstruction of ancient Pergamon Temple of Trajan at the Acropolis of Pergamon The Asklepeion of Pergamon was the worlds first hospital Pergamon or Pergamum (Greek: Πέργαμος, modern day Bergama in Turkey, ) was an ancient Greek city, in Mysia, northwestern Anatolia, 16 miles... The lower half of the benches and the remnants of the scene building of the theater of Miletus, as it was on August 6, 2005. ... The amphitheatre, seen from above. ... Olympia (Greek: Ολυμπία Olympía or Ολύμπια Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. ... Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... The Charioteer of Delphi, Delphi Archaeological Museum. ... Kylix, the most common drinking vessel in ancient Greece, c. ... Ancient Greek law is a branch of comparative jurisprudence relating to the laws and legal institutions of Ancient Greece. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Pederastic courtship scene Athenian black-figure amphora, 5th c. ... Thanks to its hardy nature pottery bulks large in the archaeological record of ancient Greece, and because we have so much of it (some 100,000 vases are recorded in the Corpus vasorum antiquorum) it has exerted a disproportionately large influence on our understanding of that society. ... Courtesan and her client, Attican Pelike with red figures by Polygnotus, c. ... Funerary stele: the slave represented as a shorter person, beside the mistress, Munich Glyptothek Slavery was an essential component throughout the development of Ancient Greece. ... Classical (or early) Greek philosophy focused on the role of reason and inquiry. ... Pythagoras Samos (Greek: ; circa 582 BC – circa 507 BC) was an Ionian (Greek) mathematician, astronomer, scientist and philosopher, founder of the mathematical, mystic, religious, and scientific society called Pythagoreans. ... Heraclitus of Ephesus (Greek Ηρακλειτος Herakleitos) (about 535 - 475 BC), known as The Obscure, was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher. ... Parmenides of Elea (Greek: , early 5th century BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher born in Elea, a Hellenic city on the southern coast of Italy. ... Protagoras (in Greek Πρωταγόρας) was born around 481 BC in Abdera, Thrace in Ancient Greece. ... Empedocles of Agrigentum Empedocles (Greek: Εμπεδοκλής, circa 490 BCE – c. ... ‎ Democritus (Greek: ) was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher (born at Abdera in Thrace around 460 BC[1][2]). Democritus was a student of Leucippus and co-originator of the belief that all matter is made up of various imperishable, indivisible elements which he called atomos, from which we get the... Socrates (Greek: , invariably anglicized as , SÇ’cratÄ“s; circa 470–399 BCE) was an ancient Greek philosopher who is widely credited for laying the foundation for Western philosophy. ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... Aristotle (Greek: AristotélÄ“s) (384 BC – March 7, 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. ... Zeno of Citium Zeno of Citium (The Stoic) (sometime called Zeno Apathea) (333 BC-264 BC) was a Hellenistic philosopher from Citium, Cyprus. ... Roman marble bust of Epicurus Epicurus (Epikouros or in Greek) (341 BC, Samos – 270 BC, Athens) was an ancient Greek philosopher, the founder of Epicureanism, one of the most popular schools of thought in Hellenistic Philosophy. ... Ancient Greek literature refers to literature written in the Greek language until the 4th century AD. // This period of Greek literature stretches from Homer until the 4th century and the rise of Alexander the Great. ... Homer (Greek: , HómÄ“ros) was a legendary early Greek poet and aoidos (singer) traditionally credited with the composition of the Iliad and the Odyssey. ... Bust, traditionally thought to be Seneca, now identified by some as Hesiod. ... Pindar (or Pindarus) (522 BC – 443 BC), perhaps the greatest of the nine lyric poets of ancient Greece, was born at Cynoscephalae, a village in Thebes. ... Bust of Aeschylus from the Capitoline Museums, Rome Aeschylus (525 BC—456 BC; Greek: Ασχύλος) was a playwright of Ancient Greece. ... Sophocles, as depicted in the Nordisk familjebok. ... A statue of Euripides Euripides (Greek: Ευριπίδης) (c. ... Sketch of Aristophanes Aristophanes (Greek: , c. ... Bust of Herodotus Herodotus of Halicarnassus (in Greek, , Herodotos Halikarnasseus) was a Dorian Greek historian who lived in the 5th century BC (484 BC–ca. ... Bust of Thucydides residing in the Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto. ... Xenophon, Greek historian Xenophon (In Greek , c. ... Polybius (c. ... The restored Stoa of Attalus, Athens Architecture, defined as building executed to an aesthetically considered design, was extinct in Greece from the end of the Mycenaean period (about 1200 BC) to the 7th century BC, when urban life and prosperity recovered to a point where public building could be undertaken. ... The Parthenon seen from the hill of the Pnyx to the west. ... The site of the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus in Turkey: Some stacked remnants recreate columns, but nothing remains of the original temple The Temple of Artemis (in Greek — Artemision, and in Latin — Artemisium), also known as Temple of Diana, was a temple dedicated to Artemis completed around 550 BC... The Acropolis of Athens, seen from the hill of the Pnyx to the west. ... Remains of the agora built in Athens in the Roman period (east of the classical agora). ... [Image:http://www. ... Statue of Zeus The Greek sculptor Phidias created the 12-m (40-ft) tall Statue of Zeus in about 435 bc. ... This drawing of Colossus of Rhodes, which illustrated The Grolier Societys 1911 Book of Knowledge, is probably fanciful, as it is unlikely that the statue stood astride the harbour mouth. ... The Temple of Hephaestus, Athens: eastern face. ... General location of Samothrace The Samothrace Temple Complex, known as the Sanctuary of the Great Gods is one of the principal Pan-Hellenic religious sanctuaries, located on the island of Samothrace within the larger Thrace. ... This is a timeline of ancient Greece. ... Aegean civilization is a general term for the Bronze Age civilizations of Greece and the Aegean. ... This article is about the Greek archaeological site. ... The Greek Dark Ages (ca. ... Ancient Greece is a period in Greek history that lasted for around one thousand years. ... The Hellenistic period of Greek history was the period between the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the annexation of the Greek peninsula and islands by Rome in 146 BC. Although the establishment of Roman rule did not break the continuity of Hellenistic society and culture, which... Roman Greece is the period of Greek history following the Roman victory over the Corinthians at the Battle of Corinth in 146 BC until the reestablishment of the city of Byzantium and the naming of the city by Emperor Constantine I as the capital of the Roman Empire (as Nova... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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