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Encyclopedia > Advertising Standards Authority

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) is the independent British self regulatory organisation (SRO) of the advertising industry. The ASA is a non-statutory organisation and so cannot interpret - or enforce - legislation. However its Codes of advertising broadly reflect legislation in many instances. Image File history File links ASA_(logo). ... Advertising, generally speaking, is the promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas, usually performed by an identified sponsor. ... Bold textJAMES CHECKLEY Legislation (or statutory law) is law which has been promulgated (or enacted) by a legislature or other governing body. ... The British Code of Advertising, Direct Marketing and Sales Promotion (the CAP Code) The 11th edition of the CAP Code came into force in March 2003. ... Bold textJAMES CHECKLEY Legislation (or statutory law) is law which has been promulgated (or enacted) by a legislature or other governing body. ...


The ASA is not funded by the British Governement, nor is funded by tax payers, contrary to popular belief. The ASA is funded by a levy on the advertising industry, thereby operating a system of self-regulation. The politics of the United Kingdom are based upon a unitary state and a constitutional monarchy. ... Advertising, generally speaking, is the promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas, usually performed by an identified sponsor. ...


The ASA's core values are to be a best-practice 'one-stop shop' for advertising regulation and to ensure that advertising is legal, decent, honest and truthful".

Contents


History of the ASA

In 1961, the Advertising Association established the Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) to draft a code of advertising for advertisers to adhere to. CAP drafted the first edition of the British Code of Advertising Practice (the CAP Code. The advertising industry, along with the Advertising Association had concluded that it was in their best interests to set up a system of self regulation, because some form of regulation was inevitable and if no self regulation system was set up, it would be a matter of legislative regulation which would bring with it the threat of fines and court orders. 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... Category: ... The Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) is the sister organisation of the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA). ... The Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) is the sister organisation of the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA). ... The British Code of Advertising, Direct Marketing and Sales Promotion (the CAP Code) The 11th edition of the CAP Code came into force in March 2003. ... Advertising, generally speaking, is the promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas, usually performed by an identified sponsor. ... Category: ... A legislature is a governmental deliberative body with the power to adopt laws. ...


In 1962, following the introduction of the CAP Code, the industry set up the Advertising Standards Authority to adjudicate on complaints that advertisements had breached the Code. The ASA operated under an independent chairman who was to have no vested interest within the industry so as to remain fair and impartial. 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... The British Code of Advertising, Direct Marketing and Sales Promotion (the CAP Code) The 11th edition of the CAP Code came into force in March 2003. ... The British Code of Advertising, Direct Marketing and Sales Promotion (the CAP Code) The 11th edition of the CAP Code came into force in March 2003. ...


Not long after the inception of the ASA, the Molony Committee considered, and then rejected proposals to introduce a system to regulate the advertising industry by statute, similar to the Federal Trade Commission used in America. The Committee reported that they were satisfied that the industry could be related effectively from within, by use of the ASA. A guarded comment within the report, however, warned that the self regulatory system depended upon the satisfactory working of the ASA, and the maintaining of acceptable standards. [1] The inference was, of course, that should the ASA not be up the job, they would be stripped of their powers and a statutory system would be put in its place. FTC headquarters, Washington, D.C. The Federal Trade Commission (or FTC) is an independent agency of the United States government, established in 1914 by the Federal Trade Commission Act. ... Motto: (1789 to 1956) (Latin for Out of many, one) In God We Trust (1956 to present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - • President George W. Bush (R)  - • Vice...


With the ASA in place and seemingly performing well, a level playing field was created that benefited both consumers and competitors.


How The ASA is Funded

Because the ASA is non-statutory and not controlled by the Governement, it is not funded either by the Governement itself or by tax payers money. The ASA is funded by a voluntary levy on advertising display costs. Advertising, generally speaking, is the promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas, usually performed by an identified sponsor. ...


In order for the ASA to operate at 'arms-length' from the industry, an organisation called ASBOF was set up to collect the funding for the ASA. ASBOF exists to ensure that the ASA does not know which advertisers have contrinuted to the voluntary funding, so there can be no question of money influencing the ASA's decision. From the advertiser's point of view, it is in their interests to ensure the ASA is fully funded, to avoid the need for legislative regulation. ASBOF collects a 0.1% levy on the advertising costs of non-broadcast advertisements, and a 0.2% levy on Mailsort contracts from direct mailers. [2] The Advertising Standards Board Of Finance (ASBOF) collects a voluntary levy on advertising costs to fund the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA). ... The Advertising Standards Board Of Finance (ASBOF) collects a voluntary levy on advertising costs to fund the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA). ... The Advertising Standards Board Of Finance (ASBOF) collects a voluntary levy on advertising costs to fund the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA). ...


To collect money from broadcast advertisers (those on TV and Radio), an organisation called BASBOF was set up. BASBOF works in a similar fashion to ASBOF, and collects the voluntary 0.1% levy on boradcast advertising costs, allowing the ASA to operate at arms-length from the industry. Again, the ASA has no knowledge of who has paid into the levy. Under the terms of the agreement with Ofcom, BASBOF must continually demonstrate thatthey have adequate funding for the ASA; Ofcom has stipulated that it will not subsidise any shortfall in funding. [3] Idiot box redirects here. ... The Broadcast Advertising Standards Board Of Finance (BASBOF) is an organization in the United Kingdom that funds the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA). ... The Broadcast Advertising Standards Board Of Finance (BASBOF) is an organization in the United Kingdom that funds the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA). ... The Advertising Standards Board Of Finance (ASBOF) collects a voluntary levy on advertising costs to fund the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA). ... The Office of Communications, usually known as Ofcom, is the UKs communications regulator. ... The Broadcast Advertising Standards Board Of Finance (BASBOF) is an organization in the United Kingdom that funds the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA). ... The Office of Communications, usually known as Ofcom, is the UKs communications regulator. ...


History Of Broadcast Advertising Regulation

In 1955, the first commercial programme was broadcast in the United Kingdom, courtesy of ITV. [4] The government was concerned that the control of advertising on television should be subject to the same level of statutory regulations as programmes, due to the highly powerful and suggestive nature of broadcast advertising. The Broadcasting Act 1954 had set down a set of strict guidelines, and from this advertising guidelines were laid down. 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ITVs Logo 2006—present Independent Television (ITV) is the name given to the original network of British commercial television broadcasters, set up to provide competition to the BBC. In England and Wales, the channel has been rebranded to ITV1 by ITV plc, the owners of the broadcasting licences for... Advertising, generally speaking, is the promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas, usually performed by an identified sponsor. ...


The Broadcasting Act 1990 superceded this legislation and from it the ITC was created. The Act required the ITC to draw up, review and enforce new, stricter, broadcast advertising codes. The ITC regulated broadcast advertising from 1 January 1991 to 28 December when Ofcom took over the duty and the ITC was disbanded - although many of their staff joined Ofcom. The ITC has been superseded as the British commercial television regulator by Ofcom (the Office of Communications). ... The ITC has been superseded as the British commercial television regulator by Ofcom (the Office of Communications). ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 28 is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 3 days remaining. ... The Office of Communications, usually known as Ofcom, is the UKs communications regulator. ... The ITC has been superseded as the British commercial television regulator by Ofcom (the Office of Communications). ... The Office of Communications, usually known as Ofcom, is the UKs communications regulator. ...


In November 2004, control of the regulation of broadcast advertising was handed over to the ASA on a provisional two year contract with a view to making the move permanent should results be satisfactory, effectively making the ASA a "one-stop shop" for advertising complaints. Look up November in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Advertising, generally speaking, is the promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas, usually performed by an identified sponsor. ...


The ASA's Remit

Printed Media

Typically, advertisements that fall in 'paid-for' spaces in newspapers (both national and regional) and magazines that are published in the UK fall within the remit of the ASA. 'Paid-for' does not necessarily mean an exchange of money; a reciprocal arrangement that does not use money could also be considered within the ASA's remit. Advertorials are also within the ASA's remit as long as a reciprocal arrangement of some kind is in place and - crucially - control over the content of the advertorial lies with the advertiser. If the editor of the publication maintains control over the advertorial, the piece is likely to be seen as editorial rather than advertising and will therefore lie outside the ASA's terms of reference. A collection of magazines A magazine is a periodical publication containing a variety of articles, generally financed by advertising and/or purchase by readers. ... An advertorial is an advertisement written in the form of an objective opinion editorial, and presented in a printed publication —usually designed to look like a legitimately and independent news story. ... An advertorial is an advertisement written in the form of an objective opinion editorial, and presented in a printed publication —usually designed to look like a legitimately and independent news story. ... An editorial is a statement or article by a news organization (generally a newspaper) that expresses an opinion rather than attempting to simply report news, as the latter should ideally be done without bias. ... Advertising, generally speaking, is the promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas, usually performed by an identified sponsor. ...


Broadcast Media

As of November 2004, the ASA has had control over broadcast advertising. Advertisements that appear in paid-for advertising spaces on both television and radio are within the ASA's remit to consider. Sponsorship Credits are considered to be part of programming content and therefore fall outside of the ASA's remit, and into Ofcom's remit. Claims on shopping channels can generally be considered, however complaints about non-delivery of items are unlikely to be taken up by the ASA unless there is evidence that the shopping channel has misled people, or that the non-delivery is a widespread problem. Look up November in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Office of Communications, usually known as Ofcom, is the UKs communications regulator. ... Shopping channels are television specialty channels that present shopping related content. ... Shopping channels are television specialty channels that present shopping related content. ...


Direct Marketing

Direct mailings, circulars, leaflets, unsolicited emails, brochures and catalogues are all typically within the ASA's remit. Items such as timeables and price lists are, however, usually outside the ASA's remit, as provided by Clause 1.2 of the CAP Code. Private correspondence, such as a doctor's letter or a bill are outside remit, however a leafletinserted within the private correspondence would be in remit if it were promoting a new or different product. Direct marketing is a discipline within marketing that involves the planned recording, analysis and tracking of individual customers (business-to-business or consumer) responses and transactions for the purpose of developing and prolonging mutually profitable customer relationships. ... A 1990 hand-drawn flyer advertising a Goa trance party from Israel. ... A pamphlet is an unbound booklet (that is, without a hard cover or binding). ... View of a modern spam email, containing an advertising image. ... A brochure is a flyer or other paper material distributed for the purposes of advertising. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Mail order. ... A timetable is an organized list or schedule, usually set out in tabular form, providing information about a series of arranged events: in particular, the time at which it is planned these events will take place. ... The British Code of Advertising, Direct Marketing and Sales Promotion (the CAP Code) The 11th edition of the CAP Code came into force in March 2003. ... A bill is a document requesting payment for goods and services previously supplied. ... A pamphlet is an unbound booklet (that is, without a hard cover or binding). ...


Internet

The Internet by its very nature is largely unregulated and the ASA has very specified terms of reference with regards to advertising on the Internet. Claims on a company's own website are generally outside of the ASA's remit. However, the ASA can typically consider claims that appear in 'paid-for' spaces on the Internet; i.e. pop up advertisements, banner advertisements and sponsored links. However the CAP Code can only apply to marketers who advertise within the United Kingdom - given the non-geographical nature of the Internet this can be hard to determine. To give an example, though, claims by an American company in a sponsored link on Google.com would be outside its remit, whereas claims by an American company in a sponsored link on Google.co.uk would be inside its remit. As well as the above, online Sales Promotions (see below) are within the ASA's remit as long as they appear in "British Web Space". Advertising, generally speaking, is the promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas, usually performed by an identified sponsor. ... This page as shown in the aol 9. ... Dozens of pop-up ads cover a desktop. ... A web banner or banner ad is a form of advertising on the World Wide Web. ... Sponsored links are text-based advertisements that describe an advertiser’s Web site and the products and services offered. ... The British Code of Advertising, Direct Marketing and Sales Promotion (the CAP Code) The 11th edition of the CAP Code came into force in March 2003. ... Sponsored links are text-based advertisements that describe an advertiser’s Web site and the products and services offered. ... Google Inc. ... Sponsored links are text-based advertisements that describe an advertiser’s Web site and the products and services offered. ... Google Inc. ... In marketing, sales promotion is one of the four aspects of promotion. ...


Sales Promotions

The Institute of Sales Promotion (ISP) has had big say over the years as to how Sales Promotions should be administered. Working to the same Code as the ASA, the ISPcan refer complaints to the ASA when it feels there has been a breach of Sales Promotions rules. That being said, there has been no one definition of what constitutes a sales promotion for the purpose of the CAP Code. Examples of Sales Promotions are: The Institute of Sales Promotion used the CAP Code to ensure sales promotions are correctly administered. ... In marketing, sales promotion is one of the four aspects of promotion. ... The British Code of Advertising, Direct Marketing and Sales Promotion (the CAP Code) The 11th edition of the CAP Code came into force in March 2003. ... The Institute of Sales Promotion used the CAP Code to ensure sales promotions are correctly administered. ... In marketing, sales promotion is one of the four aspects of promotion. ... The British Code of Advertising, Direct Marketing and Sales Promotion (the CAP Code) The 11th edition of the CAP Code came into force in March 2003. ... In marketing, sales promotion is one of the four aspects of promotion. ...

This is by no means an exhaustive list, but it gives an idea of what may be considered a Sales Promotion. Not all offers that give the consumer something free with a particular purchase may be considered Sales Promotions. For example, a mobile phone deal that offers a free Bluetooth headset may not be considered a Sales Promotion per se - it could be seen as part of a package deal. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... In finance, discounting is the process of finding the current value of an amount of cash at some future date, and along with compounding cash from the basis of time value of money calculations. ... It has been suggested that Loyalty program cashback be merged into this article or section. ... The Air Miles Reward Program is a frequent shopper program where points are gained on currency spent at participating merchants. ... A scratchcard is a small piece of card where an area has been covered by a substance that cannot be seen through, but can be scratched off. ... A lottery is a popular form of gambling which involves the drawing of lots for a prize. ... A sweepstakes is technically a lottery in which the prize is financed through the tickets sold. ... In marketing, sales promotion is one of the four aspects of promotion. ... In marketing, sales promotion is one of the four aspects of promotion. ... This article is about the Bluetooth wireless specification. ... In marketing, sales promotion is one of the four aspects of promotion. ...


Time Limit

The ASA typically only considers advertisements that have appeared within the previous three months, although there are some exceptions to this rule. Generally speaking, complaints must be made within three months of the advertisement appearing, due to the fact that if it were to investigate advertisements regardless of when they appeared, the ASA's resources would be drained with little hope of remedial action against the advertisers. The ASA can, in special circumstances, consider complaints about advertisements that appeared more than three months previously, namely if it could not have been possible for the complainant to know that the advertisement was misleading at the time (advertisements for long-term investments would be such an example). Generally speaking, advertising is the paid promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas by an identified sponsor. ... Generally speaking, advertising is the paid promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas by an identified sponsor. ... Generally speaking, advertising is the paid promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas by an identified sponsor. ... Investment is a term with several closely related meanings in finance and economics. ...


Complaints Procedure

How To Complain

When somebody has a complaint about a member an advertisement, they need to inform the ASA. They can lodge their complaint in a variety of different ways:

  • Telephone the ASA on (020) 7492 2222
  • Fax the ASA on (020) 7242 3696
  • Email the ASA at [email protected]
  • Write to the ASA, the full address is on the Contact Us section of the ASA website, www.asa.org.uk.
  • Complete the online complaints form on the ASA website in the How To Complain section.

Tips for complainants: The ASA needs to see the advertisement before it can consider the objections. The ASA does not have access to all regional press or non-commercial magazines. Therefore, complaints made in writing together with a copy of the advertisement tend to be dealt with quicker.


Data Protection

In order to take up a complaint, the ASA needs a full name and address of the complainant, in order to ensure that the complaint is legitimate. These details are never disclosed without the complainant's permission, in accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998. The only cases where the ASA might ask the complainant for their permission to be named are for complaints that a consumer has not yet received their goods, or that a consumer wishes to be removed from a marketer's database (obviously the ASA would be unable to resolve these cases without the complainant agreeing to be named). However the ASA can only reveal details with the express permission of the complainant. In the vast majority of cases, however, the complainant remains anonymous. The Data Protection Act 1984 (DPA) is a British Act of Parliament that provided a legal basis and allowing for the privacy and protection of data of individuals in the UK. It was repealed by the Data Protection Act 1998. ... Anonymity is derived from the Greek word ανωνυμία, meaning without a name or name-less. ...


That being said, Industry complaints are also actioned on a named basis. If the complaint comes from a competitor or someone with a trade or vested interest with the advertiser about which they are complaining, the ASA requires the company to agree to be named. This, according to the ASA, limits the number of petty, retaliatory or 'tit-for-tat' complaints. Again, the ASA will only proceed once it has the express permission of the complainant for their organisation to be named as the complainant.


Investigations

Should the ASA consider the advertisement to be a problem under its Code, it may decide to launch an investigation. This involves contacting the advertiser for their views on the advertisement and to obtain any substantiation, where appropriate. The ASA may, on occasion, seek advice from industry experts on more complex issues.


Once the investigation is complete, a draft recommendation is made which is sent to both the advertiser and the original complainant for any comments. The draft recommendation is then submitted to the independent Advertising Standards Authority Council which adjudicates on ASA investigations. The ASA Council then discuss the complaint in line with the draft recommendation and vote as to whether to uphold the complaints or not uphold the complaints.


The adjudication in full is subsequently posted on the ASA website in the adjudications section and made available to the press.


Appeals Procedure

Clause 60.38 of the CAP Code outlines the appeals procedure for ASA investigations. Should there be grounds for appeal, then the case will be reviewed by the Independent Reviewer. Only cases that have been presented before the ASA Council can be reviewed; complaints with which there have not been deemed grounds for investigation cannot be appealed against. The British Code of Advertising, Direct Marketing and Sales Promotion (the CAP Code) The 11th edition of the CAP Code came into force in March 2003. ...


The Clause provides that requests for an independent review can only be made within 21 days of the adjudication, and must be made in writing direct to the independent reviewer stating the grounds for appeal. Only the advertiser or the original complainant may request an appeal; those that did not complain at the time of the adjudication cannot request an independent review. Additionally, there are only two grounds upon which an appeal can be lodged:

  • Where additional evidence has come to light. If it is the advertiser that has brought additional evidence to bear, they must provide an explanation as to why the evidence was not available during the course of the investigation, since Clause 3.1 of the CAP Code states that advertisers must hold substantiation before any claims are made.
  • Where there has been a substantial flaw in either the ASA Council's adjudication, or the investigations process by which the adjudication has been made.

The Independent Reviewer's decision as to whether or not to accept an appeal is final. Similarly, the ASA Council's adjudication on a reviewed case is also final. The British Code of Advertising, Direct Marketing and Sales Promotion (the CAP Code) The 11th edition of the CAP Code came into force in March 2003. ...


Sanctions

Enforcing the Code of Advertising is essential for the ASA in order to ensure that advertising values are adhered to. Although the ASA itself cannot fine companies who breach its Code, or bring legal action against bad advertisers, it does have a number of sanctions to hand. The British Code of Advertising, Direct Marketing and Sales Promotion (the CAP Code) The 11th edition of the CAP Code came into force in March 2003. ...


Bad Publicity

Contrary to the saying, not all publicity is good publicity and the ASA realises that bad publicity is bad news for most marketers. After all, the majority of consumers would find it hard to trust a company that repeatedly found itself in breach of advertising rules. To this end, the ASA publishes weekly adjudications on its website every Wednesday where full details of its investigations can be found. To view ASA adjudications, visit the adjudications section of the ASA website. The press are also granted full access to the same information that is included in its weekly adjudications, bringing even more bad publicity to bad marketers. The British Code of Advertising, Direct Marketing and Sales Promotion (the CAP Code) The 11th edition of the CAP Code came into force in March 2003. ...


Copy Advice

The ASA can order advertisers not to advertise unless the CAP Copy Advice team have seen the advertisement first and allowed the advertisement to go ahead. The most famous example of this was when the ASA told French Connection UK Ltd, who make the FCUK branded clothing, to pre-vet all their advertisements with the CAP Copy Advice team.


CAP Compliance Team

The CAP Compliance Team is the enforcement arm of the ASA and CAP. The Compliance Team works to ensure that advertisers remove their problematic claims. The Compliance Team is a rather secretive arm of CAP as it does not report back to complainants, nor does it publish the result of its work. However, part of its work does involve contacting media owners and telling them not to take any advertisements from problematic advertisers until the CAP Copy Advice team have pre-vetted the advertisement.


Office of Fair Trading

The Office of Fair Trading (OFT) is the ASA's legal enforcement body. The OFT has powers to fine companies and bring legal action to them. If the ASA has trouble with a repeat offender, they can refer the matter to the OFT under the Control of Misleading Advertisements Regulations 1988. The OFT can then take whatever action they deem necessary. The Office of Fair Trading or OFT is a UK statutory body established by the Enterprise Act 2002, which seeks to protect the consumer from anti-competitive practices. ...


Ofcom

The ASA can also refer problematic broadcast advertisers to Ofcom. Broadcasters have ultimate responsibility for the advertisements on their channel and are therefore answerable to the statutory organisation which provides the license, Ofcom. Ofcom has the power to fine and/or to revoke licenses. following over 1,000 complaints to the ASA about the shopping channel Auctionworld, the ASA referred the matter to Ofcom who found the company in breach of its license and fined it. The fine was eventually the final straw and Auctionworld ended up in administration and went out of business. The Office of Communications, usually known as Ofcom, is the UKs communications regulator. ... The Office of Communications, usually known as Ofcom, is the UKs communications regulator. ... The Office of Communications, usually known as Ofcom, is the UKs communications regulator. ... Shopping channels are television specialty channels that present shopping related content. ...


Noteworthy rulings

Thepool.com

In an unusual step, the chairman of the ASA, Lord Borrie Q.C., ordered the advertisements for online gambling company thepool.com to be removed immediately pending investigation following a complaint from a member of the public - the ASA usually only orders advertisements to be removed following an investigation. The advertisement was deemed to have breached strict ASA rules on advertising gambling to under 18s.


One of the series of advertisements asked "Did you know it is legal to gamble at 16?" and featured the number '15' in a crossed-out sign. The ASA took a very dim view on the attempt to circumvent its Codes and upheld the complaint and told thepool.com not to repeat the approach. To add to the controversy, the minister for Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, Tessa Jowell, wrote to the ASA describing the advertisement as "utterly reprehensible". Thepool.com responded by suggesting that if Tessa Jowell felt that it was wrong to aim their advertisement at 16 year olds then she should change the law [to increase the minimum gambling age from 16 to 18]. The British Code of Advertising, Direct Marketing and Sales Promotion (the CAP Code) The 11th edition of the CAP Code came into force in March 2003. ... The Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport is a UK cabinet position with responsibility for the Department for Culture, Media and Sport. ... Rt. ... Rt. ...


Others

Apple Computer, Inc. ... Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is an international computer technology corporation with 2005 global annual sales of US$42. ... Get the Facts is a FUD-campaign-initiative created by Microsoft 2004. ... For Wikipedias policy on avoiding bias, see Wikipedia:Neutral point of view. ... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC, SEHK: 4335), founded in 1968 as Integrated Electronics Corporation, is a U.S.-based multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ... Centrino is a platform marketing initiative from Intel for a particular combination of CPU, mainboard chipset and wireless network interface in the design of a laptop personal computer. ...

See also

Advertising regulation refers to the laws and rules defining the ways in which products can be advertised in a particular region. ... The Office of Communications, usually known as Ofcom, is the UKs communications regulator. ... The Press Complaints Commission is a British organisation that has regulated printed newspapers and magazines since 1990. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Advertising Standards Authority - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2755 words)
In 1961, the Advertising Association established the Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) to draft a code of advertising for advertisers to adhere to.
Typically, advertisements that fall in 'paid-for' spaces in newspapers (both national and regional) and magazines that are published in the UK fall within the remit of the ASA.
The ASA can, in special circumstances, consider complaints about advertisements that appeared more than three months previously, namely if it could not have been possible for the complainant to know that the advertisement was misleading at the time (advertisements for long-term investments would be such an example).
Advertising slogan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (533 words)
Advertising slogans are claimed to be, and often are proven to be, the most effective means of drawing attention to one or more aspects of a product or products.
At the start of World War I, when modern advertising was in its infancy, a famous poster called on young British men to heed the need expressed by one of Britain's foremost soldiers, Lord Kitchener, and volunteer to serve their country.
Advertising slogans are subject to ethical constraints and are often viewed with reservations, if not actual misgivings by official bodies, such as the Advertising Standards Authority in the UK, or the European Advertising Standards Alliance who claim to have a responsibility to the public good and whose decision making follows an Advertising Code.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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