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Encyclopedia > Advent

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Liturgical year
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Advent (from the Latin word advenio, meaning "to come", "the coming of Christ our saviour") is a holy season of the Christian church, the period of expectant waiting and preparation for the celebration of the Nativity of Christ, also known outside the Church as the season of Christmas. It is the beginning of the Western Christian year and commences on Advent Sunday. The Eastern churches begin the year on 1 September. The progression of Advent may be marked with an Advent calendar reckoning Advent to start on 1 December, a practice introduced by German Lutherans. Look up advent in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The month of October from a liturgical calendar for Abbotsbury Abbey. ... Christmastide (also Christmas or the Christmas season) is one of the seasons of the liturgical year of some Christian churches. ... The Wise Men (Magi) adoring the infant Jesus. ... It has been suggested that Cuaresma be merged into this article or section. ... Easter Triduum, or Holy Triduum, or Paschal Triduum is a term used by some Christian churches, particularly the Roman Catholic Church, the Lutheran Church, and many Anglicans, to denote, collectively, the three days from the evening of Maundy Thursday (or Holy Thursday) to the evening of Easter Sunday. ... Eastertide, or the Easter Season, begins on Easter Sunday and continues until Pentecost in the Christian liturgical calendar, thus spanning a total of seven weeks. ... Also refers to the process of gaining Enlightenment and several meditation techniques. ... The Descent of the Holy Spirit in a 15th century illuminated manuscript. ... Ordinary Time is a season of the Christian (especially the Catholic) liturgical calendar. ... Eastern Orthodox Icon of the Exaltation of the Cross In the Christian liturgical calendar, there are several different feasts known as Feasts of the Cross, all of which commemorate the cross used in the crucifixion of Jesus. ... The Nativity Fast, practiced by the Eastern Orthodox Church, is believed to enable participants to draw closer to God by denying the body of worldly pleasure in preparation for celebration of the birth of Jesus Christ, which is held on December 25th (Julian Calendar). ... For the Nativity of Jesus, see Nativity of Jesus. ... Look up theophany in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Great Lent is the greatest fasting period in the church year in Eastern Christianity, which prepares Christians for the greatest feast of the church year, Easter (or Holy Pascha). Although it is in many ways similar to Lent in Western Christianity, there are important differences in the timing of Lent... This article is about the Christian festival. ... The Descent of the Holy Spirit in a 15th century illuminated manuscript. ... The upper part of The Transfiguration (1520) by Raphael, depicting Christ miraculously discoursing with Moses and Elijah The word Transfiguration means a changing of appearance or form. ... Dormition of the Virgin redirects here. ... The Intercession of Our Most Holy Lady Theotokos and Ever-Virgin Mary (Russian Pokrov, Покров) is one of the most important Russian Orthodoxy feasts (maybe the most important after the Twelve Great Feasts). ... Holiness means the state of being holy, that is, set apart for the worship or service of a god or gods. ... The month of October from a liturgical calendar for Abbotsbury Abbey. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... For the Nativity of Jesus, see Nativity of Jesus. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... The liturgical year, also known as the Christian year, consists of the cycle of liturgical seasons in some Christian churches which determines when Feasts, Memorials, Commemorations, and Solemnities are to be observed and which portions of Scripture are to be read. ... Advent Sunday is the first day of the Liturgical year in the Western Christian churches. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Extensive Advent calendar An Advent calendar is a symbol of the holy season of Advent, celebrated in December near Christmas, another holiday season. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Adventus is the Latin word for "coming", and is the exact Latin equivalent for the Greek word parousia, commonly used in reference to the Second Coming. Christians believe that the season of Advent serves a dual reminder of the original waiting that was done by the Hebrews for the birth of their Messiah as well as the waiting that Christians today endure as they await the second coming of Jesus. In Christianity, Parousia means the (Second) Coming of Christ. ... For other uses, see Second Coming (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Hebrew people. ... In Judaism, the Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Aramaic: , ; Arabic: , ; the Anointed One) at first meant any person who was anointed with oil on rising to a certain position among the ancient Israelites, at first that of High priest, later that of King and also that of a prophet. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ...


Tradition

Many churches display wreaths during Advent, with one candle representing each of the four Sundays preceding Christmas.
Many churches display wreaths during Advent, with one candle representing each of the four Sundays preceding Christmas.

The theme of readings and teachings during Advent is often to prepare for the Second Coming while commemorating the First Coming of Christ at Christmas. With the view of directing the thoughts of Christians to the first coming of Jesus Christ as Saviour, and to his second coming as Judge, special lessons are prescribed for each of the four Sundays in Advent. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1296 × 972 pixels, file size: 306 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1296 × 972 pixels, file size: 306 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... For other uses, see Second Coming (disambiguation). ...


A darker purple (sometimes called "Royal Purple") is used whereas in Lent the color is often a reddish purple ("Roman Purple"). This shade is used around the church, on the priest's vestments and usually the Tabernacle. On the 3rd Sunday of Advent, Gaudete Sunday, the color rose is used since this Sunday takes on a more joyous tone. In some Anglican and Lutheran churches, blue is the liturgical color for Advent, a custom traced to the medieval Sarum Rite. This color is often referred to "Sarum blue." Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religions, especially the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Anglican Churches. ... The Tabernacle is known in Hebrew as the Mishkan ( משכן Place of [Divine] dwelling). It was to be a portable central place of worship for the Hebrews from the time they left ancient Egypt following the Exodus, through the time of the Book of Judges when they were engaged in conquering... Gaudete Sunday is the third Sunday of Advent in the Christian calendar. ... The Sarum Rite, more properly called the Sarum Use, was a variant of the Latin Rite practiced in Great Britain & Ireland from the late 11th Century until the Reformation. ...


The "Late Advent Weekdays" or December 17-24, mark the singing of the Great Advent 'O Antiphons'. These are the antiphons for the Magnificat at Vespers, or Evening Prayer (in the Roman Catholic Church) and Evensong (in the Anglican Church) each day, and mark the forthcoming birth of the Messiah. They form the basis for each verse of the popular Advent hymn, "O come, O come, Emmanuel." In the Roman Catholic tradition, the O Antiphons are prayed each morning at Mass from December 17 to December 23 inclusive. ... The Visitation in the Book of Hours of the Duc of Berry For the David and the Giants album, see Magnificat (album) The Magnificat (also known as the Song of Mary) is a canticle frequently sung (or said) liturgically in Christian church services. ... Vespers is the evening prayer service in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox liturgies of the canonical hours. ... The term evensong can refer to the following: Evening Prayer (Anglican), the Anglican liturgy of Evening Prayer, especially (but not exclusively) so called when it is sung. ... O Come, O Come, Emmanuel is a Christmas carol translated by John Neale in the late 19th century. ...


From the 4th century, the season was kept as a period of fasting as strict as that of Lent (commencing in some localities on 11 November; this being the feast day of St. Martin of Tours, the fast became known as "St. Martin's Fast," "St. Martin's Lent" or "the forty days of St. Martin"). The feast day was in many countries a time of frolic and heavy eating, since the 40-day fast began the next day. In the Anglican and Lutheran churches this fasting rule was later relaxed, with the Roman Catholic Church doing likewise later, but still keeping Advent as a season of penitence. In addition to fasting, dancing and similar festivities were forbidden, and to the present day, in accordance with the symbolism of liturgical colours, purple vestments are worn at the church services, although in recent years [blue] has gained favour (to make Advent more distinctive from Lent, which continues to use violet), an apparent revival of the Sarum Rite, which dates from medieval England (Sarum being the Latin name for Salisbury, where the custom of using blue vestments at this time of year originated). In the Eastern churches, red is used. It has been suggested that Cuaresma be merged into this article or section. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Statue of Saint Martin cutting his cloak in two. ... St. ... The Anglican Communion is a world-wide organisation of Anglican Churches. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... For other uses, see Penance (disambiguation). ... Liturgical colours are colours of vestments and paraments within a Christian liturgy. ... This article is about the color. ... Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religions, especially the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Anglican Churches. ... The Sarum Rite, more properly called the Sarum Use, was a variant of the Latin Rite practiced in Great Britain & Ireland from the late 11th Century until the Reformation. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Salisbury Cathedral by Constable. ...


In many countries, Advent was long marked by diverse popular observances, some of which still survive. In England, especially in the northern counties, there was a custom (now extinct) for poor women to carry around the "Advent images", two dolls dressed to represent Jesus and the Blessed Virgin Mary. A halfpenny was expected from every one to whom these were exhibited, and bad luck was thought to menace the household not visited by the doll-bearers before Christmas Eve at the latest. This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Our Lady redirects here. ... The Christmas Eve (1904-05), watercolor painting by the Swedish painter Carl Larsson (1853-1919) Christmas Eve, the evening of December 24th, the preceding day or vigil before Christmas Day, is treated to a greater or a lesser extent in most Christian societies as part of the Christmas season. ...


In Normandy, farmers employed children under twelve to run through the fields and orchards armed with torches, setting fire to bundles of straw, and thus it is believed driving out such vermin as are likely to damage the crops. In Italy, among other Advent celebrations, is the entry into Rome in the last days of Advent of the Calabrian pifferari, or bagpipe players, who play before the shrines of Mary, the mother of Jesus, the Italian tradition being that the shepherds played these pipes when they came to the manger at Bethlehem to pay homage to the infant Jesus. For other uses, see Normandy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Manger: A person that stands for freedom and all that is right, wants to be a god person against others, And you can call him a Funfreak A manger is a trough or box of carved stone or wood construction used to hold food for animals (as in a stable). ... Arabic بيت لحم Name Meaning House of Lambs Government City (from 1995) Also Spelled Beit Lahm (officially) Bayt Lahm (unofficially) Governorate Bethlehem Population 29,930 (2006) Jurisdiction 29,799 dunams (29. ...


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CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Advent (1017 words)
According to present [1907] usage, Advent is a period beginning with the Sunday nearest to the feast of St.
Pope Innocent III (1198-1216) states that fl was the colour to be used during Advent, but violet had already come into use for this season at the end of the thirteenth century.
Flowers and relics of Saints are not to be placed on the altars during the Office and Masses of this time, except on the third Sunday; and the same prohibition and exception exist in regard to the use of the organ.
The Christian Season of Advent (3526 words)
Advent is the beginning of the Church Year for most churches in the Western tradition.
Advent is marked by a spirit of expectation, of anticipation, of preparation, of longing.
The beginning of Advent is a time for the hanging of the green, decoration of the church with evergreen wreaths, boughs, or trees that help to symbolize the new and everlasting life brought through Jesus the Christ.
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