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Encyclopedia > Adrian of Nicomedia

Saint Adrian of Nicomedia, also called Saint Hadrian of Nicomedia, (in Latin: Sanctus Adrianus Nicomediae) was a Herculian Guard of the Roman Emperor Galerius Maximian. After becoming a convert to Christianity, Adrian was martyred at Nicomedia on March 4, 303 or 304. It is said that while presiding over the torture of a band of Christians he asked them what reward they expected to receive from God. They replied, "Eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither have entered into the heart of man, the things which God hath prepared for them that love him" (I Corinthians 2:9). He was so amazed at their courage that he publicly confessed his faith. He was imprisoned, and the next day his limbs were struck off on an anvil, and he was then beheaded, dying in the arms of his wife, Saint Natalia of Nicomedia. After he was killed, Adrian and several other martyrs were taken to be burned. When the executioners began to burn their bodies, a thunderstorm arose and the furnace was extinguished; lightning killed several of the executioners. Later, Christians took Adrian's body and buried him on the outskirts of Byzantium. A small selection of Christian saints are listed below in alphabetical order by Christian name, but if necessary by surname, the place or attribute part of name as well. ... Nicomedes I of Bithynia founded the city of Nicomedia (modern İzmit), at the head of the Gulf of Astacus (which opens on the Propontis), in 264 BC The city has ever since been one of the chief towns in this part of Asia Minor. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Jovians and Herculians were the imperial guard of the Emperors of the Roman Empire from 284 until 988 The Praetorian Guard were based at Castra Praetoria just outside Rome, and during the reign of the Emperor Diocletian were in league with the Roman Senate. ... Roman Emperor is the term historians use to refer to rulers of the Roman Empire, after the epoch conventionally named the Roman Republic. ... Galerius on a coin Galerius Maximianus (c. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion that recognizes Jesus Christ as its central figure, Lord and Messiah. ... Historically, a martyr is a person who dies for their religious faith, such as during the persecution of early Christians in the Roman Empire. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... Events Diocletian launched the last major persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire; Hierocles was said to have been the instigator of the fierce persecution of the Christians under February 24 - Galerius, Roman Emperor, publishes his edict that begins the persecution of Christians in his portion of the Empire. ... Events Major Wu Hu (barbarian) uprising in China; the Hun Liu Yuan establish the Han kingdom, beginning the Sixteen Kingdoms era in China. ... The Iron Maiden of Nuremberg was an infamous and rarely used torture device. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion that recognizes Jesus Christ as its central figure, Lord and Messiah. ... A blacksmith working iron with a hammer and anvil An anvil is a manufacturing tool, made of a hard and massive block of stone or metal used as a support for hammering or chiseling other objects (see forging). ... Beheading—Facsimile of a Miniature on Wood in the Cosmographie Universelle of Munster: in folio, Basle, 1552. ... Historically, a martyr is a person who dies for their religious faith, such as during the persecution of early Christians in the Roman Empire. ... A roll cloud associated with a heavy or severe thunderstorm over Enschede, The Netherlands. ... A furnace is a device for heating air or any other fluid. ... Lightning over Pentagon City in Arlington County, Virginia Lightning is a powerful natural electrostatic discharge produced during a thunderstorm. ... A judicial executioner is a person who carries out a death sentence ordered by the state or other legal authority (known in feudal terminology as high justice), usually when presented with a warrant authorizing or ordering him to execute the sentence. ... Christianity is a monotheistic religion that recognizes Jesus Christ as its central figure, Lord and Messiah. ... Byzantium was an ancient Greek city-state, founded by Greek colonists from Megara in 667 BC and named after their king Byzas. ...


Saint Adrian shares a feast day with his wife on September 8; he also has feast days alone on March 4 and August 26. He is protector against the plague, and patron of old soldiers, arms dealers, butchers and communications phenomena. He was the chief military saint of Northern Europe for many ages, second only to St. George, and is much revered in Flanders, Germany and the north of France. He is usually represented armed, with an anvil in his hands or at his feet. The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with a saint, and referring to the day as the saints day of that saint. ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... August 26 is the 238th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (239th in leap years). ... A soldier is a person who has enlisted with, or has been conscripted into, the armed forces of a sovereign country and has undergone training and received equipment (such as a uniform and weapon) to defend that country or its interests. ... Butchers selling meat in Morocco The Butcher and his Servant, drawn and engraved by J. Amman (Sixteenth Century). ... For alternate uses, see Saint George (disambiguation) Saint George on horseback rides alongside a wounded dragon being led by a princess, late 19th century engraving. ... This article is about the Belgian region Flanders and the eponymous historical region of the Low Countries. ... A blacksmith working iron with a hammer and anvil An anvil is a manufacturing tool, made of a hard and massive block of stone or metal used as a support for hammering or chiseling other objects (see forging). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Adrian of Nicomedia (238 words)
Adrian of Nicomedia, a Christian saint, was a praetorian guard[?] of the emperor Galerius Maximian[?], who, becoming a convert to Christianity, was martyred at Nicomedia on the March 4, 303 or 304.
He was imprisoned, and the next day his limbs were struck off on an anvil, and he was then beheaded, dying in his wife's, St. Natalia of Nicomedia[?]'s, arms.
Adrian shares a feast day[?] with his wife September 8; he also has feast days alone on March 4 and August 26.
Adrian of Nicomedia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (318 words)
Saint Adrian of Nicomedia, also called Saint Hadrian of Nicomedia, (in Latin: Sanctus Adrianus Nicomediae) was a Herculian Guard of the Roman Emperor Galerius Maximian.
After becoming a convert to Christianity, Adrian was martyred at Nicomedia on March 4, 303 or 304.
Saint Adrian shares a feast day with his wife on September 8; he also has feast days alone on March 4 and August 26.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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