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Encyclopedia > Adrian Boult
Adrian Boult

Background information
Birth name Adrian Cedric Boult
Born April 8, 1889
Chester, England, UK
Died February 22, 1983 (age 93)
Farnham, England, UK
Genre(s) Classical
Occupation(s) Conductor
Years active 1932-1978
Associated
acts
BBC Symphony
Birmingham Symphony
London Philharmonic

Sir Adrian Cedric Boult CH (April 8, 1889February 22, 1983) was an English conductor. If you hold the copyright to an image (e. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the larger local government district, see Chester (district). ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Castle Street Farnham is a small town in Surrey, England. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article discusses classical music in the first sense (see below). ... A conductor conducting a band at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... The BBC Symphony Orchestra is the principal orchestra of the British Broadcasting Corporation and one of the leading orchestras in Britain. ... The City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra (CBSO) is based in Birmingham in England. ... The London Philharmonic Orchestra (frequently abbreviated to LPO), based in London, is one of the major orchestras of the United Kingdom. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... A conductor conducting a band at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ...

Contents

Biography

Boult was born in Chester and educated at Westminster School and Christ Church, Oxford. As a schoolboy, he was introduced to the world of music by a family friend, Frank Schuster, who was a friend of Edward Elgar and introduced the young Boult to the composer around 1905.[1] This article is about Chester in England. ... The Royal College of St Peter at Westminster (almost always known as Westminster School) is one of Britains leading boys independent schools and one of the nine public schools set out in the Public Schools Act 1868. ... College name Christ Church Named after Jesus Christ Established 1546 Sister College Trinity College Dean The Very Revd Christopher Andrew Lewis JCR President William Dorsey Undergraduates 426 MCR or GCR President {{{MCR President}}} Graduates 154 Home page Boat Club Christ Church (Latin: Ædes Christi, the temple or house of Christ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... Sir Edward William Elgar, 1st Baronet, OM, GCVO (2 June 1857 – 23 February 1934) was an English Romantic composer. ...


He completed his musical education at the Leipzig Conservatory where he learnt to conduct by watching the eminent Hungarian conductor Arthur Nikisch. He sang in choral festivals and at the Leeds Festival of 1913, where he went to watch Nikisch conduct, and made the acquaintance of George Butterworth and other British composers. Leipzig ( ; Sorbian/Lusatian: Lipsk from the Sorbian word for Tilia) is, with a population of over 506,000, the largest city in the federal state of Saxony, Germany. ... Arthur Nikisch (or Nikitsch) (October 12, 1855 – January 23, 1922) was a Hungarian conductor who performed mainly in Germany. ... The Reading and Leeds Festivals are a pair of annual music festivals that take place in Reading and Leeds in England. ... George Sainton Kaye Butterworth (July 12, 1885 - August 5, 1916) was a British composer best known for his settings of A. E. Housmans poems. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ...


During World War I he was employed at the War Office, and whilst there in 1918 planned a series of concerts with the London Symphony Orchestra, which included several important recent British works: Holst's The Planets, of which he gave the first private performance, A London Symphony by Ralph Vaughan Williams, of which he gave the first performance of the revised version, and Elgar's Symphony No. 2 which had fallen into neglect. Elgar wrote to him and said he felt sure the future of his music was safe in Boult's hands. In this way Boult laid the foundations for a long career as a champion of twentieth century English music. As one example, Vaughan Williams dedicated Job, A Masque for Dancing to Boult in the mid-1930s, several years after the actual première of the work. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Old War Office Building, seen from Whitehall, London - the former location of the War Office The War Office was a former department of the British Government, responsible for the administration of the British Army between the 17th century and 1963, when its functions were transferred to the Ministry of Defence. ... The London Symphony Orchestra (LSO) is one of the major orchestras of the United Kingdom. ... Gustav Holst Gustav Holst (September 21, 1874, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire - May 25, 1934, London) [1] [2] was an English composer and was a music teacher for over 20 years. ... The Planets Op. ... A London Symphony is the second symphony composed by Ralph Vaughan Williams. ... A statue of Ralph Vaughan Williams in Dorking. ... The Symphony No. ... Job: A Masque for Dancing is a ballet written by the famous British composer Ralph Vaughan Williams. ...


Career

Birmingham and the BBC

In 1924 Boult was appointed to the conductorship of the City of Birmingham Orchestra—now the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra—and in 1930 he was made Director of Music at the BBC. When the BBC formed a symphony orchestra, Boult also became its chief conductor, combining both jobs. The City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra (CBSO) is based in Birmingham, England. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... The BBC Symphony Orchestra is the principal orchestra of the British Broadcasting Corporation and one of the leading orchestras in Britain. ...


During the 1930s the orchestra became renowned for its high standard of playing and for Boult's competent performances of new and unfamiliar music, often rehearsed in a very short time. Among these successes were an early performance of Arnold Schoenberg's Variations, Op.31, the British première of Alban Berg's opera Wozzeck and the première of Vaughan Williams' Symphony No. 4 in F minor.[2] In 1933, Boult married Ann Wilson, the ex-wife of Steuart Wilson, tenor singer and administrator. The marriage lasted until Boult's death. Boult was knighted in 1937. Face The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ... Schoenberg redirects here. ... Portrait of Alban Berg by Arnold Schoenberg, c. ... Wozzeck is the first opera by the Austrian composer Alban Berg (1885-1935). ... Sir James Steuart Wilson, born Bristol, England, 21 July 1889, died Petersfield, 18 December 1966, was a tenor singer and musical administrator. ...


During World War II the BBC Symphony Orchestra was evacuated to Bristol, where it suffered from bombing, and to Bedford, where Boult strove to maintain standards and morale as many key players left. In these years he made recordings of Elgar's Second Symphony, Holst's The Planets and Vaughan Williams' Job, A Masque for Dancing. After the war the start of the BBC Third Programme saw Boult involved in several pioneering ventures for Britain, including the British premières of Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 3 and the Concerto for Orchestra of Béla Bartók.[3] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The BBC Symphony Orchestra is the principal orchestra of the British Broadcasting Corporation and one of the leading orchestras in Britain. ... This article is about the English city. ... Bedford is the county town of the English county of Bedfordshire. ... BBC Radio 3 is a radio station operated by the BBC within the United Kingdom. ... This article cites its sources but does not provide page references. ... The Symphony No. ... The Concerto for Orchestra Sz. ... Béla Bartók in 1927 Béla Viktor János Bartók (March 25, 1881 – September 26, 1945) was a Hungarian composer, pianist and collector of Eastern European and Middle Eastern folk music. ...


In 1948, Steuart Wilson was appointed Director of Music at the BBC. Suggestions that the standard of playing had fallen beyond Boult's ability to rectify were taken as a reason to insist on his retirement at the age of 60 in 1949, an incident which remains controversial to this day.[4] The Director General of the BBC at the time, Sir William Haley, later broadcast a tribute to Boult, acknowledging that he 'had listened to ill-judged advice in retiring him.'[5] Later the BBC invited Boult to give a warm introduction to Arturo Toscanini's historic second broadcast concert with the Philharmonia Orchestra on 1 October 1952; the speech has been included in some releases of the broadcast.[6] Sir James Steuart Wilson, born Bristol, England, 21 July 1889, died Petersfield, 18 December 1966, was a tenor singer and musical administrator. ... Sir William Haley (1901-1987) was Director-General of the BBC from 1944 to 1952, succeeding Robert W. Foot and giving way to Sir Ian Jacob. ... Arturo Toscanini (March 25, 1867 – January 16, 1957) was an Italian musician. ... The Philharmonia is an orchestra based in London. ...


London Philharmonic

After it became clear that Boult would not be able to retain his position with the BBC Symphony, Thomas Russell, the Managing Director of the London Philharmonic Orchestra (LPO), offered Boult the position of Principal Conductor of the LPO in succession to Eduard van Beinum. In the 1930s under Thomas Beecham, the LPO had been the other crack London orchestra, but since Beecham's departure, was in need of rebuilding. Boult accepted this position and threw himself into this task. The results can be heard to this day in a long series of recordings beginning in 1950 and including in their early years a complete set of the Vaughan Williams symphonies and much Elgar. He obtained for the orchestra a recording contract with American companies and recorded Johannes Brahms symphonies, Hector Berlioz and Jean Sibelius, among other composers. The London Philharmonic Orchestra (frequently abbreviated to LPO), based in London, is one of the major orchestras of the United Kingdom. ... Eduard van Beinum (September 1, 1901, Arnhem - April 13, 1959, Amsterdam) was a Dutch conductor. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Portrait of Berlioz by Signol, 1832 Louis Hector Berlioz (December 11, 1803 – March 8, 1869) was a French Romantic composer, best known for his compositions Symphonie Fantastique (first performed in 1830) and Grande Messe des Morts (Requiem). ... Johan Julius Christian Jean / Janne Sibelius ( ; December 8, 1865 – September 20, 1957) was a Finnish composer of classical music and one of the most notable composers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ...


There was controversy and ambiguity over Boult's role in the dismissal of Thomas Russell from his position as the LPO Managing Director, in 1952, during the Cold War years, as Russell was an avowed member of the Communist Party of Great Britain.[7] Boult served as the LPO's principal conductor until 1957. After the sudden resignation of Andrzej Panufnik from the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra (CBSO), Boult returned as Principal Conductor of the CBSO for the 1959-1960 season. That was his last chief conductorship, though he remained closely associated with the LPO as its President until his retirement. The Communist Party of Great Britain (CPGB) was the largest communist party in the United Kingdom. ... Sir Andrzej Panufnik (September 24, 1914 - October 27, 1991) was a Polish composer, pianist, and a conductor of classical music. ...


Boult recorded all seven then-existing symphonies by Vaughan Williams for Decca Records in 1953-54 with the LPO, with the composer present; these sessions included the Sea Symphony's first-ever recording. Decca also taped Vaughan Williams' short speech to the musicians following the recording of the Sixth symphony, and included it in the album. The composer was to have been present for the first recording of his Ninth symphony, for Everest Records in 1958, but he died the night before the session took place; Boult recorded a short introduction as a memorial tribute to Vaughan Williams. This recording has been reissued on CD. It has been suggested that Decca Music Group be merged into this article or section. ... An Everest Records reissue of music by Ralph Vaughan Williams and Malcolm Arnold Everest Records was a stereophonic record company in Bayside, Long Island; started by Harry D. Belock and Bert Whyte in May 1958 as a division of the Belock Instrument Corporation. ...


Later years

After what Michael Kennedy described as a 'fallow' period in the early 1960s, Boult acquired the status of a revered figure in British music, and despite advancing years continued to conduct new works, being valued for his impartiality and reliability.[8] He was guest conductor with UK orchestras and further afield (Vienna and Boston). In 1966 he resumed conducting for EMI and until his retirement enjoyed an 'Indian Summer', recording or re-recording his repertory in interpretations which have remained in the catalogues for thirty or forty years. Having recorded much British music he was encouraged to record the orchestral music of Brahms, whose Third Symphony filled an extra recording session in August 1970 and sparked this exploration of the standard repertory, Richard Wagner, and Franz Schubert. This surprised those listeners who did not know that his acquaintance with these works dated back to the pre-1914 era when he had heard Nikisch and Karl Muck conduct them in Germany. His repertory in general was much wider than his late discography might indicate; not only did he conduct seven of the nine Mahler symphonies well before the Mahler revival of the 1960s,[9] but he also frequently programmed Ravel's complete ballet Daphnis et Chloé and even Ferruccio Busoni's rarely-staged opera Doktor Faust in the late 1940s. The EMI Group (LSE: EMI) is a British music company comprising of the major record company EMI Music which operates several labels, based in Kensington in London, England, and EMI Music Publishing, based in New York. ... Richard Wagner Wilhelm Richard Wagner (22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, conductor, music theorist, and essayist, primarily known for his operas (or music dramas as he later came to call them). ... Franz Schubert Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828) was an Austrian composer. ... Karl Muck (1859 - 1940) was a German conductor. ... Maurice Ravel Joseph-Maurice Ravel (March 7, 1875 – December 28, 1937) was a French composer and pianist of the impressionistic period, known especially for the subtlety, richness and poignancy of his music. ... Daphnis et Chloé is a ballet with music by Maurice Ravel. ... Ferruccio Busoni Ferruccio Busoni (April 1, 1866 – July 27, 1924) was an Italian composer, pianist, music teacher and conductor. ...


His last public performance was conducting Elgar's ballet The Sanguine Fan for London Festival Ballet at the Coliseum, in London on 24 June 1978. His final record, completed in December 1978, was of music by Hubert Parry. He formally retired from conducting in 1981.[10] Painting of ballet dancers by Edgar Degas, 1872. ... The Sanguine Fan is a single-act ballet written by Sir Edward Elgar in 1917. ... English National Ballet is one of the leading ballet companies in the United Kingdom. ... The London Coliseum The Coliseum Theatre is one of Londons largest and best equipped theatres, opening in 1904. ... Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry (February 27, 1848 – October 7, 1918) was an English composer, probably best known for his setting of William Blakes poem, Jerusalem. ...


Legacy

The Conservatoire in Birmingham, a department of the University of Central England, includes in its home building the Adrian Boult Hall, a purpose built 500 seater recital hall, in a theatre style setting. It is primarily for classical concerts and recitals, and is occasionally used as a concert venue for jazz and world music. It opened in 1986 and was extensively refurbished in 2006.[11][not specific enough to verify] The University of Central England in Birmingham (UCE) is located in Birmingham, England. ... Birmingham (pron. ... The University of Central England in Birmingham (UCE) is located in Birmingham, England. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... World music is, most generally, all the music in the world. ...


Recordings

Boult was a prolific recording artist. Unlike many musicians, he felt at home in the recording studio and was happy working without an audience.[12] Most of the recordings below have been released on CD. Except where indicated, they are EMI recordings. The EMI Group (LSE: EMI) is a British music company comprising of the major record company EMI Music which operates several labels, based in Kensington in London, England, and EMI Music Publishing, based in New York. ...

  • Bax
    • Tintagel (LPO, mono) (Decca)
    • Tintagel (LPO, stereo) (Lyrita)
    • The Garden of Fand (LPO) (Lyrita)
    • November Woods (LPO) (Lyrita)
  • Berlioz
    • Overtures (Philharmonic Promenade Orchestra) (Pye)
  • Holst
    • Choral Symphony (LPO)
    • Egdon Heath (LPO) (Decca)
    • Japanese Suite (LPO) (Lyrita)
    • Oriental Suite (LPO) (Lyrita)
    • The Hymn of Jesus (BBC Symphony Orchestra & Chorus) (Decca)
    • The Perfect Fool Ballet Music (LPO) (Decca)
    • The Planets (five recordings between 1945 (BBC SO) and 1979 (LPO)
  • Ireland
    • The Overlanders (LPO) (Lyrita)
    • Mai-Dun (LPO) (Lyrita)
    • Piano Concerto (LPO) (Lyrita)
  • Moeran
    • Symphony (NPO) (Lyrita)
    • Sinfonietta (LPO) (Lyrita)
  • Parry
    • Blest Pair of Sirens (LPO)
    • Symphonic Variations (LSO) (Lyrita)
    • Symphony No 5 (LPO)
  • Rubbra
    • Symphony No. 7 (LPO) (Lyrita)

For other people named Bach and other meanings of the word, see Bach (disambiguation). ... Johann Sebastian Bach, c. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... A portrait by Joseph Karl Stieler, 1820 Ludwig van Beethoven (IPA: ), (baptized December 17, 1770[1] – March 26, 1827) was a composer and one of the pillars of European classical music. ... Ludwig van Beethovens Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in D major was written in 1806. ... Josef Suk (born August 8, 1929) is a Czech violinist, the grandson of Josef Suk, the composer and violinist, and great-grandson of Antonín Dvořák. ... The Philharmonia is an orchestra based in London. ... Portrait of Berlioz by Signol, 1832 Louis Hector Berlioz (December 11, 1803 – March 8, 1869) was a French Romantic composer, best known for his compositions Symphonie Fantastique (first performed in 1830) and Grande Messe des Morts (Requiem). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Alto Rhapsody, Op 53 is a work for contralto, male chorus, and orchestra by Johannes Brahms. ... Janet Baker as Mary Stuart The British mezzo-soprano Janet Baker (born August 21, 1933) is a well-known opera, concert, and lieder singer. ... Antonín Dvořák Antonín Leopold Dvořák (IPA: , ) (September 8, 1841 – May 1, 1904) was a Czech composer of Romantic music. ... Antonín Dvořáks Cello Concerto in B minor, Opus 104 is one of the most well-known cello concerti. ... Mstislav Leopoldovich Rostropovich KBE (Russian: Мстисла́в Леопо́льдович Ростропо́вич, Mstislav Leopoldovič Rostropovič, IPA pronunciation ), (March 27, 1927 – April 27, 2007), known to close friends as “Slava”, was a cellist and conductor. ... The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra (RPO) is an English orchestra based in London. ... Sir Edward William Elgar, 1st Baronet, OM, GCVO (2 June 1857 – 23 February 1934) was an English Romantic composer. ... The Apostles are an experimental punk rock band who developed within the confines of the 1980s Anarcho Punk scene in the UK, but did not necessarily adhere to the aesthetics of that movement. ... Three Bavarian Dances, Op 27 are an orchestral work by Edward Elgar. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Casals redirects here. ... The BBC Symphony Orchestra is the principal orchestra of the British Broadcasting Corporation and one of the leading orchestras in Britain. ... Paul Tortelier (March 21, 1914 - December 18, 1990) was a French cellist and composer. ... Pieter Bruegel the Elders „Das Schlaraffenland“ (The Land of Cockaigne), painted in 1567. ... Dream Children is a 1998 novel by A.N. Wilson. ... The Dream of Gerontius, popularly called just Gerontius, is an oratorio (Opus 38) in two parts composed by Edward Elgar in 1900, to text from the poem by Cardinal Newman. ... Variations on an Original Theme for orchestra, Op. ... Falstaff – Symphonic Study in C minor Op. ... Jean Froissart (~1337 - ~1405) was one of the most important of the chroniclers of medieval France. ... In the South (Alassio), Op. ... Sir Edward Elgars Introduction and Allegro for Strings, opus 47, was composed in 1905 for performance in an all-Elgar performance by the newly formed London Symphony Orchestra. ... The Kingdom (Danish title: Riget) is an eight-episode Danish television mini-series, created by Lars von Trier in 1994. ... The Music Makers, op. ... The Pomp and Circumstance Marches, op. ... The Sanguine Fan is a single-act ballet written by Sir Edward Elgar in 1917. ... The Symphony No. ... The Symphony No. ... The Violin Concerto in B Minor, opus 61, is one of Sir Edward Elgars longest works, yet it is somewhat uncommon in recording and in performance. ... Yehudi Menuhin album cover Yehudi Menuhin, Baron Menuhin, OM, KBE (April 22, 1916 – March 12, 1999) was a Jewish-born, American violinist and conductor who spent most of his performing career in the United Kingdom and eventually became a British citizen. ... The Wand of Youth Suites 1 & 2 are suites for full orchestra by the English composer Edward Elgar. ... C sar-Auguste-Jean-Guillaume-Hubert Franck (December 10, 1822–November 8, 1890) was a composer and organist. ... The Symphony in D minor is the most famous orchestral work and only symphony by the 19th century Belgian composer César Franck. ... The Philharmonia Orchestra is an orchestra based in London. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Sir Clifford Michael Curzon (May 18, 1907 - September 1, 1982) was a celebrated English pianist. ... Decca may refer to: Decca Records, a 1929 British record label, also known as Decca Music Group Decca Radar (later Racal-Decca Marine), a British marine electronics manufacturer, a spin-off from the gramophone and records company Decca tree, a microphone recording system London Decca, a maker of turntable tonearms... Edvard Grieg Edvard Hagerup Grieg (15 June 1843 – 4 September 1907) was a Norwegian composer and pianist who composed in the romantic period. ... The Piano Concerto in A minor by Edvard Grieg was the only concerto Grieg completed. ... Shura Cherkassky (October 7, 1909 - December 27, 1995) was a Ukrainian classical pianist known for his brilliant, if sometimes idiosyncratic performances of the romantic repertoire. ... HANDEL was the code-name for the UKs National Attack Warning System in the Cold War. ... Acis and Galatea is a pastoral opera or masque composed by George Frideric Handel while he was living in Cannons (the seat of James Brydges, 1st Duke of Chandos, during the summer of 1718, and later revised and expanded to three acts in 1732, to words by John Gay, Alexander... Sir Peter Neville Luard Pears (June 22, 1910 – April 3, 1986) was an English tenor and life-long partner of the composer Benjamin Britten. ... Joan Sutherland as Haydns Euridice, Vienna 1967 Dame Joan Sutherland OM, AC, DBE (born November 7, 1926) is an Australian dramatic coloratura soprano noted for her contribution to the bel canto revival of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Messiah (HWV 56), is an oratorio by George Frideric Handel based on a libretto by Charles Jennens. ... A British soprano, she was a member of Benjamin Brittens English Opera Group and created roles in some of his operas, including: Lady Rich in Gloriana The Governess in The Turn of the Screw Tytania in A Midsummer Nights Dream Mrs. ... Messiah (HWV 56), is an oratorio by George Frideric Handel based on a libretto by Charles Jennens. ... Joan Sutherland as Haydns Euridice, Vienna 1967 Dame Joan Sutherland OM, AC, DBE (born November 7, 1926) is an Australian dramatic coloratura soprano noted for her contribution to the bel canto revival of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Gustav Holst Gustav Holst (September 21, 1874, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire - May 25, 1934, London) [1] [2] was an English composer and was a music teacher for over 20 years. ... Egdon Heath is a fictitious name given to an area of moorland between Dorchester and Bournemouth in the county of Dorset, England. ... The Planets Op. ... This article cites its sources but does not provide page references. ... Kindertotenlieder (Songs on the Death of Children) is a song cycle for voice and orchestra by Gustav Mahler. ... Christa Ludwig (born March 16, 1928) is a distinguished German mezzo-soprano, known both for her opera performances and her singing of Lieder. ... Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen (Songs of a Travelling Journeyman, often mistranslated as Songs of a Wayfarer) is Gustav Mahlers first song cycle. ... Kirsten Flagstad Kirsten MÃ¥lfrid Flagstad (July 12, 1895 – December 7, 1962) was a Norwegian opera singer. ... The Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra (in German: Wiener Philharmoniker) is the best known orchestra in Austria and one of Europes major ensembles. ... Ernest John Moeran (December 31, 1894 - December 1, 1950) was an English composer. ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... André Previn (born April 6, 1929)¹ is a prominent pianist, orchestral conductor, and composer. ... Annie Fischer (July 5, 1914 - April 10, 1995) was a Hungarian classical pianist. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry (February 27, 1848 – October 7, 1918) was an English composer, probably best known for his setting of William Blakes poem, Jerusalem. ... Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff, also Sergey Rachmaninov or Serge Rakhmaninov (Серге́й Васи́льевич Рахма́нинов), (April 1, 1873 – March 28, 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist... Symphony No. ... Elsa and Ottorino Respighi in the 1920s Ottorino Respighi (Bologna, July 9, 1879 - Rome, April 18, 1936) was an Italian composer, musicologist, pianist, violist and violinist. ... Feste Romane (English “Roman Festivals”) is a work written, in 1926, by the Italian composer Ottorino Respighi. ... Edmund Rubbra (23 May 1901–14 February 1986) was a British composer. ... For the crater on the moon, see Schubert (crater) Franz Schubert Franz Peter Schubert (January 31, 1797 – November 19, 1828), was an Austrian composer. ... In 1838 Robert Schumann, on a visit to Vienna, found the dusty manuscript of Franz Schuberts C major symphony (the Great, D.944) and took it back to Leipzig, where it was performed by Felix Mendelssohn and celebrated in the Neue Zeitschrift. ... For others with the same name see Robert Schumann (disambiguation). ... The Piano Concerto in A minor, a famous Romantic concerto by Robert Schumann, was completed in 1845. ... A statue of Ralph Vaughan Williams in Dorking. ... Also known as the The Fantasia was one of the first major successes of British composer Ralph Vaughan Williams. ... Serenade to Music is a setting by Ralph Vaughan Williams for 16 vocal soloists and orchestra. ... The Lark Ascending is a musical piece written by the famous British composer Ralph Vaughan Williams in 1914. ... Hugh Cecil Bean (b. ... The Wasps is a suite for orchestra composed by the prominent British composer Ralph Vaughan Williams in 1909. ...

Bibliography

Boult was the author of two books on conducting, Thoughts on Conducting and A handbook on the technique of conducting. A selection of his essays was published in the year of his death, as Boult on Music: Words from a Lifetime's Communication. His autobiography, My Own Trumpet was published in 1973. He was also a frequent broadcaster, notable for his courteous, understated Edwardian style of speaking.

  • Boult, Adrian [1920] (1951). A handbook on the technique of conducting, 7th edition, Oxford: Hall. OCLC 155756343. 
  • Boult, Adrian (1963). Thoughts on Conducting. London: Phoenix House. OCLC 892145. 
  • Boult, Adrian (1973). My Own Trumpet. London: Hamish Hamilton. ISBN 0241024455. 
  • Boult, Adrian (1983). Boult on Music: Words from a Lifetime's Communication. London: Toccata Press. ISBN 0907689035. 
  • Kennedy, Michael (1987). Adrian Boult. London: Hamish Hamilton. ISBN 0333487524. 

OCLC Online Computer Library Center was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC). ... OCLC Online Computer Library Center was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center (OCLC). ...

References

  1. ^ "Sir Adrian Boult at 80", The Musical Times, 110(1514), pp. 367-368 (April 1969).
  2. ^ ’My Own Trumpet’, p. 186/7
  3. ^ ’My Own Trumpet’, p. 188
  4. ^ Kennedy, ch 25
  5. ^ Kennedy, p. 222
  6. ^ Arturo Toscanini Society
  7. ^ Kennedy, ch 27
  8. ^ Edmund Rubbra, "Sir Adrian Boult (Born 8 April 1889)" (70th birthday tribute). The Musical Times, 100(1394), 204 (1959).
  9. ^ The First, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Seventh, Eighth and Ninth – Kennedy, p. 336
  10. ^ Kennedy, pp. 287/8 and 294
  11. ^ Conservatoire website, January 2007 [not specific enough to verify]
  12. ^ ’My Own Trumpet’, p. 98

External links

Preceded by
Appleby Matthews
Principal Conductor and Music Director, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra
1924–1930
Succeeded by
Leslie Heward
Preceded by
Andrzej Panufnik
Principal Conductor, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra
1959–1960
Succeeded by
Hugo Rignold

  Results from FactBites:
 
Adrian Boult - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (872 words)
In 1920 Boult was appointed to the conductorship of the City of Birmingham Orchestra (later the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra) and in 1930 he was made Director of Music at the BBC.
Boult accepted the conductorship of the London Philharmonic Orchestra, which in the thirties under Beecham had been the other crack London orchestra, but since Beecham's departure, was in need of rebuilding.
Boult threw himself into this task and the results can be heard to this day in a long series of recordings beginning in 1950 and including in their early years a complete set of the nine Vaughan Williams symphonies and much Elgar.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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