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Encyclopedia > Adrastus

In Greek mythology, Adrastus, or Adrastos ("he who stands his ground", son of Talaus) was one of the three kings at Argos, along with Iphis and Amphiaraus, who was married to Adrastus' sister Eriphyle. His daughters (Argea and Deipyle) married Polynices and Tydeus, respectively. When his sons-in-law were chased out of Thebes, Adrastus helped organize the Seven Against Thebes. Adrastus was the only survivor of the battle and he died from grief over the death of his son, Aegialeus. He was venerated as a god in some cities, especially Sicyon. Greek mythology comprises the collected narratives of Greek gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines, originally created and spread within an oral-poetic tradition. ... In Greek mythology, Talaus was King of Argos and was one of the Argonauts. ... Argos (Greek: Άργος, Árgos) is a city in Greece in the Peloponnesus near Nafplio, which was its historic harbor, named for Nauplius. ... In Greek mythology, Iphis was a Cypriot shepherd who loved Anaxarete. ... In Greek mythology, Amphiaraus, or Amphiaraos (doubly-cursed) was the son of Oicles and husband of Eriphyle. ... In Greek mythology, Eriphyle, daughter of Talaus, was the mother of Alcmaeon and the wife of Amphiaraus. ... In Greek mythology, Argea (or Argeia) was a daughter of King Adrastus of Argos. ... In Greek mythology, Deipyle was the daughter of Adrastus and Amphithea, mother of Diomedes and wife of Tydeus. ... Eteocles and Polynices being carried away, dead, after the Battle of Thebes, in an 1897 illustration from Stories from the Greek Tragedians by Alfred Church Antigone and the body of Polynices In Greek mythology, Polynices was the son of Oedipus and Jocasta. ... In Greek mythology, Tydeus was the father of Diomedes and husband of Deipyle. ... Thebes (in modern Greek: Θήβα - Thíva, in ancient Greek and Katharevousa: - Thēbai or Thívai) is a city in Greece, situated to the north of the Cithaeron range, which divides Boeotia from Attica, and on the southern edge of the Boeotian plain. ... The Oath of the Seven Chiefs, an 1897 illustration from Stories from the Greek Tragedians by Alfred Church Seven Against Thebes is a play by Aeschylus concerning the battle between Eteocles and the army of Thebes and Polynices and his supporters, traditional Theban enemies. ... In Greek mythology, Aegialeus (also Aegealeus) was the son of Adrastus. ... Sicyon was an ancient Greek city situated in the northern Peloponnesus between Corinth and Achaea. ...


Another Adrastus was the son of Gordias, the Phyrgian King, with the Queen, Eurynome. He accidentally killed his brother and exiled himself to Lydia, where King Croesus welcomed him. Once again, Adrastus accidentally killed Croesus' son and then committed suicide. ... In antiquity, Phrygia was a kingdom in the west central part of the Anatolian highlands, part of modern Turkey, from ca. ... In Greek mythology, there were many women with the name Eurýnomê (far ruling). Wife of Ophion and a daughter of Oceanus (may be the same as the following) An Oceanid who mothered the Charites (may be the same as the following) Daughter of King Nisus of Megara and mother of... Lydia (disambiguation) Lydia is a historic region of western Anatolia, congruent with Turkeys modern provinces of Ä°zmir and Manisa. ... Croesus (the Latin transliteration of the Greek Kροισος, in Persian قارون Qârun), who was legendary for his enormous wealth, was king of Lydia from 560 BC until his defeat by the Persians in about 547 BC. He was the son of Alyattes and continued his fathers policy of conquering...


In Greek mythology, a third Adrastus was the son of Merops, King of Percote, and brother to Amphius. Adrastus and Amphius led a military force from Adrastea, Apaesus, Pityeia and Tereia to the Trojan War - despite the entreaties of their father, a seer, who could foresee that death awaited them on the battlefield. Sure enough, Adrastus, son of Merops, was slain by King Agamemnon. In Greek mythology, several distinct people shared the name Merops King of Ethiopia, husband of Clymene, father of Pandareus and stepfather of Phaethon son of Helios. ... Percote was a town or city on the southern (Asian) side of the Hellespont, to the northeast of Troy. ... Adrasteia is the daughter of Jupiter and Ananke. ... The Trojan War was a war waged, according to legend, against the city of Troy in Asia Minor by the armies of the Achaeans, following the kidnapping (or elopement) of Helen of Sparta by Paris of Troy. ... In Greek mythology, several distinct people shared the name Merops King of Ethiopia, husband of Clymene, father of Pandareus and stepfather of Phaethon son of Helios. ... The so-called Mask of Agamemnon. Discovered by Heinrich Schliemann in 1876 at Mycenae. ...


A fourth Adrastus, also from Greek mythology, was the father of Eurydice, the wife of King Ilus of Troy. He is otherwise unknown, but this Adrastus may be the eponym of the town or city of Adrastea in northwest Asia Minor, on the Hellespont. In Greek mythology, there were two characters named Eurydice (Eurydíkê). // Wife of Orpheus The more famous was a woman—or a nymph—who was the wife of Orpheus. ... Ilus son of Tros Ilus (Ilos in Greek) is in Greek mythology the founder of the city called Ilion (Latinized as Ilium) to which he gave his name. ... Walls of the excavated city of Troy (Turkey) Troy (Greek Τροία Troia also Ἰλιον; Latin: Troia, Ilium) is a legendary city, scene of the Trojan War, part of which is described in Homers Iliad, an epic poem in Ancient Greek, composed in the 8th or 7th century BC, but containing older...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Adrastus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (290 words)
Adrastus was the only survivor of the battle and he died from grief over the death of his son, Aegialeus.
In Greek mythology, a third Adrastus was the son of Merops, King of Percote, and brother to Amphius.
Adrastus and Amphius led a military force from Adrastea, Apaesus, Pityeia and Tereia to the Trojan War - despite the entreaties of their father, a seer, who could foresee that death awaited them on the battlefield.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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