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Encyclopedia > Adlai Stevenson
Adlai Stevenson
Adlai Stevenson

In office
1961 – 1965
President John Kennedy
Lyndon Johnson
Preceded by James J. Wadsworth
Succeeded by Arthur Goldberg

In office
January 10, 1949 – January 12, 1953
Lieutenant Sherwood Dixon
Preceded by Dwight H. Green
Succeeded by William Stratton

Election date
November 4, 1952
Running mate John J. Sparkman
Opponent(s) Dwight D. Eisenhower (R)
Incumbent Harry S. Truman (D)

Election date
November 6, 1956
Running mate Estes Kefauver
Opponent(s) Dwight D. Eisenhower (R)
Incumbent Dwight D. Eisenhower (R)

Born February 5, 1900(1900-02-05)
Los Angeles, California
Died July 14, 1965 (aged 65)
London, England, United Kingdom
Political party Democratic
Spouse Ellen Borden (married 1928, divorced 1949)
Alma mater Princeton University, Northwestern University Law School
Religion Unitarian Universalist[1]
This is about the mid-20th-century politician and diplomat; for other American politicians so named, see Adlai Stevenson (disambiguation).

Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900July 14, 1965) was an American politician, noted for his intellectual demeanor and advocacy of liberal causes in the Democratic Party. He served one term as governor of Illinois and ran, unsuccessfully, for president against Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1952 and 1956. He served as Ambassador to the United Nations from 1961 to 1965. United States Ambassador to the United Nations, full title, Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations (also known as the... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Nations. ... There have been several John Kennedys: John F. Kennedy, American president John F. Kennedy, Jr. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... James Jeremiah Wadsworth (often called Jerry Wadsworth) (born 1905) was a U.S. diplomat. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This is a list of Governors of Illinois. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dwight Herbert Green (January 9, 1897 – February 20, 1958) was Republican governor of Illinois, serving from 1941 to 1949. ... William Grant Stratton (February 26, 1914–March 2, 2001), known as Billy the Kid, was the Republican Governor of the U.S. state of Illinois from 1953 to 1961, succeeding Adlai Stevenson in that office. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Jackson Sparkman (December 20, 1899 - November 16, 1985) was a United States politician from Alabama. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... GOP redirects here. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The issue of Time Magazine in which Kefauvers victory in the New Hampshire primary was reported. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... GOP redirects here. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Alma mater is Latin for nourishing mother. It was used in ancient Rome as a title for the mother goddess, and in Medieval Christianity for the Virgin Mary. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... The School of Law at Northwestern University is one of Americas leading law schools. ... The flaming chalice is the universally recognized symbol for Unitarian Universalism. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... The History of the Democratic Party is an account of a continuously supported political party in the United States of America. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... United States Ambassador to the United Nations, full title, Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations (also known as the...

Contents

Childhood, education, and early career

Although Stevenson was born in Los Angeles, he was a member of a famous Illinois political family. His grandfather Adlai E. Stevenson I had been Vice President of the United States. His father, Lewis Green Stevenson, never held an elected office, but served as Secretary of State of Illinois and was considered a strong contender for the Democratic vice-presidential nomination in 1928. His mother was Helen Davis Stevenson. Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... This is a partial listing of prominent political families around the world. ... Adlai E. Stevenson I Adlai Ewing Stevenson I (October 23, 1835 – June 14, 1914) was a Representative from Illinois and the twenty-third Vice President of the United States. ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[2] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Lewis G. Stevenson was the secretary of state of Illinois from 1914 to 1917. ... The Secretary of State of Illinois is the keeper of the official records, laws, and Great Seal of the U.S. state of Illinois. ... A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ...


Stevenson was raised in the small city of Bloomington, Illinois; his family was a member of Bloomington's upper class and lived in one of the city's well-to-do neighborhoods. In December 1912, Stevenson accidentally killed a 16-year-old friend while demonstrating drill technique with a rifle, accidentally left loaded, during a party at the Stevenson home.[2] United States Illinois McLean 22. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into parade (military). ...


Stevenson left Bloomington after his junior year in high school and received his diploma from University High School in Normal, Illinois, Bloomington's "twin city" just to the north. After high school, he attended preparatory school at The Choate School, where he participated in sports, acting and journalism, the last as business manager of the school paper The News, where he was elected editor-in-chief. In 1918, he enlisted into the United States Navy and served at the rank of Seaman Apprentice. Eleventh grade (called Grade 11 in some regions, also known as junior year in the U.S.) is a year of education in the United States and many other nations. ... University High School (U-High), located in Normal, Illinois, is one of two laboratory schools of the College of Education at Illinois State University designed for research and teacher-training; the other is the Thomas Metcalf School, a grade school. ... Normal is an incorporated town in McLean County, Illinois, United States. ... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually abbreviated to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... Choate Rosemary Hall Choate Rosemary Hall (commonly referred to as Choate) is a New England preparatory school for students (who call themselves Choaties) in grades 9-12, known as the third through sixth forms at the school. ... An agent or representative of musicians and/or recording artists, whose main job is to supervise their business affairs, and the proper handling of their financial matters. ... Editing is the process of preparing language, images, or sound through correction, condensation, organization, and other modifications in various media. ... USN redirects here. ... Fireman variation Airman variation Seaman Apprentice insignia Seaman Apprentice is the second lowest enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard, just above Seaman Recruit and below Seaman; this rank was formerly known as Seaman Second Class. ...


He attended Princeton University, becoming managing editor of The Daily Princetonian and a member of the Quadrangle Club, and receiving a A.B. degree in 1922.[3] He was a member of the Phi Delta Theta fraternity there. He then went to Harvard Law School under prodding from his father but failed several classes and withdrew. He returned to Bloomington where he wrote for the family newspaper, The Daily Pantagraph, which was founded by his maternal great grandfather Jesse Fell, who had also served as Abraham Lincoln's campaign manager in his 1858 race for the US Senate. Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... A managing editor is a senior member of a publications management team. ... Quadrangle Club, often abbreviated to Quad is one of the ten eating clubs at Princeton University. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Early political leader in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ...


Stevenson became interested in the law again a year or so after leaving Harvard after talking to Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.. When he returned home to Bloomington, he decided to finish his law degree at Northwestern University School of Law, attending classes during the week and returning to Bloomington on the weekends to write for the Pantagraph. Stevenson received his LL.B. law degree from Northwestern in 1926 and passed the Illinois State Bar examination that year. He obtained a position at Cutting, Moore & Sidley, an old and conservative Chicago law firm. In 1928 Stevenson married Ellen Borden, a well-to-do socialite. The young couple soon became popular and familiar figures on the Chicago social scene. A Justice on the Supreme Court of the United States is nominated by the President of the United States and approved by the U.S. Senate, with at least half of that body approving in the affirmative. ... Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. ... A Law degree is the degree conferred on someone who successfully completes studies in law. ... The Northwestern University School of Law is a private American law school in Chicago, Illinois. ... A state bar association is an bar association that represents or seeks to represent all of the attorneys in a specific U.S. State. ... Sidley Austin LLP, formerly known as Sidley Austin Brown & Wood LLP, is the sixth-largest U.S.-based corporate law firm with over 1,700 lawyers, annual revenues of more than one billion dollars, and offices in Chicago, New York, Washington, DC, London, and 11 other cities. ... A law firm is a business entity formed by one or more lawyers to engage in the practice of law. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


1933 to 1948

In July 1933, Stevenson took a position as special attorney and assistant to Jerome Frank, the general counsel of the Agricultural Adjustment Administration (AAA) a part of Roosevelt’s New Deal. Following the repeal of Prohibition in 1934, Stevenson changed jobs, becoming chief attorney for the Federal Alcohol Control Administration (FACA), a subsidiary of the AAA which regulated the activities of the alcohol industry. Jerome Frank (September 10, 1889 - January 13, 1957) was an outstanding legal philosopher and played a leading role in legal realism movement. ... A General Counsel is the chief lawyer of a legal department, usually in a corporation or government department. ... The United States Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA) (P.L. 73-10 of May 12, 1933) restricted production during the New Deal by paying farmers to reduce crop area. ... This article is about the policy program of US President Franklin D Roosevelt. ... The term Prohibition, also known as A Dry Law, refers to a law in a certain country by which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ...


In 1935, Stevenson returned to Chicago to practice law. He became involved in civic activities, particularly as chairman of the Chicago branch of the Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies (known often as the White Committee, after its founder, William Allen White). The Stevensons purchased a seventy-acre tract of land on the Des Plaines River near Libertyville, Illinois where they built a house. Although he spent comparatively little time at Libertyville, Stevenson considered the farm home. The Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies (CDAAA) was an American political action group formed in May, 1940. ... William Allen White Born in Emporia, Kansas, on February 10, 1868, William Allen White was a nationally known newspaper editor for much of his life. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Libertyville is a suburb of Chicago in Lake County, Illinois, United States. ...


In 1940, Colonel Frank Knox, newly appointed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt as Secretary of the Navy, offered Stevenson a position as Principal Attorney and special assistant. In this capacity, Stevenson wrote speeches, represented Secretary Knox and the Navy on committees, toured the various theaters of war, and handled many administrative duties. From December 1943 to January 1944, he participated in a special mission to Sicily and Italy for the Foreign Economic Administration to report on the country's economy. A report he wrote following that mission was very well regarded, and he was offered several jobs as a result. Frank Knox William Franklin Frank Knox (January 1, 1874–April 28, 1944) was the Secretary of the Navy under Franklin D. Roosevelt during most of World War II. He was also the Republican vice presidential candidate in 1936. ... FDR redirects here. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... The Foreign Economic Administration (FEA) 1940-47 The Office of Arms and Munitions Control established in the Department of State to administer provisions of Joint Resolution 67 (49 Stat. ...


After Knox died in April 1944, Stevenson returned to Chicago where he attempted to purchase Knox's controlling interest in the Chicago Daily News, but his syndicate was outbid by another party. Controlling interest is to have control of a large enough portion of voting stock in a company such that no other stock holder can oppose you. ...


In 1945, Stevenson accepted what he called a "temporary" position in the State Department, as special assistant to the Secretary of State to work with Assistant Secretary of State Archibald MacLeish on a proposed world organization. Later that year, he went to London as Deputy United States Delegate to the Preparatory Commission of the United Nations Organization, a position he held until February 1946. When the head of the delegation fell ill, Stevenson assumed his role. His work at the Commission, and in particular his dealings with the representatives of the Soviet Union, resulted in appointments to the US delegations to the UN in 1946 and 1947. Department of State redirects here. ... Assistant Secretary of State is a title used for many executive positions in the United States State Department. ... Archibald MacLeish Archibald MacLeish (May 7, 1892 – April 20, 1982) was an American poet, writer and the Librarian of Congress. ...


1948 election as Illinois governor

In 1948, Stevenson entered the Illinois gubernatorial race as a Democrat and, in an upset victory, defeated incumbent Republican Dwight H. Green in a landslide. Principal among his achievements as Illinois governor were reorganizing the state police, cracking down on illegal gambling, and improving the state highways. He was a popular public speaker, gaining a reputation as an intellectual, with a self-deprecating sense of humor to match. Dwight Herbert Green (January 9, 1897 – February 20, 1958) was Republican governor of Illinois, serving from 1941 to 1949. ... State police are a type of sub-national territorial police force, particularly in Australia and the United States. ... This article is about the idea of state highways State Highway, and is more formally known as Route 139 State highway, and state route are terms that usually apply to numbered highways that are primarily administered and financed by a state government in countries that are divided into states. ... It has been suggested that After dinner speaker be merged into this article or section. ... Self-deprecation is a form of humour in which a comedian makes jokes about himself, his shortcomings, or his culture. ...


In 1949, Governor Stevenson appeared as a character witness in the first trial of Alger Hiss. Character evidence is a term used in the law of evidence in the United States to describe any testimony or document submitted for the purpose of proving that a person acted in a particular way on a particular occasion based on the character or disposition of that person. ... Alger Hiss testifying Alger Hiss (November 11, 1904 – November 15, 1996) was a U.S. State Department official involved in the establishment of the United Nations. ...


In 1949, Adlai Stevenson was divorced by his wife, Ellen Borden Stevenson. They had been married for 21 years and had three sons.


1952 presidential bid

Early in 1952, while Stevenson was still governor of Illinois, President Harry S. Truman proposed that he seek the Democratic nomination for president. In a fashion that was to become his trademark, Stevenson at first hesitated, arguing that he was committed to running for a second gubernatorial term. However, a number of his friends and associates (such as George Wildman Ball) quietly began organizing a "draft Stevenson" movement for President; they persisted in their activity even when Stevenson (both publicly and privately) told them to stop. As governor of the host state, Stevenson delivered a welcoming address to the delegates to the 1952 Democratic National Convention in Chicago so stirring that it may have helped stampede his nomination. Despite his protestations, the delegates drafted him, and he accepted the nomination with a speech that according to contemporaries, "electrified the nation:"[citation needed] For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... George Wildman Ball (1909 - 1994) was born in Des Moines, Iowa. ... The 1952 Democratic National Convention was held in Chicago, Illinois. ...

"When the tumult and the shouting die, when the bands are gone and the lights are dimmed, there is the stark reality of responsibility in an hour of history haunted with those gaunt, grim specters of strife, dissension, and materialism at home, and ruthless, inscrutable, and hostile power abroad. The ordeal of the twentieth century —the bloodiest, most turbulent age of the Christian era—is far from over. Sacrifice, patience, understanding, and implacable purpose may be our lot for years to come. … Let’s talk sense to the American people! Let’s tell them the truth, that there are no gains without pains, that we are now on the eve of great decisions."

Stevenson's distinctive speaking style quickly earned him the reputation of an intellectual and endeared him to many Americans, while simultaneously alienating him from others. Although he employed a number of first-rate speechwriters, including the historian Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. and fellow attorney John Bartlow Martin, Stevenson also wrote many of his own speeches. Arthur Meier Schlesinger, Jr. ...


Although Stevenson's eloquent oratory and thoughtful, stylish demeanor thrilled many intellectuals and members of the nation's academic community, the Republicans and some working-class Democrats ridiculed what they perceived as his indecisive, aristocratic air. During the 1952 campaign Stewart Alsop, a powerful Connecticut Republican and the brother of newspaper columnist Joseph Alsop, labeled Stevenson an "egghead", based on his baldness and intellectual air; Joe Alsop used the word in a column describing Stevenson's problems in wooing working-class voters and the nickname stuck. His running mate was Senator John Sparkman of Alabama. In the 1952 presidential election against Dwight D. Eisenhower, Stevenson lost heavily outside the Solid South; he won only nine states and lost the Electoral College vote 442 to 89. Stewart Johonnot Oliver Alsop (17 May 1914 – 26 May 1974) was an American newspaper columnist and political analyst. ... Joseph Alsop V (1910-1989) was a columnist and analyst in the Kennedy era. ... credited to the United States Senate Historical Office John Jackson Sparkman (December 20, 1899 – November 16, 1985) was a United States politician from Alabama. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Dwight David Eisenhower, born David Dwight Eisenhower (October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was a five-star General in the United States Army and U.S. politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953–1961). ... The phrase Solid South describes the electoral support of the Southern United States for Democratic Party candidates for almost a century after the Reconstruction era, 1876-1964. ... This article is about Electoral Colleges in general. ...


During the campaign, a photograph revealed a hole in the sole of Adlai's right shoe.[4] This became a well-known symbol of Adlai's frugality and earthiness. Photographer Bill Gallagher of the Flint Journal won the 1953 Pulitzer prize on the strength of the image.[5] The Flint Journal is the only major newspaper in Flint, Michigan. ... The 1953 Pulitzer Prize was won by Ernest Hemingway for his work on The Old Man and the Sea. ...


Following his defeat, Stevenson traveled throughout Asia, the Middle East and Europe, writing about his travels for Look magazine. Although he was not sent as an official emissary of the U.S. government, Stevenson's international reputation gave him access to many foreign officials. A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Look was a weekly, general-interest magazine published in the United States from 1937 to 1971, with more of an emphasis on photographs than articles. ... This article is about the federal government of the United States. ...


1956 presidential bid

With Eisenhower headed for another landslide, few Democrats wanted the 1956 nomination. Although challenged by Tennessee Senator Estes Kefauver and New York Governor W. Averell Harriman, Stevenson campaigned more aggressively to secure the nomination, and Kefauver conceded after losing several key primaries. To Stevenson's dismay, former president Truman endorsed Harriman, but the blow was softened by former first lady Eleanor Roosevelt's continued support. Stevenson again won the nomination at the 1956 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, aided by strong support from younger delegates, who were said to form the core of the "New Politics" movement. He permitted the convention delegates to choose Senator Kefauver as his running mate, despite stiff competition from Senator John F. Kennedy. Following his nomination, Stevenson waged a vigorous presidential campaign, delivering 300 speeches and traveling 55,000 miles (89,000 km). He called on the electorate to join him in a march to a "new America", based on a liberal agenda that anticipated the programs of the Kennedy and Johnson administrations. His call for a Partial Test Ban Treaty to aboveground nuclear weapons tests proved premature and lost him support. The issue of Time Magazine in which Kefauvers victory in the New Hampshire primary was reported. ... This article is about the state. ... William Averell Harriman (November 15, 1891 – July 26, 1986) was an American Democratic Party politician, businessman and diplomat. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... This article is about the use of the term first lady internationally. ... Anna Eleanor Roosevelt (IPA: ; October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was First Lady of the United States from 1933 to 1945. ... The 1956 National Convention of the U.S. Democratic Party nominated Adlai E. Stevenson of Illinois for President and Estes Kefauver for Vice President. ... New Politics was a term used in the United States in the 1950s to denote the ascending ideology of that countrys Democratic Party during that decade. ... A running mate is a person running for a subordinate position on a joint ticket during an election. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... “Electioneering” redirects here. ... LBJ redirects here. ... The Treaty Banning poop, in Outer Space, and Under Water, often abbreviated as the Partial Test Ban Treaty (PTBT), Limited Test Ban Treaty (LTBT), or Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (NTBT), although the former also refers to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), is a treaty intended to obtain an agreement...


While President Eisenhower suffered heart problems, the economy enjoyed robust health. Stevenson's hopes for victory were dashed when, in October, President Eisenhower's doctors gave him a clean bill of health and the Suez and Hungary crises erupted simultaneously. The public was not convinced that a change in leadership was needed, and Stevenson lost his second bid for the presidency, winning only 73 electoral votes in the 1956 presidential election. Combatants Israel United Kingdom France Egypt Commanders Moshe Dayan Charles Keightley Pierre Barjot Gamal Abdel Nasser Abdel Hakim Amer Strength 175,000 Israeli 45,000 British 34,000 French 70,000 Casualties 197 Israeli KIA 56 British KIA 91 British WIA 10 French KIA 43 French WIA 650 KIA[1... Hungarians investigate a disabled Soviet tank in Budapest The 1956 Hungarian Revolution, also known as the Hungarian Uprising or simply the Hungarian Revolt, was a revolt in Hungary. ... Electoral votes by state/federal district, for the elections of 2004 and 2008 The United States Electoral College is a term used to describe the 538 President Electors who meet every 4 years to cast the electoral votes for President and Vice President of the United States; their votes represent... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


Despite his two defeats, Stevenson considered a third nomination. Early in 1957, he resumed law practice with associates W. Willard Wirtz, William McC. Blair Jr. and Newton N. Minow. He also accepted an appointment on the new Democratic Advisory Council, with other prominent Democrats. He was employed part-time by the Encyclopædia Britannica. In its most general sense, the practice of law involves giving legal advice to clients, drafting legal documents for clients, and representing clients in legal negotiations and court proceedings such as lawsuits, and is applied to the professional services of a lawyer or Attorney at Law, barrister, solicitor or civil... The official portrait of W. Willard Wirtz hangs in the Department of Labor W. Willard Wirtz (born March 14, 1912) was a U.S. administrator. ... William McCormick Blair, Jr. ... Newton Norman Minow (born January 17, 1926) is an American attorney and former Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. ... A part-time job carries less hours per week than a full-time job, and usually pays less than a full-time job. ... The Encyclopædia Britannica is a general English-language encyclopaedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. ...


1960-1965

Wikisource has original text related to this article:

Prior to the 1960 Democratic National Convention, Stevenson announced that he was not seeking the Democratic nomination for president, but would accept a draft. Because he still hoped to be a candidate, Stevenson refused to give the nominating address for relative newcomer John F. Kennedy, which strained relations between the two politicians. Once Kennedy won the nomination, Stevenson, always an enormously popular public speaker, campaigned actively for him. Due to his two presidential nominations and previous United Nations experience, Stevenson perceived himself an elder statesman and a natural choice for United States Secretary of State, an opinion shared by few in the Kennedy camp. The prestigious post went to the (then) little-known Dean Rusk and Stevenson was appointed U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. There, he worked hard to support U.S. foreign policy, even when he personally disagreed with some of Kennedy's actions. Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... The 1960 Democratic National Convention nominated John F. Kennedy for President and Lyndon B. Johnson for Vice President. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Statesman is a respectful term used to refer to politicians, and other notable figures of state. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... David Dean Rusk (February 9, 1909 – December 20, 1994) was the United States Secretary of State from 1961 to 1969 under presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. ... United States Ambasadors to the United Nations, full title, Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations (also known as the... UN redirects here. ... For a history, see Timeline of United States diplomatic history For the published diplomatic papers, see The Foreign Relations of the United States For Foreign relations under George W. Bush, see Foreign policy of the George W. Bush administration. ...


In April 1961, Stevenson suffered the greatest humiliation of his career. After an attack against Fidel Castro's Communist forces at the Bay of Pigs, Stevenson unwittingly disputed allegations that the attack was financed and supported by the Central Intelligence Agency, claiming instead that the anti-Communist forces were supported by wealthy Cuban emigres. When Stevenson learned that he had been misled by the White House, and even supplied with CIA-forged photographs, he considered resigning the ambassadorship, but was convinced not to do so.

 His most famous moment came on October 25, 1962, during the Cuban missile crisis, when he gave a presentation at an emergency session of the Security Council. He forcefully asked the Soviet representative, Valerian Zorin, if his country was installing missiles in Cuba, punctuated with the famous demand "Don't wait for the translation, answer 'yes' or 'no'!" Following Zorin's refusal to answer the abrupt question, Stevenson retorted, "I am prepared to wait for my answer until Hell freezes over." In a diplomatic coup, Stevenson then showed photographs that proved the existence of missiles in Cuba, just after the Soviet ambassador had implied they did not exist. 

Stevenson was assaulted by an anti-United Nations protester in Dallas, Texas, one month before the assassination of Kennedy in that same city on October 24, 1963. A woman carrying an anti-United Nations sign hit Stevenson in the head with the sign; afterwards Stevenson told police to not arrest her, stating that "I don't want her to go to jail, I want her to go to school." Disturbed by the incident, Stevenson advised President Kennedy to not visit the city. is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the video game based on the possible outcomes of this event, see Cuban Missile Crisis: The Aftermath. ... “Security Council” redirects here. ... Valerian Alexandrovich Zorin (Валериан Александрович Зорин in Russian) (January 1, 1902 - 1986) was a Soviet diplomat and statesman. ... Dallas redirects here. ... President Kennedy with his wife, Jacqueline, and Texas Governor John Connally in the presidential limousine just moments before his assassination The assassination of John F. Kennedy, the thirty-fifth President of the United States, took place on Friday, November 22, 1963, in Dallas, Texas, USA at 12:30 p. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ...


While walking in London with Marietta Tree through Grosvenor Square, Stevenson suffered a heart attack on the afternoon of July 14, 1965, and died later that day of heart failure at St George's Hospital. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The north side of Grosvenor Square in the 18th or early 19th century. ... A myocardial infarction occurs when an atherosclerotic plaque slowly builds up in the inner lining of a coronary artery and then suddenly ruptures, totally occluding the artery and preventing blood flow downstream. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Congestive heart failure (CHF), also called congestive cardiac failure (CCF) or just heart failure, is a condition that can result from any structural or functional cardiac disorder that impairs the ability of the heart to fill with or pump a sufficient amount of blood throughout the body. ... St Georges Hospital, founded in 1733, is a teaching hospital in London, England. ...


Marietta Tree recounts: [After leaving the Embassy]

"We walked around the neighborhood a little bit and where his house had been where he had lived with his family at the end of the War, there was now an apartment house and he said that makes me feel so old. Indeed, the whole walk made him feel very not so much nostalgic but so much older. As we were walking along the street he said do not walk quite so fast and do hold your head up Marietta. I was burrowing ahead trying to get to the park as quickly as possible and then the next thing I knew, I turned around and I saw he'd gone white, gray really, and he fell and his hand brushed me as he fell and he hit the pavement with the most terrible crack and I thought he'd fractured his skull."


That night in her diary, Marietta wrote, "Adlai is dead. We were together."[6] Following memorial services in Washington, D.C; Springfield, Illinois; and Bloomington, Illinois, Stevenson was interred in the family plot in Evergreen Cemetery, Bloomington, Illinois. The funeral in Bloomington's Unitarian Church was attended by many national figures, including President Lyndon Johnson, Vice President Hubert Humphrey, and Supreme Court Chief Justice Earl Warren. ... : Home of President Abraham Lincoln United States Illinois Sangamon 60. ... United States Illinois McLean 22. ... Family Plot is a 1976 Universal motion picture directed by Alfred Hitchcock and starring Karen Black, Bruce Dern, Barbara Harris and William Devane, with Cathleen Nesbitt. ... Evergreen Cemetery, in Bloomington, Illinois, is also known as Evergreen Memorial Cemetery. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Unitarianism is the belief... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial... For the swing saxophonist and occasional singer, see Earle Warren Earl Warren (March 19, 1891 – July 9, 1974) was a California district attorney of Alameda County, the 20th Attorney General of California, the 30th Governor of California, and the 14th Chief Justice of the United States (from 1953 to 1969). ...


Additional facts of note

Stevenson's wit was legendary. During one of Stevenson's presidential campaigns, allegedly, a supporter told him that he was sure to "get the vote of every thinking man" in the U.S., to which Stevenson is said to have replied, "Thank you, but I need a majority to win." Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American...


On another campaign occasion, he was somewhat rudely introduced at a Houston Baptist convention in the following way: "Gov. Stevenson, we want to make it clear you are here as a courtesy because Dr. Norman Vincent Peale has instructed us to vote for your opponent." Stevenson stepped to the podium and quipped, "Speaking as a Christian, I find the Apostle Paul appealing and the Apostle Peale appalling."[7] Dr. Norman Vincent Peale (May 31, 1898 – December 24, 1993) was a Protestant preacher and author (most notably of The Power of Positive Thinking) and a progenitor of the theory of positive thinking. // Peale was born in Bowersville, Ohio and died in Pawling, New York. ... Paul of Tarsus (b. ...


Stevenson's father, Lewis G. Stevenson, was Illinois secretary of state (1914–1917). Stevenson's eldest son, Adlai E. Stevenson III, was a U.S. Senator from Illinois (1970–1981). Actor McLean Stevenson was a second cousin once removed. Lewis G. Stevenson was the secretary of state of Illinois from 1914 to 1917. ... Adlai Stevenson III Adlai Ewing Stevenson III (born October 10, 1930, in Chicago) is an American politician of the Democratic party. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... McLean Stevenson (November 14, 1927 – February 15, 1996) (full name Edgar McLean Stevenson, Jr. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The Central Illinois Regional Airport near Bloomington has a whimsical statue of Stevenson, sitting on a bench with his feet propped on his briefcase and his head in one hand, as if waiting for his flight. He is wearing the shoes that he famously displayed to reporters during one of his campaigns, a hole worn in the sole from all the miles he had walked in an effort to win the election. Central Illinois Regional Airport (IATA: BMI, ICAO: KBMI, FAA LID: BMI), also known as Central Illinois Regional Airport at Bloomington-Normal and informally known as CIRA, is a public airport located three miles (5 km) east of the central business district (CBD) of the city of Bloomington and southeast of...


Stevenson smoked a pack of cigarettes a day, before quitting in the mid-1950s. Friends say he resumed smoking at some point in the early 1960s, during his years at the United Nations.


Stevenson once showed in a World Series game between the New York Yankees and the Brooklyn Dodgers that he was neutral by wearing a hat from both teams. Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... The Brooklyn Dodgers were a Major League Baseball team that played from 1890-1957. ...


Stevenson in popular culture

  • In episode 424 "Manos: The Hands of Fate", of the series Mystery Science Theater 3000, a character remarks, "Adlai Stevenson buys a car!" over a shot of a similar looking man in an auto dealership.
  • The Avalanche by acclaimed folk artist Sufjan Stevens contains a song about Adlai Stevenson, similarly named.
  • He was quoted in a closing by Alan Shore (James Spader) on Boston Legal
  • Holly Golightly (Audrey Hepburn) in 1961's Breakfast at Tiffany's mentions Adlai Stevenson as an ideal man. ("If I were free to choose from anybody alive, just snap my fingers and say come here you, I wouldn't choose Jose. Nehru, maybe, or Adlai Stevenson or Sidney Poitier....")
  • In the movie Annie Hall, character Alvie, played by Woody Allen, wears an 'Adlai' political button.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the British actor. ... Merkin Muffley was the President of the United States in the 1964 movie Dr. Strangelove. ... Strangelove redirects here. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Lisa the Iconoclast is the sixteenth episode of The Simpsons seventh season, and is probably the most important episode for Jebediah Springfield since The Telltale Head. The episodes plot bears a striking resemblance to the short story The Washingtonians by Bentley Little. ... Groundskeeper Willie (a. ... By other animals Humans are not the only species to bury their dead. ... This article contains a list of recurring characters from The Simpsons with descriptions. ... The Secret War of Lisa Simpson is the last episode in the eighth season of The Simpsons. ... This article is about the British actor. ... Merkin Muffley was the President of the United States in the 1964 movie Dr. Strangelove. ... For the hit 1987 single by Depeche Mode, see the album Music for the Masses Film poster for Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb is a 1964 satirical film directed by Stanley Kubrick. ... CCCP redirects here. ... Valerian Alexandrovich Zorin (Валериан Александрович Зорин in Russian) (January 1, 1902 - 1986) was a Soviet diplomat and statesman. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... UN redirects here. ... For the video game based on the possible outcomes of this event, see Cuban Missile Crisis: The Aftermath. ... This article is about the entire Star Trek franchise. ... Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (Paramount Pictures, 1991; see also 1991 in film) is the sixth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... The year 2000 in film involved some significant events. ... For the non-fiction book, see Thirteen Days (book). ... Waynes World 2 is a 1993 comedy film starring Mike Myers and Dana Carvey as hosts of a cable access television show from Aurora, Illinois. ... The Paramount Theatre under renovation, downtown Aurora. ... Sufjan Stevens (IPA pronunciation: ) (born July 1, 1975) is an American singer-songwriter and musician from Petosky, Michigan. ...

Schools and other entities named after Stevenson

United States Illinois McLean 22. ... Adlai E. Stevenson High School, Stevenson High School, or SHS, is a public four-year high school located near the corner of Milwaukee Avenue and Half Day Road in Lincolnshire, Illinois, a northern suburb of Chicago. ... Lincolnshire is a village in Lake County, Illinois, United States. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Sterling Heights is a city in Macomb County of the U.S. state of Michigan. ... Livonia is a city located in the northwest part of Wayne County in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... The Bronx is one of the five boroughs of United States. ... Incorporated Village in 1956. ... Plum is a borough located in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. ... “UCSC” redirects here. ... Illinois State University is a public university in Normal, Illinois and is the oldest public institution of higher education in the state. ... Normal is an incorporated town in McLean County, Illinois, United States. ... Sonoma State University is a public, coeducational business and liberal arts college affiliated with the California State University system. ... Rohnert Park is a city in Sonoma County, California, United States. ... Interstate 55 (abbreviated I-55) is an interstate highway in the central United States. ... Chicagoland is an informal name for the Chicago metropolitan area, used primarily by copywriters, advertising agencies, native residents, and traffic reporters. ... : Home of President Abraham Lincoln United States Illinois Sangamon 60. ...

References

  • Baker, Jean H. (1996). The Stevensons: A Biography of An American Family. New York: W. W. Norton & Co. ISBN 0-393-03874-2. 
  • Broadwater, Jeff. Adlai Stevenson and American Politics: The Odyssey of a Cold War Liberal. Twayne, 1994. 291 pp
  • Cowden, Jonathan A. Adlai Stevenson: a Retrospective. Princeton University Library Chronicle 2000 61(3): 322-359. ISSN 0032-8456
  • McKeever, Porter (1989). Adlai Stevenson: His Life and Legacy. New York: William Morrow and Company. ISBN 0-688-06661-5. 
  • Martin, John Bartlow . Adlai Stevenson of Illinois: The Life of Adlai E. Stevenson (1976) and Adlai Stevenson and the World: The Life of Adlai E. Stevenson (1977), the standard scholarly biography
  • Murphy, John M. Civic Republicanism in the Modern Age: Adlai Stevenson in the 1952 Presidential Campaign Quarterly Journal of Speech 1994 80(3): 313-328. ISSN 0033-5630
  • Slaybaugh, Douglas. Adlai Stevenson, Television, and the Presidential Campaign of 1956 Illinois Historical Journal 1996 89(1): 2-16. ISSN 0748-8149
  • Slaybaugh, Douglas. Political Philosophy or Partisanship: a Dilemma in Adlai Stevenson's Published Writings, 1953-1956. Wisconsin Magazine of History 1992 75(3): 163-194. ISSN 0043-6534. Argues by 1956, Stevenson had alienated many of his well-placed and well-educated supporters without winning over many new rank-and-file Democrats.
  • White, Mark J. Hamlet in New York: Adlai Stevenson During the First Week of the Cuban Missile Crisis" Illinois Historical Journal 1993 86(2): 70-84. ISSN 0748-8149
  • Adlai Stevenson Had a Peace Proposal.Shouldn't Democrats Today? by Lawrence S. Wittner
  • Stevenson, Adlai. The Papers of Adlai E. Stevenson (6 vol) 1972)
  • Blair, William McC. ed. Adlai Stevenson's Legacy: Reminiscences by His Friends and Family . Princeton University Library Chronicle (2000) 61(3): 360-403. ISSN 0032-8456 Reminiscences by Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., William McC. Blair, Adlai Stevenson III, Newton N. Minow, and Willard Wirtz.

A number of people have been named John Murphy Father John Murphy, leader during the Irish Rebellion of 1798 John Murphy (Alabama) (1786-1841), American Governor and Congressman from Alabama John Murphy (announcer), American football announcer for the Buffalo Bills John Murphy (Australian politician) (born 1950), member of the House... Republicanism is the ideology of governing a nation as a republic, with an emphasis on liberty, rule by the people, and the civic virtue practiced by citizens. ... Rank-and-file refers to the ordinary members of an organisation, excluding the officers or managers. ... Arthur Meier Schlesinger, Sr. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Adlai Stevenson
  2. ^ "KILLED IN STEVENSON HOME.; Girl Shot Accidentally by Former Vice President's Grandson.". The New York Times (1912-12-31). Retrieved on 2007-11-03.
  3. ^ Princeton - News - Mudd Library Completes Catalog, Preservation of Adlai E. Stevenson Papers
  4. ^ http://www.flintjournal.com/125/paper/galleries/history/source/14.html
  5. ^ The Pulitzer Prizes for 1953
  6. ^ Human Rights Commission & Marietta Peabody Tree biography
  7. ^ Hoekstra, Dave. "A former president's gag order; Ford's symposium examines humor in the Oval Office", Chicago Sun-Times, Sept. 28, 1986, pg. 22. Retrieved from Proquest Newspapers on Sept. 17, 2007.

The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
  • Adapted parts from: Adlai E. Stevenson: A Voice of Conscience, part of a series on notable American Unitarians
  • Adlai Today includes speeches, photographs, and more.
  • NNDB biographical facts
  • A brief biography, United Nations Association - McLean County Chapter.
  • Text and Audio of Stevenson's First Presidential Nominee Acceptancefrom AmericanRhetoric.com
  • Text, Audio, Video of Stevenson's United Nations Security Council Address on the Buildup of Soviet Missiles in Cubafrom AmericanRhetoric.com
  • Text and Audio of Stevenson's UN Memorial Remarks for JFKfrom AmericanRhetoric.com
  • Text and Audio of Stevenson's UN Memorial Remarks for Eleanor Roosveltfrom AmericanRhetoric.com
  • Radio spots of Adlai E. Stevenson from the 1952 Presidential election
Political offices
Preceded by
Dwight H. Green
Governor of Illinois
1949 – 1953
Succeeded by
William G. Stratton
Party political offices
Preceded by
Harry S. Truman
Democratic Party presidential candidate
1952, 1956
Succeeded by
John F. Kennedy
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
James J. Wadsworth
United States Ambassador to the United Nations
1961 – 1965
Succeeded by
Arthur Goldberg
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The United Nations Association is an international charitable trust which styles itself as an independent authority on the United Nations. ... McLean County is the name of several counties in the United States: McLean County, Illinois McLean County, Kentucky McLean County, North Dakota This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Dwight Herbert Green (January 9, 1897 – February 20, 1958) was Republican governor of Illinois, serving from 1941 to 1949. ... The Governor of Illinois is the chief executive of the State of Illinois and the various agencies and departments over which the officer has jurisdiction, as prescribed in the state constitution. ... William Grant Stratton (February 26, 1914–March 2, 2001), known as Billy the Kid, was the Republican Governor of the U.S. state of Illinois from 1953 to 1961, succeeding Adlai Stevenson in that office. ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... This is a list of the candidates for the offices of President of the United States and Vice President of the United States that the U.S. Democratic Party has nominated since its founding. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... James Jeremiah Wadsworth (often called Jerry Wadsworth) (born 1905) was a U.S. diplomat. ... United States Ambassador to the United Nations, full title, Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations, with the rank and status of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, and Representative of the United States of America in the Security Council of the United Nations (also known as the... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This is a list of Governors of Illinois. ... Shadrach Bond Shadrick Bonbs Shadrach Bond (November 24, 1773–April 12, 1832) was Illinoiss first governor, and for six years before that, the first representative of the area to become Illinois. ... Edward Coles (December 15, 1786 – July 7, 1868) was governor of Illinois, serving from 1822 to 1826. ... Ninian Edwards (March 17, 1775–July 20, 1833) was a U.S. political figure. ... John Reynolds, US politician and Governor of Illinois John Reynolds (February 26, 1788–May 8, 1865) was a United States politician from the U.S. state of Illinois. ... 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Charles Samuel Deneen (May 4, 1863 – February 5, 1940) was a Republican governor of Illinois, serving from 1905 to 1913, and as a U.S. Senator from Illinois, 1925-1931. ... Edward Fitzsimmons Dunne (1853–1937) was an American politician. ... Frank Orren Lowden (1861 - 1943) was a U.S. political figure. ... Lennington Small (June 16, 1862 – May 17, 1936) was a Republican governor of Illinois, serving from 1921 to 1929. ... Louis Lincoln Emmerson (1883 - 1941) was a U.S. political figure. ... Henry Horner (November 30, 1879 – October 6, 1940) was a Democrat governor of Illinois, serving from 1933 to 1940. ... John Henry Stelle (born August 10, 1891 McLeansboro, Illinois - died July 5, 1962 St. ... Dwight Herbert Green (January 9, 1897 – February 20, 1958) was Republican governor of Illinois, serving from 1941 to 1949. ... William Grant Stratton (February 26, 1914–March 2, 2001), known as Billy the Kid, was the Republican Governor of the U.S. state of Illinois from 1953 to 1961, succeeding Adlai Stevenson in that office. ... Otto Kerner, Jr. ... Samuel H. Shapiro (April 25, 1907 - March 16, 1987) was Democratic Governor of Illinois, serving from 1968 to 1969. ... Richard Buell Ogilvie (1923–1988) was an American political figure. ... Daniel Walker (born April 24, 1991) is a former governor of the U.S. state of Illinois from 1992 to 2008. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... James Edgar (born January 22, 1946, Vinita, Oklahoma) is an American politician who was the Governor of Illinois from 1991 to 1999. ... George Ryan George Homer Ryan (born February 24, 1934 in Maquoketa, Iowa) was the Governor of the U.S. state of Illinois from 1999 until 2003. ... Milorad Blagojevich, commonly known as Rod R. 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James Russell Wiggins (December 4, 1903 in Luverne, Minnesota – November 19, 2000 in Brooklin, Maine) was the managing editor of The Washington Post from 1947 to 1966 and the United States ambassador to the United Nations from 1968 to 1969 during the Lyndon Johnson presidency. ... Charles W. Yost (born in Watertown, NY in 1907 – died in Washington, DC in 1981), educated at Hotchkiss School and Princeton University, was a Career U.S. Ambassador and ambassador to the United Nations from 1967 to 1971. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... John A. Scali (US Ambassador to the United Nations) ... Daniel Patrick “Pat” Moynihan (March 16, 1927 – March 26, 2003) was a United States Senator, Ambassador, and eminent sociologist. ... Scranton made the cover of Time in 1962 William Warren Scranton (born July 19, 1917) is a former U.S. Republican Party politician. ... Andrew Jackson Young, Jr. ... Donald F. McHenry (October 13, 1936 (unconfirmed)-- ) was the Ambassador and U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations from September 1979 until January 20, 1981. ... Jeane Kirkpatrick Jeane Jordan Kirkpatrick (November 19, 1926 â€“ December 7, 2006) was an American ambassador and an ardent anticommunist. ... Vernon Walters is the smiling man in the center of the picture. ... Thomas Reeve Tom Pickering (born November 5, 1931), is a retired United States Ambassador. ... Edward J. Perkins (born 1928), U.S. diplomat, U.S. ambassador to United Nations 1992-1993. ... Madeleine Korbel Albright (born Marie Jana Korbelová, IPA: , on May 15, 1937) was the first woman to become United States Secretary of State. ... For other persons named William Richardson, see William Richardson (disambiguation). ... Richard Charles Albert Holbrooke (born April 24, 1941) is an American diplomat, magazine editor, author, Peace Corps official, and investment banker. ... John Dimitri Negroponte (born July 21, 1939 in the United Kingdom) (IPA ) is an American (of Greek origin) career diplomat. ... John Danforth John Claggett Danforth (born September 5, 1936), also referred to as Jack Danforth, is a former United States Ambassador to the United Nations and former Republican United States Senator from Missouri. ... John Robert Bolton (born November 20, 1948), is an jewish American diplomat in several Republican administrations, who served as the Permanent US Representative to the UN from August 2005 until December 2006, on a recess appointment. ... Zalmay Mamozy Khalilzad (Pashto/Persian: ) (born: 22 March 1951) is the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Nations. ... The United States presidential election of 1960 marked the end of Dwight D. Eisenhowers two terms as President. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The 1960 Democratic National Convention nominated John F. Kennedy for President and Lyndon B. Johnson for Vice President. ... Ross Robert Barnett (January 22, 1898 – November 6, 1987) was the Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of Mississippi from 1960 to 1964. ... For other persons named Pat Brown, see Pat Brown (disambiguation). ... Michael Vincent DiSalle (January 6, 1908 - September 14, 1981) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ... LBJ redirects here. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Robert Baumle Meyner (July 3, 1908 - May 27, 1990) of Phillipsburg, New Jersey was the Democratic Governor of New Jersey from 1954 to 1962. ... Wayne Lyman Morse (October 20, 1900 – July 22, 1974) was a United States Senator from Oregon from 1945 to 1969. ... George Smathers George Armistead Smathers (born November 14, 1913) is an American lawyer and politician who represented Florida in the United States Senate for eighteen years, from 1951 until 1969, as a member of the Democratic Party. ... William Stuart Symington William Stuart Symington (June 26, 1901–December 14, 1988) was a businessman and political figure from Missouri. ... LBJ redirects here. ... GOP redirects here. ... Mitchell who sits next to Ryan Anderson in computer class at Thunderbolt Middle School is weird. ... Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–87) and the Republican Partys nominee for president in the 1964 election. ... Nixon redirects here. ... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American Vice President, governor of New York State, philanthropist and businessman. ... Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. ...

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Adlai Stevenson (1384 words)
Adlai Ewing Stevenson (February 5, 1900-July 14, 1965), politician and diplomat, was twice the Democratic Party's candidate for President of the United States.
Stevenson spent 1933-34 in Washington, D.C. where he was counsel to the Agricultural Adjustment Administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "New Deal." He returned to Washington, from 1941-44, to serve as special assistant and personal counsel to Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox.
Stevenson's version of liberal religion was sufficiently broad that he apparently thought it proper to support both his mother's and his father's churches.
Adlai Stevenson Summary (3214 words)
Stevenson's intelligence was the subject of much ridicule among anti-intellectuals; it was during the 1952 campaign that Republican vice presidential candidate Sen. Richard M. Nixon of California labelled Stevenson an "egghead." In the 1952 presidential election against Dwight D. Eisenhower, Stevenson secured only nine states and lost the Electoral College vote 442 to 89.
Stevenson's legendary "Don't wait for the translation" speech to the Soviet ambassador Valerian Zorin on the 25 October 1962 in front of the Security Council of the United Nations during the Cuban Missile Crisis was in part replicated for dramatic effect in the sixth Star Trek film, The Undiscovered Country.
Stevenson also features in a somewhat bizarre conspiracy theory which has circulated on the internet for some years; the theory suggests that Stevenson provided the inspiration for, makes a cameo appearance as, or is in fact the same person as Gogo, a character from the 1993 videogame classic Final Fantasy 6.
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