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Encyclopedia > Adlai E. Stevenson
Adlai E. Stevenson
Adlai E. Stevenson

In office
March 4, 1893 – March 4, 1897
President Grover Cleveland
Preceded by Levi P. Morton
Succeeded by Garret Hobart

Born October 23, 1835
Christian County, Kentucky
Died June 14, 1914 (aged 78)
Chicago
Nationality American
Political party Democratic Party
Spouse Letitia Green Stevenson

Adlai Ewing Stevenson I (October 23, 1835June 14, 1914) was a Congressman from Illinois and the twenty-third Vice President of the United States. Portrait of Adlai Stevenson Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900–July 14, 1965) was an American politician and statesman, noted for his skill in debate and oratory. ... Adlai Stevenson III Adlai Ewing Stevenson III (born October 10, 1930, in Chicago) is an American politician of the Democratic party. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1079x1330, 79 KB) U.S. Vice President Adlai Stevenson (1893-1897). ... Seal of the office of the Vice-President of the United States The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd and 24th President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Garret Augustus Hobart (June 3, 1844–November 21, 1899) was the twenty-fourth Vice President of the United States. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Christian County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... June 14 is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Come and take it, slogan of the Texas Revolution 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... June 14 is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Seal of the office of the Vice-President of the United States The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ...

Contents

Early life

Stevenson's parents, John Turner Stevenson and Eliza Ewing Stevenson, were Presbyterians of Scots-Irish descent. John Turner Stevenson's grandfather, William was born in Roxburghshire, Scotland then migrated to and from Ulster around 1748, settling first in Pennsylvania and then in North Carolina in the County of Iredell where many Stevensons still reside. John Turner Stevenson and family moved to Kentucky in 1813. Stevenson was born on the family farm in Christian County, Kentucky. He attended the common school in Blue Water, Kentucky. In 1852, when he was 16, frost killed the family's tobacco crop. His father set free their few slaves and the family moved to Bloomington, Illinois, where his father then operated a sawmill. Stevenson attended Illinois Wesleyan University at Bloomington and ultimately graduated from Centre College, in Danville, Kentucky. While there, he became a brother of the Phi Delta Theta Fraternity International, Inc. Kentucky Alpha chapter. His father's death prompted Adlai to return from Kentucky to Bloomington to run the sawmill. Roxburghshire (Siorrachd Rosbroig in Gaelic) is a traditional county of Scotland. ... Statistics Area: 24,481 km² Population (2006 estimate) 1,993,918 Ulster (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Ulstèr, IPA: ) is one of the four traditional provinces of Ireland, in addition to Connaught, Munster and Leinster. ... Christian County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... United States Illinois McLean 22. ... Ames Library, located on the campus of Illinois Wesleyan University in Bloomington. ... Centre College is an accredited, private, four-year liberal arts college located in Danville, Kentucky, USA, a community of about 15,000 in Boyle County, approximately 35 miles (56. ... Danville is a city in Boyle County, Kentucky, United States. ... Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ...


Stevenson was admitted to the bar in 1858, at age 23, and commenced practice in Metamora, in Woodford County, Illinois. As a young lawyer, Stevenson encountered such celebrated Illinois attorneys as Stephen A. Douglas and Abraham Lincoln, campaigning for Douglas in his 1858 Senate race against Lincoln. Stevenson also made speeches against the "Know-Nothing" movement, a nativist group opposed to immigrants and Catholics. That stand helped cement his support in Illinois' large German and Irish communities. In a predominantly Republican area, the Democratic Stevenson won friends through his storytelling and his warm and engaging personality. Metamora is a village located in Woodford County, Illinois. ... Woodford County is a county located in the state of Illinois, USA. As of 2000, the population is 35,469. ... Stephen Arnold Douglas (nicknamed the Little Giant Because he was short but was considered by many a giant in politics) was an American politician from the western state of Illinois, and was the Democratic Party nominee for president in 1860. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Fillmore/Donelson campaign poster The Know Nothing movement was a nativist American political movement of the 1850s. ...


Marriage and political life, 1860-1884

Congressman Stevenson
Congressman Stevenson

Stevenson was appointed master in chancery (an aide in a court of equity), his first public office, which he held during the Civil War. In 1864 Stevenson was a presidential elector for the Democratic ticket; he was also elected district attorney. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 486 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2080 × 2563 pixel, file size: 437 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Adlai Ewing Stevenson sr. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 486 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2080 × 2563 pixel, file size: 437 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Adlai Ewing Stevenson sr. ... The United States Electoral College is the electoral college that chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ...


In 1866 he married Letitia Green, with whom he had fallen in love nine years earlier, at Centre College (her father, the Reverend Lewis Warner Green, the head of the college, had not agreed to the marriage, but he had died, and Letitia and her mother - who also opposed the marriage - had subsequently moved to Bloomington). They had three daughters and a son, Lewis G. Stevenson. Letitia helped establish the Daughters of the American Revolution as a way of healing the divisions between the North and South after the Civil War, and succeeded the wife of Benjamin Harrison as the DAR's second president-general. Lewis G. Stevenson was the secretary of state of Illinois from 1914 to 1917. ... The Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) is a lineage membership organization[1] dedicated to promoting historic preservation, education, and patriotism. ... Benjamin Harrison, VI (August 20, 1833 – March 13, 1901) was a sex offender from Arkansas, serving one term from 1889 to 1893. ...


In 1868, at the end of his term as district attorney, he entered law practice with his cousin, James S. Ewing, moving with his wife back to Bloomington, settling in a large house on Franklin Square. Stevenson & Ewing would become one of the state's most prominent law firms. Ewing would later became the U.S. ambassador to Belgium.


In 1874, Stevenson was elected as a Democrat to the Forty-fourth Congress, serving from March 4, 1875 to March 4, 1877. Local Republican newspapers painted him as a "vile secessionist," but the continuing hardships from the economic panic of 1873 caused voters to sweep him into office with the first Democratic congressional majority since the Civil War. Congress in Joint Session. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1876, Stevenson was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection. The Republican presidential ticket, headed by Rutherford B. Hayes carried his district, and Stevenson was narrowly defeated, getting 49.6 percent of the vote. In 1878, he ran on both the Democratic and Greenback tickets and won, returning to a House from which one-third of his earlier colleagues had either voluntarily retired or been removed by the voters. In 1880, again a presidential election year, he once more lost narrowly, and he lost again in 1882 in his final race for Congress. The U.S. House election, 1876 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1876 which coincided with the (heavily contested) election of President Rutherford B. Hayes. ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... The U.S. House election, 1878 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1878 which occurred in the middle of President Rutherford B. Hayes term. ...


Election of Grover Cleveland in 1884 and the U.S. Post Office

Stevenson served as first assistant postmaster General under Grover Cleveland in 1885. During that time he fired over 40,000 Republican workers and replaced them with Democrats from the South. The Republican-controlled U.S. Congress did not forget this: when Stevenson was nominated for a federal judgeship, he was defeated for confirmation by the same people who never forgot his 1885 purge. Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd and 24th President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897). ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ...


Vice President, 1893-1897

In 1892, when the Democrats chose Cleveland once again as their standard bearer, they appeased party regulars by the nomination of Stevenson, "headsman of the post-office," for vice president. As a supporter of using greenbacks and free silver to inflate the currency and alleviate economic distress in the rural districts, Stevenson balanced the ticket headed by Cleveland, the hard-money, gold-standard supporter. The winning Cleveland-Stevenson ticket carried Illinois, although not Stevenson's home district. Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


Civil service reformers held out hope for the second Cleveland administration but saw Vice President Stevenson as a symbol of the spoils system. He never hesitated to feed names of Democrats to the Post Office Department. Once he called at the Treasury Department to protest against an appointment and was shown a letter he had written endorsing the candidate. Stevenson told the treasury officials not to pay attention to any of his written endorsements; if he really favored someone he would tell them personally.


A habitual cigar-smoker, Cleveland developed cancer of the mouth that required immediate surgery in the summer of 1893. The president insisted that the surgery be kept secret to avoid another panic on Wall Street. While on a yacht in New York harbor that summer, Cleveland had his entire upper jaw removed and replaced with an artificial device, an operation that left no outward scar. The cancer surgery remained secret for another quarter century. Cleveland's aides explained that he had merely had dental work. His vice president little realized how close he came to the presidency that summer.


Adlai Stevenson enjoyed his role as vice president, presiding over the U.S. Senate, "the most august legislative assembly known to men." He won praise for ruling in a dignified, nonpartisan manner. In personal appearance he stood six feet tall and was "of fine personal bearing and uniformly courteous to all." Although he was often a guest at the White House, Stevenson admitted that he was less an adviser to the president than "the neighbor to his counsels." He credited the President with being "courteous at all times" but noted that "no guards were necessary to the preservation of his dignity. No one would have thought of undue familiarity." For his part, President Cleveland snorted that the Vice President had surrounded himself with a coterie of free-silver men dubbed the "Stevenson cabinet." The president even mused that the economy had gotten so bad and the Democratic party so divided that "the logical thing for me to do ... was to resign and hand the Executive branch to Mr. Stevenson," joking that he would try to get his friends jobs in Stevenson's new cabinet.


Presidential campaigns of 1896 and 1900

Stevenson was mentioned as a candidate to succeed Cleveland in 1896. Although he chaired the Illinois delegation to the Democratic National Convention, he gained little support. As one Democrat noted, "the young men of the country are determined to have something to say during the next election, and are tired of these old hacks." Stevenson, 60 years old, received a smattering of votes, but the convention was taken by storm by a thirty-six-year-old former representative from Nebraska, William Jennings Bryan, who delivered his fiery "Cross of Gold" speech in favor of a free-silver plank in the platform. Not only did the Democrats repudiate Cleveland by embracing free silver, but they also nominated Bryan for president. Many Cleveland Democrats, including most Democratic newspapers, refused to support Bryan, but Vice President Stevenson loyally endorsed the ticket. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was an American lawyer, statesman, and politician. ...


After the 1896 election, Bryan became the titular leader of the Democrats and frontrunner for the nomination in 1900. Much of the newspaper speculation about who would run as the party's vice-presidential candidate centered on Indiana Senator Benjamin Shively. But when reporter Arthur Wallace Dunn interviewed Shively at the convention, the senator said he "did not want the glory of a defeat as a vice presidential candidate." A disappointed Dunn said that he still had to file a story on the vice-presidential nomination, and then added: "I believe I'll write a piece about old Uncle Adlai." "That's a good idea," said Shively. "Stevenson is just the man. There you have it. Uniting the old Cleveland element with the new Bryan Democracy. You've got enough for one story. But say, this is more than a joke. Stevenson is just the man." For the rest of the day, Dunn heard other favorable remarks about Stevenson, and by that night the former vice president was the leading contender, since no one else was "very anxious to be the tail of what they considered was a forlorn hope ticket." Summary The election was held on November 6, 1900. ... Benjamin Franklin Shively (March 20, 1857 - March 14, 1916) was a United States Representative and Senator from Indiana. ...


The Populists had already nominated the ticket of Bryan and Charles A. Towne, a pro-silver Republican from Minnesota, with the tacit understanding that Towne would step aside if the Democrats nominated someone else. Bryan preferred his good friend Towne, but Democrats wanted one of their own, and the regular element of the party felt comfortable with Stevenson. Towne withdrew and campaigned for Bryan and Stevenson. As a result, Stevenson, who had run with Cleveland in 1892, now ran with his nemesis Bryan in 1900. Twenty-five years senior to Bryan, Stevenson added age and experience to the ticket. Nevertheless, their effort never stood a chance against the Republican ticket of McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt. However it should be noted that Stevenson was the first of two former Vice Presidents to be nominated by his party for his former office. (The other being Republican Charles Warren Fairbanks in 1916) . Charles Arnette Towne (November 21, 1858 – October 22, 1928) was an American politician. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... Charles Warren Fairbanks (May 11, 1852 – June 4, 1918) was a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-sixth Vice President of the United States. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Final years

After the 1900 election, Stevenson returned again to private practice in Illinois. He made one last attempt at office in a race for governor of Illinois in 1908, at age 72, narrowly losing. After that, he retired to Bloomington, where his Republican neighbors described him as "windy but amusing." He died in Chicago on June 14, 1914. His body is interred in a family plot in Evergreen Cemetery, Bloomington, Illinois. The Governor of Illinois is the chief executive of the State of Illinois and the various agencies and departments over which the officer has jurisdiction, as prescribed in the state constitution. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Evergreen Cemetery, in Bloomington, Illinois, is also known as Evergreen Memorial Cemetery. ... United States Illinois McLean 22. ...


Stevenson's son, Lewis G. Stevenson, was Illinois secretary of state (1914–1917). Stevenson's grandson Adlai Ewing Stevenson II was Democratic candidate for President of the United States in 1952 and 1956. His great-grandson, Adlai Ewing Stevenson III, was a U.S. senator from Illinois from 1970 to 1981. His great-grandson was the actor McLean Stevenson. Lewis G. Stevenson was the secretary of state of Illinois from 1914 to 1917. ... Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900 – July 14, 1965) was an American politician, noted for intellectual demeanor and advocacy of liberal causes in the Democratic party. ... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Adlai Stevenson III Adlai Ewing Stevenson III (born October 10, 1930, in Chicago) is an American politician of the Democratic party. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... McLean Stevenson (November 14, 1927 – February 15, 1996) (full name Edgar McLean Stevenson, Jr. ...


References

Baker, Jean H. (1996). The Stevensons: A Biography of An American Family. New York: W. W. Norton & Co.. ISBN 0-393-03874-2. 


External links

  • Adlai Stevenson.htm Official U.S. Senate biography
  • Stevensons put stamp on history, www.pantagraph.com
  • Adlai Ewing Stevenson
Preceded by
John McNulta
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Illinois's 13th congressional district

18751877
Succeeded by
Thomas F. Tipton
Preceded by
Thomas F. Tipton
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Illinois's 13th congressional district

18791881
Succeeded by
Dietrich C. Smith
Preceded by
Allen G. Thurman
Democratic Party Vice Presidential candidate
1892 (won)
Succeeded by
Arthur Sewall
Preceded by
Levi P. Morton
Vice President of the United States
March 4, 1893March 4, 1897
Succeeded by
Garret Hobart
Preceded by
Arthur Sewall
Democratic Party Vice Presidential candidate
1900 (lost)
Succeeded by
Henry G. Davis

 
 

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