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Encyclopedia > Adam and Eve
Michelangelo's Creation of Adam, from the Sistine Chapel. Michelangelo shows God creating Adam, with Eve in His arm. While not strictly true to the Genesis account, this is one of the most famous depictions of the creation of Adam and Eve in Western art.
Michelangelo's Creation of Adam, from the Sistine Chapel. Michelangelo shows God creating Adam, with Eve in His arm. While not strictly true to the Genesis account, this is one of the most famous depictions of the creation of Adam and Eve in Western art.
Main articles: Adam and Eve (Bible)

Adam (Hebrew: אָדָם‎, Adam, "man"; Arabic: آدم, Adam; Ge'ez: አዳም) and Eve (Hebrew: חַוָּה‎, Ḥavva, "living one"; Arabic: حواء, Hawwaa; Ge'ez: ሕይዋን, Hiywan) were the first man and woman created by God according to the Bible and the Qur'an. God creates Adam by Michelangelo, Sistine Chapel, Vatican City. ... God creates Adam by Michelangelo, Sistine Chapel, Vatican City. ... For other uses, see Michelangelo (disambiguation). ... Categories: Art stubs | Paintings ... The Sistine Chapel (Italian: ) is a chapel in the Apostolic Palace, the official residence of the Pope, in the Vatican City. ... For other uses, see Adam (disambiguation). ... Michelangelos The Creation of Eve, a fresco on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, shows God creating Eve from the side of Adam. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ... Arabic redirects here. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... “Hebrew” redirects here. ... Arabic redirects here. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... Various creation stories have a first man, the first human being. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ...


This story is told in the book of Genesis, chapters 1, 2 and 3, with some additional elements in chapters 4 and 5. God (referred to as YHWH) creates Adam from the dust of the earth and breathes life into him. Later, he makes Eve from Adam's rib. The serpent tempts Eve into eating the forbidden fruit from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil, and she gives the fruit to Adam, too. God expels them both from the Garden of Eden and curses them. They have children, Cain, Abel, Seth, and others, who then populate the world. For other uses, see Genesis (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Serpent (disambiguation). ... In the Bible, the forbidden fruit is the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil eaten by Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. ... In the Bibles Book of Genesis, the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil was the tree in the middle of the Garden of Eden from which God forbade Adam and Eve to eat. ...


Adam and Eve appear in many books besides Genesis, such as the Life of Adam and Eve, the Talmud, Gnostic texts, and the Qur'an. Jewish tradition sometimes includes reference to other wives of Adam's. Christians see Jesus Christ as a "new Adam" who brings life instead of death. They see the serpent as Satan, and the Fall as establishing original sin. Muslims honor Adam as a prophet and say that God gave him the kaaba. “Original Sin” redirects here. ... The Kaaba (Arabic: ; IPA: ) , also known as (), ( The Primordial House), or ( The Sacred House), is a large cuboidal building located inside the mosque known as al-Masjid al-Haram in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. ...


While Jews, Christians, and Muslims have traditionally understood Adam and Eve to have been fake, historical people, modern historical scholarship and the natural history of the human species offer alternatives to this belief. Biologists, however, refer to the matrilineal ancestor of all living people as Mitochondrial Eve and to the patrilineal ancestor of all living people as Y-chromosomal Adam.

Contents

Narrative

This is the Marriage of Adam and Eve
This is the Marriage of Adam and Eve

God (referred to as YHWH) creates Adam from the dust of the earth and breathes life into him, making him a living being (nephesh). God then creates the animals, and Adam names them. Finally, God makes Adam a helpmate fashioned from his rib, the woman Eve. God forbids Adam and Eve from eating the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil, warning that they will die if they do. The serpent tempts Eve into eating the forbidden fruit, and she gives the fruit to Adam, too. They become aware of their nakedness, and when God sees the clothes they have made for themselves, he knows they've disobeyed his command. God expels them both from the Garden of Eden and curses them. The man is cursed to labor, and the woman is cursed to submit to her husband and to bear children in pain. God also curses the serpent to crawl and to eat dust, and he puts enmity between people and serpents. God posts an angel to guard the entrance to the garden. File links The following pages link to this file: Ryu Hayabusa ... File links The following pages link to this file: Ryu Hayabusa ... Nephesh is the Hebrew word largely translated by soul in english. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Adam and Eve have two sons, Cain and Abel. Cain creates Abel when God rejects his offering and accepts Abel's. Cain is then cursed to wander, and he founds a city and a lineage. Adam and Eve have another son, Seth, and other children. These children then multiply, populate the world, and take dominion over it, as God had commanded.


Later Abrahamic traditions

Jewish traditions

Adam after the Fall. Fresco from the monastery of Cantauque, Provence.
Adam after the Fall. Fresco from the monastery of Cantauque, Provence.

In the Sibylline Oracles, the name Adam is explained as a notaricon composed of the initials of the four directions; anatole (east), dusis (west), arktos (north), and mesembria (south). The Jews had their own acrostic interpretation of the name Adam. In the 2nd century, Rabbi Yohanan used the Greek technique of notarichon to explain the name אָדָם as the initials of the words afer, dam, and marah, being dust, blood, and gall. Image File history File links Adam-travaille. ... Image File history File links Adam-travaille. ... The surviving Sibylline Oracles are not the famous Sibylline Books of Roman history, which were lost not once, but twice, and thus there is very little knowledge of the actual contents. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the P. G. Wodehouse character. ... Arktos, Greek αρκτος, means bear. The Arctic is named from this Greek word in reference to the northern constellations of Ursa Major, Great Bear, and Ursa Minor, Little Bear. ... Nessebar (Несебър), previously known as Mesembria and before that as Menebria, is an ancient city on the Black Sea coast of Bulgaria, located in Obshtina Nessebar, Burgas Oblast. ... An acrostic (from the late Greek akróstichon, from ákros, extreme, and stíchos, verse) is a poem or other writing in an alphabetic script, in which the first letter, syllable or word of each verse, paragraph or other recurring feature in the text spells out another message. ... The 2nd century is the period from 101 - 200 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Kalanchoë infected with crown-gall using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. ...


According to the Torah (Genesis 2:7), Adam is said to have been formed by God from "dust from the earth"; in the Talmud (Tractate Sanhedrin 38b) of the first centuries of the Christian era he is, more specifically, described as having initially been a golem kneaded from mud. (cf Prometheus) In the Torah, God is described, at Genesis 1:26, as breathing the breath of life into the nostrils of the first man, and this is usually interpreted in Judaeo-Christian circles as having brought life immediately to the first man. For other uses, see Genesis (disambiguation). ... The Talmud (Hebrew: תַּלְמוּד) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs and history. ... For other uses, see Golem (disambiguation). ... This article is about a type of online computer game. ... For other uses, see Prometheus (disambiguation). ...


At this point, in the Torah, God is described as causing a deep sleep to fall upon Adam, and removing part of his body, usually interpreted as a rib (though a more literal translation is non-specific, referring to "side"). Once a matron asked Rabbi Jose (Talmud [citation needed]), "Why did God steal a rib from Adam?" "Steal?" replied the Sage. "If one were to take away from your house an ounce of silver, and give you in return a pound of gold, that would not be stealing from you." "But," persisted the matron, "what need was there for secrecy?" "It was surely better," replied R. José, "to present Eve to Adam when she was quite presentable, and when no traces of the effects of the operation were visible"[1]. This article is about the bones called ribs. ...


Even in ancient times, the presence of two distinct accounts was noted, and regarded with some curiosity. The first account says male and female [God] created them, which has been assumed by critical scholars to imply simultaneous creation, whereas the second account states that God created Eve from Adam's rib because Adam was lonely. Thus to resolve this apparent discrepancy, mediaeval rabbis suggested that Eve and the woman of the first account were two separate individuals. Preserved in the Midrash, and the mediaeval Alphabet of Ben Sira, this rabbinic tradition held that the first woman refused to take the submissive position to Adam in sex, and eventually fled from him, consequently leaving him lonely. This first woman was identified in the Midrash as Lilith, a figure elsewhere described as a night demon. Midrash (Hebrew: מדרש; plural midrashim) is a Hebrew word referring to a method of exegesis of a Biblical text. ... The Alphabet of Ben-Sira is an anonymously-authored medieval novel describing the conception, birth, and education of the prophet Ben Sira. ... The missionary position A variation on the missionary position as depicted in Pompeii The missionary position is a common human sex position also used by certain other species including bonobos[1] and armadillos. ... It has been suggested that Duration of sexual intercourse be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about the demon Lilith. ...


The word liyliyth can also mean "screech owl", as it is translated in the King James Version of Isaiah 34:14, although some scholars take this to be a reference to the same demonic entity as mentioned in the Talmud. The King James or Authorized Version of the Bible is an English translation of the Christian Bible first published in 1611. ... This article is about the Book of Isaiah. ...


In the Talmud, Adam is said to have separated from Eve for 130 years, during which time his ejaculations gave rise to ghouls, and demons.[citation needed] Elsewhere in the Talmud, Lilith is identified as the mother of these creatures. The demons were said to prey on newborn males before they had been circumcised, and so a tradition arose in which a protective amulet was placed around the neck of newborns. Traditions in the Midrash concerning Lilith, and her sexual appetite, have been compared to Sumerian mythology concerning the demon ki-sikil-lil-la-ke, by scholars who postulate an intermediate Akkadian folk etymology interpreting the lil-la-ke portion of the name as a corruption of lîlîtu, a female storm demon originating in Sumer. Ejaculation is the ejecting of semen from the penis, and is usually accompanied by orgasm. ... This article is being rewritten at Circumcision/temp Circumcision is the removal of some or all of the prepuce or foreskin though often the frenulum is also excised. ... Chaldean mythology is the collective name given to Sumerian, Assyrian and Babylonian mythologies, although Chaldea did not comprehend the whole territory inhabited by those peoples. ... Akkadian (lišānum akkadÄ«tum) was a Semitic language (part of the greater Afro-Asiatic language family) spoken in ancient Mesopotamia, particularly by the Assyrians and Babylonians. ... Folk etymology is a term used in two distinct ways: A commonly held misunderstanding of the origin of a particular word, a false etymology. ...


The Alphabet of Ben Sira Midrash goes even further and identifies a third wife, created after Lilith deserted Adam, but before Eve. This unnamed wife was purportedly made in the same way as Adam, from the "dust of the earth", but the sight of her being created proved too much for Adam to take and he refused to go near her. It is also said that she was created from nothing at all, and that God created into being a skeleton, then organs, and then flesh. The Midrash tells that Adam saw her as "full of blood and secretions," suggesting that he witnessed her creation and was horrified at seeing a body from the inside out. Ben Sira does not record this wife's fate. She was never named, and it assumed that she was allowed to leave the Garden a perpetual virgin, or was ultimately destroyed by God in favor of Eve, who was created when Adam was asleep and oblivious. It should be noted here, that both Lilith and the Second Wife are free from any curse of the Tree of Knowledge, as they left long before the event occurred.


Genesis does not tell for how long Adam and Eve were in the Garden of Eden, but the Book of Jubilees states that they were removed from the garden on the new moon of the fourth month of the 8th year after creation (Jubilees 3:33); other Jewish sources assert that it was less than a day. Shortly after their expulsion, Eve brought forth her first-born child, and thereafter their second — Cain and Abel, respectively. For other uses, see Garden of Eden (disambiguation). ... The Book of Jubilees expands and reworks material found in Genesis to Exodus 15. ... Cain and Abel redirect here. ...


Another Jewish tradition — also used to explain "male and female He created them" line, is that God originally created Adam as a hermaphrodite [Midrash Rabbah - Genesis VIII:1] [citation needed], and in this way was bodily and spiritually male and female. He later decided that "it is not good for [Adam] to be alone", and created the separate beings of Adam and Eve, thus creating the idea of two people joining together to achieve a union of the two separate spirits. The 1st-century BC sculpture The Reclining Hermaphrodite, in the Museo Nazionale Romano, Palazzo Massimo Alle Terme in Rome A hermaphrodite is an organism that possesses both male and female sex organs during its life. ...

The Death of Adam, by Piero della Francesca (1452-1466).
The Death of Adam, by Piero della Francesca (1452-1466).

Only three of Adam's children (Cain, Abel, and Seth) are explicitly named in Genesis, although it does state that there were other sons and daughters as well (Genesis 5:4). In Jubilees, two daughters are named - Azûrâ being the first, and Awân, who was born after Seth, Cain, Abel, nine other sons, and Azûrâ. Jubilees goes on to state that Cain later married Awân and Seth married Azûrâ, thus, accounting for their descendants. However, according to Genesis Rabba and other later sources, either Cain had a twin sister, and Abel had two twin sisters, or Cain had a twin sister named Lebuda, and Abel a twin sister named Qelimath. In the Conflict of Adam and Eve with Satan, Cain's twin sister is named Luluwa, and Abel's twin sister is named Aklia. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2536x2539, 578 KB) Description: Title: de: Freskenzyklus der Â»Legende vom Heiligen Kreuz« im Chor von San Francesco in Arezzo, Szene: Tod und Bestattung Adams, Detail: Tod Adams Technique: de: Fresko Dimensions: Country of origin: de: Italien Current location (city): de: Arezzo... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2536x2539, 578 KB) Description: Title: de: Freskenzyklus der Â»Legende vom Heiligen Kreuz« im Chor von San Francesco in Arezzo, Szene: Tod und Bestattung Adams, Detail: Tod Adams Technique: de: Fresko Dimensions: Country of origin: de: Italien Current location (city): de: Arezzo... The Baptism of Christ, 1450 (National Gallery, London). ... Events October - English troops under John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury, land in Guyenne, France, and retake most of the province without a fight. ... Events Chimú Empire conquered by troops of the Inca End of term for Regent of Sweden Jöns Bengtsson Oxenstierna. ... In stories common to the Abrahamic religions, Cain or Káyin (קַיִן / קָיִן spear Standard Hebrew Qáyin, Tiberian Hebrew Qáyin / Qāyin; Arabic قايين QāyÄ«n in the Arabic Bible; قابيل QābÄ«l in Islam) is the eldest son of Adam and Eve, and the first man born in creation... In the Book of Genesis, Abel (Hebrew הֶבֶל / הָבֶל, Standard Hebrew Hével / Hável, Tiberian Hebrew Héḇel / Hāḇel; Arabic هابيل HābÄ«l) was the second son of Adam. ... This article is about the Biblical Seth. ... The Book of Jubilees expands and reworks material found in Genesis to Exodus 15. ... Genesis Rabba, (Breshit Rabba in Hebrew), is a religious text holy to classical Judaism. ... The Conflict of Adam and Eve with Satan is a Christian pseudepigraphical work found in Ethiopic and Arabic, from the 5th century CE at the earliest. ...


Other pseudepigraphs give further details of their life outside of Eden, in particular, the Life of Adam and Eve (also known as the Apocalypse of Moses) consists entirely of a description of their life outside Eden. As the first man, Adam was traditionally a significant figure to whom was attributed prophecy and wisdom. Pseudepigrapha (Greek pseudos = false, epi = after, later and grapha = writing (or writings), latterly or falsely attributed, or down right forged works, describes texts whose claimed authorship is unfounded in actuality. ... The Life of Adam and Eve is a Jewish pseudepigraphical writing, the original of which was perhaps written around 70 BC. The story begins immediately after Adam and Eves exile from the Garden of Eden and continues to their deaths. ...


After Cain killed Abel, and was cursed to wander, Adam and Eve conceived a third child named Seth, who, with Cain, gave rise to the two family lines of the Generations of Adam. The generations of Adam are the two lines of descent from Adam, both ending in the name Lamech, which are given in Genesis. ...


A sidenote, when Cain was banished for killing Abel, Cain fears that God's punishment of his banishment is "too great to bear" and that he "must avoid [God]'s presence and become a restless wanderer on earth--anyone who meets me may kill me" (Genesis 4.3) suggesting life of other men outside of and prior to or during Cain's lineage.


According to the Bible, Adam finally died at the age of 930 years, the traditional Jewish view being that he and Eve are currently buried in the Cave of Machpelah, in Hebron. The Cave of the Patriarchs is considered to be the spiritual center of the ancient city of Hebron. ... Arabic الخليل Government City Also Spelled al-Khalil (officially) al-Halil (unofficially) Governorate Hebron Population 166,000 (2006) Jurisdiction  dunams Head of Municipality Mustafa Abdel Nabi Hebron (Arabic:   al-ḪalÄ«l or al KhalÄ«l; Hebrew:  , Standard Hebrew: Ḥevron, Tiberian Hebrew: Ḥeḇrôn) is a city in the southern Judea...


Christianity

Adam and Eve, by Albrecht Dürer (1507).
Adam and Eve, by Albrecht Dürer (1507).
Adam, Eve, and the (female) Serpent (Often identified as Lilith.) at the entrance to Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris. Medieval Christian art often depicted the Edenic Serpent as a woman, thus both emphasizing the Serpent's seductiveness as well as its relationship to Eve. Several early Church Fathers, including Clement of Alexandria and Eusebius of Caesarea, interpreted the Hebrew "Heva" as not only the name of Eve, but in its aspirated form as "female serpent."
Adam, Eve, and the (female) Serpent (Often identified as Lilith.) at the entrance to Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris. Medieval Christian art often depicted the Edenic Serpent as a woman, thus both emphasizing the Serpent's seductiveness as well as its relationship to Eve. Several early Church Fathers, including Clement of Alexandria and Eusebius of Caesarea, interpreted the Hebrew "Heva" as not only the name of Eve, but in its aspirated form as "female serpent."

The story of Adam and Eve forms the basis for the Christian doctrine of original sin: "Sin came into the world through one man and death through sin, and so death spread to all men because all men sinned," said Paul of Tarsus in his Epistle to the Romans, writing in Greek about 58 AD.[1][2] St Augustine of Hippo (354-430), working with a Latin translation of the epistle, understood Paul to have said that Adam's sin was hereditary: "Death passed upon (i.e. spread to) all men because of Adam, [in whom] all sinned".[3] Original sin, the concept that man is born in a condition of sinfulness and must await redemption, became a cornerstone of Christian theological tradition, primarily in Western-rite churches, but is not shared by Judaism, the Orthodox churches,[4] nor by post-Reformation churches such as the Congregationalist churches, nor The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Download high resolution version (552x700, 58 KB)Adam and Eve by Albrecht Durer (1507) given by Christina of Sweden to King Philip IV in 1654. ... Download high resolution version (552x700, 58 KB)Adam and Eve by Albrecht Durer (1507) given by Christina of Sweden to King Philip IV in 1654. ... Albrecht Dürer (pronounced /al. ... Year 1507 was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (427x615, 79 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Adam and Eve Serpent (symbolism) Notre Dame de Paris The Fall of Man Gothic art Eve (Bible) Temptation... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (427x615, 79 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Adam and Eve Serpent (symbolism) Notre Dame de Paris The Fall of Man Gothic art Eve (Bible) Temptation... For other uses, see Adam (disambiguation). ... Michelangelos The Creation of Eve, a fresco on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, shows God creating Eve from the side of Adam. ... For other uses, see Serpent (disambiguation). ... This article is about the demon Lilith. ... Notre Dame de Paris: Western Façade For other uses, see Notre Dame. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Church Fathers, Early Church Fathers... Clement of Alexandria (Titus Flavius Clemens), was the first member of the Church of Alexandria to be more than a name, and one of its most distinguished teachers. ... Eusebius of Caesarea Eusebius of Caesarea (c. ... “Original Sin” redirects here. ... Paul of Tarsus (b. ... The Epistle to the Romans is one of the letters of the New Testament canon of the Christian Bible. ... St. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ...


Over the centuries, a system of uniquely Christian beliefs has developed from the Adam and Eve story. Baptism has become understood as a means of washing away the stain of hereditary sin in some churches. In other branches of Christianity, baptism is a means of washing away sins that were actually committed by the person being baptised. It is an identification with the death, burial and resurrection of Jesus Christ. It is a ceremony of spiritually washing one in the blood of the Savior, which was shed on the cross. In still other Christian traditions, this process is merely seen as a symbol of faith and also an initiation, or a public declaration of faith.[5] Additionally, the serpent that tempted Eve was interpreted by some to have been Satan, although there is no mention of this identification in the Torah. Christian interpretations of the Scripture are often considered more literal than Jewish interpretations. This article is about the Christian religious act of Baptism. ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ...


Because Eve had tempted Adam to eat of the fatal fruit, some early Fathers of the Church held her and all subsequent women to be the first sinners, and especially responsible for the Fall. "You are the devil's gateway," Tertullian told his female listeners in the early 2nd century, and went on to explain that they were responsible for the death of Christ: "On account of your desert _ that is, death - even the Son of God had to die."[6] In 1486 the Dominicans Kramer and Sprengler used similar tracts to justify the Malleus Maleficarum ("Hammer of the Witches") that led to three centuries of persecution of "witches". The Church Fathers or Fathers of the Church are the early and influential theologians and writers in the Christian church, particularly those of the first five centuries of Christian history. ... Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus, anglicised as Tertullian, (ca. ... Cover of the seventh Cologne edition of the Malleus Maleficarum, 1520 (from the University of Sydney Library). ...


Eastern Orthodox tradition holds that the sword placed at the entrance to Paradise to prevent humankind from returning to the Garden was removed once Jesus was born. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Faith... Paradise, Jan Bruegel Paradise is an English word from Persian roots that is generally identified with the Garden of Eden or with Heaven. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ...


Liberal Christians teach that many parts of the Bible should not be taken literally. The story of Adam & Eve may be included. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Liberal Christianity, sometimes called...

See also: Harrowing of Hell

The Harrowing of Hell is a doctrine in Christian theology referenced in the Apostles Creed and the Athanasian Creed (Quicumque vult), which states that Jesus descended into Hell. ...

Gnostic and Manichaean traditions

Main article: Gnostics

While the Gnostics used scriptural texts as teaching devices, rather than viewing them to be literal accounts genuinely written by early patriarchs, this was the converse of what was true of what became official Christianity. The Gnostic's Nag Hamadi text "Apocalypse of Adam", for instance contains the account of the enlightenment Adam received, for which certain angels became jealous. The "Testament of Adam", for example takes a further step to produce a faked ancient prophecy, of events that had supposedly already occurred by the time it was published. Gnosticism is a blanket term for various religions and sects most prominent in the first few centuries A.D. General characteristics The word gnosticism comes from the Greek word for knowledge, gnosis (γνῶσις), referring to the idea that there is special, hidden mysticism (esoteric knowledge... Gnosticism is a blanket term for various religions and sects most prominent in the first few centuries A.D. General characteristics The word gnosticism comes from the Greek word for knowledge, gnosis (γνῶσις), referring to the idea that there is special, hidden mysticism (esoteric knowledge... Gnosticism is a blanket term for various religions and sects most prominent in the first few centuries A.D. General characteristics The word gnosticism comes from the Greek word for knowledge, gnosis (γνῶσις), referring to the idea that there is special, hidden mysticism (esoteric knowledge... Nag Hammâdi is a village in the middle of Egypt, called Chenoboskion in classical antiquity, about 225 kilometres north-west of Aswan with some 30. ... The Apocalypse of Adam discovered in 1945 as part of the Nag Hammadi Library is a Gnostic work written in Coptic. ... The Testament of Adam is a Christian pseudepigraphical work extant in Syriac and Arabic. ...


In certain forms of Christian Gnosticism the creation of Adam as Protanthropos - the original man, had a very important place. The Apocalypse of Adam suggests that Adam and Eve were originally conjoined in a single androgynous being both male and female and greater than the eternal angels and higher than Samael, the God of the Aeon and Powers that had created them. This seems to be what Irenaeus (I, xxix, 3) refers to when he states that the Aeon Autogenes (self-created Aeon) creates a true and perfect human Anthrôpos, also called Adamas, who has "Perfect Knowledge. In wrath of Samael, the God of the Aeon then separated Adam from Eve, causing their superior knowledge of God to flee from them. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Apocalypse of Adam discovered in 1945 as part of the Nag Hammadi Library is a Gnostic work written in Coptic. ...


The Perfection of the Protanthropos is also sometimes seen as a result of a non material emanation from God, called the Son of God and seen as the prefigurement for the appearance of Jesus, who, even in Conventional Christian literature is often referred to as "The Second Adam". According to the Naassenes it is only when Adam and Eve are separated that they "sink" into material form. The Genesis verse, that "according to the image of God he made them, male and female he made them", implied that the first account of the creation of man and woman, according to Theodotus (c. 160), that both man and God were anthropogynous beings, later separated by God, the Father/Mother. As Pagels shows "The followers of Valentinus suggested that the Mother herself had encouraged the God of Israel to think he was acting autonomously, but as they explain, "It was because he was foolish and ignorant of his Mother that he said, 'I am (the only) God; there is no-one beside me'. (p.69) In the Secret Book of John, the creator of Adam and Eve, when he said: 'I am a jealous God and there is no other God besides me.' But by announcing this he indicated to the angels ... that another God does exist; for if there were no other one, of whom would he be jealous?... Then the Mother began to be distressed." This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Elaine Pagels, née Hiesey, (born February 13, 1943), is the Harrington Spear Paine Professor of Religion at Princeton University. ...

Main article: Manichaeans

This is taken up in the Manichaean belief that the Protanthropos is seen as "the World Soul", (Anima Mundi), sent to fight against darkness. The "Fall" is then seen as the primordial man being delivered up to evil and swallowed in darkness, with the Universe as a whole now existing as a means of delivering the primordial Adam from Darkness. Here too the intercourse between Adam and Eve was seen as the way in which darkness overcame the light. Manichaeism was one of the major ancient religions. ... Manichaeism was one of the major ancient religions. ... Anima mundi is the soul of the world, a pure ethereal spirit, which was proclaimed by some ancient philosophers to be diffused throughout all nature. ...

"Mani said, 'Then Jesus came and spoke to the one who had been born, who was Adam, and explained to him (about) the gardens (of Paradise), the deities, Gehenna, the satans, earth, heaven, sun, and moon. He also made him fear Eve, showing him how to suppress (desire) for her, and he forbade him to approach her, and made him fear to be near her, so that he did (what Jesus commanded). Then that (male) archon came back to his daughter, who was Eve, and lustfully had intercourse with her. He engendered with her a son, deformed in shape and possessing a red complexion, and his name was Cain, the Red Man. Then that son had intercourse with his mother, and engendered with her a son of white complexion, whose name was Abel, the White Man. Then Cain again had intercourse with his mother, and engendered with her two girls, one of whom was named Hakimat al-Dahr and the other Ibnat al-Hirê . Then Cain took Ibnat al-Hirê as his wife and presented Hakimat al-Dahr to Abel, and he took her as his wife.'"[7]

Gnostics seem to have taken the Marcionite belief that the Wrathful Yahweh of the Torah and the loving Father of Christianity were two separate divinities. In their book "The Origin of the World" for instance it states:-

The heaven and his earth were destroyed by the troublemaker that was below them all. And the six heavens shook violently; for the forces of chaos knew who it was that had destroyed the heaven that was below them. And when Pistis (Faith) knew about the breakage resulting from the disturbance, she sent forth her breath and bound him and cast him down into Tartarus. Since that day, the heaven, along with its earth, has consolidated itself through Sophia (Wisdom) the daughter of Yaldabaoth, she who is below them all.
Now when the heavens had consolidated themselves along with their forces and all their administration, the prime parent became insolent. And he was honored by all the army of angels. And all the gods and their angels gave blessing and honor to him. And for his part, he was delighted and continually boasted, saying to them, "I have no need of anyone." He said, "It is I who am God, and there is no other one that exists apart from me." And when he said this, he sinned against all the immortal beings who give answer. And they laid it to his charge.
Then when Pistis saw the impiety of the chief ruler, she was filled with anger. She was invisible. She said, "You are mistaken, Samael," (that is, "blind god"). "There is an immortal man of light who has been in existence before you, and who will appear among your modelled forms; he will trample you to scorn, just as potter's clay is pounded. And you will descend to your mother, the abyss, along with those that belong to you.

Gnostic accounts also turned the identification of the serpent with Satan on its head, and the serpent was seen as the hero, particularly to Ophites, who was trying to help the couple gain knowledge to defeat evil Samael, whom the Gnostics saw as the jealous demiurge of the creation. Gnosticism is a blanket term for various religions and sects most prominent in the first few centuries A.D. General characteristics The word gnosticism comes from the Greek word for knowledge, gnosis (γνῶσις), referring to the idea that there is special, hidden mysticism (esoteric knowledge... The Ophites is a blanket term for numerous gnostic sects in Syria and Egypt about 100 A.D. The common trait was that these sects would give great importance to the serpent. ... The Demiurge, The Craftsman or Creator, in some belief systems, is the deity responsible for the creation of the physical universe. ...


There is also the tradition that Satan refused to bow to Adam as a result of his exclusive love of God, and felt that bowing to humankind was a form of idolatry. This tradition informs the treatment of Satan in some forms of Christian gnosticism. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


More extended versions of the fall of Satan exist in which he leads a divine war, which, while in works such as the Book of Enoch is recorded as being in heaven after Satan turns away from God.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This Manual of Style has the simple purpose of making things easy to read by following a consistent format — it is a style guide. ...

Islamic tradition

See also: Adam (prophet of Islam)

The Qur'an tells of آدم (ʾĀdam) in the surah al-Baqara (2):30-39, al-A'raf (7):11-25, al-Hijr (15):26-44, al-Isra (17):61-65, Ta-Ha (20):115-124, and Sad (38):71-85. Adam is the first Prophet of Islam and mentioned in the Quran as the husband of Eve (Hawwa). ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... See also: Sura (disambiguation). ... SÅ«rata’l-Baqarah (Arabic: ‎ the Cow) is the second, and the longest, chapter of the Quran, with 286 verses. ... Surat al-Araf (Arabic: سورة الأعراف ) (The Heights)[1] is the 7th sura of the Quran, with 206 ayat. ... Surat al-Hijr (Al-Hijr, The Stoneland, The Rock City) is the 15th sura of the Quran. ... Surat Al-Isra (Arabic: سورة الإسراء ) (ie The Night Journey) is the 17th sura of the Quran . ... Sura Ta-Ha is the 20th sura of the Quran. ... Surat Sad (The Letter Sad) is the 38th sura of the Quran with 88 ayat. ...


The early Islamic commentator Muhammad ibn Jarir al-Tabari adds a number of details to the Torah, based on claimed hadith as well as specific Jewish traditions (so-called isra'iliyyat).[8] Tabari records that when it came time to create Adam, God sent Gabriel (Jibril), then Michael (Mika'il), to fetch clay from the earth; but the earth complained, saying I take refuge in God from you, if you have come to diminish or deform me, so the angels returned empty-handed. Tabari goes on to state that God responded by sending the Angel of Death, who took clay from all regions, hence providing an explanation for the variety of appearances of the different races of mankind. Balamis 14th century Persian version of Universal History by al-Tabari Abu Jafar Muhammad ibn Jarir at-Tabari 838–923 (father of Jafar, named Muhammad, son of Jarir from the province of Tabaristan, Arabic الطبري), was an author from Persia, one of the earliest, most prominent and famous Persian... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... 12th-century icon of Archangel Gabriel from Novgorod. ... Guido Renis archangel Michael (in the Capuchin church of Santa Maria della Concezione, Rome) tramples Satan. ... Grim Reaper redirects here. ...


According to Tabari's account, after receiving the breath of God, Adam remained a dry body for 40 days, then gradually came to life from the head downwards, sneezing when he had finished coming to life, saying All praise be to God, the Lord of all beings[citation needed]. Having been created, Adam, the first man, is described as having been given dominion over all the lower creatures, which he proceeds to name. As one of the people to whom God is said to have spoken to directly, Adam is seen as a prophet in Islam. Prophets of Islam are male human beings who are regarded by Muslims to be prophets chosen by God. ...


At this point, Adam takes a prominent role in Islamic traditions concerning the fall of Satan, which is not recorded in the Torah, but in the Book of Enoch which is used in Oriental Orthodox churches. In these, when God announces his intention of creating Adam, some of the angels express dismay, asking why he would create a being that would do evil. Teaching Adam the names reassures the angels as to Adam's abilities, though commentators dispute which particular names were involved; various theories say they were the names of all things animate and inanimate, the names of the angels, the names of his own descendants, or the names of God. This article is about the concept of Satan. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The term Oriental Orthodoxy refers to the churches of Eastern Christian traditions that keeps the faith of only the first three ecumenical councils of the undivided Church - the councils of Nicea, Constantinople and Ephesus. ... The 99 Names of God, also known as The 99 Attributes of God (Arabic: transliteration: ), are the names of God revealed in the Quran and Sunnah;[1] even though the names (as adjectives, word constructs, or otherwise) exceed ninety-nine in the Quran and Sunnah. ...


When God orders the angels to bow to Adam one of those present, Satan [Lucifer] (Iblis in Islam, a Djinn who said "why should I bow to man, I am made of pure fire"), refuses due to his pride, and is summarily banished from the Heavens. Liberal movements within Islam have viewed God's commanding the angels to bow before Adam as an exaltation of humanity, and as a means of supporting human rights, others view it as an act of showing Adam that the biggest enemy of humans on earth will be their ego.[9] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Genie is the anglicized word for the Arabic jinni. In Semitic mythology and Islamic religion, a jinni (also djinni or djini) is a member of the jinn (or djinn), a race of spirits. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Human rights are rights which some hold to be inalienable and belonging to all humans. ...


More extended versions of the fall of Satan also exist in works such as that of Tabari, and the Shia commentator al-Qummi. In these explanations Iblis is sent against the jinn, who had angered God by sin and fighting. In such versions where Satan leads the battle on God's behalf, rather than his own, it is the pride and conceit resulting from his victory which results in his expulsion, since pride is seen as a sin. Islamic traditions further record that, in vengeful anger, Iblis promises God that he will lead as many humans astray as he can, to which God replies that it is the choice of humans - those who so desire will follow Satan, while those who so desire will follow God. Shiʻa Islam (Arabic شيعى follower; English has traditionally used Shiite) makes up the second largest sect of believers in Islam, constituting about 30%–35% of all Muslim. ...


Eve is not mentioned by name in the Qur'an, she is nevertheless referred to as Adam's spouse, and Islamic tradition refers to her by an etymologically similar name - حواء (Hawwāʾ) . In fact, although her creation is not recounted in the Qur'an, Tabari recounts the biblical tale of her creation, stating that she was named because she was created from a living thing (her name means living). The torah gives an etymology for woman, or rather the Hebrew equivalent (ish-shah), stating that she should be called woman since she was taken out of man (ish in Hebrew). The etymology is regarded as implausible by most semitic linguists. Interestingly, Quran blame both, Adam and Eve for eating the forbidden fruit. Some Muslims therefore interpret that this even does not pose a problem of women inferiority to men intrinsically.


Al-Qummi records the opinion that Eden was not entirely earthly, and so, having been sent to earth, Adam and Eve first arrived at mountain peaks outside Mecca; Adam on Safa, and Eve on Marwa. In this Islamic tradition, Adam remained weeping for 40 days, until he repented, at which point God rewarded him by sending down the Kaaba, and teaching him the hajj. Other Islamic traditions hold that Adam was moved to Sri Lanka, as the next best thing to Eden, and, viewing Adam as having been a giant, human size having shrunk drastically before the great flood, Adam's Peak is said to contain his giant footprint. This article is about the city in Saudi Arabia. ... The South African Football Association -- SAFA. Members SAFA Regions SAFAs 9 Provinces SAFA Eastern Cape SAFA Free State SAFA Gauteng SAFA KwaZulu-Natal SAFA Mpumalanga SAFA Northern Cape SAFA Northern Province SAFA North-West SAFA Western Cape The League NSL PSL First Division Associate Members USSASA SASSU SAIFA SAFCA... Marwa is a Lebanese singer. ... The Kaaba (Arabic: ; IPA: ) , also known as (), ( The Primordial House), or ( The Sacred House), is a large cuboidal building located inside the mosque known as al-Masjid al-Haram in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. ... A supplicating pilgrim at Masjid Al Haram, the mosque which was built around the Kaaba (the cubical building at center). ... This article is on mythology involving great floods. ... Adams Peak, also known as Sri Pada, is a 2,243 metre (7,360 feet) tall conical mountain in central Sri Lanka. ...


The Qur'an also describes the two sons of Adam (named Qabil and Habil in Islamic tradition, but not mentioned by name in the Qur'an) that correspond to Cain and Abel.


Historicity

Many Biblical scholars consider Adam and Eve as an example of a story focusing on the teaching of perceived fundamental truths; the narrative's purpose is to convey the importance and truth of sin and human rebellion in their traditions, regardless of historical accuracy. All, some, or none of the actual events of the narrative may have actually happened, or been embellished, although there is no real evidence of embellishment of this narrative in the Masoretic Text. Embellishment is a term used in sewing and crafts. ... The Masoretic Text (MT) is the Hebrew text of the Tanakh approved for general use in Judaism. ...


Adam and Eve are considered in evangelical Christianity and Orthodox Judaism as real historical people, as Genesis 5:4 records Adam within a genealogy. In the New Testament, Paul references Adam and Eve many times, especially contrasting Adam with Jesus where Paul writes in the 5th chapter of Romans "12 Therefore, just as through one man sin entered the world, and death through sin, and thus death spread to all men, because all sinned— 13 (For until the law sin was in the world, but sin is not imputed when there is no law. 14 Nevertheless death reigned from Adam to Moses, even over those who had not sinned according to the likeness of the transgression of Adam, who is a type of Him who was to come. 15 But the free gift is not like the offense. For if by the one man’s offense many died, much more the grace of God and the gift by the grace of the one Man, Jesus Christ, abounded to many." This is taken to support a historical Adam by fundamentalists as some theologians interpret Adam's sin as a historical event that changed humankind. Others argue that Paul could be merely using the myth as a teaching method, or that Paul believed in Adam and Eve but was mistaken on this count. However, Jesus also made reference to the story of Adam and Eve, in Matthew 19:4,5. Adam is also listed in Jesus' genealogy in Luke 3. Others view Adam and Eve as metaphorical for every person when they first sin and God seeks them out. Those who hold this view point out that adam can also be translated humankind. This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... Look up Paul in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... “Original Sin” redirects here. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ...


Thomas Paine's The Age of Reason prompted some Christians to interpret the Bible as strict history; William Whiston was one such early scholar. James Ussher calculated Adam and Eve's life at approximately 4,000 BC, basing on the Genealogies of Genesis and Table of Nations. For other persons of the same name, see Thomas Paine (disambiguation). ... For the 18th Century intellectual and scientific movement, see The Age of Enlightenment. ... William Whiston William Whiston (December 9, 1667 - August 22, 1752), English divine and mathematician, was born at Norton in Leicestershire, of which village his father was rector. ... Archbishop James Ussher (1581-1656) James Ussher (sometimes spelled Usher) (4 January 1581–21 March 1656) was Anglican Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland between 1625–1656 and a prolific religious scholar who most famously published a chronology which calculated the date of Creation as 4004 BC. // Ussher... The genealogies of Genesis record the descendents of Adam and Eve as given in the first book of the Bible, Genesis. ... The neutrality and factual accuracy of this article are disputed. ...


In modern times the theory of evolution has challenged the Christian belief in the historicity of Adam and Eve. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about evolution in biology. ...


Ancestry and evolutionary biology

Main articles: Mitochondrial Eve and Y-chromosomal Adam

The idea of a single male and female human ancestor is contradictory to evolutionary theory. According to this theory, the population of humans gradually evolved from other hominans, and the population size was never two (indeed if the population size had been just two, humans would almost certainly have become extinct). Somewhat confusingly however, geneticists have identified individuals dubbed "Y-chromosomal Adam" and "Mitochondrial Eve". Mitochondrial Eve is the common matrilineal ancestor of all humans alive today whilst Y-chromosomal Adam is the common patrilineal ancestor who lived many millennia after Mitochondrial Eve. Mitochondrial Eve (mt-mrca) is the name given by researchers to the woman who is the matrilineal most recent common ancestor (MRCA) for all living humans. ... In human genetics, Y-chromosomal Adam (Y-mrca) is the male counterpart to mitochondrial Eve: the most recent common ancestor from whom all male human Y chromosomes are descended. ... This article is about biological evolution. ... Genera Homo (humans) Paranthropus (extinct) Australopithecus (extinct) Sahelanthropus (extinct) Orrorin (extinct) Ardipithecus (extinct) Kenyanthropus (extinct) The more anthropomorphic primates of the Hominini tribe are placed in the Hominina subtribe. ... In population genetics and population ecology, population size (usually denoted N) is the number of individual organisms in a population. ... In human genetics, Y-chromosomal Adam (Y-mrca) is the male counterpart to mitochondrial Eve: the most recent common ancestor from whom all male human Y chromosomes are descended. ... Mitochondrial Eve (mt-mrca) is the name given by researchers to the woman who is the matrilineal most recent common ancestor (MRCA) for all living humans. ...


Cultural influence

"Adam and Eve" by Lucas Cranach the Elder
"Adam and Eve" by Lucas Cranach the Elder

Adam and Eve and their temptation in paradise are mimicked in Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials novel trilogy through the characters Will Parry and Lyra Belacqua. Image File history File links Cranach. ... Image File history File links Cranach. ... A self portrait Lucas Cranach the Elder (1472 – October 16, 1553) was a German painter. ... Philip Pullman CBE (born October 19, 1946) is an English writer. ... The trilogy (U.K versions), in order of succession from left to right. ... Will Parry is one of the protagonists in Philip Pullmans trilogy His Dark Materials, along with Lyra Belacqua. ... Lyra Belacqua (also known as Lyra Silvertongue) is the heroine of Philip Pullmans His Dark Materials trilogy. ...


Early Renaissance artists used the theme of Adam and Eve as a way to represent female and male nudes. Later, the nudity was objected to by more modest elements, and fig leaves were added to the older pictures and sculptures, covering their genitals. The choice of the fig was a result of Mediterranean traditions identifying the unnamed Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil as a fig tree, and since figs leaves were actually mentioned in Genesis as being used to cover Adam and Eve's nudity. Portrait of Giovanni Arnolfini and Wife by Jan van Eyck (1434). ... A sex organ, or primary sexual characteristic, narrowly defined, is any of those parts of the body (which are not always bodily organs according to the strict definition) which are involved in sexual reproduction and constitute the reproductive system in an complex organism; namely: Male: penis (notably the glans penis... Species About 800, including: Ficus altissima Ficus americana Ficus aurea Ficus benghalensis - Indian Banyan Ficus benjamina - Weeping Fig Ficus broadwayi Ficus carica - Common Fig Ficus citrifolia Ficus drupacea Ficus elastica Ficus godeffroyi Ficus grenadensis Ficus hartii Ficus lyrata Ficus macbrideii Ficus microcarpa - Chinese Banyan Ficus nota Ficus obtusifolia Ficus palmata...


Another issue was whether they should be depicted with navels. Since they were created fully grown, and did not develop in a uterus, they would not have had the umbilical scars possessed by all born humans. However, paintings without navels looked unnatural. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In Northern Europe, the unnamed "Forbidden fruit" became considered a form of apple, because of a misunderstanding of the Latin "malum", where malum as an adjective means evil, but as a noun means apple. The larynx in the human throat, noticeably more prominent in males, was consequently called an Adam's apple, from a notion that it was caused by the forbidden fruit sticking in Adam's throat as he swallowed, and the name has stuck. Species Malus domestica Malus sieversii Apple is the fruit (pome) of the genus Malus belonging to the family Rosaceae, and is one of the most widely cultivated tree fruits. ... The larynx (plural larynges), colloquially known as the voicebox, is an organ in the neck of mammals involved in protection of the trachea and sound production. ... For other uses, see Adams apple (disambiguation). ...


Some Slavonic texts state that the "forbidden fruit" was actually the grape, that was later changed in its nature and made into something good, much as the serpent was changed by losing its legs and speech. Old Church Slavonic (pol. ... This article is about the fruits of the genus Vitis. ...


Other Eastern Christians sometimes assume that the "forbidden fruit" was the fig, from the account of their using leaves of this tree to cover themselves. Eastern Christianity refers collectively to the Christian traditions and churches which developed in Greece, Russia, Armenia, the Balkans, Eastern Europe, Asia Minor, the Middle East, northeastern Africa and southern India over several centuries of religious antiquity. ... Species About 800, including: Ficus altissima Ficus americana Ficus aurea Ficus benghalensis- Indian Banyan Ficus benjamina- Weeping Fig Ficus broadwayi Ficus carica- Common Fig Ficus citrifolia Ficus coronata Ficus drupacea Ficus elastica Ficus godeffroyi Ficus grenadensis Ficus hartii Ficus lyrata Ficus macbrideii Ficus macrophylla- Moreton Bay Fig Ficus microcarpa- Chinese...


John Milton's Paradise Lost is a famous 17th century epic poem written in blank verse which explores the story of Adam and Eve in great detail. Notably, the character of Satan is portrayed almost sympathetically. For other uses, see Paradise Lost (disambiguation). ...


Jules Verne's The Eternal Adam presents a catastrophe that submerges all dry land and raises some submarine terrain. Among the survivors there are one Adam and one Eve. The resulting mankind holds them mythical. It is revealed that mankind has passed several times through a new creation, reproducing itself from pairs of Adams and Eves. This article is about the French author. ...


In C.S. Lewis' The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe of The Chronicles of Narnia series of novels, the kings and queens that sit on Narnia's throne at the castle in Narnia's capital, Cair Paravel, are referred to as "Sons of Adam" and "Daughters of Eve". In the story, two male and two female humans are to sit on the four thrones of Cair Paravel to signify the return of peace to Narnia. Clive Staples Lewis (November 29, 1898 – November 22, 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an author and scholar. ... This article is about the novel. ... Narnia redirects here. ...


John Steinbeck's 1952 novel East of Eden is based on the story of Adam, Eve, Cain and Abel. It was later made into a film starring James Dean. John Ernst Steinbeck (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) was one of the best-known and most widely read American writers of the 20th century. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see East of Eden (disambiguation). ... East of Eden is a 1955 movie, directed by Elia Kazan, and based on the novel of the same name by John Steinbeck. ... For the film, see James Dean (film). ...


In late 20th Century / early 21st Century politics, the names of Adam and Eve are frequently invoked by those who oppose homosexuality on a religious basis, in the slogans "God made Adam and Eve, not Adam and Steve" and "God made Adam and Eve, not Madam and Eve." (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... 20XX redirects here. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... This article lacks information on the importance of the subject matter. ...


Cockney Rhyming Slang uses "Adam and Eve" to mean "believe" (e.g. "Would you Adam and Eve it?", meaning "Would you believe it?"). Unlike most cockney rhyming slang, both the rhyming and non-rhyming parts are typically used. Cockney rhyming slang is a form of English slang which originated in the East End of London. ...


The story of Adam and Eve is parodied in The Simpsons' episode Simpsons Bible Stories. Simpsons redirects here. ... Simpsons Bible Stories is the eighteenth episode of The Simpsons tenth season. ...


In the television series Neon Genesis Evangelion and its film sequels Evangelion: Death and Rebirth and The End of Evangelion, the first Angel is named Adam and all but one of the Evangelion mecha are created from this being's substance. As "Evangelion" is usually shortened to "Eva", the form of the name "Eve" in many languages, this creation myth parallels the Old Testament version. Also, one of the possible interpretations of the ending of The End of Evangelion is that Shinji Ikari and Asuka Langley Soryu are slated to play the roles of the post-Third Impact Adam and Eve. Original run October 4, 1995 – March 27, 1996 No. ... The End of Evangelion ) is a 1997 anime film written and chief directed by Hideaki Anno; it won the Japan Academy Prize for popularity. ... // In the anime Neon Genesis Evangelion, Angels are beings which attack Tokyo-3 over the course of the story. ... In the anime/manga franchise Neon Genesis Evangelion, Evangelions, or simply Evas, are the mechas piloted by the Children chosen by NERV. The Evas were created by NERV for the apparent purpose of defending Tokyo-3 from the threat of the Angels. ... Shinji Ikari ) is a fictional character and one of the three primary protagonists from the anime and manga series Neon Genesis Evangelion and the movies Evangelion: Death and Rebirth and The End of Evangelion. ... Asuka Langley Soryu ) is a 14 year old[2] fictional character and one of the three primary protagonists from the anime and manga Neon Genesis Evangelion and the movies Evangelion: Death and Rebirth and The End of Evangelion. ... NERV redirects here. ...


The opening view of Desperate Housewives features an allusion to Adam and Eve. Desperate Housewives is an American television comedy-drama series, created by Marc Cherry, who also serves as show runner, and produced by ABC Studios - The Walt Disney Companys main television studio - and Cherry Productions. ...


Prince's song "And God Created Woman" resembles the story of Adam and Eve. For another person sometimes known as The Artist, see Michael Haynes III. Prince Rogers Nelson (born June 7, 1958 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is an American funk musician. ...


British-based Metal band Cradle of Filth used the story of Adam and Eve for the music video to their cover of Heaven 17's song "Temptation." In the video, frontman Dani Filth portrays Adam, while contributing vocalist Victoria Harrison, known by her stage name Dirty Harry, portrays Eve. Cradle of Filth are a heavy metal band formed in Suffolk, England in 1991. ... Heaven 17 are an English synthpop band originating in Sheffield in the early 1980s. ... Dani Filth (born Daniel Lloyd Davey on July 25, 1973 in Hertford, England) is the lyricist, vocalist and founding member of the British heavy metal band Cradle of Filth. ... Dirty Harry, born Victoria Harrison, is a British rock singer who is now based in Los Angeles. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Romans 5:12
  2. ^ Later theological commentators characterised Adam and Eve's disobedience to God's word as the foundation of sin. Nevertheless, Chapter 3 of Genesis does not use the word "sin", and Genesis 3:24 makes clear that they are expelled "lest he put forth his hand and take also of the tree of life, and eat, and live for ever".
  3. ^ For a brief overview see Robin Lane Fox, "The Unauthorized Version", 1991, pp15-27 passim
  4. ^ Orthodox beliefs
  5. ^ Original Sin
  6. ^ Tertullian, "De Cultu Feminarum", Book I Chapter I, Modesty in Apparel Becoming to Women in Memory of the Introduction of Sin Through a Woman (in "The Ante-Nicene Fathers")
  7. ^ Manichaean beliefs
  8. ^ On The Transmitters Of Isra'iliyyat
  9. ^ Javed Ahmed Ghamidi, Mizan, Lahore: Dar al-Ishraq, 2001

Robin Lane Fox (born 1946) is an English academic and historian, currently a Fellow of New College, Oxford, and University Reader in Ancient History. ... Javed Ahmed Ghamidi (Urdu: جاوید احمد غامدی) (b. ...

References

  • Mahmoud Ayoub, The Qur'an and its Interpreters, SUNY: Albany, 1984.
  • R. Patai, The Jewish Alchemists, Princeton University Press, 1994.
  • Fazale Rana and Ross, Hugh, Who Was Adam: A Creation Model Approach to the Origin of Man, 2005, ISBN 1-57683-577-4
  • Sibylline Oracles, III; 24-6. This Greek acrostic also appears in 2 Enoch 30:13.
  • David Rohl, Legend: The Genesis of Civilisation, 1998
  • Bryan Sykes, The Seven Daughters of Eve
  • C.S. Lewis, The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe"
  • Adam Mackie, The Importance of being Adam - Alexo 1997 (only 2000 copies published)
  • Robin Lane Fox, The Unauthorized Version, Penguin, 1991 (no ISBN available)

Hugh Ross Hugh N. Ross (born 1945) is a Canadian-born Old Earth Creationist. ... Robin Lane Fox (born 1946) is an English academic and historian, currently a Fellow of New College, Oxford, and University Reader in Ancient History. ...

See also

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Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Adam is the first Prophet of Islam and mentioned in the Quran as the husband of Eve (Hawwa). ... In Mormonism, the Biblical account of Adam and Eve is believed to be partly literal and partly symbolic, with much meaning and clarification added in the Book of Moses (Pearl of Great Price, Moses 3-5) and in the Book of Mormon (2 Nephi 2). ... Ask and Embla on a postage stamp of the Faroe Islands, 2003 by Anker Eli Petersen. ... The Conflict of Adam and Eve with Satan is a Christian pseudepigraphical work found in Ethiopic and Arabic, from the 5th century CE at the earliest. ... ... For other uses, see Garden of Eden (disambiguation). ... The generations of Adam are the two lines of descent from Adam, both ending in the name Lamech, which are given in Genesis. ... Kaliyan was the sixth fragment of the primordial manifestation of Kroni (evil) according to Akilam, the source of Ayyavazhi mythology and the holy book of Ayyavazhi religion. ... Mitochondrial Eve (mt-mrca) is the name given by researchers to the woman who is the matrilineal most recent common ancestor (MRCA) for all living humans. ... The idea that humans existed before Adam, which is known as the Pre-Adamite hypothesis or Preadamism, has a long history, probably having its origins in early pagan responses to Jewish and Christian claims regarding the origins of the human race. ... The Quran and Bible possess many similarities as the holy scriptures of Islam and Christianity, respectively. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... In human genetics, Y-chromosomal Adam (Y-mrca) is the male counterpart to mitochondrial Eve: the most recent common ancestor from whom all male human Y chromosomes are descended. ... A Bible handwritten in Latin, on display in Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. ...

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Sex Toys - Adam and Eve Sex Shop (568 words)
Sexual pleasure is an important part of life, and we want you to feel comfortable and able to live the sex life that's right for you.
All Adam & Eve orders are delivered in plain, brown padded envelopes and boxes to preserve your privacy.
Adam and Eve offers an extensive collection of sex positive movies – from our own Adam and Eve Productions as well as all your other favorite adult movie studios.
Adam And Eve (672 words)
Adam and Eve were the first humans, according to the Jewish, Islamic, and Christian religions, and all humans have descended from them.
Adam comes from the Hebrew adomah, meaning "man." Eve is from the Hebrew for "life." The complete biblical account of Adam and Eve can be found in Genesis 1:26 to Genesis 5:5.
As it is told in Genesis 2:16-17, God told Adam that he was free to eat from every tree in the garden, except the tree of knowledge of good and evil.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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