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Encyclopedia > Adam Sedgwick
Adam Sedgwick
Adam Sedgwick
Adam Sedgwick
Born March 22nd, 1785
Dent, Yorkshire
Died January 27, 1873
Cambridge, England
Residence UK
Nationality British
Field Geologist
Institution University of Cambridge
Alma Mater University of Cambridge
Academic Advisor Thomas Jones and John Dawson
Notable Students William Hopkins
Charles Darwin
Known for Classification of Cambrian rocks
Notable Prizes Wollaston Medal (1833)
Copley Medal (1863)
Religion Anglican

Adam Sedgwick (March 22nd, 1785January 27, 1873) was one of the founders of modern geology. He proposed the Devonian period of the geological timescale and later the Cambrian period. The latter proposal was based on work which he did on Welsh rock strata. Image File history File links Adam Sedgwick (Geologist) Portrait File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... March 22 is the 81st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (82nd in Leap years). ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Dent may mean: In England: Dent, a small fell in the west of Cumbria Dent, a village in the south east of Cumbria Dent Bank, a small village in County Durham In the United States: Dent, Minnesota Dent, Ohio Other: Dent Arthurdent, the principal character in The Hitchhikers Guide... Look up Yorkshire in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... January 27 is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Shown within Cambridgeshire Geography Status: City (1951) Region: East of England Admin. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... A geologist is a contributor to the science of geology, studying the physical structure and processes of the Earth and planets of the solar system (see planetary geology). ... The University of Cambridge, located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... The University of Cambridge, located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... Thomas Jones (June 23, 1756 - July 18, 1807) was Head Tutor at Trinity College, Cambridge for twenty years and an outstanding teacher of mathematics. ... John Dawson (1734–1820) was both a mathematician and surgeon. ... William Hopkins (February 2, 1793 – October 13, 1866) was an English mathematician and geologist. ... Charles Robert Darwin FRS (12 February 1809 – 19 April 1882) was an English naturalist [1] who achieved lasting fame by producing considerable evidence that species originated through evolutionary change, at the same time proposing the scientific theory that natural selection is the mechanism by which such change occurs. ... The Cambrian is a major division of the geologic timescale that begins about 542 ± 1. ... Rock may refer to: Rock, a geologic substance composed of minerals Rock, short for Rock and Roll music Rock, a small offshore islet with minimal soil Rock, a confectionery made and sold in many of the UKs seaside holiday resorts Rock candy, a type of confectionery composed of large... The Wollaston Medal is a scientific award for geology, the highest award granted by the Geological Society of London. ... The Copley Medal is a scientific award for work in any field of science, the highest award granted by the Royal Society of London. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... March 22 is the 81st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (82nd in Leap years). ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... January 27 is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... World geologic provinces Oceanic crust  0-20 Ma  20-65 Ma  >65 Ma Geologic provinces  Shield  Platform  Orogen  Basin  Large igneous province  Extended crust Geology (from Greek γη- (ge-, the earth) and λογος (logos, word, reason))[1] is the science and study of the solid matter of a celestial body, its composition... The Devonian is a major division of the geologic timescale that extends from the end of the Silurian period (360 million years ago (mya)) to the beginning of the Mississippian subperiod of the Carboniferous (408. ... The Cambrian is a major division of the geologic timescale that begins about 542 ± 1. ... Motto: (Welsh for Wales forever) Anthem: Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau Capital Cardiff (Caerdydd) Largest city Cardiff (Caerdydd) Official language(s) Welsh, English Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Rhodri Morgan AM Unification    - by Gruffudd ap Llywelyn 1056  Area    - Total...


Sedgwick was born in Dent, Yorkshire, the third child of an Anglican vicar. He was educated at Sedbergh School and Trinity College, Cambridge. Dent may mean: In England: Dent, a small fell in the west of Cumbria Dent, a village in the south east of Cumbria Dent Bank, a small village in County Durham In the United States: Dent, Minnesota Dent, Ohio Other: Dent Arthurdent, the principal character in The Hitchhikers Guide... Look up Yorkshire in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sedbergh school is a co-educational boarding school in Sedbergh, Cumbria for ages 13-18. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names King’s Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street...


He obtained his BA (5th Wrangler) from the University of Cambridge1808 and his MA in 1811. His academic mentors at Cambridge were Thomas Jones and John Dawson. The University of Cambridge, located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... Thomas Jones (June 23, 1756 - July 18, 1807) was Head Tutor at Trinity College, Cambridge for twenty years and an outstanding teacher of mathematics. ... John Dawson (1734–1820) was both a mathematician and surgeon. ...


Sedwick studied the geology of the British Isles and Europe. He founded the system for the classification of Cambrian rocks and with Murchison worked out the order of the carboniferous and underlying Devonian strata. He investigated the phenomena of metamorphism and concretion, and was the first to distinguish clearly between stratification, jointing, and slaty cleavage as mechanisms to juxtapose different kinds of rock. He was elected to Fellow of the Royal Society on February 1, 1821. Stratification is the building up of layers of deposits, and can have several variations of meaning: Social stratification, is the dividing of a society into levels based on wealth or power. ... A geological joint is a generally planar fracture formed in a rock from extensional stress. ... The premises of the Royal Society in London (first four properties only). ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The coronation banquet for George IV 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Charles Darwin was one of his geological students and the two kept up a correspondence while Darwin was aboard the Beagle. However Sedgwick never accepted the case for evolution made in the Origin of Species. At one point he wrote to Darwin saying Charles Robert Darwin FRS (12 February 1809 – 19 April 1882) was an English naturalist [1] who achieved lasting fame by producing considerable evidence that species originated through evolutionary change, at the same time proposing the scientific theory that natural selection is the mechanism by which such change occurs. ...

If I did not think you a good tempered and truth-loving man I should not tell you that ... I have read your book with more pain than pleasure. Parts of it I admired greatly; parts I laughed at till my sides were almost sore; other parts I read with absolute sorrow; because I think them utterly false and grievously mischievous. You have deserted -- after a start in that tram-road of all solid physical truth -- the true method of induction ...

However despite this difference of opinion, the two men remained friendly until Sedgwick's death.


References

  • J.W. Clark and T.M. Hughes, The Life and Letters of the Reverend Adam Sedgwick, Cambridge University Press, 1890, vols. 1-2.
  • Dictionary of Scientific Biography, Charles Scribner's Sons: 1970-1990; vol. 12, pp. 275-279.
  • A Biographical Dictionary of Scientists, Williams, T. I., Ed., Wiley, 1969, pp. 467-468.
  • Isaac Asimov, I. Asimov's Biographical Encyclopedia of Science and Technology (2nd Ed.), Doubleday: 1982, p. 299.
  • Quart. J. Geol. Soc., 1873, 29, pp. xxx-xxxix.
  • Dictionary of National Biography, Smith, Elder & Co., 1908-1986, vol. 17, pp. 1117-1120.

Dr. Isaac Asimov (c. ...

External link

  • Sedgwick Museum, Cambridge
  • The Sedgwick Club, Cambridge
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
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Adam Sedgwick - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1579 words)
Adam Sedgwick (March 22, 1785 January 27, 1873) was one of the founders of modern geology.
Sedgwick is said to have remarked, upon being appointed Woodwardian Professor, "Hitherto I have never turned a stone; henceforth I will leave no stone unturned." In 1822 he carried out fieldwork unraveling the complex geology of the Lake District of northern England, armed with the new discoveries and techniques of William Smith.
Sedgwick's own geological views were generally catastrophic -- he believed that the history of the Earth had been marked by a series of cataclysmic events which had destroyed much of the Earth's life.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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