FACTOID # 18: Alaska spends more money per capita on elementary and secondary education than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Adairsville, Georgia

Adairsville is a city in Bartow County, Georgia, United States. The population was 2,542 at the 2000 census. As of the 2005 census Adairsville's population rose to 3,416, making Adairsville the 3rd largest city in the county. Adairsville is 11.81 miles south of Calhoun, 18.21 miles northeast of Rome and 61.11 miles north of Atlanta. Bartow County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Calhoun is a city in Gordon County, Georgia, United States. ... Aerial view of downtown Rome Location of Rome and major highways Nestled in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, Rome is the largest city in and the county seat of Floyd County, Georgia, United States. ... Nickname: Location in Fulton and DeKalb counties in the state of Georgia Coordinates: , Country State Counties Fulton, DeKalb Government  - Mayor Shirley Franklin (D) Area  - City  132. ...

Contents

Geography

Location of Adairsville, Georgia

Adairsville is located at 34°22′6″N, 84°55′42″W (34.368925, -84.928212)GR1. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 16.0 km² (6.2 mi²), all land. Adapted from Wikipedias GA county maps by Seth Ilys. ...


History

Adairsville used to be a small Cherokee village named after Chief Walter (John) S. Adair, a Scottish settler who married a Cherokee Indian woman before the removal of the Cherokee in 1838. It was part of the Cherokee territory along with Calhoun and including New Echota (see New Echota, Calhoun and Trail of Tears for more information on Cherokee removal). For other uses, see Cherokee (disambiguation). ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The monument on New Echota Historic Site honored the Cherokees who died on the Trail of Tears. ... Calhoun is a city in Gordon County, Georgia, United States. ... This monument at the New Echota Historic Site honors Cherokees who died on the Trail of Tears. ...


After the removal of the Cherokees, the village became part of Georgia, and the residents built the town keeping the name Adairsville. One of the developers was William Watts who had a lot of railroad business interest in this town. He had brought the Western and Atlantic Railroad from Atlanta (still in use). He deeded land to the railroad, surveyed business lots including hotels, mills, and blacksmith shops around the town where the railroad ran by the 1847 train depot. Watt's plan was successful and brought the town the nickname: "Granary of the State" and led to its incorporation in 1854. He was also a town resident and he had a home that was built around the foundation of an Indian cabin which is on a hill overlooking the town. The Western & Atlantic Railroad (W&A) runs from Atlanta, Georgia, to Chattanooga, Tennessee. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


During the American Civil War, Adairsville was involved on the side of the Confederate States of America in 1861 against the Union. On April 12, 1862, the steam locomotive General was pursued from Atlanta and passed through Adairsville as its people witnessed the incident during the Great Locomotive Chase. After this happened, Adairians set their own three day street festival in remembrance of the Chase. The Civil War came to the town on May 17, 1864 in full force where the Confederate army failed to defeat Sherman and his Union army during the Atlanta Campaign. This battle is known as the Battle of Adairsville. After the Civil War ended in 1865, Adairsville rebuilt and became a hub for the carpet and textile industries, and for farm and transportation services, including its famous railroad. Some historical buildings still intact in the town include the original train depot which was involved in "The Great Locomotive Chase". Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Built in 1855 in Paterson, New Jersey, the General provided frieght and passenger service between Atlanta, Georgia and Chattanooga, Tennessee before the Civil War. ... The Great Locomotive Chase or Andrews Raid was a military raid that occurred April 12, 1862, in northern Georgia during the American Civil War. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman, educator, and author. ... Palisades and chevaux-de-frise in front of the Potter House, Atlanta, Georgia, 1864. ... Battle of Adairsville Conflict American Civil War Date May 17, 1864 Place Bartow County, Georgia Result Union victory The Battle of Adairsville was a battle of the Atlanta campaign fought during the American Civil War on May 17, 1864 just northeast (62 miles) of Atlanta, Georgia. ...


Adairsville is also well known for Barnsley Gardens, now a golf resort. The home was built by Sir Godfrey Barnsley of Derbyshire, England in the late 1840's for his wife Julia. She died before the house could be completed, but it is said that her ghost appeared to Sir Godfrey, telling him to complete the work. It was brought the visions of Andrew Jackson Downing, the architect who designed the grounds of the U.S. Capitol and White House. The history of the plantation is steeped in tragedy, American Civil War history, and is a must see for any history buff. The ruins of the great main house remain. Almost lost to time and the elements, the land, including all of the ruins, was bought in 1988 by Prince Hubertus Fugger who restored the gardens and renovated the grounds into an upscale golf resort. Now, the history remains, as do the museum and restaurants and people come from miles around, and from outside of the United States to view the beautiful gardens, which are still intact (along with the grave of Sir Godfrey Barnsley's wife, Julia Scarborough, of Savannah, Georgia) and learn the fascinating history of the man and the plantation that Margaret Mitchell used as inspiration for the character of Rhett Butler while writing Gone with the Wind. Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Andrew Jackson Downing (born October 31, 1815 - died July 28, 1852) was an American landscape designer and writer from Newburgh, New York and the editor and publisher of The Horticulturist magazine. ... United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the building which serves as home for the legislative branch of the United States government. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... This section may require cleanup to meet Wikipedias quality standards. ... For the Canadian politician see Margaret Mitchell (politician) Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell (November 8, 1900 – August 16, 1949) was the American author, who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 for her immensely successful novel, Gone with the Wind, which was published in 1936. ... Rhett Butler is a handsome, dashing hero of Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell. ... For the film, see Gone with the Wind (film). ...

Downtown Adairsville including original train depot used in the Great Chase.
Downtown Adairsville including original train depot used in the Great Chase.

ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2272x1712, 432 KB) Summary train depot (original) that was involved in The Great Chase during Civil War next to downtown historic Adairsville (photo by Cculber007, one of Wikipedia users) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2272x1712, 432 KB) Summary train depot (original) that was involved in The Great Chase during Civil War next to downtown historic Adairsville (photo by Cculber007, one of Wikipedia users) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the...

Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 2,542 people, 991 households, and 702 families residing in the city. The population density was 159.1/km² (411.9/mi²). There were 1,103 housing units at an average density of 69.0/km² (178.7/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 72.58% White, 22.54% African American, 0.31% Native American, 1.38% Asian, 1.49% from other races, and 1.69% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.01% of the population. 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 991 households out of which 35.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.3% were married couples living together, 19.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.1% were non-families. 25.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.08. Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


In the city the population was spread out with 29.2% under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 29.7% from 25 to 44, 20.4% from 45 to 64, and 12.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 85.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.4 males.


The median income for a household in the city was $31,114, and the median income for a family was $34,828. Males had a median income of $31,123 versus $21,899 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,828. About 16.4% of families and 18.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.4% of those under age 18 and 22.1% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Famous graduates of Adairsville High School include Dustin Evans, a minor league pitcher for the Atlanta Braves organization. Also, Atlanta Braves manager Bobby Cox lives in Adairsville. Orlando Wilson, a famous TV fisherman also lives in Adairsville.


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Georgia (6751 words)
Adairsville, Georgia Adairsville is a city located in 2000 census, the city had a total population of 2,542.
Buckhead, Georgia Buckhead is a population of 205.
Dahlonega, Georgia Dahlonega is a population of 3,638.
Adairsville, Georgia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (987 words)
Adairsville is 11.81 miles north of Calhoun, 18.21 miles south of Rome and 61.11 miles south of Atlanta.
Adairsville is in that way of Atlanta and Chattoonga as well as Rome, Calhoun and Cartersville.
Adairsville has a three-day street festival is held in remembrance of the event for the Chase (first weekend each October).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m