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Encyclopedia > Ada Lovelace
Ada Lovelace

Born December 10, 1815(1815-12-10)
Piccadilly Terrace, London, England
Died November 27, 1852 (aged 36)
6 Great Cumberland Place, Marylebone, London, England

Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace (December 10, 1815 London, EnglandNovember 27, 1852 Marylebone, London, England [1]), born Augusta Ada Byron, is mainly known for having written a description of Charles Babbage's early mechanical general-purpose computer, the analytical engine. She is also known as the "first programmer", though she might more accurately be described as the first publisher of a program, as she published a program written by Babbage[2]. She was also a keen promoter of computing seeing how influential its possibilities, though unrealized as yet, might be. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (631x786, 45 KB) From The Ada Picture Gallery. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Marylebone (sometimes written St. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Marylebone (sometimes written St. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Babbage redirects here. ... The analytical engine, an important step in the history of computers, was the design of a mechanical general-purpose computer by the British professor of mathematics Charles Babbage. ... Charles Babbage Charles Babbage (December 26, 1791 – October 18, 1871) was an English mathematician, analytical philosopher and (proto_) computer scientist who was the first person to come up with the idea of a programmable computer. ...

Contents

Biography

Ada was the first legitimate child of the poet Lord Byron and his wife, Annabella (full name Anne Isabella Milbanke). She was named after Byron's half-sister, Augusta Leigh, whose child he was rumoured to have fathered. Ada was born on December 10, 1815, London, England. On January 16, 1816, Annabella left Byron, taking 1-month old Ada with her. On April 21, Byron signed the Deed of Separation and left England for good a few days later. Byron redirects here. ... Anne Isabella Milbanke Anne Isabella Milbanke (May 17, 1792 - May 16, 1860), or Annabella as she was called, was born in London, the only child of Sir Ralph Milbanke and his wife, Lady Judith Milbanke née Noel, daughter of the ninth Lord Wentworth. ... Somebodys half-sister is a female sibling with one shared parent. ... Augusta Byron, later Augusta Leigh (1783 - 1851) was the only daughter of Captain Mad Jack Byron, the poet Lord Byrons father, by his first wife, Amelia dArcy, Baroness Conyers in her own right, the divorced wife of Francis, Marquis of Carmarthen, who was later to become 5th Duke... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1816 (MDCCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Ada never met her younger half-sister, Allegra Byron, daughter of Lord Byron and Claire Clairmont, who died at the age of five in 1822. Ada did have some contact with Elizabeth Medora Leigh, the daughter of Byron's half-sister Augusta Leigh. Ada and Medora were told by Ada's mother that Byron was Medora's father. Clara Allegra Byron Clara Allegra Byron (January 15, 1817 - April 20, 1822), initially named Alba, meaning dawn, or white, by her mother, was the illegitimate daughter of George Gordon, Lord Byron and Claire Clairmont, the stepsister of Mary Shelley[1]. Born in Bath, England, she initially lived with her mother... Claire Clairmont Clara Mary Jane Clairmont (April 27, 1798 – March 19, 1879), or Claire Clairmont as she was commonly known, was a stepsister of writer Mary Shelley. ... 1822 (MDCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Elizabeth Medora Leigh (1814 - 1849) was the third daughter of Augusta Leigh. ...


Ada lived with her mother, as is apparent in her father's correspondence concerning her. Lady Byron was also highly interested in mathematics, which dominated her life, even after marriage. Her obsession with rooting out any of the insanity of which she accused Lord Byron was one of the reasons why Annabella taught Ada mathematics at an early age. Ada was privately home schooled in mathematics and science by William Frend, William King and Mary Somerville. One of her later tutors was Augustus De Morgan. An active member of London society, she was a member of the Bluestockings in her youth. For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... William Frend (1757-1841) was a clergyman, social reformer and writer. ... William King-Noel, 1st Earl of Lovelace William King, 1st Earl of Lovelace, FRS (1805-1893) was an English nobleman and scientist. ... Mary Somerville Mary Somerville (December 26, 1780 – November 28, 1872) was a Scottish science writer and polymath, at a time when womens participation in science was discouraged. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Blue Stockings Society was an informal womens social and educational movement in England in the mid-eighteenth century, created in imitation of the French society of the same name, emphasizing education and mutual co-operation rather than the individualism which marked the French version. ...

Ada Lovelace
Ada Lovelace

In 1835 she married William King, 8th Baron King, later 1st Earl of Lovelace. They had three children; Byron born 12 May 1836, Annabella (Lady Anne Blunt) born 22 September 1837 and Ralph Gordon born 2 July 1839. The family lived at Ockham Park, at Ockham, Surrey. Her full name and title for most of her married life was The Right Honourable Augusta Ada, Countess of Lovelace. She is widely known in modern times simply as Ada Lovelace, or by her maiden name, Ada Byron. Ada Lovelace, National Physical Gallery, Teddington File links The following pages link to this file: Ada Lovelace Categories: Public domain art ... Ada Lovelace, National Physical Gallery, Teddington File links The following pages link to this file: Ada Lovelace Categories: Public domain art ... William King-Noel, 1st Earl of Lovelace William King, 8th Baron King (1805-1893) became William King-Noel 1st Earl of Lovelace in 1838, and was also the Lord Lieutenant of Surrey. ... The title of Earl of Lovelace was created in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1838. ... Byron King-Noel, 12th Baron Wentworth, styled Viscount Ockham (12 May 1836–1 September 1862) was a British peer. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Anne Isabella (Annabella) Noel Blunt, née King-Noel, 15th Baroness Wentworth (22 September 1837-15 December 1917), known for most of her life as Lady Anne Blunt, was co-founder with her husband the poet Wilfrid Scawen Blunt of the Crabbet Arabian Stud. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Ockham is a tiny English village near East Horsley, in Surrey, south-west of London. ...


Many sources attribute to Lovelace a reputation for drinking, gambling and scandal [3], but it has been questioned whether any good evidence exists to support this or whether in fact "she led rather a dull life in comparison to other figures of her day" [4].



She knew and was taught by Mary Somerville, noted researcher and scientific author of the 19th century, who introduced her in turn to Charles Babbage on June 5, 1833. Other acquaintances were Sir David Brewster, Charles Wheatstone, Charles Dickens and Michael Faraday. is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1833 (MDCCCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Sir David Brewster. ... Charles Wheatstone Sir Charles Wheatstone (February 6, 1802 - October 19, 1875) was the British inventor of many innovations including the English concertina the Stereoscope an early form of microphone the Playfair cipher (named for Lord Playfair, the person who publicized it) He was a major figure in the development of... Dickens redirects here. ... Michael Faraday, FRS (September 22, 1791 – August 25, 1867) was an English chemist and physicist (or natural philosopher, in the terminology of that time) who contributed to the fields of electromagnetism and electrochemistry. ...


During a nine-month period in 1842–1843, Ada translated Italian mathematician Luigi Menabrea's memoir on Babbage's newest proposed machine, the Analytical Engine. With the article, she appended a set of notes which specified in complete detail a method for calculating Bernoulli numbers with the Engine, recognized by historians as the world's first computer program. Biographers debate the extent of her original contributions, with some holding that the programs were written by Babbage himself. Babbage wrote the following on the subject, in his Passages from the Life of a Philosopher (1846)[5]: Federico Luigi, Conte Menabrea, Marquis of Valdora (September 4, 1809 - May 24, 1896), Italian general and statesman, was born at Chambery. ... The analytical engine, an important step in the history of computers, was the design of a mechanical general-purpose computer by the British professor of mathematics Charles Babbage. ... In 1840 Charles Babbage was invited to give a seminar at the University of Turin about his analytical engine. ... In mathematics, the Bernoulli numbers Bn were first discovered in connection with the closed forms of the sums for various fixed values of n. ... A computer program is a collection of instructions that describe a task, or set of tasks, to be carried out by a computer. ...

I then suggested that she add some notes to Menabrea's memoir, an idea which was immediately adopted. We discussed together the various illustrations that might be introduced: I suggested several but the selection was entirely her own. So also was the algebraic working out of the different problems, except, indeed, that relating to the numbers of Bernoulli, which I had offered to do to save Lady Lovelace the trouble. This she sent back to me for an amendment, having detected a grave mistake which I had made in the process.

Lovelace's prose also acknowledged some possibilities of the machine which Babbage never published, such as speculating that "the Engine might compose elaborate and scientific pieces of music of any degree of complexity or extent."


Interaction with Charles Babbage

Ada met and corresponded with Charles Babbage on many occasions, including socially and in relation to Babbage's Difference Engine and Analytical Engine. Their relationship was not of a romantic nature. Babbage redirects here. ... Part of Babbages Difference engine, assembled after his death by Babbages son, using parts found in his laboratory. ...


Ada was one of the few people who fully understood Babbage's ideas and created a program for the Analytical Engine. Had the Analytical Engine ever actually been built, her program would have been able to calculate a sequence of Bernoulli numbers. Based on this work, Lovelace is now widely credited with being the first computer programmer. In mathematics, the Bernoulli numbers are a sequence of rational numbers with deep connections in number theory. ... In computing, a programmer is someone who does computer programming and develops computer software. ...


Babbage was impressed by Ada's intellect and writing skills. He called her "The Enchantress of Numbers". In 1843 he wrote of Ada:[6]


Forget this world and all its troubles and if possible its multitudinous Charlatans - every thing in short but the Enchantress of Numbers.


The level of impact of Ada on Babbage's engines are the subject of debate. The debate is difficult to resolve due to Charles Babbage's tendency to not acknowledge (either verbally or in writing) the influence of other people in his work.


Death

Ada Lovelace was bled to death at the age of 36 by her physicians, while trying to cure her uterine cancer.[7] She perished at the same age as her father. She left two sons and a daughter, Lady Anne Blunt, famous in her own right as a traveller in the Middle East and a breeder of Arabian horses, co-founder of the Crabbet Arabian Stud. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Endometrial cancer. ... Anne Isabella (Annabella) Noel Blunt, née King-Noel, 15th Baroness Wentworth (22 September 1837-15 December 1917), known for most of her life as Lady Anne Blunt, was co-founder with her husband the poet Wilfrid Scawen Blunt of the Crabbet Arabian Stud. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... The Arabian horse is a breed of horse with a reputation for intelligence, high spirit, and outstanding stamina. ... The Crabbet Arabian Stud was established on 2 July 1878 when the first Arabian horses brought to England by Wilfrid Scawen Blunt and Lady Anne Blunt arrived at Crabbet Park, their Queen Anne house in Sussex. ...


Lovelace was buried next to the father she never knew at the Church of St. Mary Magdalene in Hucknall, Nottingham. Over one hundred years after her death, in 1953, Ada Lovelace's notes on Babbage's Analytical Engine were republished after being forgotten. The engine has now been recognized as an early model for a computer and Ada Lovelace's notes as a description of a computer and software. The Church of St. ... Hucknall, formerly known as Hucknall Torkard, is a town in Nottinghamshire, England, in the district of Ashfield. ... For other uses, see Nottingham (disambiguation). ... This article is about the machine. ... Computer software (or simply software) refers to one or more computer programs and data held in the storage of a computer for some purpose. ...


Influence

The computer language Ada, created by the U.S. Defense Department, was named after Lovelace. The reference manual for the language was approved on December 10, 1980, Ada's birthday, and the Department of Defense Military Standard for the language, "MIL-STD-1815" was given the number of the year of her birth. In addition Lovelace's image can be seen on the Microsoft product authenticity hologram stickers. Since 1998, the British Computer Society has awarded a medal in her name.[8] and in 2008 initiated an annual competition[9] for women students of computer science. Ada is a structured, statically typed, imperative, and object-oriented high-level computer programming language. ... The United States Department of Defense, abbreviated as DoD or DOD and sometimes called the Defense Department, is a civilian Cabinet organization of the United States government. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... A United States Defense Standard, often called a military standard, MIL-STD, or MIL-SPEC, is used to help achieve standardization objectives by the U.S. Department of Defense. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... This article is about the photographic technique. ... Established in 1957, The British Computer Society (BCS) is a body that represents those working in Information and Communications Technology ICT. It is the largest United Kingdom-based professional body for computing. ... The Lovelace Medal was established by the British Computer Society in 1998. ...


Publications

  • Menabrea, Luigi Federico; Ada Lovelace (1843). "Sketch of the Analytical Engine Invented by Charles Babbage". Scientific Memoirs 3.  With notes upon the Memoir by the Translator
  • Woolley, Benjamin (February 2002). The Bride of Science: Romance, Reason, and Byron's Daughter. 
  • Toole, Betty Alexandra Toole Ed.D, Ada, the Enchantress of Numbers, A Selection from the Letters of Ada Lovelace, and her Description of the First Computer (1992)
  • Toole, Betty Alexandra Toole Ed.D., Ada, The Enchantress of Numbers, Prophet of the Computer Age, 1998
  • Kim, Eugene and Toole, Betty Alexandra T, Ada and the First Computer, Scientific American, May, 1999

Federico Luigi, Conte Menabrea, Marquis of Valdora (September 4, 1809 - May 24, 1896), Italian general and statesman, was born at Chambry. ... Scientific Memoirs, Selected from the Transactions of Foreign Academies of science and Learned Societies and from Foreign Journals was a series of books edited and published by Richard Taylor (1781–1858) in London between 1837 and 1852. ...

See also

// Global concerns about current and future roles of women in computing occupations gained more importance with the emerging information age. ...

References

  1. ^ GRO Register of Deaths: DEC 1852 1a * MARYLEBONE - Augusta Ada Lovelace
  2. ^ Fara, Patricia: "Athene's Owl: A History of Women in Science" Wizard, 2005
  3. ^ Exmoor National Park - Ada Lovelace and Exmoor
  4. ^ Professor John Fuegi commenting on his review of Lovelace's correspondence: BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time - ADA LOVELACE - streaming audio
  5. ^ (from an excerpt found in Perspectives on the Computer Revolution (1970), edited by Zenon Pylyshyn)
  6. ^ Toole, Betty (1998). "Acknowledgments", The Enchantress of Numbers. Critical Connection. ISBN 0912647183. 
  7. ^ Joan Baum,The Calculating Passion of Ada Byron, Archon Books, 1986, ISBN 0208021191 p.99-100
  8. ^ Lovelace Lecture & Medal : BCS Accessed March 2, 2008.
  9. ^ Undergraduate Lovelace Colloquium, BCSWomen Accessed March 6, 2008

David Bryant Mumford (born 11 June 1937) is an American mathematician known for distinguished work in algebraic geometry, and then for research into vision and pattern theory. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Genealogics is a free genealogical, historical website run by Leo van de Pas [1] and Ian Fettes. ... The MacTutor history of mathematics archive is a website hosted by University of St Andrews in Scotland. ... Internet Archive headquarters is in the Presidio, a former US military base in San Francisco. ... A dead link or broken link is a link on the world wide web that points to a webpage or server that is permanently unavailable. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ada Lovelace: Founder of Scientific Computing (585 words)
Lady Byron and Ada moved in an elite London society, one in which gentlemen not members of the clergy or occupied with politics or the affairs of a regiment were quite likely to spend their time and fortunes pursuing botany, geology, or astronomy.
Ada met Babbage in 1833, when she was just 17, and they began a voluminous correspondence on the topics of mathematics, logic, and ultimately all subjects.
Ada died of cancer in 1852, at the age of 37, and was buried beside the father she never knew.
Augusta Ada Byron (1815 - 1852), Countess of Lovelace (1119 words)
Augusta Ada Byron (1815 - 1852), Countess of Lovelace
Ada kept up regular correspondence with the leading scientific lights of her day, and it was through her friendship with mathematician Mary Somerville that she was eventually introduced to Charles Babbage.
Ada remains one of the few female pioneers of the `computer age' and, as yet, the only woman to be honoured with a programming language bearing her name - ADA, a Pascal-based language developed in a US Department of Defence sponsored project in the 1970's.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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