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Encyclopedia > Acupressure
Acupressure
This article is part of the branches of CAM series.
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Acupressure (a portmanteau of "acupuncture" and "pressure") is a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) technique based on the same ideas as acupuncture. Acupressure involves placing physical pressure by hand, elbow, or with the aid of various devices on different acupuncture points on the surface of the body. Traditional Chinese Medicine does not usually operate within a scientific paradigm but some practitioners make efforts to bring practices into an evidence-based medicine framework. There is no scientific consensus over whether or not evidence supports the efficacy of acupressure beyond a placebo. Reviews of existing clinical trials have been conducted by the Cochrane Collaboration and Bandolier according to the protocols of evidence-based medicine; for most conditions they have concluded a lack of effectiveness or lack of well-conducted clinical trials.No affence bro but if you have to use your thumb in order to perform this, then that probably means its gay, faggish to be exact.Yea your right i agree with this fag. hahaha chip is gay. and so is sunshine.fuck you hey hey no offence but your the fudgepackie and you take it.... or are you the fudge packer...? hahaha. cocksucker. Stop choking your chicken about your mom. ass hole. JEW hey at least i dont take it up the ass queer Sam sucks ass at least he doesnt suck dick cause hes cool your right he sucks his dads balls ha ha ass chip sucks his dads balls Terms and concepts in alternative medicine provides a glossary of quick and to the point definitions of important terms and concepts unique to alternative medicine (CAM). ... Look up portmanteau word in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Acupuncture chart from Hua Shou (fl. ... Traditional Chinese medicine shop in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong. ... Acupuncture points (also called acupoints or tsubo) are specific anatomical locations on the body that are believed to be therapeutically useful for acupuncture, acupressure, sonopuncture, or laser treatment. ... For the scientific journal named Science, see Science (journal). ... Since the late 1960s, the word paradigm (IPA: ) has referred to a thought pattern in any scientific discipline or other epistemological context. ... Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is an attempt to more uniformly apply the standards of evidence gained from the scientific method, to certain aspects of medical practice. ... “Placebo effect” redirects here. ... The Cochrane Collaboration developed in response to Archie Cochranes call for systematic, up-to-date reviews (currently known as systematic reviews) of all relevant randomized clinical trials of health care. ... Bandolier is an independent online electronic journal about evidence-based healthcare, written by Oxford scientists. ... Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is an attempt to more uniformly apply the standards of evidence gained from the scientific method, to certain aspects of medical practice. ...


Traditional Chinese medicine's acupuncture theory predates use of the scientific method, and has received various criticisms based on scientific thinking. There is no known anatomical or histological basis for the existence of acupuncture points or meridians.[1] Acupuncturists tend to perceive TCM concepts in functional rather than structural terms, i.e. as being useful in guiding evaluation and care of patients. [2][3] Neuroimaging research suggests that certain acupuncture points have distinct effects that are not otherwise predictable anatomically.[4] Traditional Chinese medicine shop in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong. ... Scientific method is a body of techniques for investigating phenomena and acquiring new knowledge, as well as for correcting and integrating previous knowledge. ... Greek anatome, from ana-temnein, to cut up), is the branch of biology that deals with the structure and organization of living things; thus there is animal anatomy (zootomy) and plant anatomy (phytonomy). ... A thin section of lung tissue stained with hematoxylin and eosin. ... Acupuncture chart from the Ming dynasty Acupuncture (from Lat. ... The concept of meridians (Chinese: jing-luo 经络) arises from the techniques and doctrines of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), including acupuncture, acupressure, and qigong. ...

Contents

Background

Acupoints used in treatment may or may not be in the same area of the body as the targeted symptom. The TCM theory for the selection of such points and their effectiveness is that they work by stimulating the meridian system to bring about relief by rebalancing yin, yang and qi (also spelled "chi"). This theory is based on the paradigm of TCM, not that of science. The concept of meridians (Chinese: jing-luo 经络) arises from the techniques and doctrines of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), including acupuncture, acupressure, and qigong. ... Taijitu, the traditional symbol representing the forces of yin and yang The dual concepts of yin and yang – or the single concept yin-yang – originate in ancient Chinese philosophy and metaphysics, which describe two primal opposing but complementary principles said to be found in all non-static objects and processes... Taijitu, the traditional symbol representing the forces of yin and yang The dual concepts of yin and yang – or the single concept yin-yang – originate in ancient Chinese philosophy and metaphysics, which describe two primal opposing but complementary principles said to be found in all non-static objects and processes... QI, standing for Quite Interesting and a play on IQ, is a comedy panel game television show hosted by Stephen Fry and shown on BBC Two and BBC Four. ...


Many East Asian martial arts also make extensive study and use of acupressure for self-defense and health purposes (chin na, tui na). The points or combinations of points are said to be used to manipulate or incapacitate an opponent. Also, martial artists regularly massage their own acupressure points in routines to remove blockages from their own meridians, claiming to thereby enhance their circulation and flexibility and keeping the points "soft" or less vulnerable to an attack. Attacking the acupressure points is one theme in the wuxia genre of movies and novels. East Asia is a subregion of Asia. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ... Chin Na or Qinna (擒拿, pinyin: qín ná, Wade-Giles: chin2 na2) is a Chinese term describing joint-manipulation techniques for self defense used in the Chinese martial arts. ... Tui na (推拏 or 推拿, both pronounced tūi ná), is a form of Chinese manipulative therapy often used in conjunction with acupuncture, moxibustion, Chinese herbalism and qigong. ... Wǔxiá (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: , Mandarin IPA: , Cantonese Pinyin: mou5 hap6), literally meaning martial (arts) heroes, is a distinct quasi-fantasy sub-genre of the martial arts genre in literature, television and cinema. ...


Acupressure might work via release of endogenous opioid analgesics such as enkephalin, endorphin and dynorphins leading to alleviation of pain.[citation needed] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Scientific research

A randomised trial of Tapas Acupressure Technique for weight-loss maintenance found attendance at weight maintenance was 72% for TAT Tapas Acupressure Technique- higher than any other method studied and warranting further study. This study was supported by a grant (R21 AT01190-02) from the National Center for Complementary/Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, USA. The abstract for this study can be accessed via: [1] Tapas Acupressure Technique (TAT) is an acupressure technique used by practicioners to attain a feeling of relaxation and empowerment. ... Tapas Acupressure Technique (TAT) is an acupressure technique used by practicioners to attain a feeling of relaxation and empowerment. ...


An acupressure wristband that is claimed to relieve the symptoms of motion sickness and other forms of nausea is available. The band is designed to provide pressure to the P6 acupuncture point, a point that has been extensively investigated. The Cochrane Collaboration, a group of evidence-based medicine (EBM) reviewers, reviewed the use of P6 for nausea and vomiting, and found it to be effective for reducing post-operative nausea, but not vomiting [2]. The Cochrane review included various means of stimulating P6, including acupuncture, electro-acupuncture, transcutaneous nerve stimulation, laser stimulation, acustimulation device and acupressure; it did not comment on whether one or more forms of stimulation were more effective. EBM reviewer Bandolier said that P6 acupressure in two studies showed 52% of patients with control having a success, compared with 75% with P6 acupressure[3]. One author of an article published in the Scientific Review of Alternative Medicine disagreed [4]. It has been suggested that airsickness, seasickness be merged into this article or section. ... For the Beck song, see Nausea (song). ... The Cochrane Collaboration developed in response to Archie Cochranes call for systematic, up-to-date reviews (currently known as systematic reviews) of all relevant randomized clinical trials of health care. ... Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is an attempt to more uniformly apply the standards of evidence gained from the scientific method, to certain aspects of medical practice. ... Bandolier is an independent online electronic journal about evidence-based healthcare, written by Oxford scientists. ...


A Cochrane Collaboration review found that massage provided some long-term benefit for low back pain, and said: It seems that acupressure or pressure point massage techniques provide more relief than classic (Swedish) massage, although more research is needed to confirm this.[5] The Cochrane Collaboration developed in response to Archie Cochranes call for systematic, up-to-date reviews (currently known as systematic reviews) of all relevant randomized clinical trials of health care. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Back pain. ...


Criticism of TCM theory

Clinical use of acupressure frequently relies on the conceptual framework of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), which some scholars have characterized as pseudoscientific. There is no physically verifiable anatomical or histological basis for the existence of acupuncture points or meridians.[1] Proponents reply that TCM is a prescientific system that continues to have practical relevance. Acupuncturists tend to perceive TCM concepts in functional rather than structural terms, i.e. as being useful in guiding evaluation and care of patients. [3] Traditional Chinese medicine shop in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong. ... Phrenology is regarded today as a classic example of pseudoscience. ... Greek anatome, from ana-temnein, to cut up), is the branch of biology that deals with the structure and organization of living things; thus there is animal anatomy (zootomy) and plant anatomy (phytonomy). ... A thin section of lung tissue stained with hematoxylin and eosin. ... Acupuncture chart from the Ming dynasty Acupuncture (from Lat. ... The concept of meridians (Chinese: jing-luo 经络) arises from the techniques and doctrines of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), including acupuncture, acupressure, and qigong. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

See Acupuncture: Criticism of TCM theory

Acupuncture chart from Hua Shou (fl. ...

See also

Acupoint Therapy is an extension of Willy Penzels APM system (Akupunkt Massage), and it involves the stimulation of acupuncture points or meridians with a therapy stick. ... Fire cupping is a method of applying acupressure by creating a vacuum next to the patients skin. ... Jīng (Chinese: 精; Wade-Giles: ching1) is the Chinese word for essence, specifically kidney essence, or semen. ... Luo Points is an acupuncture term referring to special points in the body that are believed to have greater significance. ... Manipulative therapy involves the use of body work or massage therapy and other physical manipulation of the body for healing, such as those techniques used in osteopathy, chiropractic, and physical therapy. ... Massage is the practice of applying structured or unstructured pressure, tension, motion, or vibration — manually or with mechanical aids — to the soft tissues of the body, including muscles, connective tissue, tendons, ligaments, joints, lymphatic vessels, organs of the gastrointestinal system and reproductive system to achieve a beneficial response. ... Moxibustion Moxibustion (Chinese: ; pinyin: jiŭ) is an oriental medicine therapy utilizing moxa, or mugwort herb. ... For other uses of the term, see Pushing Hands Pushing hands, (推手, Wade-Giles tui1 shou3, pinyin tuī shǒu), is a name for two-person training routines practiced in internal Chinese martial arts such as Pa Kua Chang (Baguazhang), Hsing-i Chuan (Xingyiquan), Tai Chi Chuan... Qigong is an aspect of Chinese medicine involving the coordination of different breathing patterns with various physical postures and motions of the body. ... This is an example of a reflexology chart, correlating areas of the feet with organs in the zones of the body. ... Shiatsu (指圧 Japanese from shi, meaning finger, and atsu, meaning pressure) - is a hands-on therapy technique originating in Japan. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Felix Mann: "...acupuncture points are no more real than the black spots that a drunkard sees in front of his eyes." (Mann F. Reinventing Acupuncture: A New Concept of Ancient Medicine. Butterworth Heinemann, London, 1996,14.) Quoted by Matthew Bauer in Chinese Medicine Times, Vol 1 Issue 4 - Aug 2006, "The Final Days of Traditional Beliefs? - Part One"
  2. ^ Kaptchuk, 1983, pp. 34-35
  3. ^ a b "Despite considerable efforts to understand the anatomy and physiology of the "acupuncture points", the definition and characterization of these points remains controversial. Even more elusive is the basis of some of the key traditional Eastern medical concepts such as the circulation of Qi, the meridian system, and the five phases theory, which are difficult to reconcile with contemporary biomedical information but continue to play an important role in the evaluation of patients and the formulation of treatment in acupuncture." Acupuncture. National Institutes of Health: Consensus Development Conference Statement, November 3-5, 1997. Available online at consensus.nih.gov/1997/1997Acupuncture107html.htm. Retrieved 30 January 2007.
  4. ^ Pariente J, Lewith GT; White PJ (Sep 2005). "[http://ecam.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/2/3/315 Investigating acupuncture using brain imaging techniques: the current state of play.]". Evid Based Complement Alternat Med - Oxford University Press 2 (3). PMID 16136210. Retrieved on 2007-03-06. 

Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (66th in leap years). ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Acupressure - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (630 words)
Acupressure (a portmanteau of "acupuncture" and "pressure") is a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) technique based on the same ideas as acupuncture.
Acupressure involves placing physical pressure by hand, elbow, or with the aid of various devices on different acupuncture points on the surface of the body.
An acupressure wristband that is claimed to relieve the symptoms of motion sickness and other forms of nausea is available.
Acupressure: Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine (2155 words)
Acupressure is a form of touch therapy that utilizes the principles of acupuncture and Chinese medicine.
Acupressure massage performed by a therapist can be very effective both as prevention and as a treatment for many health conditions, including headaches, general aches and pains, colds and flu, arthritis, allergies, asthma, nervous tension, menstrual cramps, sinus problems, sprains, tennis elbow, and toothaches, among others.
Acupressure seeks to stimulate the points on the chi meridians that pass close to the skin, as these are easiest to unblock and manipulate with finger pressure.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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