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Encyclopedia > Acting

Acting is the work of an actor or actress, which is a person in theatre, television, film, or any other storytelling medium who tells the story by portraying a character and, usually, speaking or singing the written text or play. For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... This article is about motion pictures. ... For the 2001 film, see Storytelling (film) Storytelling is the ancient art of conveying events in words, images, and sounds. ... Look up Story in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Bold text This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. ... For other uses, see Play (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Definition and history

The word acting is derived from the Latin word agĕre meaning "to do", this is precisely what acting is. In acting, an actor suppresses or augments aspects of their personality in order to reveal the actions and motivations of the character for particular moments in time. The actor is said to be "assuming the role" of another, usually for the benefit of an audience, but also because it can bring one a sense of artistic satisfaction. The first actor is believed to be Thespis of Icaria, a man of ancient Greece. "Plays" of this time, called choric dithyrambs, involved a chorus of 50 who sang the story to the audience. Thespis stepped out of the chorus and spoke to them as a separate character in the story. Before Thespis, the chorus in all plays would sing in a narrative way, "Dionysus did this, Dionysus said that." When Thespis stepped out from the chorus, he said "I am Dionysus. I did this." And acting was born. This may only be a legend, but in his honor a word was crafted: thespian, meaning any sort of performer but chiefly an actor. The International Thespian Society, a society comparable to a fraternity (yet possessing the troop system of the Girl Scouts) for students involved in the arts has also been named in his honor. Peter Ault and William Armstrong For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... A function is part of an answer to a question about why some object or process occurred in a system that evolved or was designed with some goal. ... An audience is a group of people who participate in an experience or encounter a work of art, literature, theatre, music or academics in any medium. ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Thespis car, relief of the Giottos Belltower in Florence, Italy, Nino Pisano, 1334-1336 Thespis (1965), bronze sculpture by Robert Cook, commissioned for the opening of the Canberra Theatre Thespis of Icaria (6th century BC) is claimed to be the first person ever to have a man-gina According... Thespian may refer to: A citizen of the ancient Greek city of Thespiae An actor; this usage is derived from Thespis of Icaria, the legendary first actor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... A Girl Guide is a girl, usually ranging from 10 to 17 years of age, participating in the worldwide Scouting movement. ...


Actors are generally expected to possess a number of skills, including good vocal projection, clarity of speech, physical expressiveness, a good sense of perspective, emotional availability, a well developed imagination, the ability to analyze and understand dramatic text, and the ability to emulate or generate emotional and physical conditions. Well-rounded actors are often also skilled in singing, dancing, emotional expressiveness, imitating dialects and accents, improvisation, observation and emulation, mime, stage combat, and performing classical texts such as Shakespeare. Many actors train at length in special programs or colleges to develop these skills, which have a wide range of different artistic philosophies and processes. In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... Bold text This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Perspective in theory of cognition is the choice of a context or a reference (or the result of this choice) from which to sense, categorize, measure or codify experience, cohesively forming a coherent belief, typically for comparing with another. ... Imagination is accepted as the innate ability and process to invent partial or complete personal realms within the mind from elements derived from sense perceptions of the shared world. ... For other uses, see Emotion (disambiguation). ... Antonym of psychical. ... Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. ... A contemporary dancer rehearsing in a dance studio Dance generally refers to human movement either used as a form of expression or presented in a social, spiritual or performance setting. ... A dialect (from the Greek word διάλεκτος, dialektos) is a variety of a language characteristic of a particular group of the languages speakers. ... Accents mark speakers as a member of a group by their pronunciation of the standard language. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Look up mime in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Actresses Uma Thurman (right) and Vivica A. Fox performing a fight choreography Stage combat is a specialized technique in theatre designed to create the illusion of physical combat without causing harm to the performers. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Philosophy (from the Greek words philos and sophia meaning love of wisdom) is understood in different ways historically and by different philosophers. ...


For history and other details, see actor, thespian, or Thespis. For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... Thespian may refer to: A citizen of the ancient Greek city of Thespiae An actor; this usage is derived from Thespis of Icaria, the legendary first actor. ... Thespis car, relief of the Giottos Belltower in Florence, Italy, Nino Pisano, 1334-1336 Thespis (1965), bronze sculpture by Robert Cook, commissioned for the opening of the Canberra Theatre Thespis of Icaria (6th century BC) is claimed to be the first person ever to have a man-gina According...


Theories

See also the Acting theorists category

Antonin Artaud Antoine Marie Joseph Artaud, better known as Antonin Artaud (born September 4, 1896, in Marseille; died March 4, 1948 in Paris) was a French playwright, poet, actor and director. ... Eugenio Barba (born in Brindisi, Italy, on October 29, 1936) is an Italian author and authority on theatre. ... Augusto Boal (born 1931 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) is an innovative and influential theatrical director, writer and politician. ... Anne Bogart is an American director of theatre. ... Brecht redirects here. ... For the British politician, see Peter Brooke. ... Joseph Chaikin (September 16, 1935–June 22, 2003) was an American theatre director. ... Nātyāchārya Vidūshakaratnam Padma Shri Māni Mādhava Chākyār (1899 - 1990) - The Doyen of Kutiyattam and Abhinaya Guru Mani Madhava Chakyar ( Māni Mādhava Chākyār, Sanskrit:मािण माधव चाक्यार्, Malayalam:മാണി മാധവ ചാക്യാര്) (15 February 1899 - 14 January 1990) was a performance artist and Sanskrit scholar from... Mikhail Aleksandrovich Chekhov (Russian: Михаил Александрович Чехов, August 29, 1891 in Moscow – September 30, 1955 in Beverly Hills, California) was an Academy Award-nominated Russian-American actor, director, author, and developer of his own acting technique used by actors such as Clint Eastwood, Marilyn Monroe, Yul Brynner, and Robert Stack. ... Jacques Copeau (1879-1949) was an influential French theatre director, producer, critic and playwright. ... Dario Fo (born March 24, 1926) is an Italian satirist, playwright, theater director, actor, and composer. ... Jerzy Grotowski (11 August 1933 – 14 January 1999) was a Polish theatre director and a leading figure in avant garde theatre of the 20th century. ... Keith Johnstone is a drama instructor who has taught in England and Canada and more recently around the world. ... Joan Maud Littlewood (6 October 1914 - 20 September 2002) was a theatrical director, famous for her work in developing the left-wing Theatre Workshop. ... David Alan Mamet (born November 30, 1947) is an American author, essayist, playwright, screenwriter, and film director. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Stella Adler (February 10, 1901 – December 21, 1992) was an American actress, and for decades was regarded as Americas foremost acting teacher. ... Lee Strasberg (November 17, 1901 – February 17, 1982) was an American director, actor, producer, and acting teacher. ... Sanford Meisner (August 31, 1905-February 2nd, 1997) was an actor and acting coach well known for the Meisner technique. ... Vsevolod Emilevich Meyerhold (born Karl Kazimir Theodor Meyerhold) (1874 - 1940) was a Russian theatrical director, actor and theorist. ... Bharata Muni was an ancient Indian writer whose life has been dated differently from the 5th century BCE to the 2nd century Ad. ... Image:Spolin2. ... Young Stanislavski Stanislavski in Carlo Goldonis La locandiera (The Innkeeper Woman, 1753), in 1898. ...

Professional actors

Main article: Actor

Not all people working as actors in film, television or theatre are professionally trained. Chances of succeeding as an actor are greatly enhanced by studying drama at a university or college, or attending an acting conservatory. Conservatories offer two to three years training on all aspects of acting. Universities will offer three to four year programs, where a student can choose to focus on acting, while still learning about other aspects of theatre. Schools will vary in their approach, but in North America the most popular method taught is the 'inside out' technique, developed by Stanislavski in his early years and popularized in America by Lee Strasberg and Stella Adler. Others may include a more physical approach, following the teachings of Jerzy Grotowski and others. Regardless of a school's approach, students should expect intensive training in textual interpretation, voice and movement. Applications to drama programs and conservatories are through auditions in the United States. Anybody over the age of 18 can usually apply to drama school. For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... This article is about people called professionals. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... An audition is a sample performance by an actor, singer, musician, dancer or other performing artist. ... A Drama School is a higher education college which specialises in the vocational teaching of drama. ...


A list of drama schools in Britain, North America and Australia can be found on the drama school article. A Drama School is a higher education college which specialises in the vocational teaching of drama. ...


Bibliography

  • Brustein, Robert. 2005. Letters to a Young Actor New York: Basic Books. ISBN 0465008062.
  • Hagen, Uta. 1973. Respect for Acting. New York: Macmillan. ISBN 0025473905.
  • Hodge, Alison, ed. 2000. Twentieth Century Actor Training. London and New York: Routledge. ISBN 0415194520.
  • Marston, Merlin, ed. 1987. Sanford Meisner on Acting New York: Random House. ISBN 0394750594.
  • Stanislavski, Constantin. 1936. An Actor Prepares. London: Methuen, 1988. ISBN 0413461904.
  • Zarrilli, Phillip B., ed. 2002. Acting (Re)Considered: A Theoretical and Practical Guide. Worlds of Performance Ser. 2nd edition. London and New York: Routledge. ISBN 041526300X.

  Results from FactBites:
 
acting (1579 words)
Acting in front of camera: is the emotion large.
Acting on the stage and for the camera are the same, the difference is proportions.
Defining acting: acting is not memorizing the text while wearing disguises or matter of pieces of business.
Acting - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (330 words)
Acting is the work of an actor, a person in theatre, film, or any other storytelling medium who tells the story by portraying a character and, usually, speaking or singing the written text or play.
From the Latin word agĕre meaning "to do", this is precisely what acting is. In acting, an actor suppresses or augments aspects of their personality in order to reveal the actions and motivations of the character for particular moments in time.
Modern pioneers in the area of acting have included Konstantin Stanislavski, Jerzy Grotowski, Lee Strasberg, Uta Hagen, Stella Adler, Eric Morris, Michael Chekhov, Viola Spolin and Sanford Meisner.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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