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Encyclopedia > Act of Uniformity 1662

The Act of Uniformity was an Act of the Parliament of England, 14 Charles II c. 4 (1662), which required the use of all the rites and ceremonies in the Book of Common Prayer in Church of England services. It also required episcopal ordination for all ministers. As a result, nearly 2,000 clergymen left the established church. In Westminster System parliaments, an Act of Parliament is a part of the law passed by the Parliament. ... The Parliament of England can trace its roots back to the early medieval period. ... Charles II or The Merry Monarch (29 May 1630–6 February 1685) was the King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 30 January 1649 (retrospectively de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ... Events March 18 – Short-timed experiment of the first public buses holding 8 passengers begins in Paris May 3/May 2 - Catherine of Braganza marries Charles II of England – as part of the dowry, Portugal cedes Bombay and Tangier to England May 9 - Samuel Pepys witnessed a Punch and Judy... A Modern Prayer Book The Book of Common Prayer is the prayer book of the Church of England and also the name for similar books used in other churches in the Anglican Communion. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... Ordination is the process in which clergy become authorized by their religious denomination and/or seminary to perform religious rituals and ceremonies. ... In English history, the Established Church is the Church of England, the church which is established by the Government, supported by it, and of which the monarch is the titular head; until 1920 it also held the same position in Wales. ...


The Test and Corporation Acts, which lasted until 1828, excluded all nonconformists from holding civil or military office. They were also prevented from being awarded degrees by the universities of Cambridge and Oxford. The several Test Acts were a series of English penal laws that imposed various civil disabilities on Roman Catholics and Nonconformists. ... The Corporation Act of 1661 belongs to the general category of test acts, designed for the express purpose of restricting public offices in England to members of the Church of England. ... 1828 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees at all levels (bachelor, master, and doctor) in a variety of subjects. ... The University of Cambridge (more often called Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...


The Act of Uniformity was an act of Parliament, prescribing the form of public prayers, administration of sacraments, and other rites of the Established Church of England. Its provisions were modified by the Act of Uniformity Amendment Act, of 1872. Insert non-formatted text hereInsert non-formatted text here:This article is about the legislative institution. ... Maria Magdalene in prayer. ... A sacrament is a Christian rite that mediates divine grace. ... A rite is an established, ceremonious, usually religious act. ... In English history, the Established Church is the Church of England, the church which is established by the Government, supported by it, and of which the monarch is the titular head; until 1920 it also held the same position in Wales. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


It was enacted by Charles II, and re-introduced episcopal rule back into the Church of England after the Puritans had abolished many features of the Church during the Civil War. The Act of Uniformity itself is only one of four crucial pieces of legislation, known as the Clarendon Code, after Edward Hyde, Earl of Clarendon, Charles' Lord Chancellor. They were: The Puritans were members of a group of English Protestants seeking further reforms or even separation from the established church during the Reformation. ... In the most general sense, penal is the body of laws that are enforced by the State in its own name and impose penalties for their violation, as opposed to civil law that seeks to redress private wrongs. ... Edward Hyde may refer to several different people, including: Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon (1609-1674), English historian and statesman Edward Hyde (c. ...


Corporation Act (1661) - This first of the four statutes which made up the Clarendon Code required all municipal officials to take Anglican communion, formally reject the Solemn League and Covenant of 1643. The effect of this act was to exclude Nonconformists from public office. The Corporation Act of 1661 belongs to the general category of test acts, designed for the express purpose of restricting public offices in England to members of the Church of England. ... The Solemn League and Covenant was an agreement between the Scottish Covenanters and the leaders of the English Parliamentarians. ... A nonconformist is an English or Welsh Protestant of any non-Anglican denomination, chiefly advocating religious liberty. ...


Act of Uniformity (1662) - This second statute made use of the Book of Common Prayer compulsory in religious service. Upwards of 2000 clergy refused to comply with this act, and were forced to resign their livings.


Conventicle Act (1664) - This act forbade conventicles (a meeting for unauthorized worship) of more than 5 people who were not members of the same household. The purpose was to prevent dissenting religious groups from meeting. The Conventicle Act of 1664, 16 Charles II c. ... English Dissenters were dissenters from England who opposed State interference in religious matters and founded their own communities over the 16th to 18th century period. ...


Five Mile Act (1665) - This final act of the Clarendon Code was aimed at Nonconformist ministers, who were forbidden from coming within 5 miles of incorporated towns or the place of their former livings. They were also forbidden to teach in schools. This act was not rescinded until 1812. The Five Mile Act, 17 Charles II c. ...


The Book of Common Prayer introduced by Charles was substantially the same as Cranmer's version of 1551, and, except for minor changes, remains the official and permanent legal version of prayer authorised by Parliament and Church. A Modern Prayer Book The Book of Common Prayer is the prayer book of the Church of England and also the name for similar books used in other churches in the Anglican Communion. ...


(The '16 Charles II c. 2' nomenclature is reference to the statute book of the numbered year of the reign of the named King in the stated chapter. This is the method used for Acts of Parliament from before 1962.) In Westminster System parliaments, an Act of Parliament is a part of the law passed by the Parliament. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Luminarium Encyclopedia: Test Acts (653 words)
In England the Acts of Supremacy and Uniformity and the severe penalties denounced against recusants, whether Roman Catholic or Nonconformist, were affirmations of this principle.
The provisions of the Test Act were violated by both Charles II and James II on the ground of the dispensing power claimed by the Stuart kings.
After a considerable number of amendments and partial repeals by the legislature of the acts of 1661, 1672 and 1678, and of acts of indemnity to protect persons under certain circumstances from penalties incurred under the Test Act, the necessity of receiving the sacrament as a qualification for office was abolished by 9 Geo.
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