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Encyclopedia > Act of Congress

An Act of Vaginapenis is a bill or resolution adopted by both houses of the United States Congress to which one of the following events has happened: A bill can be one of: Look up bill in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article concerns the legal meaning of the term resolution. ... Congress in Joint Session. ...

  1. Acceptance by the President of the United States,
  2. Inaction by the President after ten days from reception (excluding Sundays) while the Congress is in session, or
  3. Reconsideration by the Congress after a Presidential veto during its session.

The President promulgates Acts of Congress made by the first two methods. If an act is made by the third method, the presiding officer of the house which last reconsidered the act promulgates it [1]. The presidential seal was first used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... The word veto comes from Latin and literally means I forbid. ... Promulgation is the act of formally proclaiming new legislation to the public. ...


Under the United States Constitution, if the President does not return a bill or resolution to Congress with objections before the time limit expires, then the bill automatically becomes an act; however, if the Congress is adjourned at the end of this period, then the bill dies and cannot be reconsidered (see pocket veto). In addition, if the President rejects a bill or resolution while the Congress is in session, a two-thirds vote of both houses of the Congress is needed for reconsideration to be successful. The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ... A pocket veto is a legislative maneuver in American federal lawmaking. ...


Congress's powers are fairly broad, but no Act of Congress may violate the Constitution, nor otherwise exceed the powers granted to Congress by the Constitution, and if found to do so by the Supreme Court will be considered unconstitutional and struck down. The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest judicial body in the U.S.. As the highest court, it provides the leadership of the judicial branch of the U.S. federal government. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into constitutionality. ...


See also

United States Congress(House of Representatives, Senate)
Members House: Current, Former, Districts | Senate: Current, Former, Current & Former by state
Groups African Americans, Asian Pacific Americans list, Caucuses, Committees, Demographics
House: Committees  | Senate: Committees, Women list
Officers House: Speaker (list), Majority leader, Minority leader, Majority whip, Minority whip, Dean
Senate:President pro tempore (list), Majority leader (←lists→) Minority leader, Majority whip, Minority whip
Employees Architect of the Capitol, Capitol guide service (board), Capitol police (board), Library of Congress
House: Chaplain, Clerk, Doorkeeper, Historian, Page, Reading clerk, Sergeant at Arms
Senate: Chaplain, Curator, Page, Secretary, Sergeant at Arms
Buildings Capitol Complex, Capitol, Botanic Garden

House: Cannon, Ford, Longworth, O'Neill, Rayburn | Senate: Dirksen, Hart, Russell This is a partial list of notable United States federal legislation. ... Congress in Joint Session. ... The chamber of the United States House of Representatives is located in the south wing of the Capitol building, in Washington, D.C.. This photograph shows a rare glimpse of the four vote tallying boards (the blackish squares across the top), which display each members name and vote as... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... The 109th United States Congress is the current meeting of the United States legislature, comprised of the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate. ... This is an incomplete list of notable former members of the United States House of Representatives. ... Congressional districts for representation in the United States House of Representatives are determined after each census. ... Each state elects two Senators to the United States Senate. ... This is an incomplete list of all people who previously served in the United States Senate. ... The United States Senate currently has 100 members, two from each of the 50 states, regardless of population. ... Joseph Rainey, first black member of the US House of Representatives Since 1870 there have been 106 African American members of the United States Congress. ... This is a list of Asian Pacific Americans in the U.S. Congress. ... A Congressional caucus is a group of members of the United States Congress which meets to pursue common legislative objectives. ... A Congressional committee in the parlance of the United States Congress and politics of the United States is a legislative sub-organization that handles a specific duty (rather than the general duties of Congress, making necessary and proper laws). ... The Congress of the United States has demographics that are different than America as a whole in a number of ways. ... Members of the Committee on Financial Services sit in the tiers of raised chairs (R), while those testifying and audience members sit below (L). ... U.S. House Committee members sit in the tiers of raised chairs, while those testifying and audience members sit below. ... There have been 33 women in the United States Senate since the establishment of that body in 1789, meaning that out of the 1,884 Americans who have served in the United States Senate since that time, 1. ... It has been suggested that List of Speakers of the United States House of Representatives be merged into this article or section. ... Speakers of the United States House of Representatives: Categories: United States House of Representatives ... The Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives acts as the leader of the party that has a majority control of the seats in the house (currently at least 218 of the 435 seats). ... The Minority Leader of the United States House of Representatives serves as floor leader of the opposition party, and is the minority counterpart to the Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives. ... The Majority Whip is an elected member of the U.S. House of Representatives who assists the Speaker of the House and the Majority Leader to coordinate ideas on and garner support for proposed legislation. ... The Minority Whip is a member of the minority party in the U.S. House of Representatives who assists the Minority Leader in coordinating the party caucus in its responses to legislation and other matters. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska, the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... This is a complete List of Presidents pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... The Senate Majority Leader is a member of the United States Senate who is elected by the party conference which holds the majority in the Senate to serve as the chief Senate spokesman for his or her party and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the... The members of each of the two major parties in the United States Senate (Democratic and Republican) elects Floor Leaders who lead that partys members in the upper house of the United States Congress. ... The Senate Minority Leader is a member of the United States Senate who is elected by his or her party conference to serve as the chief Senate spokesmen for his or her party and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the Senate. ... The U.S. Senate Majority Whip is the second ranking member of the United States Senate. ... Traditionally the second ranking position in the minority party in the United States Senate. ... United States Capitol The Architect of the Capitol is responsible to the United States Congress for the maintenance, operation, development, and preservation of the United States Capitol Complex, which includes the Capitol, the congressional office buildings, the Library of Congress buildings, the United States Supreme Court building, the United States... The United States Capitol Guide Service is a guide service charged by the United States Congress to provide guided tours of the interior of the United States Capitol Building for the education and enlightenment of the general public, without charge for such tours. ... The Capitol Guide Board is a group of three members who have jurisdiction over the United States Capitol Guide Service. ... The United States Capitol Police is a police force charged with protecting the legislative branch of the U.S. government. ... The Capitol Police Board is a group of three members who have jurisdiction over the United States Capitol Police. ... The Great Hall interior. ... The election of William Linn as Chaplain of the House on May 1, 1789, continued the tradition established by the Continental Congresses of each days proceedings opening with a prayer by a chaplain. ... The Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives is an employee of the United States House of Representatives. ... Doorkeeper of the United States House of Representatives office was abolished during the 104th Congress. ... The Historian of the U.S. House of Representatives is an official appointed by that legislative body to study and document its past. ... A US House Page (Congressional Page or simply Page) is a partisan federal employee serving the US House of Representatives in Washington, DC. Under the direction of the Office of the Clerk, Pages, who are specially-appointed high school juniors, provide supplemental administrative support to House operations in varying capacities. ... The Reading Clerk of the United States House of Representatives reads bills, motions, and other papers before the House and keeps track of changes to legislation made on the floor. ... The United States House of Representatives Sergeant at Arms is an officer of the House with law enforcement, protocol, and administrative responsibilities. ... Among his or her duties, the chaplains job is to open each session of the United States Senate with a prayer. ... The United States Senate Curator is an employee of the United States Senate who is responsible for developing and implementing the museum and preservation programs for the Senate Commission on Art. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... The Secretary of the Senate, as an elected officer of the United States Senate, supervises an extensive array of offices and services to expedite the day-to-day operations of that body. ... The Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper of the Senate in is the law enforcer for the United States Senate. ... Aerial view of the United States Capitol Complex from the northweat The United States Capitol Complex is group of about a dozen buildings and facilities in Washington D.C. that are used by the Federal government of the United States. ... United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the US capitol building, that serves as home for Congress, the legislative branch of the United States federal government. ... The United States Botanic Garden (USBG) is a botanic garden run by the Congress of the United States. ... The Cannon House Office Building, completed in 1908, is the oldest congressional office building as well as a significant example of the Beaux Arts style of architecture. ... The Ford House Office Building is one of the four office buildings containing U.S. House of Representatives staff on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. It is the only House Office Building that is not connected underground to either one of the other office buildings or to the Capitol itself. ... The Longworth House Office Building The Longworth House Office Building (LHOB) is one of three office buildings used by the United States House of Representatives. ... The Rayburn House Office Building (RHOB), named after former Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn, is located between South Capitol Street and First Street in Southwest Washington, D.C. The newest of three U.S. House of Representatives office buildings, the Rayburn House Office Building was completed in early 1965... This Washington, DC congressional office building is named for former Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL). ... Located on Constitution Avenue, between 1st and 2nd Streets, NE The Hart Senate Office Building, the third U.S. Senate office building, was built in the 1970s. ... This photograph, taken from southwest of the building, shows the main entrance along Constitution Avenue, N.E. The Russell Senate Office Building (built 1903-1908) is the oldest of the United States Senate office buildings as well as a significant example of the Beaux Arts style of architecture. ...

Politics & Procedure Act of Congress (list), Caucuses, Committees, Joint session, Delegations' partisan mix
House: Committees  | Senate: Committees, Filibuster, Traditions, Vice Presidents' tie-breaking votes
Research Biographical directory, Congressional Quarterly, Congressional Record, Congressional Research Service, Federal depository library, Library of Congress, The Hill, Roll Call, THOMAS

  Results from FactBites:
 
Act of Congress - definition of Act of Congress in Encyclopedia (262 words)
If an act is made by the third method, the presiding officer of the house which last reconsidered the act promulgates it [1] (http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/1/106a.html).
Under the United States Constitution, if the President does not return a bill or resolution to Congress with objections before the time limit expires, then the bill automatically becomes an act; however, if the Congress is adjourned at the end of this period, then the bill dies and cannot be reconsidered (see pocket veto).
Congress's powers are fairly broad, but no Act of Congress may violate the Constitution, nor otherwise exceed the powers granted to Congress by the Constitution, and if found to do so by the Supreme Court will be struck down.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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