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Encyclopedia > Acropolis of Athens
Acropolis of Athens*
UNESCO World Heritage Site

The Acropolis of Athens, seen from the hill of the Pnyx to the west.
State Party Flag of Greece Greece
Type Cultural
Criteria i, ii, iii, iv, vi
Reference 404
Region Europe and North America
Coordinates 37°58′17″N 23°44′10″E / 37.971421, 23.736166
Inscription History
Inscription 1987  (11th Session)
* Name as inscribed on World Heritage List.
Region as classified by UNESCO.

The Acropolis of Athens is the best known acropolis (high city, The "Sacred Rock") in the world. Although there are many other acropoleis in Greece, the significance of the Acropolis of Athens is such that it is commonly known as The Acropolis without qualification. The Acropolis was formally proclaimed as the pre-eminent monument on the European Cultural Heritage list of monuments on 26 March 2007[1]. The Acropolis is a flat-topped rock which rises 150 m (512 ft) above sea level in the city of Athens. It was also known as Cecropia, after the legendary serpent-man, Kekrops or Cecrops, the first Athenian king. A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 232 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photo by Adam Carr Originally uploaded to English Wikipedia by Adam Carr. ... As of 2006, there are a total of 830 World Heritage Sites located in 138 State Parties. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Greece. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... This is a list of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Europe. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Acropolis (Gr. ... Acropolis (Gr. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... For other uses, see Snake (disambiguation). ... The name Cecrops (Greek: ) means face with a tail and it is said that this mythical Greek king, born from the earth itself, had his top half shaped like a man and the bottom half in serpent or fish-tail form. ...

Contents

History

Early human occupation

While the earliest artifacts date to the Middle Neolithic era, there have been documented habitations in Attica from the Early Neolithic (6th millennium BC). Once into the Bronze Age, there is little doubt that a Mycenaean megaron must have stood on top of the hill, housing the local potentate and his household, guards, the local cult facilities and a number of workshops and ordinary habitations. The compound was surrounded by a thick Cyclopean circuit wall, possibly between 4.5 m and 6 m in height, consisting of two parapets built with large stone blocks and cemented with an earth mortar called emplekton. The wall follows typical Mycenaean convention in that its gate was arranged obliquely, with a parapet and tower overhanging the incomers' right-hand side, thus facilitating defense. There were two lesser approaches up the hill on its north side, consisting of steep, narrow flights of steps cut in the rock. Homer is assumed to refer to this fortification when he mentions the "strong-built House of Erechtheus" (Odyssey 7.81). It was during that time that an earthquake caused a fissure near the northeastern edge, one that ran all the way down to the marl layer and in which water collected. An elaborate set of stairs was built and the well was used as a protected source of drinking water during some portion of the Mycenaean period, as it was invaluable in times of siege. An array of Neolithic artifacts, including bracelets, axe heads, chisels, and polishing tools. ... Attica (in Greek: Αττική, Attike; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a periphery (subdivision) in Greece, containing Athens, the capital of Greece. ... During the 6th millennium BC, agriculture spreads from the Balkans to Italy and Eastern Europe and from Mesopotamia to Egypt. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Mycenaean Greece, the last phase of the Bronze Age in ancient Greece, is the historical setting of the epics of Homer and much other Greek mythology. ... The megaron is the great hall of Minoan-Mycenaean culture, a rectangular hall, fronted by an open, two-columned porch and a more or less central hearth traditional in Greece since Mycenaean times. ... Cyclopean is a descriptor applied to the characteristic wall-building method of the Mycenaean culture. ... A parapet is a barrier at the edge of a roof or structure to prevent persons or vehicles from falling over the edge. ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... Erechtheus in Greek Mythology was the name of a king of Athens, and a secondary name for two other characters In Homers Iliad the name is applied to the earth-born son of Hephaestus later mostly called Erichthonius by later writers. ... For other uses, see Odyssey (disambiguation). ...


The Dark Ages

The western side of the Parthenon on the Acropolis of Athens.
The western side of the Parthenon on the Acropolis of Athens.

It seems that the Acropolis might have been spared the violent destruction of other Mycenaean palaces, as there are no signs of fire or other large-scale destruction in what few artifacts of that time survive. This agrees with the standard Athenian folklore that the area resisted the Dorians successfully. Not much is known as to the precise state of building on the rock leading up to the archaic era, except that the Acropolis was taken over by Kylon in the Kylonian revolt, and twice by Pisistratus: all attempts directed at seizing political power by coups d' etat. Nevertheless it seems that a nine-gate wall, the Enneapylon, had been built around the biggest water spring, the "Clepsydra", at the northwestern foot. It was Pisistratus who initially established a precinct for Artemis on the site. Download high resolution version (1740x1062, 600 KB)Acropolis of Athens This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (1740x1062, 600 KB)Acropolis of Athens This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... For other uses, see Parthenon (disambiguation). ... This article or section should include material from Dorian invasion The Dorians were one of the ancient Hellenic (Greek) races. ... Cylon (also spelled Kylon) was an Athenian associated with the first reliably dated event in Athenian history, the Cylonian affair. ... Peisistratos or Peisistratus (Greek: )[1] (ca. ... A coup détat, or simply a coup, is the sudden overthrow of a government, usually done by a small group that just replaces the top power figures. ... Clepsydra may refer to Clepsydra, a type of water thief. ... Peisistratos or Peisistratus (Greek: )[1] (ca. ... For other uses, see Artemis (disambiguation). ...


Archaic Acropolis

A temple sacred to "Athena Polias" (Protectress of the City) was erected by mid-6th century BC. This Doric limestone building, from which many relics survive, is referred to as the "Bluebeard" temple, named after the pedimental three-bodied man-serpent sculpture, whose beards were painted dark blue. Whether this temple replaced an older one, or a mere sacred precinct or altar, is not known. In the late 6th century BC yet another temple was built, usually referred to as the Archaios Naos (Old Temple). It is thought that the so-called Doerpfeld foundations might have belonged to this temple, which may have been sacred not to Polias but to Athena Parthenos (Virgin), at least for as long as the Polias "Bluebeard" temple stood. It is not known how long these temples coexisted. The Doric order was one of the orginal pokersthree orders or organizational systems of Ancient Greek or classical architecture; the other two canonical orders were the Ionic and the Corinthian. ...


To confuse matters, by the time the "Bluebeard" Temple had been dismantled, a newer and grander marble building, the "Older Parthenon", was started following the victory at Marathon in 490 BC. To accommodate it, the south part of the summit was cleared of older remnants, made level by adding some 8,000 two-ton blocks of Piraeus limestone, a foundation 11 m deep at some points, and the rest filled with earth kept in place by the retaining wall. The Mycenaean gate was demolished and replaced with the Old Propylon, a monumental colonnaded structure whose purpose was strictly ceremonial, rather than defensive. Combatants Athens, Plataea Persia Commanders Miltiades, Callimachus â€ , Arimnestus Datis â€ ?, Artaphernes Strength 10,000 Athenians, 1,000 Plataeans 20,000 - 100,000 a Casualties 192 Athenians killed, 11 Plataeans killed (Herodotus) 6,400 killed, 7 ships captured (Herodotus) a These are modern consensus estimates. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 540s BC 530s BC 520s BC 510s BC 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC Years: 495 BC 494 BC 493 BC 492 BC 491 BC - 490 BC - 489 BC 488 BC... It has been suggested that Kaminia (Piraeus), Greece be merged into this article or section. ...


The Older Parthenon was caught unfinished by the invading Persians in 480 BC, and was razed to the ground burnt and looted, along with the Archaios Neos and practically everything else on the rock. Once the Persian Wars were over, the Athenians brought some order to the location, firstly by ceremonially burying objects of worship and art that were rendered unsuitable for further use. This "Persian debris" is the richest archaeological treasure excavated on the Acropolis, as its burial had protected it from further destruction through the ages. The Persian invasion of Greece in 480-479 BC May — King Xerxes I of Persia marches from Sardis and onto Thrace and Macedonia. ... The Greco-Persian Wars or Persian Wars were a series of conflicts between the Greek world and the Persian Empire that started about 500 BC and lasted until 448 BC. The term can also refer to the continual warfare of the Roman Empire and Byzantine Empire against the Parthians and... Perserschutt, Acropolis, 1866 The Perserschutt (German: Persian debris, or refuse) was the bulk of architectural and votive sculptures destroyed by the invading Persian army on the Acropolis of Athens in 480 BCE, and then ceremonially buried by the Athenians upon the departure of the Persians. ...


The Periclean building program

Most of the major temples were rebuilt under the leadership of Pericles during the Golden Age of Athens (460–430 BC). Phidias, a great Athenian sculptor, and Ictinus and Callicrates, two famous architects, were responsible for the reconstruction. During the 5th century BC, the Acropolis gained its final shape. After winning at Eurymedon in 468 BC, Cimon and Themistocles ordered the reconstruction of southern and northern walls, and Pericles entrusted the building of the Parthenon to Ictinus and Phidias. For the Shakespeare play, see Pericles, Prince of Tyre. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Phidias Showing the Frieze of the Parthenon to his Friends by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema Phidias (or Pheidias) (in ancient Greek, ) (c. ... Iktinos (also Iktious or Ictinus) was an architect active in the mid 5th century BC, who, together with Kallikrates designed the Parthenon (447?–432 B.C.) in Athens, Greece. ... Kallikrates was one of the two architects of the Parthenon, active mid-5th century BC. He was responsible for the Temple of Athena Nike, also on the Acropolis. ... Combatants Delian League Persia Commanders Cimon Unknown Strength Unknown 200 ships Casualties The naval Battle of the Eurymedon took place between 470 BC and 466 BC on the Eurymedon River in Pamphylia in Asia Minor, and was between the Athenian-led Delian League and Persia. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Themistocles (Greek: ; c. ... For other uses, see Parthenon (disambiguation). ...

the Propylaea
the Propylaea
the Erechtheum
the Erechtheum

In 437 BC Mnesicles started building the Propylaea, monumental gates with columns of Pentelic marble, partly built upon the old propylaea of Pisistratus. These colonnades were almost finished in the year 432 BC and had two wings, the northern one serving as picture gallery. At the same time, south of the propylaea, building of the small Ionic Temple of Athena Nike commenced. After an interruption caused by the Peloponnesian War, the temple was finished in the time of Nicias' peace, between 421 BC and 415 BC. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 356 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 445 pixel, file size: 267 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 356 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 445 pixel, file size: 267 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC - 430s BC - 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC Years: 442 BC 441 BC 440 BC 439 BC 438 BC - 437 BC - 436 BC 435 BC... Mnesicles (5th century BCE) was the architect of the great Propylaea of the Athenian Acropolis, set up by Pericles about 437 BCE. The Erechtheum is also sometimes ascribed to him. ... Crowds of tourists climb the steps to the Propylaea, gateway to the Acropolis, Athens Stairs leading up to the Propylea The Propylaea, Propylea or Propylaia (Greek Προπυλαια) is the monumental gateway that serves as the entrance to the Acropolis in Athens. ... Pentéli or Pendeli, (Greek: Πεντέλη, ancient forms: Pentele, Pentelikon or Pentelicus, and Vrilissos or Vrilittos (Greek: Βριλησσός, Βριληττός), Mendeli in medieval times) is a tall mountain and mountain range situated northeast of Athens and southwest of Marathon. ... For other uses, see Marble (disambiguation). ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC - 430s BC - 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC Years: 437 BC 436 BC 435 BC 434 BC 433 BC 432 BC 431 BC 430 BC... Reconstruction of the temple Nike means Victory in Greek, and Athena was worshiped in this form, as goddess of victory, on the Acropolis, Athens. ... “Athenian War” redirects here. ... Nicias expeditions, before the Sicilian campaign. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC - 420s BC - 410s BC 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC Years: 426 BC 425 BC 424 BC 423 BC 422 BC - 421 BC - 420 BC 419 BC... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 460s BC 450s BC 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC - 410s BC - 400s BC 390s BC 380s BC 370s BC 360s BC Years: 420 BC 419 BC 418 BC 417 BC 416 BC - 415 BC - 414 BC 413 BC...


During the same period the building of the Erechtheum, a combination of sacred precincts including the temples of Athena Polias, Poseidon, Erechtheus, Cecrops, Herse, Pandrosos and Aglauros, with its so-called the Kore Porch (or Caryatids' balcony), was begun. This was found when the Jagex company discovered it in 12BC. Erechtheum, from SW The Porch of Maidens The Erechtheum, or Erechtheion, is an ancient Greek temple on the north side of the Acropolis of Athens in Greece, notable for a design that is both elegant and unusual. ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... Erechtheus in Greek Mythology was the name of a king of Athens, and a secondary name for two other characters In Homers Iliad the name is applied to the earth-born son of Hephaestus later mostly called Erichthonius by later writers. ... The name Cecrops means face with a tail and it is said that this mythical Greek king, born from the earth itself, had his top half shaped like a man and the bottom half in serpent or fish-tail form. ... This is an article about the Greek mythological figure; for an article on the French bicycle manufacturer, see Herse. ... Pandrosus (the all-dewy one), also spelled Pandrosos, is a figure in Greek mythology, and a daughter of Cecrops. ... Aglaulus is a figure in Greek mythology, daughter of Cecrops. ... A caryatid (also spelt Karyatid), is a sculpted female figure serving as an architectural support taking the place of a column or a pillar supporting an entablature on her head. ... Jagex Ltd. ...


Between the temple of Athena Nike and the Parthenon there was the temenos of Artemis Brauronia or Brauroneion, the goddess represented as a bear and worshipped in the deme of Brauron. The archaic xoanon of the goddess and a statue made by Praxiteles in the 4th century BC were both in the sanctuary. Greek Temenos ([1], from the Greek verb to cut) (plural = temene) is a piece of land cut off and assigned as an official domain, especially to kings and chiefs, or a piece of land marked off from common uses and dedicated to a god, a sanctuary, holy grove or holy... For other uses, see Artemis (disambiguation). ... 3D computer generated image of the sanctuary of Artemis Brauonia. ... In biology, a deme (rhymes with team) is another word for a local population of organisms of one species that actively interbreed with one another and share a distinct gene pool. ... Xoanon Publishing was founded in 1992 e. ... For the 1934 film, see The Goddess (1934 film). ... Praxiteles of Athens, the son of Cephisodotus, was the greatest of the Attic sculptors of the 4th century BC, who has left an imperishable mark on the history of art. ...


Behind the Propylaea, Phidias' gigantic bronze statue of Athena Promachos ("she who fights in the front line"), built between 450 BC and 448 BC, dominated. The base was 1.50 m high, while the total height of the statue was 9 m. The goddess held a lance whose gilt tip could be seen as a reflection by crews on ships rounding Cape Sounion, and a giant shield on the left side, decorated by Mys with images of the fight between the Centaurs and the Lapiths. Other monuments that have left almost nothing visible to the present day are the Chalkotheke, the Pandroseion, Pandion's sanctuary, Athena's altar, Zeus Polieus's sanctuary and, from Roman times, the circular temple of Augustus and Rome. The Athena Promachos (she who fights in the front line) was a colossal bronze statue which stood between the Propylaia and the Parthenon on the acropolis of Athens. ... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 500s BC 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC - 450s BC - 440s BC 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC Years: 455 BC 454 BC 453 BC 452 BC 451 BC - 450 BC - 449 BC 448 BC... Centuries: 6th century BC - 5th century BC - 4th century BC Decades: 490s BC 480s BC 470s BC 460s BC 450s BC - 440s BC - 430s BC 420s BC 410s BC 400s BC 390s BC Years: 453 BC 452 BC 451 BC 450 BC 449 BC - 448 BC - 447 BC 446 BC... Fig. ... This article is about the mythological creatures. ... In Greek mythology, the Lapiths were a semi-legenday, semi-historical race, whose home was in Thessaly in the valley of the Peneus. ... Computer generated reconstruction of the Chalkotheke The Chalkotheke was a building located on the Acropolis of Athens which housed the treasury of Athens. ... Reconstruction of the Pandroseion as it would have looked around 421 BC The Pandroseion was a sanctuary dedicated to Pandrosus, one of the daughters of Cecrops I, the first king of Athens, located on the Acropolis of Athens. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ...


Archaeological remains

The entrance to the Acropolis was a monumental gateway called the Propylaea. To the south of the entrance is the tiny Temple of Athena Nike. A bronze statue of Athena, sculpted by Phidias, originally stood at its center. At the center of the Acropolis is the Parthenon or Temple of Athena Parthenos (Athena the Virgin). East of the entrance and north of the Parthenon is the temple known as the Erechtheum. South of the platform that forms the top of the Acropolis there are the also the remains of an outdoor theatre called Theatre of Dionysus. A few hundred metres away, there is the now partially reconstructed Theatre of Herodes Atticus. Crowds of tourists climb the steps to the Propylaea, gateway to the Acropolis, Athens Stairs leading up to the Propylea The Propylaea, Propylea or Propylaia (Greek Προπυλαια) is the monumental gateway that serves as the entrance to the Acropolis in Athens. ... Reconstruction of the temple Nike means Victory in Greek, and Athena was worshiped in this form, as goddess of victory, on the Acropolis, Athens. ... Phidias Showing the Frieze of the Parthenon to his Friends by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema Phidias (or Pheidias) (in ancient Greek, ) (c. ... For other uses, see Parthenon (disambiguation). ... Erechtheum, from SW The Porch of Maidens The Erechtheum, or Erechtheion, is an ancient Greek temple on the north side of the Acropolis of Athens in Greece, notable for a design that is both elegant and unusual. ... Theatre of Dionysus as viewed from the Acropolis. ... The Herodes Atticus Odeon was built in 161 by Herodes Atticus in memory of his wife, Aspasia Annia Regilla, on the south slope of the Acropolis hill. ...


Most of the valuable ancient artifacts were situated in the Acropolis Museum, which resides on the southeast corner of the same rock. An operation to move them for the 400 meters distance to the New Acropolis Museum started on Sunday, October 14, 2007, and will continue for six weeks.[1] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The New Acropolis Museum is a museum by architect Bernard Tschumi located near the Acropolis in Athens, Greece. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

Site plan of the Acropolis at Athens showing the major archaeological remains
Site plan of the Acropolis at Athens showing the major archaeological remains

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (825x534, 30 KB) 1 Parthenon 2 Old Temple of Athena 3 Erectheum 4 Statue of Athena Promachus 5 Propylaea 6 Temple of Athena Nike 7 Eleusinion 8 Sanctuary of Artemis Brauronia 9 Chalkotheke. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (825x534, 30 KB) 1 Parthenon 2 Old Temple of Athena 3 Erectheum 4 Statue of Athena Promachus 5 Propylaea 6 Temple of Athena Nike 7 Eleusinion 8 Sanctuary of Artemis Brauronia 9 Chalkotheke. ...

Site plan

  1. Parthenon
  2. Old Temple of Athena
  3. Erechtheon
  4. Statue of Athena Promachos
  5. Propylaea
  6. Temple of Athena Nike
  7. Eleusinion
  8. Sanctuary of Artemis Brauronia or Brauroneion
  9. Chalkotheke
  10. Pandroseion
  11. Arrephorion
  12. Altar of Athena
  13. Sanctuary of Zeus Polieus
  14. Sanctuary of Pandion
  15. Odeon of Herodes Atticus
  16. Stoa of Eumenes
  17. Sanctuary of Asclepius or Asclepieion
  18. Theatre of Dionysus Eleuthereus
  19. Odeon of Pericles
  20. Temenos of Dionysus Eleuthereus
  21. Aglaureion

For other uses, see Parthenon (disambiguation). ... The Old Temple of Athena (also known as the Hekatompedom) stood in the centre of the Acropolis of Athens. ... The Athena Promachos (she who fights in the front line) was a colossal bronze statue which stood between the Propylaia and the Parthenon on the acropolis of Athens. ... Crowds of tourists climb the steps to the Propylaea, gateway to the Acropolis, Athens Stairs leading up to the Propylea The Propylaea, Propylea or Propylaia (Greek Προπυλαια) is the monumental gateway that serves as the entrance to the Acropolis in Athens. ... Reconstruction of the temple Nike means Victory in Greek, and Athena was worshiped in this form, as goddess of victory, on the Acropolis, Athens. ... An Athenian temple to Demeter, the Eleusinion was the place where all sacred objects associated with the Eleusinian Mysteries were kept between ceremonies. ... 3D computer generated image of the sanctuary of Artemis Brauonia. ... Computer generated reconstruction of the Chalkotheke The Chalkotheke was a building located on the Acropolis of Athens which housed the treasury of Athens. ... Reconstruction of the Pandroseion as it would have looked around 421 BC The Pandroseion was a sanctuary dedicated to Pandrosus, one of the daughters of Cecrops I, the first king of Athens, located on the Acropolis of Athens. ... The Herod Atticus Odeon on the south slope of the Acropolis The Herodes Atticus Odeon was built in 161 by Herodes Atticus in memory of his wife, Aspasia Annia Regilla, on the south slope of the Acropolis hill. ... In ancient Greece, an asclepieion was a healing temple, sacred to the god Asclepius. ... Theatre of Dionysus as viewed from the Acropolis. ... Theatre of Dionysus as viewed from the Acropolis. ...

Cultural significance

Every four years the Athenians held a festival called the Panathenaea that rivaled the Olympic Games in popularity. During the festival, a procession moved through Athens up to the Acropolis and into the Parthenon (as depicted in the frieze on the inside of the Parthenon). There, a vast robe of woven wool (peplos) was ceremoniously placed on Phidias' massive ivory and gold statue of Athena. The Panathenaic Games were a set of games held every four years in Athens in Ancient Greece. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... For other uses, see Parthenon (disambiguation). ... Terracotta of a Greek woman 2. ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ...


See also

Acropolis (Gr. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

  Results from FactBites:
 
Acropolis, Athens - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1615 words)
The Acropolis of Athens, seen from the hill of the Pnyx to the west.
At the center of the acropolis is the Parthenon or Temple of Athena Parthenos (Athena the Virgin).
Acropolis of Athens — AcropolisofAthens.gr — one monument, one heritage
Acropolis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (299 words)
The word "Acropolis", though Greek in origin and associated primarily with Greek cities (Athens, Argos, Thebes, and Corinth with its Acrocorinth), may be applied generically to all such citadels (Rome, Jerusalem, Celtic Bratislava, many in Asia Minor, or even Castle Hill at Edinburgh).
The most famous example of the kind is the Acropolis of Athens, which, by reason of its historical associations and the famous buildings erected upon it, is generally known without qualification as simply "The Acropolis".
Acropolis in Athens from the south-west with the Propylea and the Temple of Nike (left centre) and the theatre of Herodes Atticus (below left).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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