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Encyclopedia > Acid house
Acid House
Stylistic origins
Cultural origins
Typical instruments
Synthesizer
Drum machine
Sequencer
Keyboard
Roland TB-303
Roland TR-808
Mainstream popularity late 1980s and early 1990s United States, United Kingdom. Resurgence in mid-2000s.
Derivative forms Breakbeat hardcore
Other topics
Styles of house music

Acid house is a sub-genre of house music that emphasizes a repetitive, hypnotic and trance-like style, with samples or spoken lines usually used rather than sung lyrics. Acid house's core electronic squelch sounds were developed by mid-1980s DJs from Chicago who experimented with the Roland TB-303 electronic synthesizer-sequencer. Acid house spread to the United Kingdom, Australia, and continental Europe, where it was played by DJ's in the early rave scene. By the late 1980s, copycat tracks and acid house remixes brought the style into the mainstream, where it had some influence on pop and dance styles. Irvine Welsh (born Leith, Edinburgh, September 27, 1958) is an acclaimed contemporary Scottish novelist, most famous for his novel Trainspotting. ... The Acid House is a 1994 novel by Irvine Welsh, later made into a film. ... House music is a style of electronic dance music that was developed by dance club DJs in Chicago in the early to mid-1980s. ... The 1980s was the decade spanning from 1980 to 1989, also called The Eighties. The decade saw social, economic and general upheaval as wealth, production and western culture migrated to new industrializing economies. ... Synth redirects here. ... A Boss DR-202 Drum Machine A drum machine is an electronic musical instrument designed to imitate the sound of drums and/or other percussion instruments. ... In the field of electronic music, a sequencer was traditionally a device or piece of software that allows the user to record, play back and edit musical patterns. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... The Roland TB-303 Bass Line is a synthesizer with built-in sequencer manufactured by the Roland corporation in 1982 that had a defining role in the development of contemporary electronic music. ... The Roland TR-808 Rhythm Composer was one of the first programmable drum machines (TR serving as an acronym for Transistor Rhythm). Introduced by the Roland Corporation in late 1980, it was originally manufactured for use as a tool for studio musicians to create demos. ... The 1980s was the decade spanning from 1980 to 1989, also called The Eighties. The decade saw social, economic and general upheaval as wealth, production and western culture migrated to new industrializing economies. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... This article is about the decade of 2000-2009. ... Breakbeat hardcore (popularly known as rave music, originally referred to as simply hardcore in the United Kingdom, with old school hardcore a common term in the 21st century) is a style of electronic music that primarily uses breakbeats for its rhythm lines. ... House music has many sub-divisions: Acid house: A Chicago derivative built around the Roland TB-303 bassline machine. ... House music is a style of electronic dance music that was developed by dance club DJs in Chicago in the early to mid-1980s. ... Trance is a style of electronic music that developed in the 1990s. ... DJ or dj may stand for Disc jockey, dinner jacket The DeadJournal website, or Djibouti. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... The Roland TB-303 Bass Line is a synthesizer with built-in sequencer manufactured by the Roland corporation in 1982 that had a defining role in the development of contemporary electronic music. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rave (disambiguation). ... A remix is an alternative version of a song, different from the original version. ...


The sound of acid, a nickname for acid house,[1] was different to the emerging styles of deep house or vocal house in that it was starkly minimal, being very light or absent of instrumentation and generally harder or trancier sounding than these. This bifurcation marked an early separation in house music that directly correlated to the origin of hard dance and trance and which developed in conjunction with the more underground and specialized rave scene. The starkness of the style was as a result of the discovery of the strange sounds that the Roland 303 bass line synthesizer produced when tweaked and the straight 4|4 rhythm which though shared by much of house and techno music was programmed into much harder and more pounding rhythms than pop or electro. Both of these elements are present in most of the tracks considered core to the sound of acid house. Roland's other famous sound, the Roland TR-909 drum machine is nearly as common. Acid house's influence on dance music is tangible considering the sheer number of electronic music tracks referencing acid house through the use of its sounds, including trance, Goa Trance, psytrance, breakbeat, big beat, techno, trip-hop and house music.[2] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Vocal house is a musical genre that came to the fore in the late 1980s and early 90s. ... Trance music is a subgenre of electronic dance music that developed in the 1990s. ... Music sample: Matt Ricks - Home Again (2006) ( file info) — Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... Trance is a style of electronic music that developed in the 1990s. ... The Roland TR-909 Rhythm Composer is a partially analog, partially sample-based drum machine built by the Japanese Roland Corporation in 1984. ... Trance - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Goa trance (often referred as Goa or by the number 604) is a form of electronic music and is a style of trance music which originated in the Indian state of Goa, as opposed to most other forms of trance music which appeared in Europe. ... Raja Ram has been experementing with psychedelic trance as early as the 1980s. ... This article is about breakbeat, the electronic dance music genre. ... Big beat (sometimes called chemical breaks) is a term deployed in the mid 1990s by the British music press to describe the work of artists such as The Chemical Brothers, Fatboy Slim and The Prodigy. ... For the comic book character previously known as Techno, see Fixer (comics). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... House music is a style of electronic dance music that was developed by dance club DJs in Chicago in the early to mid-1980s. ...

The Roland TB-303 bass synthesizer provided the electronic squelch sounds often heard in acid house tracks.
The Roland TB-303 bass synthesizer provided the electronic squelch sounds often heard in acid house tracks.

Contents

Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ...

History

A yellow smiley face is considered the emblem of acid house.
A yellow smiley face is considered the emblem of acid house.

Image File history File links Smiley. ... Image File history File links Smiley. ... For other uses of smiley and smiley face, see Smiley (disambiguation). ...

Origins in Chicago

The first acid house records were produced in Chicago, Illinois. Phuture, a group founded by Nathan "DJ Pierre" Jones, Earl "Spanky" Smith Jr., and Herbert "Herb J" Jackson, is credited with having been the first to use the TB-303 in the house music context (the instrument appeared as early as 1983 in disco via Alexander Robotnick).[3] The group's 12-minute "Acid Tracks" was recorded to tape and was played by DJ Ron Hardy at the Music Box, where Hardy was resident DJ. Hardy once played it four times over the course of an evening until the crowd responded favorably. Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Phuture (nowadays called Phuture 303) are a Chicago-based acid house group founded in 1985 by DJ Pierre, Spanky and Herb J. Their twelve-minute track Acid Trax (1986) is one of several recordings that lay claim to being the first-ever acid house record. ... The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline for Music. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Chicago's house music scene was suffering from a massive crack down of parties and events by the police. Sales of house records were dwindling and by 1988, the genre was selling less than a tenth as many records as at the height of the style's popularity.[4] However, house and especially acid house was beginning to experience a massive surge in popularity in Britain.


The London house-music scene

London's club Shoom, circa 1987, was one of the first clubs to introduce acid house to the clubbing public of England. It was opened by Danny Rampling and his wife. The club was extremely exclusive and featured thick fog, a dreamy atmosphere and acid house.[5] This period began what some call the Second Summer of Love. The movement has been credited with a reduction in football hooliganism, instead of fights, football fans were listening to music, taking ecstasy, and joining the other club attendees in a peaceful movement often paralleled to the Summer of Love in San Francisco in the 1960s.[6] However the movement is generally considered much less politicized, and often seen as hedonistic and self indulgent. Danny Rampling is a British based House Music DJ and is widley credited as one of the orginal founders of the UK`s rave/club scene. ... The Second Summer of Love is a name given to the period in 1988 in Britain, during the rise of Acid House music and the euphoric explosion of unlicensed Ecstasy-fuelled rave parties[1]. The term generally refers to both the summers of 1988/9[2] [3] when electronic dance... MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine), most commonly known today by the street name Ecstasy (often abbreviated E, X, or XTC), is a semisynthetic member of the phenethylamine class of psychoactive drugs. ... The Summer of Love refers to the summer of 1967, when an unprecedented gathering of as many as 100,000 young people converged on the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood of San Francisco, creating a phenomenon of cultural and political rebellion. ...


Another club called Trip was opened by Nick Holloway in 1988 and was geared directly towards the acid house music scene. It known for its intensity and stayed open until 3 AM. The patrons would spill into the streets chanting and would draw the police on regular occasions. The reputation that occurrences like this created along with the UK's strong anti-club laws started to make it increasingly difficult to offer events in the conventional club atmosphere. Considered illegal in London during the late 80s, after-hour clubbing was against the law. However, this did not stop the club-goers from continuing after-hours dancing. Police would raid the after-hour parties, so the groups began to assemble inside warehouses and other inconspicuous venues in secret, hence also marking the first developments of the rave.[7] Raves were well attended at this time and consisted of single events or moving series of parties thrown by production companies or unlicensed clubs. Two well known groups at this point were the famous "RiP" or Revolution in Progress, known for the dark atmosphere and hard music at their events which were usually thrown in warehouses[8] and Sunrise who held particularly massive outdoor events. For other uses, see Rave (disambiguation). ...


The Sunrise group threw several large acid house raves in England which gathered serious press attention. In 1988 they threw "Burn It Up," 1989 brought "Early Summer Madness," "Midsummer Night's Dream," and "Back to the Future." They advertised huge sound systems, fairground rides, foreign DJs, and other attractions. Many articles were written sensationalizing these parties and the results of them, focusing especially on the drug use and out-of-control nature that the media perceived.[9]


In September 1989, Sunrise held the largest Acid House rave ever, just outside Reigate in Surrey. In the fields adjacent to the school playing fields at Hartswood (between Woodhatch and Sidlow Bridge), the rave took place and lasted from 10pm on the Saturday night until late into Sunday night. It was estimated that nearly 20,000 attended during the weekend and car queues stretched from the top of Reigate Hill all the way to the field in question (4 miles!). It was widely covered by the Press and television and remains the largest rave ever, notable for the fact that it is the only time in British history that the police have retreated on mainland soil.


Media attention

Beat Dis by Bomb the Bass (1988) features the "bloodied" version of the popular smiley icon.
Beat Dis by Bomb the Bass (1988) features the "bloodied" version of the popular smiley icon.

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, news media and tabloids devoted an increasing amount of coverage to the hedonistic acid house/rave scene, focusing on its association with psychedelic drugs and club drugs. The sensationalist nature of the coverage may have contributed to the banning of acid house during its heyday from radio, television, and retail outlets in the United Kingdom. The moral panic of the press began in 1988, when the UK tabloid The Sun, which only weeks earlier had promoted Acid House as "cool and groovy" while running an offer on Acid Smiley Face T-Shirts, abruptly turned on the scene. On October 19th, the tabloid ran with the headline "Evils of Ecstasy," linking the Acid House scene with the new and relatively unknown drug. The resultant panic incited by the tabloids eventually led to a crackdown on clubs and venues that played Acid House and had a profound negative impact on the scene.[10] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The 1980s was the decade spanning from 1980 to 1989, also called The Eighties. The decade saw social, economic and general upheaval as wealth, production and western culture migrated to new industrializing economies. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Club drugs are a loosely defined category of recreational drugs which are popular at dance clubs, parties, and rock concerts. ... This article is about a British tabloid. ...


UK acid house and rave fans used the yellow smiley face symbol simply as an emblem of the music and scene, a "vapid, anonymous smile" that portrayed the "simplest and gentlest of the Eighties’ youth manifestations" that was non-aggressive, "except in terms of decibels" at the high-volume DJ parties.[11] Some acid house fans used a smiley face with a blood streak on it, which Watchmen comics creator Alan Moore asserts was based on Dave Gibbons' artwork for the series.[12] For other uses of smiley and smiley face, see Smiley (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Watchman. ... For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ... Dave Gibbons (born April 14, 1949) is a British writer and artist of comics. ...


Within just a few years, acid house had gained a considerable fan base, and the influence of the music reached beyond the club and warehouse environment. It also influenced UK pop music during these formative years, emerging in a somewhat sanitized version in songs like Bananarama's "Tripping on Your Love" (1991) and Samantha Fox's "Love House" (1989). Acid house influences also appear in the 1988 hit by S'Express, "Theme from S'Express" and in remixes of pop songs on 12" singles by various mainstream acts. Bananarama are a British girl group who have had success on the pop and dance charts since 1982. ... This article is about the English model and singer; for the American erotic actress, see Samantha Fox (porn star). ... SExpress (pronounced ess-express; sometimes spelled SXpress or S-Express; otherwise known as Victim Of the Ghetto) were a British dance music act from the late 1980s who had one of the earliest commercial successes in the acid house genre. ... Theme from SExpress was a popular single by English dance music band SExpress. ... The 12-inch [30 cm] single gramophone record gained popularity with the advent of disco music in the 1970s. ...


Musically, acid house started to move away from its almost nearly complete reliance on the TB-303, but continued to use repeated sound sequences that were shifted and warped by electronic modulation.


Influence of house music

Acid house remained active after the first wave and has experienced waves of popularity. Richie Hawtin, Moby, Massive Attack all released tunes in the early 1990s featuring the Roland TB-303. Josh Wink released "Higher State of Consciousness" in 1995, just another peak in acid house's continuous up-and-down cycle in over 20 years of popularity and performance. As computer programs such as Reason and VSTi (Virtual Studio Technology Instrument) versions of the essential Roland TB-303 were developed, the sound began to appear in many different styles of music. Roland released the MC-303 Groovebox in the mid 1990s, which featured samples of the original TB-303. Richard (Richie) Hawtin (born June 4, 1970, Banbury, Oxfordshire, England) is a English-Canadian electronic musician and internationally-touring DJ who was an influential part of Detroit technos second wave of artists in the early 1990s. ... Moby (born Richard Melville Hall, September 11, 1965) is an American DJ, songwriter, musician and singer. ... Massive Attack are an English trip hop band. ... Josh Wink (born Joshua Winkelman in 1970) is an electronic music DJ, label owner, producer, remixer, and artist. ... Reason is a popular music software program developed by Swedish software developers Propellerhead Software. ... For the television term, see Virtual studio. ...


DJ's and producers using tracks or sounds from acid house that appeared in the 1990s and 2000s include Chris Liberator, 808 State, DJ Pierre, Chemical Brothers, Fatboy Slim, Terry Mullen, Luke Vibert, Aphex Twin, and many others including artists far outside the acid house genre such as Madonna, the Beastie Boys, Nine Inch Nails, and The Prodigy.[13] For the American state with the area code 808, see Hawaii. ... The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline for Music. ... The Chemical Brothers are an English electronic music duo, comprised of Tom Rowlands and Ed Simons. ... FatBoy Slim (born Quentin Leo Cook on July 31, 1963,[1] also known as Norman Cook) is a British big beat musician. ... Luke Vibert is a Cornish recording artist and producer known for his work in many subgenres of electronica. ... Richard D. James redirects here. ... This article is about the American entertainer. ... The Beastie Boys are a hip hop musical group from New York City consisting of Michael Mike D Diamond, Adam MCA Yauch, Adam Ad-Rock Horovitz. ... NIN redirects here. ... This article is about the English band. ...


Etymology of the term

There are conflicting accounts about how the term acid came to be used to describe this style of house music. British performer and musician Genesis P-Orridge from the experimental music collective Psychic TV has claimed that he invented the term "acid house".[citation needed] However, this claim is disputed by Fred Giannelli, another member of Psychic TV.[14] Even P-Orridge himself has given a different account of his introduction to the genre: In an interview in the 1999 documentary Better Living Through Circuitry, he states that when he asked a Chicago record store clerk for the weirdest records on hand, he was pointed to the "acid" section. P-Orridge claims that he merely listened to them to try to figure out what made them psychedelic, and concluded that the tempo was the key element. Neil Megson redirects here. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Boston, Massachusetts born Fred Giannelli began experimenting with electronics in the late 70s as Turning Shrines. ... Better Living Through Circuitry is a 1999 documentary about Electronic music and Dance culture. ...


The reference to "acid" may also be a celebratory reference to psychedelic drugs in general, such as LSD, as well as a popular mid-1980s club drug Ecstasy (MDMA). [15] A fractal pattern similar to the spiral patterns that may be seen as the result of some psychedelic drug experiences. ... Club drugs are a loosely defined category of recreational drugs which are popular at dance clubs, parties, and rock concerts. ... MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine), most commonly known by the street names ecstasy or XTC (for more names see the full list), is a synthetic entactogen of the phenethylamine family, whose primary effect is believed to be the stimulation of secretion as well as inhibition of re-uptake of large amounts...


Other accounts of the etymology of the term are not based on the LSD or psychedelic connotations. One such account is that before DJ Pierre's "Acid Trax" (an early example of the genre and credited to his group Phuture) was given a title for commercial release, it was played at a nightclub by DJ Ron Hardy, where it was called "Ron Hardy's Acid Track" (or "Ron Hardy's Acid Trax"). After the release of Phuture's song, and the term Acid House came into common parlance.[16] Philippe Renaud, a journalist for La Presse in Montreal, states that the term Acid house was "Coined in Chicago in 1987 to describe the sound of the Roland 303 bass machine." Renaud states that acid house music "made its first significant recording appearance on Phuture's Acid Trax (DJ Pierre) in that year."[17] Electronic music historian Dan Sicko also advances this theory in his book Techno Rebels, stating acid house is "named for its psychedelic sounds," particularly that of the Roland TB-303.[18] The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline for Music. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Phuture (nowadays called Phuture 303) are a Chicago-based acid house group founded in 1985 by DJ Pierre, Spanky and Herb J. Their twelve-minute track Acid Trax (1986) is one of several recordings that lay claim to being the first-ever acid house record. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... La Presse, founded in 1884, is a large-circulation French-language daily newspaper published in Montreal, Quebec. ...


The theory that acid was a derogatory reference towards the use of samples in acid house music was repeated in the press and in the British House of Commons.[19] In this theory, the term acid came from the slang term "acid burning", which the Oxford Dictionary of New Words calls "a term for stealing." Since acid house makes substantial use of sampling, this can be deemed "stealing from other tracks."[20] One of the problems with this theory is that although early house music producers did use samples, most acid house music was fully original compositions made using sequencers and synthesizers. Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin...


In 1991, UK Libertarian advocate Paul Staines claimed that he coined the non-drug-oriented explanation (equating "acid burning" with stealing) to discourage the government from adopting anti-rave party legislation. Staines stated that he spread this misinformation because he believed that the British public would deem the use of drugs at rave parties to be unacceptable, and would therefore support legislation against rave parties.[21][22] Paul Staines is a political blogger. ...


Once the term acid house became more widely used, participants at acid house-themed events in the UK and Ibiza made the psychedelic drug connotations a reality by using club drugs such as ecstasy.[23][24] The association of acid house, MDMA, and smiley faces was observed in New York City by late 1988.[25] This coincided with an increasing level of scrutiny and sensationalism in the mainstream press,[26] although conflicting accounts about the degree of connection between acid house music and drugs continued to surface.[27] Club drugs are a loosely defined category of recreational drugs which are popular at dance clubs, parties, and rock concerts. ... MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine), most commonly known today by the street name Ecstasy (often abbreviated E, X, or XTC), is a semisynthetic member of the phenethylamine class of psychoactive drugs. ...


Notable acid house artists

  • PhutureChicago-based group of acid-house pioneers, formed in 1985 and best known for its classic 1987 single "Acid Tracks," which is considered to be the 12-inch single that gave birth to the acid house movement.
  • DJ Pierre, a member of Phuture, released various solo acid house tracks and remixes
  • Armando—Chicago acid house musician, for "Land of Confusion" and many other seminal tracks
  • Mr. Lee - another Chicago house musician who released several acid house tracks in 1988
  • Fast Eddie - another Chicago house musician, for "Acid Thunder"
  • Adonis - another Chicago house musician, for "We're Rockin Down The House"
  • Bam Bam - another Chicago house musician, for "Where Is Your Child" and "Give It To Me"
  • Lil Louis - another Chicago house musician, for "Frequency"
  • 808 State - a Manchester, UK-based group of house/techno musicians, formed in 1988. Their first album, Newbuild, was acid house, and occasional acid house influences appear in later tracks.
  • A Guy Called Gerald - 808 State cofounder, for the single "Voodoo Ray"
  • The KLF - for "What Time Is Love?" and their self-described "stadium house" sound, which mixes acid house with hip-hop, pop, and stadium rock/chant influences
  • The Shamen - Psychedelic techno act formed as a rock band in Aberdeen, Scotland in 1986. One of the first groups to bring acid house and techno into the pop mainstream.
  • Psychic TV, released early albums of acid house music in 1988 as fake compilations.
  • S'Express - Brought acid house to number one in the United Kingdom
  • Baby Ford - UK-based band, formed in 1988. Their first single, Oochy Koochy and first album, Fordtrax was influenced by acid house.
  • D Mob - Best known for 1988 UK #3 hit "We Call It Acieed"
  • Guru Josh - for the 1989 single "Infinity (1990s... Time For The Guru)"

Phuture (nowadays called Phuture 303) are a Chicago-based acid house group founded in 1985 by DJ Pierre, Spanky and Herb J. Their twelve-minute track Acid Trax (1986) is one of several recordings that lay claim to being the first-ever acid house record. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... See also: other events of 1985 Musical groups established in 1985 Record labels established in 1985 list of years in music 1980s in music // January 28 - Various artists, including Ray Charles, Bob Dylan, Michael Jackson, Billy Joel, Cyndi Lauper, Steve Perry, Kenny Loggins, Willie Nelson, Lionel Richie, Smokey Robinson, Kenny... See also: Musical groups established in 1987 Record labels established in 1987 // January 3 - Aretha Franklin becomes the first woman inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. ... Acid Tracks is a 12-inch single released in 1987 by Phuture. ... The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline for Music. ... Mr. ... Fast Eddie aka Eddie Smith is an African American house music producer from Chicago, Illinois. ... Adonis is a Chicago acid house pioneer with classic Were Rockin Down The House released in 1986. ... Bam Bam may refer to: Bam Bam, a UK radio presenter Bam Bam Bigelow, an American professional wrestler Ken Weekes, a West Indian cricketer Bam Bam, a Chicago acid house artist Bamm-Bamm Rubble, a fictional character on the animated television show The Flintstones Category: ... Lil Louis is the stage name used by Chicago-born house music producer and DJ Louis Burns. ... For the American state with the area code 808, see Hawaii. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... // Peter Ruzicka became director of the Hamburg State Opera and State Philharmonic Orchestra. ... A Guy Called Gerald is the stage name for musician, record producer and DJ Gerald Simpson from Moss Side in Manchester, United Kingdom. ... Early Acid House track by A Guy Called Gerald. ... KLF redirects here. ... What Time Is Love? is a song and - in different mixes - a series of singles by acid house pioneers The KLF. What Time Is Love? is one of the landmark songs of The KLFs career and, in its original form, an acid house anthem. ... The Shamen were an experimental electronic music band, initially formed in Aberdeen, Scotland by Colin Angus (b. ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... SExpress (pronounced ess-express; sometimes spelled SXpress or S-Express; otherwise known as Victim Of the Ghetto) were a British dance music act from the late 1980s who had one of the earliest commercial successes in the acid house genre. ... // Peter Ruzicka became director of the Hamburg State Opera and State Philharmonic Orchestra. ... D Mob (or D-Mob) is one of the stage names used by British house music producer Dancin Danny D. The 1988 UK hit We Call It Acieed hit #3 in the singles chart, and was one of a wave of acid house singles to enjoy success that year. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

See also

The Second Summer of Love is a name given to the period in 1988 in Britain, during the rise of Acid House music and the euphoric explosion of unlicensed Ecstasy-fuelled rave parties[1]. The term generally refers to both the summers of 1988/9[2] [3] when electronic dance... Lords of Acid is a Belgian acid house band from the 1990s that started as a spinoff of Praga Khan with the controversial New Beat single I Sit on Acid in 1988. ... Sunrise/Back to the Future were the most widely publicised Acid House promoters in the UK. They staged a series of large scale events in venues such as aircraft hangars, equestrian centres and large warehouses. ... Genesis88 was a party promotion crew who threw some of the first acid house parties also known as raves in the United Kingdom from 1988 to 1992. ... An NME Originals issue covering the Madchester movement. ... A free party is a party free from the restrictions of the legal club scene. ... ACID TECHNO RULES Acid techno is the term used to describe a style of techno that originated in the London squat party scene in the mid 1990s. ... For other uses, see Rave (disambiguation). ... This is a list of electronic music genres, sub-genres and styles, though for the latter, not all possess their own article (in which case, see the main genre article). ...

External links

References

  1. ^ Shapiro, Peter (2000). Modulations: A History of Electronic Music. Caipirinha Productions Inc., 70. ISBN 0819564982. 
  2. ^ Shapiro, Peter (2000). Modulations: A History of Electronic Music. Caipirinha Productions Inc., 76–77. ISBN 0819564982. 
  3. ^ Shapiro, Peter (2000). Modulations: A History of Electronic Music. Caipirinha Productions Inc., 32. ISBN 0819564982. 
  4. ^ Shapiro, Peter (2000). Modulations: A History of Electronic Music. Caipirinha Productions Inc., 34. ISBN 0819564982. 
  5. ^ Shapiro, Peter (2000). Modulations: A History of Electronic Music. Caipirinha Productions Inc., 60. ISBN 0819564982. 
  6. ^ Shapiro, Peter (2000). Modulations: A History of Electronic Music. Caipirinha Productions Inc., 64. ISBN 0819564982. 
  7. ^ Shapiro, Peter (2000). Modulations: A History of Electronic Music. Caipirinha Productions Inc., 62. ISBN 0819564982. 
  8. ^ Shapiro, Peter (2000). Modulations: A History of Electronic Music. Caipirinha Productions Inc., 62. ISBN 0819564982. 
  9. ^ Unknown. Sunrise Profile. [1]. Retrieved on 2008-01-15. “Youngsters were so high on Ecstacy and cannabis they ripped the birds’ heads off;”
  10. ^ Rave's relationship to the Media. Fantazia Rave Archive. Retrieved on 2007-10-23.
  11. ^ The Independent, March 3, 1990: “Acid House, whose emblem is a vapid, anonymous smile, is the simplest and gentlest of the Eighties’ youth manifestations … non-aggressive (except in terms of decibels).”
  12. ^ Dave Walsh (2003). The Alan Moore interview. Blather. Retrieved on 2007-07-09. “There were big coincidences happening around the work [sic] and then all of a sudden the central image of it has been nicked on all these acid house t-shirts everywhere.”
  13. ^ Unknown (2005). [www.thetechnocracy.net/techschool/2005/09/23/equipment-profile-the-roland-tb-303-bassline/ Equipment Profile: The Roland TB-303 Bassline]. [2]. Retrieved on 2008-01-14.
  14. ^ Giannelli, Fred, in an interview (archived from http://fopi.net/inter/fred.htm in July 2007) for the Family Ov Psychick Individuals (FOPI) Psychic TV fan club in June 2000.
  15. ^ The Oxford Dictionary of New Words (Knowles, Elizabeth [ed], Elliott, Elizabeth [ed]). Second Edition, Oxford University Press, 1997. ISBN 0-19-863152-9. — The word acid here is probably taken from the record Acid Trax by Phuture (in Chicago slang, acid burning is a term for stealing and this type of music relies heavily on sampling, or stealing from other tracks); a popular theory that it is a reference to the drug LSD is denied by its followers (but compare acid rock, a sixties psychedelic rock craze, which certainly was).
  16. ^ Cheeseman, Phil. "The History Of House".
  17. ^ Philippe Renaud: Look it up in the dictionary—An alphabetical guide to electronic music
  18. ^ Sicko, Dan, Techno Rebels, Billboard Books, pp. 104, ISBN 0-8230-8428-0 
  19. ^ Quoted in the British House of Commons Hansard, 9 March 1990, column 1111—the term acid house party derives from Chicago slang describing the theft and subsequent mixing of recording tracks played at warehouse parties. But because of its association with drug LSD or acid, the promoters prefer to use descriptions such as all-night party."
  20. ^ Rushkoff, Douglas (1994, 2nd ed. 2002). Cyberia: Life in the Trenches of Cyberspace. ISBN 1-903083-24-9& House DJs would sample pieces of music that were called bites so (others spell it bytes, to indicate that these are digital samples that can be measured in terms of RAM size). Especially evocative bites were called acid bites." Thus, music of the house, made up of these acid bites, became known as acid house. When
  21. ^ Staines, Paul (1991). "Acid House Parties Against the Lifestyle Police and the Safety Nazis" article in Political Notes (ISSN 0267-7059), issue 55 (ISBN 1-85637-039-9). Also quoted in Saunders, Nicholas with Doblin, Rick (July 1, 1996). Ecstasy: Dance, Trance & Transformation, Quick American Publishing Company. ISBN 0-932551-20-3.
  22. ^ Garratt, Sheryl (May 6, 1999). Adventures in Wonderland: Decade of Club Culture. Headline Book Publishing Ltd. (UK). ISBN 0-7472-5846-5.
  23. ^ DeRogatis, Jim (December 1, 2003). Turn on Your Mind: Four Decades of Great Psychedelic Rock, 436. Google Print. ISBN 0-634-05548-8 (accessed June 9, 2005). Also available in print from Hal Leonard.
  24. ^ Donnally, Trish. (October 17, 1988). Article published in the San Francisco Chronicle and distributed via the Los Angeles Times Syndicate to other newspapers and published under various headlines—British youths, mostly younger than 20, are flocking to members-only nightclubs, taking a cheap tab of LSD ($5) or the much more expensive designer drug Ecstasy ($30) and then dancing all night long, sometimes - with the aid of amyl nitrate poppers — until 10 the next morning.
  25. ^ Foderaro, Lisa (1988-12-18), “At some Manhattan nightclubs, 'X' marks the 'inner circle's' perfect drug”, San Diego Union: A-45  This article was distributed by the New York Times News Service and published under various headlines in several U.S. newspapers. Most striking is the parallel rise at some nightclubs of a new kind of music called "acid house," which is a stripped-down, highly percussive disco sound — punctuated by television jingles, spoken non sequiturs and high-pitched beeps — whose overall effect is psychedelic. "The music and the drug were made for each other," said a 22-year-old disc jockey from Hawaii wearing a T-shirt that reads A (plus) E (equals) (Smiley Face) — read as a "Acid House Plus Ecstasy Equals Happiness."
  26. ^ Takiff, Jonathan. (December 14, 1988). Philadelphia Daily News—BBC banned all records that mentioned acid
  27. ^ Leary, Mike. (November 24, 1988). Philadelphia Inquirer.
Additional references
  • Collin, Matthew; Godfrey, John. (1st edition, April 1997; 2nd edition, November 15, 1998). Altered State: The Story of Ecstasy Culture and Acid House. Serpent's Tail. ISBN 1-85242-377-3 (1st edition); ISBN 1-85242-604-7 (2nd edition).
  • Bussmann, Jane. (1998) Once in a Lifetime: The Crazy Days of Acid House and Afterwards. London: Virgin. ISBN 0-7535-0260-7.
  • Shapiro, Peter (ed.), et al. (October 15, 2000). Modulations: A History of Electronic Music: Throbbing Words on Sound. Charles Rivers Publishing Co. ISBN 1-891024-06-X.
  • A bibliography of acid house references in 1988–1989 periodicals
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Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... House music is a style of electronic dance music that was developed by dance club DJs in Chicago in the early to mid-1980s. ... Ambient house, a mix between house music and ambient music is a music style that describes itself as dreamy, chill out and quiet music. ... Chicago house is a style of house music. ... Dark-house is a type of electronic dance music. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Dream house (also known as dream trance), was a short-lived dance music style which had a big success on the dance scene between 1995 and 1997. ... Electro house (also known as dirty house, electrotech, and often shortened to electro) is a subgenre of house music that rose to become one of the most prominent genres of electronic dance music in 2004-today. ... New York house, also known as New York garage, US garage or just garage, is a style of house music born in the Paradise Garage nightclub in New York City, USA in the early 1980s. ... Ghetto house, booty house or Juke house is a type of Chicago House which started being recognised in its own right from around 1992 onwards. ... Hard house is a style of electronic music that evolved from mixing techno and house music in the 1990s. ... Hip house, also known as house rap, is a mixture of house music and hip-hop which arose during the 1980s in New York. ... Italo house (often simply referred to as Italo) is a form of house music popular in Italy, Britain and United States since the late 1980s that fuses house and Italo disco. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... This article is about music. ... It has been suggested that Dark house be merged into this article or section. ... Pumpin house is a subgenre of House music. ... Tech house is a fusion of house and techno music. ... Tribal house is a form of electronic dance music derived from house music but being highly drum-centric and often without a core melody. ... Electronic dance music is a broad set of percussive music genres that largely inherit from 1970s disco music and, to some extent, the experimental pop music of Kraftwerk. ... This is a list of electronic music genres, sub-genres and styles, though for the latter, not all possess their own article (in which case, see the main genre article). ... Ambient music is a musical genre in which sound is more important than notes. ... This article is about breakbeat, the electronic dance music genre. ... Drum and bass (commonly abbreviated to d&b, DnB, dnb, dnb, drum n bass, drum & bass) is a type of electronic dance music also known as jungle which emerged in the late 1980s. ... Electro, short for electro funk (also known as robot hip hop and Electro hop) is an electronic style of hip hop directly influenced by Kraftwerk and funk records (unlike earlier rap records which were closer to disco). ... Hardcore (sometimes ardcore) is a term that has been used to describe a variety of related electronic dance music styles over almost two decades. ... House music is a style of electronic dance music that was developed by dance club DJs in Chicago in the early to mid-1980s. ... Synthpop is a subgenre of New Wave in which the synthesizer is the dominant musical instrument. ... For the comic book character previously known as Techno, see Fixer (comics). ... Trance is a style of electronic music that developed in the 1990s. ... Trip hop (also known as the Bristol sound) is a term coined by United Kingdom dance magazine Mixmag, to describe a musical trend in the mid-1990s; trip hop is downtempo electronic music that grew out of Englands hip hop and house scenes. ... UK garage (also known as UKG or just garage) refers to several different varieties of modern electronic dance music generally connected to the evolution of house in the United Kingdom in the mid 1990s. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Acid house - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2646 words)
The origins of Acid House can be traced back to the 1980's when DJ’s used the House music that was already popular in Chicago and New York mixed with the “squelch” and deep baseline of the Roland TB-303 synthesizer.
Eventually Acid House spread across the Atlantic and arrived in the United Kingdom where it would become the central part of the early rave scene.
Acid House was around before the Acid Trax release by Phuture in 1987 but this release would start the Acid House movement.
Acid house - definition of Acid house in Encyclopedia (311 words)
Acid house is a variant of house music characterized by the use of simple tone generators with tempo-controlled resonant filters.
The term "acid" was used in Chicago at the time as a term for the squelchy "acid" sounds of such bass synthesizers such as the TB-303, and has no connection to LSD (in fact, the drug most commonly associated with the acid house scene was MDMA, or Ecstasy).
Acid house music became a central part of the early rave scene in the U.K., and the yellow smiley became its emblem.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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