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Encyclopedia > Achilles
The Wrath of Achilles, by François-Léon Benouville (18211859) (Musée Fabre)

In Greek mythology, Achilles (also Akhilleus or Achilleus; Ancient Greek: Ἀχιλλεύς) was a Greek hero of the Trojan War, the central character and greatest warrior of Homer's Iliad, which takes for its theme the Wrath of Achilles. Look up Achilles in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Achilles is the name of the Greek mythological hero of the Trojan War. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Esther ou Odalisque The Wrath of Achilles, by François-Léon Benouville (Musée Fabre) François-Léon Benouville (Paris, March 30, 1821 - February 16, 1859) was a French painter. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Musée Fabre is a museum in the French city of Montpellier, capital of the Hérault département. ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... For other uses, see Hero (disambiguation). ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... A fictional character is any person who appears in a work of fiction. ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ...


Achilles also has the attributes of being the most handsome of the heroes assembled against Troy,[1] as well as the quickest. Central to his myth is his relationship with Patroclus, characterized in different sources as either deep friendship or passionate love. A cup depicting Achilles bandaging Patroklos arm, by the Sosias Painter. ...


Achilles's death came as divine retribution for his hubristic murder of Troilus. The Trojan boy had spurned his sexual advances and was killed by the enraged hero inside Apollo's temple.[2] Later legends (beginning with a poem by Statius in the first century AD) state that Achilles was invulnerable on all of his body except for his heel. These legends state that Achilles was killed in battle by an arrow to the heel, and so an "Achilles' heel" or Achilles' tendon has come to mean a person's principal weakness. Hubris or hybris (Greek ), according to its modern usage, is exaggerated self pride or self-confidence (overbearing pride), often resulting in fatal retribution. ... Troilus is a character in medieval and Renaissance versions of the legend of the Trojan War. ... Pederastic courtship scene Athenian black-figure amphora, 5th c. ... Greek Temenos ([1], from the Greek verb to cut) (plural = temene) is a piece of land cut off and assigned as an official domain, especially to kings and chiefs, or a piece of land marked off from common uses and dedicated to a god, a sanctuary, holy grove or holy... Publius Papinius Statius, (c. ... An Achilles’ heel is a fatal weakness in spite of overall strength, actually or potentially leading to downfall. ...

Contents

Birth

Achilles was the son of the mortal Peleus, king of the Myrmidons, and the immortal sea nymph Thetis in Farsala, Thessaly. Zeus and Poseidon had been rivals for the hand of Thetis until Prometheus, the fire-bringer, warned Zeus of a prophecy that Thetis would bear a son greater than his father. For this reason, the two gods withdrew their pursuit, and had her wed to Peleus.[3] Peleus consigns Achilles to Chirons care, white-ground lekythos by the Edinburgh Painter, ca. ... The Myrmidons (or Myrmidones Μυρμιδόνες) were an ancient nation of Greek mythology. ... This article is about the Greek sea nymph. ... Coordinates 39°18′ N 22°23′ E Country Greece Periphery Thessaly Prefecture Larissa Population 10,812 source (2001) Elevation 160 m Postal code 403 00 Area code 24910 Licence plate code ΡΙ Website farsala. ... Map showing Thessaly periphery in Greece Thessaly (Θεσσαλια; modern Greek Thessalía; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is one of the 13 peripheries of Greece, and is further sub-divided into 4 prefectures. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... Neptune reigns in the city of Bristol. ... In Greek mythology, Prometheus (Ancient Greek: , forethought)[1] is a Titan known for his wily intelligence, who stole fire from Zeus and gave it to mortals for their use. ...


As with most mythology there is a tale which offers an alternative version of these events: in Argonautica (iv.760) Hera alludes to Thetis's chaste resistance to the advances of Zeus, that Thetis had been so loyal to Hera's marriage bond that she coolly rejected him. The Argonautica (Greek: ) is a Greek epic poem written by Apollonius Rhodius in the 3rd century BC. The only surviving Hellenistic epic, the Argonautica tells the myth of the voyage of Jason and the Argonauts to retrieve the Golden Fleece from the mythical land of Colchis. ... For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ...

The Education of Achilles (ca. 1772), by James Barry
The Education of Achilles (ca. 1772), by James Barry

According to the incomplete poem Achilleis written by Statius in the first century AD, and to no other sources, when Achilles was born Thetis tried to make him immortal by dipping him in the river Styx. However, she forgot to wet the heel she held him by, leaving him vulnerable at that spot. (See Achilles heel, Achilles' tendon.) It is not clear if this version of events was known earlier. In another version of this story, Thetis anointed the boy in ambrosia and put him on top of a fire to burn away the mortal parts of his body. She was interrupted by Peleus and abandoned both father and son in a rage.[4] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 752 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2335 × 1861 pixel, file size: 534 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 752 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2335 × 1861 pixel, file size: 534 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... James Barry (1741-1806), Irish-English painter, best remembered for his six part series of paintings entitled The Progress of Human Culture. ... Publius Papinius Statius, (c. ... Styx may refer to: Styx (band), an American rock band popular in the 1970s and 1980s Styx (album), the first album released by the band Styx in 1972 Styx forest, a forest in Tasmania, Australia Styx (Game), a 1983 game by Windmill Software Styx (MUD), a text-based game Styx... In Greek mythology, Achilles is made invulnerable by being dipped in the river Styx by his mother, Thetis. ... Posterior view of the foot and leg, showing the Achilles tendon (tendo calcaneus). ... In ancient Greek mythology, Ambrosia (Greek ) is sometimes the food, sometimes the drink, of the gods, often depicted as conferring immortality on whoever consumes it. ...


However none of the sources before Statius makes any reference to this invulnerability. To the contrary, in the Iliad Homer mentions Achilles being wounded: in Book 21 the Paeonian hero Asteropaeus, son of Pelegon, challenged Achilles by the river Scamander. He cast two spears at once, one grazed Achilles' elbow, "drawing a spurt of blood." Paionia (Romanized as Paeonia) was, in ancient geography, the land of the Paionians (or Paiones, Paeonians), the exact boundaries of which, like the early history of its inhabitants, are very obscure. ... In the Iliad Asteropaios (Latin: Asteropaeus) was the leader of the Paionians along with Pyraichmes, the Paionians were Trojan allies. ...


Also in the fragmentary poems of the Epic Cycle in which we can find description of the hero's death, Kùpria (unknown author), Aithiopis by Arctinus of Miletus, Ilias Mikrà by Lesche of Mytilene, Iliou pèrsis by Arctinus of Miletus, there is no trace of any reference to his invulnerability or his famous (achilles) heel; in the later vase-paintings presenting Achilles' death, the arrow (or in many cases, arrows) hit his body. The Epic Cycle (Greek: Επικός Κύκλος) was a collection of Ancient Greek epic poems that related the story of the Trojan War, which includes the Kypria, the Aithiopis, the Little Iliad, the Iliou persis (The Sack of Troy), the Nostoi (Returns), and the Telegony. ... The Cypria is one of the lost sections of the eight volume cycle that told the full story of the Trojan War. ... The Aithiopis (Greek: Αἰθιοπίς; Latin: Aethiopis) is a lost epic of ancient Greek literature. ... Arctinus of Miletus was one of the earliest poets of Greece and contributors to the epic cycle. ... The Little Iliad (Greek: Ἰλιὰς μικρά, Ilias mikra; Latin: Ilias parva) is a lost epic of ancient Greek literature. ... Arctinus of Miletus was one of the earliest poets of Greece and contributors to the epic cycle. ...


Peleus entrusted Achilles to Chiron the Centaur, on Mt. Pelion, to be raised.[5] Chiron and Achilles In Greek mythology, Chiron (hand) — sometimes transliterated Cheiron or rarely Kiron — was held as the superlative centaur among his brethren. ... This article is about the mythological creatures. ... It may have been generated by a computer or by a translator with limited proficiency in English or the original language. ...


Achilles in the Trojan War

The Rage of Achilles, by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo
The Rage of Achilles, by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo

The first two lines of the Iliad read: Download high resolution version (814x1023, 163 KB)The Rage of Achilles by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo (1696-1770) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (814x1023, 163 KB)The Rage of Achilles by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo (1696-1770) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, also known as Gianbattista or Giambattista Tiepolo (March 5, 1696 - March 27, 1770) was a Venetian painter and printmaker, considered among the last Grand Manner fresco painters from the Venetian republic. ...

μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος
οὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί' Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε' ἔθηκεν,
Anger be now your song, immortal one,
Akhilleus' anger, doomed and ruinous,

Achilles is the only mortal to experience consuming rage (menis). His anger is at some times wavering, at other times absolute. The humanization of Achilles by the events of the war is an important theme of the narrative.


Telephus

When the Greeks left for the Trojan War, they accidentally stopped in Mysia, ruled by King Telephus. In the resulting battle, Achilles gave Telephus a wound that would not heal; Telephus consulted an oracle, who stated that "he that wounded shall heal". Mysia. ... A Greek mythological figure, Telephus referred to two different people. ...


According to other reports in Euripides' lost play about Telephus, he went to Aulis pretending to be a beggar and asked Achilles to heal his wound. Achilles refused, claiming to have no medical knowledge. Alternatively, Telephus held Orestes for ransom, the ransom being Achilles' aid in healing the wound. Odysseus reasoned that the spear had inflicted the wound; therefore, the spear must be able to heal it. Pieces of the spear were scraped off onto the wound and Telephus was healed. This is an example of sympathetic magic. A statue of Euripides. ... In Greek mythology, Aulis was a daughter of King Ogyges and Thebe. ... The Remorse of Orestes by William-Adolphe Bouguereau For other uses, see Orestes (disambiguation). ... For other meanings, see Odysseus (disambiguation) Ulysses redirects here. ... Magic (also called magick to distinguish it from stage magic) is a supposed way of influencing the world through supernatural, mystical, or paranormal means. ...


Cycnus of Colonae

According to traditions related by Plutarch and the Byzantine scholar John Tzetzes, once the Greek ships arrived in Troy, Achilles fought and killed Cycnus of Colonae, a son of Poseidon. Cycnus was invulnerable, except for his head.[6] Mestrius Plutarchus (Greek: Πλούταρχος; 46 - 127), better known in English as Plutarch, was a Greek historian, biographer, essayist, and Middle Platonist. ... John Tzetzes, was a Byzantine poet and grammarian, known to have lived at Constantinople during the 12th century. ... In Greek mythology, four people were known as Cycnus or Cygnus. ...


Troilus

According to Dares Phrygius' Account of the Destruction of Troy,[7] the Latin summary through which the story of Achilles was transmitted to medieval Europe, while Troilus, the youngest son of Priam and Hecuba (who some say was fathered by Apollo), was watering his horses at the Lion Fountain outside the walls of Troy, Achilles saw him and fell in love with his beauty (whose "loveliness of form" was described by Ibycus as being like "gold thrice refined"). The youth rejected his advances and took refuge inside the temple of Apollo. Achilles pursued him into the sanctuary and decapitated him on the god's own altar.[8] At the time, Troilus was said to be a year short of his twentieth birthday, and the First Vatican Mythographer reports that if Troilus had lived to be twenty, Troy would have been invincible. Dares Phrygius, according to Homer (Iliad, v. ... Troilus is a character in medieval and Renaissance versions of the legend of the Trojan War. ... King Priam killed by Neoptolemus, son of Achilles, detail of an Attic red-figure amphora In Greek mythology, Priam (Greek Πρίαμος, Priamos) was the king of Troy during the Trojan War, and youngest son of Laomedon. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... Ibycus (), of Rhegium in Italy, Greek lyric poet, contemporary of Anacreon, flourished in the 6th century BC. He was included in the canonical list of nine lyric poets by the scholars of Hellenistic Alexandria. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


In the Iliad

Achilles sacrificing to Zeus, from the Ambrosian Iliad, a 5th century illuminated manuscript.
Achilles sacrificing to Zeus, from the Ambrosian Iliad, a 5th century illuminated manuscript.
Main article: Iliad

Homer's Iliad is the most famous narrative of Achilles' deeds in the Trojan War. The Homeric epic only covers a few weeks of the war, and does not narrate Achilles' death. It begins with Achilles' withdrawal from battle after he is dishonored by Agamemnon, the commander of the Achaean forces. Agamemnon had taken a woman named Chryseis as his slave. Her father Chryses, a priest of Apollo, begged Agamemnon to return her to him. Agamemnon refused and Apollo sent a plague amongst the Greeks. The prophet Calchas correctly determined the source of the troubles but would not speak unless Achilles vowed to protect him. Achilles did so and Calchas declared Chryseis must be returned to her father. Agamemnon consented, but then commanded that Achilles' battle prize Briseis be brought to replace Chryseis. Angry at the dishonor (and as he says later, because he loved Briseis)[9] and at the urging of Thetis, Achilles refused to fight or lead his troops alongside the other Greek forces. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1952x1228, 330 KB)Achilles sacrificing to Zeus from the Ambrosian Iliad. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1952x1228, 330 KB)Achilles sacrificing to Zeus from the Ambrosian Iliad. ... For other uses, see Zeus (disambiguation). ... This article needs translation. ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... This article is about a character in Greek mythology. ... This article is about the ancient people of the Achaeans. ... In Greek mythology, Chryseis (Greek: Χρύσηίς, Khrysēís) was a Trojan woman, the daughter of Chryses. ... Chryses attempting to ransom his daughter Chryseis from Agamemnon, Apulian red-figure crater by the Athens 1714 Painter, ca. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Kalchas Thestórides (son of Thestor), or Calchas (brazen) for short, a loyal Argive, was a powerful seer, a gift of Apollo: as an augur, Calchas had no rival in the camp (Iliad i, E.V. Rieu translation) Calchas prophesized that in order to gain a favourable... In Greek mythology, Brisēis (Greek Βρισηίς) was a Trojan widow (from Lyrnessus) who was abducted during the Trojan War by Achilles upon the death of her three brothers and husband, King Mynes of Lyrnessus, in the fight. ...


As the battle turned against the Greeks, Nestor declared that had Agamemnon not angered Achilles, the Trojans would not be winning and urged Agamemnon to appease Achilles. Agamemnon agreed and sent Odysseus and two other chieftains to Achilles with the offer of the return of Briseis and other gifts. Achilles refused and urged the Greeks to sail home as he was planning to do. In Greek mythology, Nestor of Gerênia (Greek: Νέστωρ) was the son of Neleus and Chloris, and the King of Pylos. ... For other meanings, see Odysseus (disambiguation) Ulysses redirects here. ...


Eventually, however, hoping to retain glory despite his absence from the battle, Achilles prayed to his mother Thetis, asking her to plead with Zeus to allow the Trojans to push back the Greek forces.


The Trojans, led by Hector, subsequently pushed the Greek army back toward the beaches and assaulted the Greek ships. With the Greek forces on the verge of absolute destruction, Achilles consented to Patroclus leading the Myrmidons into battle, though Achilles would remain at his camp. Patroclus succeeded in pushing the Trojans back from the beaches, but was killed by Hector before he could lead a proper assault on the city of Troy. For other uses, see Hector (disambiguation). ... The Myrmidons (or Myrmidones Μυρμιδόνες) were an ancient nation of Greek mythology. ...


Achilles versus Hector

Triumphant Achilles dragging Hector's lifeless body in front of the Gates of Troy. (From a panoramic fresco on the upper level of the main hall of the Achilleion)
Triumphant Achilles dragging Hector's lifeless body in front of the Gates of Troy. (From a panoramic fresco on the upper level of the main hall of the Achilleion)

After receiving the news of the death of Patroclus from Antilochus, the son of Nestor, Achilles grieved over his friend and held many funeral games in his honor. His mother Thetis came to comfort the distraught Achilles. She persuaded Hephaestus to make new armor for him, in place of the armor that Patroclus had been wearing which was taken by Hector. The new armor included the Shield of Achilles, described in great detail by the poet. For other uses of Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... This article is about the artistic term Panorama. ... For other uses, see Fresco (disambiguation). ... Achilleion Palace Achilleas thniskon in the gardens of the Achilleion. ... In Greek mythology, Antilochus (also transliterated as Antílokhos) was the son of Nestor, king of Pylos. ... Hephaestus (pronounced or ; Greek Hēphaistos) was a Greek god whose Roman equivalent was Vulcan; he was the god of technology, blacksmiths, craftsmen, artisans, sculptors, metals and metallurgy, and fire. ... For other uses, see Hector (disambiguation). ... The Shield Described in the Iliad The Shield of Achilles is described in the Iliad in great detail. ...


Enraged over the death of Patroclus, Achilles ended his refusal to fight and took the field killing many men in his rage but always seeking out Hector. Achilles even engaged in battle with the river god Scamander who became angry that Achilles was choking his waters with all the men he killed. The god tried to drown Achilles but was stopped by Hera and Hephaestus. Zeus himself took note of Achilles' rage and sent the gods to restrain him so that he would not go on to sack Troy itself, seeming to show that the unhindered rage of Achilles could defy fate itself as Troy was not meant to be destroyed yet. Finally Achilles found his prey. Achilles chased Hector around the wall of Troy three times before Athena, in the form of Hector's favorite and dearest brother, Deiphobus, persuaded Hector to fight face to face. Achilles got his vengeance, killing Hector with a blow to the neck. He then tied Hector's body to his chariot and dragged it around the battlefield for nine days. In Greek mythology, Scamander (Skamandros) was an Oceanid, son of Oceanus and Tethys. ... For other uses, see Hera (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Athena (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Deiphobus was a son of Priam and Hecuba. ... For other uses, see Chariot (disambiguation). ...


With the assistance of the god Hermes, Hector's father, Priam, went to Achilles' tent and convinced Achilles to permit him to allow Hector his funeral rites. The final passage in the Iliad is Hector's funeral, after which the doom of Troy is just a matter of time. For other uses, see Hermes (disambiguation). ...


Penthesilea

Achilles, after his temporary truce with Priam, fought and killed the Amazonian warrior queen Penthesilea. The Amazons (in Greek, ) were a mythical ancient nation of all-female warriors. ... In Greek mythology, Penthesilea (also spelled Penthesilia) was an Amazonian queen, daughter of Ares and Otrera, sister of Hippolyte, Antiope and Melanippe. ...


Memnon, and the death of Achilles

Achilles dying in the gardens of the Achilleion in Corfu
Achilles dying in the gardens of the Achilleion in Corfu

Following the death of Patroclus, Achilles's closest companion was Nestor's son Antilochus. When Memnon of Ethiopia killed Antilochus, Achilles was once again drawn onto the battlefield to seek revenge. The fight between Achilles and Memnon over Antilochus echoes that of Achilles and Hector over Patroclus, except that Memnon (unlike Hector) was also the son of a goddess. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1243 KB) Summary I am the author. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1243 KB) Summary I am the author. ... This article is about the Greek island Kerkyra known in English as Corfu or Corcyra. ... This article is about the Greek island Kerkyra known in English as Corfu or Corcyra. ... In Greek mythology, Antilochus (also transliterated as Antílokhos) was the son of Nestor, king of Pylos. ... Memnon may refer to three men: Memnon (mythology), in Greek mythology Memnon (Fantasy Literature), in the Forgotten Realms setting Memnon of Heraclea was a Greek historian. ...


Many Homeric scholars argued that episode inspired many details in the Iliad's description of the death of Patroclus and Achilles' reaction to it. The episode then formed the basis of the cyclic epic Aethiopis, which was composed after the Iliad, possibly in the 7th century BC. The Aethiopis is now lost, except for scattered fragments quoted by later authors. The Epic Cycle (Greek: Επικός Κύκλος) was a collection of Ancient Greek epic poems that related the story of the Trojan War, which includes the Kypria, the Aithiopis, the Little Iliad, the Iliou persis (The Sack of Troy), the Nostoi (Returns), and the Telegony. ... The Aithiopis (Greek: Αἰθιοπίς; Latin: Aethiopis) is a lost epic of ancient Greek literature. ...


Quintus of Smyrna also gives us an epic treatment of Memnon's mortal death and the immortality then bestowed upon him by Zeus as well as lyrical description of his countrymen's extreme grief. Quintus Smyrnaeus, Greek epic poet, probably flourished in the latter part of the 4th century AD. He is sometimes called Quintus Calaber, because the only manuscript of his poem was discovered at Otranto in Calabria by Cardinal Bessarion in 1450. ...


As predicted by Hector with his dying breath, Achilles was thereafter killed by Paris — either by an arrow (to the heel according to Statius), or in an older version by a knife to the back while visiting Polyxena, a princess of Troy. In some versions, the god Apollo guided Paris' arrow. For other uses, see Hector (disambiguation). ... See List of King Priams children Statue of Paris in the British Museum This article is about the prince of Troy. ... Publius Papinius Statius, (c. ... For the Christian Saint, please see Acts of Xanthippe, Polyxena, and Rebecca Polyxena dies by the hand of Neoptolemus on the tomb of Achilles. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ...

Ajax carries off the body of Achilles: Attic black-figure lekythos, ca. 510 BCE, from Sicily (Staatliche Antikensammlungen, Munich
Ajax carries off the body of Achilles: Attic black-figure lekythos, ca. 510 BCE, from Sicily (Staatliche Antikensammlungen, Munich

Both versions conspicuously deny the killer any sort of valor owing to the common conception that Paris was a coward and not the man his brother Hector was, and Achilles remains undefeated on the battlefield. His bones are mingled with those of Patroclus, and funeral games are held. He was represented in the lost Trojan War epic of Arctinus of Miletus as living after his death in the island of Leuke at the mouth of the Danube (see below). Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 440 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1839 × 2503 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 440 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1839 × 2503 pixel, file size: 2. ... Attica (in Greek: Αττική, Attike; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is a periphery (subdivision) in Greece, containing Athens, the capital of Greece. ... Theseus and the Marathonian bull, white-ground lekythos, ca. ... The Staatliche Antikensammlungen (State Collections of Antiques) in the Kunstareal of Munich is a museum for the Bavarian states antique collections for Greek, Etruscan and Roman art. ... A cup depicting Achilles bandaging Patroklos arm, by the Sosias Painter. ... Arctinus of Miletus was one of the earliest poets of Greece and contributors to the epic cycle. ... Map of the Snake Island Snake Island (Romanian: Insula şerpilor, Ukrainian: ostriv Zmiyinyy) is an isle in the Black Sea, currently claimed by Romania, but administered by Ukraine and included in its Kiliya raion of Odeska oblast. Geography The island is a limestone formation located 44 km from the... This article is about the Danube River. ...


Paris was later killed by Philoctetes using the enormous bow of Heracles. In Greek mythology, Philoctetes (also Philoktêtês or Philocthetes, Φιλοκτήτης) was the son of King Poeas of Meliboea in Thessaly. ... Alcides redirects here. ...


The fate of Achilles' armor

Achilles' armor was the object of a feud between Odysseus and Telamonian Ajax (Achilles' older cousin). They competed for it by giving speeches on why they were the bravest after Achilles and the most deserving to receive it. Odysseus won. Ajax went mad with grief and anguish and vowed to kill his comrades; he started killing sheep, thinking in his madness that they were Greek soldiers. He then committed suicide. For other meanings, see Odysseus (disambiguation) Ulysses redirects here. ... Ajax Ajax or Aias (ancient Greek: ) was a mythological Greek hero, the son of Telamon and Periboea and king of Salamis. ...


Achilles and Patroclus

Achilles' relationship with Patroclus is a key aspect of his myth. Its exact nature has been a subject of dispute in both the classical period and modern times. In the Iliad, it is clear that the two heroes have a deep and extremely meaningful friendship, but the evidence of a romantic or sexual element is equivocal. Commentators from the classical period to today have tended to interpret the relationship through the lens of their own cultures. Thus, in 5th century BC Athens the relationship was commonly interpreted as pederastic. Enlarge Achilles bandages the arm of his friend Patroclus. ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... The 5th century BC started the first day of 500 BC and ended the last day of 401 BC. // The Parthenon of Athens seen from the hill of the Pnyx to the west. ... This article is about the capital of Greece. ... Pederasty or paederasty (literally boy-love, see Etymology below) refers to an intimate or erotic relationship between an adolescent boy and an adult male outside his immediate family. ...


The cult of Achilles in antiquity

There was an archaic heroic cult of Achilles on the White Island, Leuce, in the Black Sea off the modern coasts of Romania and Ukraine, with a temple and an oracle which survived into the Roman period.[10] Cult of Oedipus on a lucanian amphora, ca. ... Map of Snake Island For the Bulgarian island also in the Black Sea and often referred to as Snake Island see St. ... For other uses, see Black Sea (disambiguation). ... This article is about prophetic oracles in various cultures. ...


In the lost epic Aithiopis, a continuation of the Iliad attributed to Arktinus of Miletos, Achilles’ mother Thetis returned to mourn him and removed his ashes from the pyre and took them to Leuce at the mouths of the Danube. There the Achaeans raised a tumulus for him and celebrated funeral games. The Aithiopis (Greek: Αἰθιοπίς; Latin: Aethiopis) is a lost epic of ancient Greek literature. ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... Arctinus of Miletus was one of the earliest poets of Greece and contributors to the epic cycle. ...


Pliny's Natural History (IV.27.1) mentions a tumulus that is no longer evident (Insula Akchillis tumulo eius viri clara), on the island consecrated to him, located at a distance of fifty Roman miles from Peuce by the Danube Delta, and the temple there. Pausanias has been told that the island is "covered with forests and full of animals, some wild, some tame. In this island there is also Achilles’ temple and his statue” (III.19.11). Ruins of a square temple 30 meters to a side, possibly that dedicated to Achilles, were discovered by Captain Kritzikly in 1823, but there has been no modern archeology done on the island. Naturalis Historia Pliny the Elders Natural History is an encyclopedia written by Pliny the Elder. ... A tumulus (plural tumuli, from the Latin word for mound or small hill, from the root to bulge, swell also found in ) is a mound of earth and stones raised over a grave or graves. ... Peuce is the Greek name of an island in the Black Sea (16 km from the delta of the River Danube) actually held by Ukraine (USSR 1947 - 1992). ... Danube Delta - Landsat satellite photo (2000) The Danube Delta (Delta Dunării in Romanian), split between Tulcea County of Romania and Odessa Oblast of Ukraine, is the largest and best preserved of European deltas, with an area of 3446 km², after the Volga Delta. ... Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ...


Pomponius Mela tells that Achilles is buried in the island named Achillea, between Boristhene and Ister (De situ orbis, II, 7). And the Greek geographer Dionysius Periegetus of Bithynia, who lived at the time of Domitian, writes that the island was called Leuce "because the wild animals which live there are white. It is said that there, in Leuce island, reside the souls of Achilles and other heroes, and that they wander through the uninhabited valleys of this island; this is how Jove rewarded the men who had distinguished themselves through their virtues, because through virtue they had acquired everlasting honor” (Orbis descriptio, v. 541, quoted in Densuşianu 1913). Pomponius Mela, who wrote around AD 43, was the earliest Roman geographer. ...


The Periplus of the Euxine Sea gives the following details: "It is said that the goddess Thetis raised this island from the sea, for her son Achilles, who dwells there. Here is his temple and his statue, an archaic work. This island is not inhabited, and goats graze on it, not many, which the people who happen to arrive here with their ships, sacrifice to Achilles. In this temple are also deposited a great many holy gifts, craters, rings and precious stones, offered to Achilles in gratitude. One can still read inscriptions in Greek and Latin, in which Achilles is praised and celebrated. Some of these are worded in Patroclus’ honor, because those who wish to be favored by Achilles, honor Patroclus at the same time. There are also in this island countless numbers of sea birds, which look after Achilles’ temple. Every morning they fly out to sea, wet their wings with water, and return quickly to the temple and sprinkle it. And after they finish the sprinkling, they clean the hearth of the temple with their wings. Other people say still more, that some of the men who reach this island, come here intentionally. They bring animals in their ships, destined to be sacrificed. Some of these animals they slaughter, others they set free on the island, in Achilles’ honor. But there are others, who are forced to come to this island by sea storms. As they have no sacrificial animals, but wish to get them from the god of the island himself, they consult Achilles’ oracle. They ask permission to slaughter the victims chosen from among the animals that graze freely on the island, and to deposit in exchange the price which they consider fair. But in case the oracle denies them permission, because there is an oracle here, they add something to the price offered, and if the oracle refuses again, they add something more, until at last, the oracle agrees that the price is sufficient. And then the victim doesn’t run away any more, but waits willingly to be caught. So, there is a great quantity of silver there, consecrated to the hero, as price for the sacrificial victims. To some of the people who come to this island, Achilles appears in dreams, to others he would appear even during their navigation, if they were not too far away, and would instruct them as to which part of the island they would better anchor their ships”. (quoted in Densuşianu) A periplus in the ancient navigation of Phoenicians, Greeks, and Romans is a manuscript document that lists in order the ports and coastal landmarks, with approximate distances between, that the captain of a vessel could expect to find along a shore. ...


The heroic cult of Achilles on Leuce island was widespread in Antiquity, not only along the sealanes of the Pontic Sea but also in maritime cities whose economic interests were tightly connected to the riches of the Black Sea. For other uses, see Black Sea (disambiguation). ...


Achilles from Leuce island was venerated as Pontarches the lord and master of the Pontic (Black) Sea, the protector of sailors and navigation. Sailors went out of their way to offer sacrifice. To Achilles of Leuce were dedicated a number of important commercial port cities of the Greek waters: Achilleion in Messenia (Stephanus Byzantinus), Achilleios in Laconia (Pausanias, III.25,4) Nicolae Densuşianu (Densuşianu 1913) even thought he recognized Achilles in the name of Aquileia and in the north arm of the Danube delta, the arm of Chilia ("Achileii"), though his conclusion, that Leuce had sovereign rights over Pontos, evokes modern rather than archaic sea-law." Stephanus Byzantinus (Stephanus of Byzantium), the author of a geographical dictionary entitled Εθνικα (Ethnica), of which, apart from some fragments, we possess only the meagre epitome of one Hermolaus. ... Pausanias (Greek: ) was a Greek traveller and geographer of the 2nd century A.D., who lived in the times of Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius. ... Nicolae DensuÅŸianu (1846–1911) was a Romanian ethnologist and collector of Romanian folklore (Vechi cîntece ÅŸi tradiÅ£ii populare româneÅŸti: texte poetice din răspunsurile la Chestionarul istoric, 1893-1897). ... Aquileia (Friulian Aquilee, Slovene Oglej) is an ancient Roman town of Italy, at the head of the Adriatic at the edge of the lagoons, about 10 km from the sea, on the river Natiso (modern Natisone), the course of which has changed somewhat since Roman times. ...


Leuce had also a reputation as a place of healing. Pausanias (III.19,13) reports that the Delphic Pythia sent a lord of Croton to be cured of a chest wound. Ammianus Marcellinus (XXII.8) attributes the healing to waters (aquae) on the island. For other uses, see Delphi (disambiguation). ... Ammianus Marcellinus (325/330-after 391) was a fourth-century Greek historian [1][2]. His is the last major historical account of the late Roman empire which survives today: his work chronicled the history of Rome from 96 to 378, although only the sections covering the period 353 - 378 are...


The cult of Achilles in modern times: The Achilleion in Corfu

In the region of Gastouri (Γαστούρι) to the south of the city of Corfu Greece, Empress of Austria Elisabeth of Bavaria also known as Sissi built in 1890 a summer palace with Achilles as its central theme and it is a monument to platonic romanticism. The palace, naturally, was named after Achilles: Achilleion (Αχίλλειον). This elegant structure abounds with paintings and statues of Achilles both in the main hall and in the lavish gardens depicting the heroic and tragic scenes of the Trojan war. This article is about the Greek island Kerkyra known in English as Corfu or Corcyra. ... Elisabeth in a riding habit, from Vanity Fair, 1884. ... Platonic idealism is the theory that the substantive reality around us is only a reflection of a higher truth. ... Romantics redirects here. ... This article is about the Greek island Kerkyra known in English as Corfu or Corcyra. ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ...


The name of Achilles

Achilles' name can be analyzed as a combination of ἄχος (akhos) "grief" and λαός (Laos) "a people, tribe, nation, etc." In other words, Achilles is an embodiment of the grief of the people, grief being a theme raised numerous times in the Iliad (frequently by Achilles). Achilles' role as the hero of grief forms an ironic juxtaposition with the conventional view of Achilles as the hero of kleos (glory, usually glory in war).


Laos has been construed by Gregory Nagy, following Leonard Palmer, to mean a corps of soldiers. With this derivation, the name would have a double meaning in the poem: When the hero is functioning rightly, his men bring grief to the enemy, but when wrongly, his men get the grief of war. The poem is in part about the misdirection of anger on the part of leadership. Gregory Nagy (pronounced Nahjj) is a professor of Classics at Harvard, specializing in Homer and archaic Greek poetry. ...


The name Achilleus was a common and attested name among the Greeks early after 7th century BC[11].It was also turned into the female form of Ἀχιλλεία,firstly attested in Attica,4th century BC, (IG II² 1617) and Achillia, a relief from Halicarnassus as the name of a female gladiator fighting, 'Amazonia'. Roman gladiatorial games often referenced classical mythology and this seems to reference Achilles' fight with Penthesilea, but give it an extra twist of Achilles being 'played' by a woman. (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 7th century BC started on January 1, 700 BC and ended on December 31, 601 BC. // Overview Events Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria who created the the first systematically collected library at Nineveh A 16th century depiction of the Hanging Gardens of... Gladiatrix links here. ... Image File history File links Gladiatrix_relief. ...


Other stories about Achilles

Achilles as guardian of the palace in the gardens of the Achilleion in Corfu. He gazes northward toward the city. The inscription in Greek reads: ΑΧΙΛΛΕΥΣ i.e. Achilles
Achilles as guardian of the palace in the gardens of the Achilleion in Corfu. He gazes northward toward the city. The inscription in Greek reads: ΑΧΙΛΛΕΥΣ i.e. Achilles

Some post-Homeric sources claim that in order to keep Achilles safe from the war, Thetis (or, in some versions, Peleus) hides the young man at the court of Lycomedes, king of Skyros. There, Achilles is disguised as a girl and lives among Lycomedes' daughters, perhaps under the name "Pyrrha" (the red-haired girl). With Lycomedes' daughter Deidamia, whom in the account of Statius he rapes, Achilles there fathers a son, Neoptolemus (also called Pyrrhus, after his father's possible alias). According to this story, Odysseus learns from the prophet Calchas that the Achaeans would be unable to capture Troy without Achilles' aid. Odysseus goes to Skyros in the guise of a peddler selling women's clothes and jewelry and places a shield and spear among his goods. When Achilles instantly takes up the spear, Odysseus sees through his disguise and convinces him to join the Greek campaign. In another version of the story, Odysseus arranges for a trumpet alarm to be sounded while he was with Lycomedes' women; while the women flee in panic, Achilles prepares to defend the court, thus giving his identity away. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1944x2592, 2331 KB) Summary I am the author. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1944x2592, 2331 KB) Summary I am the author. ... Achilleion Palace Achilleas thniskon in the gardens of the Achilleion. ... This article is about the Greek island Kerkyra known in English as Corfu or Corcyra. ... In Greek mythology, Lycomedes (also known as Lycurgus) was the King of Skyros during the Trojan War. ... Skyros (Greek: Σκύρος) is the southernmost island of the Sporades, a Greek archipelago in the Aegean Sea. ... In Greek mythology, Deidamea, or Deidamia, was the daughter of Lycomedes, King of Scyros. ... Publius Papinius Statius, (c. ... Neoptolemus killing Priam In Greek mythology, Neoptolemus, also Neoptólemos or Pyrrhus, was the son of the warrior Achilles and the princess Deidamea. ... In Greek mythology, Kalchas Thestórides (son of Thestor), or Calchas (brazen) for short, a loyal Argive, was a powerful seer, a gift of Apollo: as an augur, Calchas had no rival in the camp (Iliad i, E.V. Rieu translation) Calchas prophesized that in order to gain a favourable...


In Homer's Odyssey, there is a passage in which Odysseus sails to the underworld and converses with the shades. One of these is Achilles, who when greeted as "blessed in life, blessed in death", responds that he would rather be a slave to the worst of masters than be king of all the dead. This has been interpreted as a rejection of his warrior life, but also as indignity to his martyrdom being slighted. Achilles was worshipped as a sea-god in many of the Greek colonies on the Black Sea, the location of the mythical "White Island" which he was said to inhabit after his death, together with many other heroes. For other uses, see Odyssey (disambiguation). ... Colonies in antiquity were city-states founded from a mother-city, not from a territory-at-large. ... For other uses, see Black Sea (disambiguation). ...


Post-Homeric literature explores a pederastic interpretation of the love between Achilles and Patroclus. By the fifth and fourth centuries, the deep — and arguably ambiguous — friendship portrayed in Homer blossomed into an unequivocal erotic love affair in the works of Aeschylus, Plato, and Aeschines, and seems to have inspired the enigmatic verses in Lycophron's third century Alexandra that claim Achilles slew Troilus in a matter of unrequited love. For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... Pederastic courtship scene Athenian black-figure amphora, 5th c. ... Enlarge Achilles bandages the arm of his friend Patroclus. ... This article is about the ancient Greek playwright. ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... Aeschines (389 - 314 BC), Greek statesman and one of the ten Attic orators, was born at Athens. ... Lycophron was a Greek poet and grammarian. ...


The kings of the Epirus claimed to be descended from Achilles through his son. Alexander the Great, son of the Epiran princess Olympias, could therefore also claim this descent, and in many ways strove to be like his great ancestor; he is said to have visited his tomb while passing Troy. The Despotate of Epirus was one of the medieval Greek successor states of the Byzantine Empire, founded in the aftermath of the Fourth Crusade in 1204. ... For the film of the same name, see Alexander the Great (1956 film). ... This article is about the Macedonian princess. ...


Achilles fought and killed the Amazon Helene. Some also said he married Medea, and that after both their deaths they were united in the Elysian Fields of Hades — as Hera promised Thetis in Apollonius' Argonautica. In some versions of the myth, Achilles has a relationship with his captive Briseis. The Amazons (in Greek, ) were a mythical ancient nation of all-female warriors. ... In Greek mythology, Helene (different from Helen of Troy as well as Hellen) referred to two different people: A friend of Aphrodites, Helene helped her seduce Adonis. ... This article is about the Greek mythological figure. ... The Argonautica (Greek: ) is a Greek epic poem written by Apollonius Rhodius in the 3rd century BC. The only surviving Hellenistic epic, the Argonautica tells the myth of the voyage of Jason and the Argonauts to retrieve the Golden Fleece from the mythical land of Colchis. ... In Greek mythology, BrisÄ“is (Greek Βρισηίς) was a Trojan widow (from Lyrnessus) who was abducted during the Trojan War by Achilles upon the death of her three brothers and husband, King Mynes of Lyrnessus, in the fight. ...


Achilles in Greek tragedy

Main article: Achilles (play)

The Greek tragedian Aeschylus wrote a trilogy of plays about Achilles, given the title Achilleis by modern scholars. The tragedies relate the deeds of Achilles during the Trojan War, including his defeat of Hector and eventual death when an arrow shot by Paris and guided by Apollo punctures his heel. Extant fragments of the Achilleis and other Aeschylean fragments have been assembled to produce a workable modern play. The first part of the Achilleis trilogy, The Myrmidons, focused on the relationship between Achilles and chorus, who represent the Achaean army and try to convince Achilles to give up his quarrel with Agamemnon; only a few lines survive today.[12] Achilles is a trilogy of plays written by the Greek tragedian Aeschylus. ... For other uses, see Tragedy (disambiguation). ... This article is about the ancient Greek playwright. ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... For other uses, see Hector (disambiguation). ... See List of King Priams children Statue of Paris in the British Museum This article is about the prince of Troy. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ...


The tragedian Sophocles also wrote a play with Achilles as the main character, The Lovers of Achilles. Only a few fragments survive. This article is about the Greek tragedian. ...

Zeno's paradox on a Croatian election poster

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 423 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (701 × 992 pixel, file size: 346 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This 1990 poster for the Social Democratic Union of Croatia and Social Democratic Union of Yugoslavia features a picture of Zenos paradox of motion with... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 423 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (701 × 992 pixel, file size: 346 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This 1990 poster for the Social Democratic Union of Croatia and Social Democratic Union of Yugoslavia features a picture of Zenos paradox of motion with...

Achilles in Greek philosophy

The philosopher Zeno of Elea centered one of his paradoxes on an imaginary footrace between "swift-footed" Achilles and a tortoise, in which he proved that Achilles could not catch up to a tortoise with a head start, and therefore that motion and change were impossible. As a student of the monist Parmenides and a member of the Eleatic school, Zeno believed time and motion to be illusions. Zeno of Elea (IPA:zɛnoʊ, ɛlɛɑː)(circa 490 BC? – circa 430 BC?) was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher of southern Italy and a member of the Eleatic School founded by Parmenides. ... “Arrow paradox” redirects here. ... “Arrow paradox” redirects here. ...


Spoken-word myths (audio)

Achilles myths as told by story tellers
1. Achilles and Patroclus, read by Timothy Carter
Bibliography of reconstruction: Homer Iliad, 9.308, 16.2, 11.780, 23.54 (700 BC); Pindar Olympian Odes, IX (476 BC); Aeschylus Myrmidons, F135-36 (495 BC); Euripides Iphigenia in Aulis, (405 BC); Plato Symposium, 179e (388 BC-367 BC); Statius Achilleid, 161, 174, 182 (96 CE)

For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... For the PINDAR military bunker in London, please see the PINDAR section of Military citadels under London Pindar (or Pindarus, Greek: ) (probably born 522 BC in Cynoscephalae, a village in Boeotia; died 443 BC in Argos), was a Greek lyric poet. ... This article is about the ancient Greek playwright. ... A statue of Euripides. ... For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... Publius Papinius Statius, (c. ...

Achilles in later art

Drama

  • Achilles is portrayed as a former hero, who has become lazy and devoted to the love of Patroclus, in William Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida.
  • Achilles is a major character in Paris, a musical based on the Trojan War written by Jon English and David MacKay which premiered in October 2003 in Australia.

Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For the Chaucer poem, see Troilus and Criseyde. ...

Fiction

  • Achilles appears in the novels Ilium and Olympos by science fiction author Dan Simmons.
  • Achilles the novel by Elizabeth Cook
  • Achilles appears in Dante's "The Inferno."
  • The Wrath of Achilles is a starship in 'Gene Rodenberry's Andromeda'
  • Achilles appears in the novel "Inside The Walls of Troy", with emphasis on his relationship to Polyxena
  • Achilles appears in the book trilogy "Troy" by the late heroic fantasy novelist David Gemmell
  • Achilles is featured heavily in the novel "The Firebrand" by Marion Zimmer Bradley
  • The comic book hero Captain Marvel is endowed with the powers of Archilles, as well as other legendary heroes.
  • Achilles is featured in the 1998 computer game Battlezone as a fictional planet orbiting Uranus It is destroyed at the end of the game.

For other uses, see Ilium. ... Dan Simmons novel Olympos, published in 2005, is the sequel to Ilium and final part of Ilium/Olympus duology. ... Dan Simmons (born April 4, 1948 in Peoria, Illinois) is an American author most widely known for his Hugo Award-winning science fiction novel Hyperion and its sequel The Fall of Hyperion. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... For articles with similar titles, see Battle zone (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Uranus (disambiguation). ...

Film

The role of Achilles has been played by:

  • Gordon Mitchell in "Achilles" (UK) / "Fury of Achilles" (US) (1962)
  • Piero Lulli in Ulysses (1955)
  • Riley Ottenhof in Something about Zeus (1958)
  • Stanley Baker in Helen of Troy (1956)
  • Arturo Dominici in La Guerra di Troia (1962)
  • Derek Jacobi [voice] in Achilles (Channel Four Television) (1995)
  • Steve Davislim in La Belle Hélène (TV, 1996)
  • Joe Montana (actor) in Helen of Troy (TV, 2003)
  • Brad Pitt in Troy (2004)

Sir Stanley Baker (February 8, 1927 - June 28, 1976) was a Welsh actor. ... Helen of Troy is a 1956 Warner Bros. ... Arturo Dominici (1918 - 1992) was an Italian actor and dubbing artist. ... Sir Derek George Jacobi, CBE (IPA: ) (born 22 October 1938) is an English actor and director, knighted in 1994 for his services to the theatre. ... Helen of Troy depicts the battles fought to win the love of the worlds most beautiful woman. ... William Bradley Brad Pitt (born December 18, 1963) is an American actor, film producer, and social activist. ... Troy is a movie released on May 14, 2004 about the Trojan War, which is described in Homers Iliad and other Greek myths as having taken place in Anatolia (modern Turkey) around the 13th or 12th century BC. It stars, among others: Brad Pitt as Achilles, Eric Bana as...

Television

  • In the animated television series Class of the Titans, the character Archie is descended from Achilles and has inherited both his vulnerable heel and part of his invincibility.

Not to be confused with MGMs 1981 film, Clash of the Titans. ...

Music

Achilles has frequently been mentioned in music.

  • "Achilles Last Stand", by Led Zeppelin; from the album Presence, 1976, Atlantic Records.
  • Achilles is referred to in Bob Dylan's song, "Temporary Like Achilles".
  • "Achilles' Revenge" is a song by Warlord.
  • Achilles Heel is an album by the indie rock band Pedro the Lion.
  • Achilles and his heel are referenced in the song "Special K" by the rock band Placebo.
  • "Achilles' Heel" is a song by the UK band Toploader.
  • "Achilles" is a song by the Colorado-based power metal band Jag Panzer, from the album Casting the Stones.
  • Achilles is referenced in the Indigo Girls song "Ghost".
  • Song by Melbourne band Love Outside Andromeda called "Achilles (All 3)".
  • "Achilles, Agony & Ecstasy In Eight Parts", by Manowar; from the album The Triumph of Steel, 1992, Atlantic Records.
  • Although not mentioned by name, "Citadel" (about the Siege of Troy) by The Crüxshadows mentions Paris' arrow 'landing true'.
  • "Achilles' Wrath", a concert piece by Sean O'Loughlin.
  • Achilles is mentioned in "Little Joanna" by McFly: "Achilles wears a necklace".

Audio sample Info (help· info) Achilles Last Stand [1] is a song by English rock group Led Zeppelin, featured as the opening track on their 1976 album Presence. ... For the bands 1969 eponymous debut album, see Led Zeppelin (album). ... Presence is the seventh studio album by English rock band Led Zeppelin, released by Swan Song Records on March 31, 1976. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Warlord is an 1980s heavy metal band from Los Angeles, California. ... Achilles Heel is the fourth and final album by indie rock band Pedro the Lion. ... Pedro the Lion was an indie rock band from Seattle, Washington, and, for over a decade, the main creative outlet of singer/songwriter David Bazan. ... Placebo are an alternative rock band currently consisting of Brian Molko and Stefan Olsdal. ... Toploader were a British rock band from Eastbourne, formed in 1997. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Indigo Girls are an American folk rock duo, consisting of Amy Ray and Emily Saliers. ... Manowar is an American heavy metal band from Auburn, New York, which formed in 1980. ... The Triumph Of Steel was released in 1992 by Manowar. ... Atlantic Records (Atlantic Recording Corporation) is an American record label, and operates as a wholly owned subsidiary of Warner Music Group. ... The Crüxshadows (Pronounced as IPA: )[3] is an independent music group from Florida. ... Sean OLoughlin is an English rugby league player. ...

Namesakes

The Leander class was a class of eight (including modified Australian Leanders) light cruisers built for the Royal Navy (RN), named after the character from Greek mythology. ... The Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) is the maritime arm of the New Zealand Defence Force. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Combatants Germany United Kingdom New Zealand Commanders Hans Langsdorff Henry Harwood Strength 1 heavy cruiser 1 heavy cruiser 2 light cruisers Casualties 1 heavy cruiser damaged 36 dead 60 wounded 1 heavy cruiser heavily damaged 2 light cruisers damaged 72 dead 28 wounded For other uses, see The Battle of... HMS Ajax was a Leander-class light cruiser. ... The fourth and best known of the Exeters, HMS Exeter (68), was a York class heavy cruiser of the Royal Navy that served in World War II. She was laid down on 1 August 1928 at the Devonport Dockyard, Plymouth, Devon. ... Prince Achileas-Andreas of Greece and Denmark (b. ... For other uses, see Monarch (disambiguation). ... Constantine II Constantine II (born June 2, 1940), was King of Greece from March 6, 1964 to December 8, 1974. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Plato, Symposium, 180a
  2. ^ James Davidson, "Zeus Be Nice Now" in London Review of Books; 19 July 2007[1] accessed October 23rd, 2007
  3. ^ Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound 755-768; Pindar, Nemean 5.34-37, Isthmian 8.26-47; Poeticon astronomicon (ii.15)
  4. ^ Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica 4.869-479.
  5. ^ Hesiod, Catalogue of Women, fr. 204.87-89 MW; Iliad 11.830-32
  6. ^ Plutarch, Greek Questions 28; Tzetzes, On Lycophron
  7. ^ Dares' account of the destruction of Troy, Greek Mythology Link.
  8. ^ Tzetzes, scholiast on Lycophron.
  9. ^ Iliad 9.334-343.
  10. ^ Guy Hedreen, "The Cult of Achilles in the Euxine" Hesperia 60.3 (July 1991), pp. 313-330.
  11. ^ Epigraphical database gives 164 matches for Ἀχιλλεύς and 368 for Ἀχιλλε.The earliest ones: Corinth 7th c. BC,Delphi 530 BC,Attica and Elis 5th c. BC.
  12. ^ Pantelis Michelakis, Achilles in Greek Tragedy, 2002

For other uses, see Plato (disambiguation). ... The Symposium is a philosophical dialogue written by Plato sometime after 385 BC. It is a discussion on the nature of love, taking the form of a series of speeches, both satirical and serious, given by a group of men at a symposium or drinking party at the house of... The Symposium is a philosophical dialogue written by Plato sometime after 385 BC. It is a discussion on the nature of love, taking the form of a series of speeches, both satirical and serious, given by a group of men at a symposium or drinking party at the house of... This article is about the ancient Greek playwright. ... For the PINDAR military bunker in London, please see the PINDAR section of Military citadels under London Pindar (or Pindarus, Greek: ) (probably born 522 BC in Cynoscephalae, a village in Boeotia; died 443 BC in Argos), was a Greek lyric poet. ... Two pages from the Ratdolt edition of the Poeticon astronomicon showing woodcuts of the constellations Cassiopeia and Andromeda. ... Apollonius of Rhodes, also known as Apollonius Rhodius (Latin; Greek Apollōnios Rhodios), early 3rd century BC - after 246 BC, was an epic poet, scholar, and director of the Library of Alexandria. ... The Argonautica (Greek: ) is a Greek epic poem written by Apollonius Rhodius in the 3rd century BC. The only surviving Hellenistic epic, the Argonautica tells the myth of the voyage of Jason and the Argonauts to retrieve the Golden Fleece from the mythical land of Colchis. ... Roman bronze bust, the so-called Pseudo-Seneca, now identified by some as possibly Hesiod Hesiod (Hesiodos, ) was an early Greek poet and rhapsode, who presumably lived around 700 BC. Hesiod and Homer, with whom Hesiod is often paired, have been considered the earliest Greek poets whose work has survived... John Tzetzes, was a Byzantine poet and grammarian, known to have lived at Constantinople during the 12th century. ... Scholium (plural scholia) is the name given to grammatical, critical and explanatory notes or brief commentary whether original or extracted from existing commentaries, which are inserted on the margin of the manuscript of an ancient author as a succinct gloss. ... Lycophron was a Greek poet and grammarian. ...

References

For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... For other uses, see Homer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Odyssey (disambiguation). ... The Bibliotheca (in English Library), in three books, provides a grand summary of traditional Greek mythology and heroic legends. ... For other uses, see Ovid (disambiguation) Publius Ovidius Naso (March 20, 43 BC – 17 AD) was a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid who wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... // Cover of George Sandyss 1632 edition of Ovids Metamorphosis Englished The Metamorphoses by the Roman poet Ovid is a poem in fifteen books that describes the creation and history of the world in terms according to Greek and Roman points of view. ... For other uses, see Ovid (disambiguation) Publius Ovidius Naso (March 20, 43 BC – 17 AD) was a Roman poet known to the English-speaking world as Ovid who wrote on topics of love, abandoned women and mythological transformations. ... Heroides (The Heroines) or Epistulae Heroidum (Letters of Heroines) was a work composed by Ovid in 5 BC. It is composed of fifteen fictional letters as if written by mythological heroines of antiquity grieving over their lovers mistreatment or neglect. ... Apollonius of Rhodes (Apollonius Rhodius), librarian at Alexandria, was a poet, the author of Argonautica, a literary epic retelling of ancient material concerning Jason and the Argonauts quest for the Golden Fleece in the mythic land of Colchis. ... The Argonautica (Greek: ) is a Greek epic poem written by Apollonius Rhodius in the 3rd century BC. The only surviving Hellenistic epic, the Argonautica tells the myth of the voyage of Jason and the Argonauts to retrieve the Golden Fleece from the mythical land of Colchis. ... DANTE is also a digital audio network. ... For other uses see The Divine Comedy (disambiguation), Dantes Inferno (disambiguation), and The Inferno (disambiguation) Dante shown holding a copy of The Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory and the city of Florence, with the spheres of Heaven above, in Michelino...

Bibliography

  • Ileana Chirassi Colombo, “Heroes Achilleus— Theos Apollon.” In Il Mito Greco, ed. Bruno Gentili & Giuseppe Paione, Rome, 1977;
  • Anthony Edwards:
    • “Achilles in the Underworld: Iliad, Odyssey, and Æthiopis”, Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies, 26 (1985): pp. 215-227 ;
    • “Achilles in the Odyssey: Ideologies of Heroism in the Homeric Epic”, Beitrage zur klassischen Philologie, 171, Meisenheim, 1985 ;
    • “Kleos Aphthiton and Oral Theory,” Classical Quarterly, 38 (1988): pp. 25-30 ;
  • Hedreen, Guy (1991). "The Cult of Achilles in the Euxine". Hesperia 60 (3): 313–330.
  • Hélène Monsacré, Les larmes d'Achille. Le héros, la femme et la souffrance dans la poésie d'Homère, Paris, Albin Michel, 1984;
  • Gregory Nagy:
    • The Best of The Acheans: Concepts of the Hero in Archaic Greek Poetry, Johns Hopkins University, 1999 (rev. edition);
    • The Name of Achilles: Questions of Etymology and 'Folk Etymology', Illinois Classical Studies, 19, 1994;
  • Dale S. Sinos, The Entry of Achilles into Greek Epic, Ph.D. thesis, Johns Hopkins University;
  • Johansson, Warren. Achilles. Encyclopedia of Homosexuality. Dynes, Wayne R. (ed.), Garland Publishing, 1990. p. 8
  • Hamilton, Edith, Mythology, New York: Mentor, 1942

Gregory Nagy (pronounced Nahjj) is a professor of Classics at Harvard, specializing in Homer and archaic Greek poetry. ... Edith Hamilton (August 12, 1867 - May 31, 1963) was a classicist and educator before she became a writer on mythology. ... Mythology: Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes is a 1942 book written by Edith Hamilton. ...

External links

Wikisource has the text of the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica article Achilles.
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Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... This is a list of the characters that appear in the Iliad by Homer. ... In Greek mythology, Acamas (unwearying) was the son of Phaedra and Theseus. ... In Greek mythology, Actor was a son of King Deion, of Phocis and Diomede, the daughter of Xuthus. ... In Greek mythology, Adrastus, or Adrastos (he who stands his ground, son of Talaus) was one of the three kings at Argos, along with Iphis and Amphiaraus, who was married to Adrastus sister Eriphyle. ... This article is about a character in Greek mythology. ... Agapenor: Leader of the Arkadians Reference Homer, The Iliad, translated by Richmond Lattimore, 1951 Categories: ... Ajax Ajax or Aias (ancient Greek: ) was a mythological Greek hero, the son of Telamon and Periboea and king of Salamis. ... Ajax (Greek: Αἴας), a Greek hero, son of Oïleus the king of Locris, called the lesser or Locrian Ajax, to distinguish him from Ajax, son of Telamon. ... In Greek mythology, Antilochus (also transliterated as Antílokhos) was the son of Nestor, king of Pylos. ... In Greek mythology, two people share the name Ascalaphus. ... In Greek mythology, Automedon, son of Diores, was Achilles charioteer. ... In Greek mythology, Balius (Dappled) and Xanthus (Blonde) were two immortal horses, the offspring of the harpy Podarge and the West wind, Zephyros (); following another tradition, their father was Zeus. ... In Greek mythology, Bias was a brother of Melampus who received one third of Argos (see Melampus for more information). ... In Greek mythology, BrisÄ“is (Greek Βρισηίς) was a Trojan widow (from Lyrnessus) who was abducted during the Trojan War by Achilles upon the death of her three brothers and husband, King Mynes of Lyrnessus, in the fight. ... DiomÄ“dÄ“s or Diomed (Gk:Διομήδης - God-like cunning or advised by Zeus) is a hero in Greek mythology, mostly known for his participation in the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology, Euryalus referred to two different people. ... In Greek mythology, Eurybates was the herald for the Greek armies during the Trojan War. ... As written in Homers The Iliad, Hecamede, daughter of Arsinous, was captured from the isle of Tenedos and given as captive to King Nestor. ... In Greek mythology, Idomeneus was a Cretan warrior, grandson of Minos. ... In Greek mythology, Machaon was a son of Asclepius. ... In Greek mythology, Mecisteus was the son of Talaus and and Lysimache. ... In Greek mythology, there were two people called Medôn. ... In Greek mythology, Mégês Phyleïdês was a son of Phyleus. ... Menelaus regains Helen, detail of an Attic red-figure crater, ca. ... Menestheus, the son of Peteus, son of Orneus, son of Erechtheus, was a legendary King of Athens during the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology, Nestor of Gerênia (Greek: Νέστωρ) was the son of Neleus and Chloris, and the King of Pylos. ... In Greek mythology, Nireus was the name of several individuals: Nireus was a son of Poseidon and Canace. ... For other meanings, see Odysseus (disambiguation) Ulysses redirects here. ... A cup depicting Achilles bandaging Patroklos arm, by the Sosias Painter. ... In Greek mythology, Philoctetes (also Philoktêtês or Philocthetes, Φιλοκτήτης) was the son of King Poeas of Meliboea in Thessaly. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Phoenix (mythology). ... In Greek mythology, Podarces was a son of Iphicles. ... In Greek mythology, Promachus (who leads in battle) referred to several different people. ... In Greek mythology, Protesilaus was the son of Iphicles and the leader of the Phylaceans. ... In the Iliad, he was the son of Iphitus and brother of Epistrophus. ... In Greek mythology, Stentor (Στεντωρ) was a herald of the Greek forces during the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology, Sthenelus refers to four different people. ... In Greek Mythology and epic poetry, Talthybius was a herald in the Greek camp during the Trojan War and a friend of Agamemnons. ... In Greek mythology Teucer, also Teucrus or Teucris from Greek Τεύκρος, was the son of King Telamon of Salamis and his second wife Hesione, daughter of King Laomedon of Troy. ... In Greek mythology, Thersites, son of Agrius, was a rank-and-file soldier of the Greek army during the Trojan War. ... Thoas, son of Andraimon, was one of the heroes who fought for the Greeks in the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology Thrasymedes was a participent in the Trojan War. ... Tlepolemus, or Tlêpólemos, in Greek mythology was the son of Heracles by Astyocheia, daughter of the King of Ephyra. ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ... In Greek mythology, Aesepus was the son of the naiad Abarbarea and Bucolion. ... In history and Greek mythology, Agenor (which means very manly) was a king of Tyre. ... In Greek mythology, Alcathous was a son of Pelops and Hippodamia. ... In Greek mythology, Amphimachus is the name of seven men. ... Aeneas Bearing Anchises from Troy, by Carle van Loo, 1729 (Louvre) In Greek mythology, Anchises was a son of Capys and Themiste (daughter of Ilus, son of Tros) or Hieromneme, a naiad. ... Andromache grieves the loss of Hector In Greek mythology, Andromache was the wife of Hector and daughter of Eetion, sister to Podes. ... In Greek mythology, Antenor was a son of the Dardanian noble Aesyetes by Cleomestra. ... In Greek mythology, Ant phat s was King of the Laestrogynes. ... In Greek mythology, one of these people: In the Iliad, Antiphus, or Ántiphos, a Trojan ally, the son of Talaemenes and a nymph. ... In the Iliad Archelochus was a son of Antenor and along with his brother Acamas and Aeneas, shared the command of the Dardanians fighting on the side of the Trojans. ... In Greek mythology, Asius refers to two people who fought during the Trojan War: Asius (Asios) son of Hyrtacus was the leader of the Trojan allies that hailed from, on, or near the Dardanelles (Iliad, 2. ... In the Iliad Asteropaios (Latin: Asteropaeus) was the leader of the Trojan-allied Paionians along with fellow warrior Pyraechmes. ... In Greek mythology, Astyanax (Greek Ἀστυάναξ, prince of the city) was the son of Hector and Andromache. ... Axylus is mentioned in Book VI of Homers Iliad. ... In Greek mythology, Kalchas Thestórides (son of Thestor), or Calchas (brazen) for short, a loyal Argive, was a powerful seer, a gift of Apollo: as an augur, Calchas had no rival in the camp (Iliad i, E.V. Rieu translation) Calchas prophesized that in order to gain a favourable... Calesius was the attendant and charioteer of Axylus. ... For other uses, see Cassandra (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Chryseis (Greek: Χρύσηίς, Khrysēís) was a Trojan woman, the daughter of Chryses. ... Chryses attempting to ransom his daughter Chryseis from Agamemnon, Apulian red-figure crater by the Athens 1714 Painter, ca. ... Clytius is the name of many people in Greek mythology: A son of Laomedon in Homers Iliad, book 10. ... Dares Phrygius, according to Homer (Iliad, v. ... In Greek mythology, Deiphobus was a son of Priam and Hecuba. ... In Greek mythology, Dolon (In Ancient Greek: Δόλων) was the son of Eumedes. ... In Greek mythology Elephenor was the son of Chalcodon and king of the Abantes of Euboea. ... Epeus redirects here. ... In the Iliad, he was the son of Iphitus and brother of Schedius. ... In Greek mythology, Eteóneus was King Menelaus of Spartas weapon-carrier during the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology, Euneus was a son of Jason and Queen Hypsipyle of Lemnos; he later became King of Lemnos. ... In Greek mythology, Euphemus was the son of Europa and Poseidon. ... Euphorbus, the son of Panthous, was a Trojan hero during the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology, Eurypylus (Greek: Εὐρύπυλος) was the name of several different people. ... In Greek mythology, Glaucus (shiny, bright or bluish-green) was the name of several different figures, including one God. ... The Halizones (Halizonians) are an obscure people that appear in Homers Iliad as allies of Troy during the Trojan War. ... For other uses, see Hector (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Helen of Troy redirects here. ... Helenus was a Trojan soldier in the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology, Kebriones was the son of King Priam of Troy and a slave. ... Lykomedes was on the side of the Argives in the Trojan War. ... In Greek mythology, there were three people named Melanippus: Son of Agrius, killed by Heracles Son of Perigune and Theseus Son of Astacus, defended Thebes in the Seven Against Thebes. ... In Greek mythology, Mentor (sometimes Mentes) was the son of Alcumus and, in his old age, a friend of Odysseus. ... Meriones was a son of Molus and Melphis. ... Mydon was one of the defenders of Troy in Homers Iliad. ... In Greek mythology, King Mygdon of Phrygia was a son of Acmon and father of Coroebus by his wife Anaximene. ... In Greek Mythology, Othryoneus was a suitor of Princess Cassandra of Troy. ... In Homers Iliad, Pandarus or Pandaros is the son of Lycaon and a famous archer. ... See List of King Priams children Statue of Paris in the British Museum This article is about the prince of Troy. ... In Greek mythology, Pedasus was the son of the naiad Abarbarea and Bucolion. ... Phorcys and Ceto, Mosaic, Late Roman, Bardo Museum, Tunis, Tunisia In Greek mythology, Phorcys, or Phorkys was one of the names of the Old One of the Sea, the primeval sea god, who, according to Hesiod, was the son of Pontus and Gaia. ... In Greek mythology, Podalirius was a son of Asclepius. ... In Greek mythology, Polites referred to two different people. ... In Greek mythology, Poludamas was a lieutenant and friend of Hector during the Trojan War. ... Polybus was a famous physician. ... In Greek mythology, Polydorus referred to three different people. ... King Priam killed by Neoptolemus, son of Achilles, detail of an Attic red-figure amphora In Greek mythology, Priam (Greek Πρίαμος, Priamos) was the king of Troy during the Trojan War, and youngest son of Laomedon. ... Pyraechmes was, along with Asteropaeus, a leader of the Paeonians in the Trojan War. ... Rhesus (Rhêsos) was a Thracian king who fought on the side of Trojans in the Iliad. ... In Greek mythology, Sarpedon referred to several different people. ... This article is about the mythological Theano. ...


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Achilles (665 words)
Achilles was the son of the mortal Peleus and the Nereid Thetis.
In the later version, she held the young Achilles by the heel and dipped him in the river Styx; everything the sacred waters touched became invulnerable, but the heel remained dry and therefore unprotected.
Achilles' disguise was finally penetrated by Odysseus, who placed arms and armor amidst a display of women's finery and seized upon Achilles when he was the only "maiden" to be fascinated by the swords and shields.
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The Achilles Group is the leading provider of supplier management information, delivering a wide range of procurement and business solutions to major companies across the globe.
Achilles’ supplier management schemes improve the efficiency of the procurement cycle while promoting health and safety, environmental management and wider corporate responsibility in the supply chain.
Achilles Group welcome you to Aberdeen’s Offshore Europe 2007 Event
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