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Encyclopedia > Achaeus (general)
Coin of Achaeus, with the legend ΒΑΣIΛEΩΣ AΧAIOΥ.

Achaeus (in Greek Ἀχαιός; died 213 BC), was a general and later a separatist ruler of part of the Greek Seleucid kingdom. He was the son of Andromachus; the latter was brother of Laodice, the wife of Seleucus Callinicus and the mother of Antiochus the Great. Achaeus himself married Laodice, the daughter of Mithridates II, king of Pontus.1 He accompanied Seleucus Ceraunus, the son of Callinicus, in his expedition across mount Taurus against Attalus, and after the assassination of Seleucus revenged his death; and though he might easily have assumed the royal power, he remained faithful to the family of Seleucus. Image File history File links AchaeusCoin. ... Image File history File links AchaeusCoin. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC - 210s BC - 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC Years: 218 BC 217 BC 216 BC 215 BC 214 BC - 213 BC - 212 BC 211 BC... The Seleucid Empire was a Hellenistic successor state of Alexander the Greats dominion. ... Andromachus (in Greek AνδρoμαχoÏ‚; lived 3rd century BC) was son of Achaeus and a grandson of Seleucus Nicator, the founder of the Seleucid Empire. ... Laodice (in Greek Λαοδικη; lived in the 3rd century BC), wife of Seleucus II Callinicus, was, according to the express statement of Polybius1, a sister of Andromachus, the father of Achaeus. ... Coin of Seleucus II. Reverse shows Apollo leaning on a tripod. ... Silver coin of Antiochus III Antiochus III the Great, (ruled 223 - 187 BC), younger son of Seleucus II Callinicus, became ruler of the Seleucid kingdom as a youth of about eighteen in 223 BC. (His traditional designation, the Great, stems from a misconception of Megas Basileus (Great king), the traditional... Laodice (in Greek Λαοδικη; lived in the 3rd century BC), wife of Achaeus, she was daughter of Mithridates II king of Pontus and sister of Antiochus IIIs wife, also called Laodice. ... The name Mithridates (more accurately, Mithradates) is the Hellenized form of the Indo-Aryan Mithra-Datt, which means One given by Mithra. Mithra is the Indo-Aryan sun-god and Datt (given by) derives from the Proto-Indo-European root da (to give). That name was born by a large... Traditional rural Pontic house A man in traditional clothes from Trabzon, illustration Pontus is the name which was applied, in ancient times, to extensive tracts of country in the northeast of Asia Minor (modern Turkey) bordering on the Euxine (Black Sea), which was often called simply Pontos (the main), by... Coin of Seleucus III (243-223 BC) Seleucus III Ceraunus or Soter (c. ... Demirkazık Summit [IN CHINA] The Taurus Mountains (Turkish: Toros DaÄŸları, also known as Ala-Dagh or Bulghar-Dagh) are a mountain range in the southeastern Anatolian plateau, from which the Euphrates (Turkish: Fırat) descends into Syria. ... Coin struck during the reign of Attalus I, depicting the head of Attalus great uncle Philetaerus on the obverse and seated Athena, Greek goddess of war and wisdom, on the reverse Attalus I Soter (Greek: Savior; 269 BCE – 197 BCE)[1] ruled Pergamon, a Greek polis in what is now...


Antiochus, the successor of Seleucus, appointed him to the command of all Asia on this side of mount Taurus in 223 BC. Achaeus recovered for the Syrian empire all the districts which Attalus had gained; but having been falsely accused by Hermeias, the minister of Antiochus, of intending to revolt, he did so in self-defence, assumed the title of king, and ruled over the whole of Asia on this side of the Taurus. As long as Antiochus was engaged in the war with Ptolemy, he could not march against Achaeus; but after a peace had been concluded with Ptolemy, he crossed the Taurus, united his forces with Attalus, deprived Achaeus in one campaign of all his dominions and took Sardis with the exception of the citadel. Achaeus after sustaining a siege of two years in the citadel at last fell into the hands of Antiochus in 213 BC, through the treachery of Bolis, who had been employed by Sosibius, the minister of Ptolemy, to deliver him from his danger, but betrayed him to Antiochus, who ordered him to be put to death immediately.2 World map showing the location of Asia. ... Demirkazık Summit [IN CHINA] The Taurus Mountains (Turkish: Toros Dağları, also known as Ala-Dagh or Bulghar-Dagh) are a mountain range in the southeastern Anatolian plateau, from which the Euphrates (Turkish: Fırat) descends into Syria. ... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 270s BC 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC - 220s BC - 210s BC 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC Years: 228 BC 227 BC 226 BC 225 BC 224 BC - 223 BC - 222 BC 221 BC... Hermeias (in Greek Eρμειας or Eρμιας; died 220 BC) was a Carian by birth, who had raised himself to be the favourite and chief minister of Seleucus III Ceraunus (225–223 BC), and was left at the head of affairs in Syria by that monarch when he set out on... Silver coin of Antiochus III Antiochus III the Great, (ruled 223 - 187 BC), younger son of Seleucus II Callinicus, became ruler of the Seleucid kingdom as a youth of about eighteen in 223 BC. (His traditional designation, the Great, stems from a misconception of Megas Basileus (Great king), the traditional... Under the reign of Ptolemy IV Philopator (reigned 221-204 BC), son of Ptolemy III and Berenice II of Egypt, the decline of the Ptolemaic kingdom began. ... A recent view of the ceremonial court of the thermae–gymnasium complex in Sardis, dated to 211—212 AD Sardis, also Sardes (Lydian: Sfard, Greek: Σάρδεις, Persian: Sparda), modern Sart in the Manisa province of Turkey, was the capital of the ancient kingdom of Lydia, the seat of a proconsul under... Centuries: 4th century BC - 3rd century BC - 2nd century BC Decades: 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC 230s BC 220s BC - 210s BC - 200s BC 190s BC 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC Years: 218 BC 217 BC 216 BC 215 BC 214 BC - 213 BC - 212 BC 211 BC... Sosibius (in Greek Σωσιβιoς; lived 3rd century BC) was the chief minister of Ptolemy Philopator (221–203 BC), king of Egypt. ...


References

Polybius (c. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... NY redirects here. ... Sir William Smith (1813 - 1893), English lexicographer, was born at Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist parents. ... Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology is a encyclopedia/biographical dictionary. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ...

Notes

1 Polybius, 4.51.4, 8.22.11
2 Polybius, 4.2.6, 4.48, 5.40, 5.42, 5.57, 7.15–18, 8.17–23

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology by William Smith (1867). The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology is a encyclopedia/biographical dictionary. ... Sir William Smith (1813 - 1893), English lexicographer, was born at Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist parents. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Achaeus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (254 words)
Achaeus, a tragic poet of Eretria who wrote forty-five tragedies, some of whose titles are preserved (e.g.
Achaeus of Syracuse was another tragic poet who wrote ten or fourteen tragedies.
Achaeus, a relative of Antiochus III the Great who was appointed governor of all the king's provinces beyond Taurus.
Crete (2944 words)
Achaeus and his army were forced to retreat into the city of Sardis, and Antiochus troops were camped almost all the way around the city in siege.
Achaeus figured that once he had escaped he could travel quickly back to Syria, while Antiochus was still occupied in the siege of Sardis, and create a great movement in his favor.
Achaeus was indeed doing his best; but he did not consider that, as the saying goes, he was trying to play the Cretan with a Cretan.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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