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Encyclopedia > Acadian
Acadians
Acadian flag
Acadian Flag
Total population

approximately 80,000 (not including Louisiana or most of New England) Image File history File links Flag_of_Acadia. ...

Regions with significant populations
Canada: 71,590
(self-identified in 2001 Canadian census) 1

  New Brunswick: 26,220
  Quebec: 17,420
  Nova Scotia: 11,180
  Ontario: 8,745
  Prince Edward Island: 3,020
United States
  New England: ?
Motto: Spem reduxit (Hope restored) Official languages English, French Flower Purple Violet Tree Balsam Fir Bird Black-capped Chickadee Capital Fredericton Largest city Saint John Lieutenant-Governor Herménégilde Chiasson Premier Shawn Graham (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 10 10 Area Total  - Land  - Water  (% of total)  Ranked... Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Official languages French Flower Blue Flag Iris (Iris versicolor Linné) Tree Yellow Birch Bird Snowy Owl Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Lieutenant-Governor Lise Thibault Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 75 24 Area Total  - Land  - Water  (% of... Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit (Latin: One defends and the other conquers) Official languages English, French (Canadian Gaelic) [] Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 11 10 Area Total  - Land  - Water  (% of total)  Ranked... Motto: Ut Incepit Fidelis Sic Permanet (Latin: Loyal she began, loyal she remains) Official languages English (de facto) Flower White Trillium Tree Eastern White Pine Bird Common Loon Capital Toronto Largest city Toronto Lieutenant-Governor James K. Bartleman Premier Dalton McGuinty (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 106 24... Motto: Parva Sub Ingenti The Small Protected By The Great) Official languages English Flower Pink Ladys Slipper Tree Red Oak Bird Blue Jay Capital Charlottetown Largest city Charlottetown Lieutenant-Governor Barbara Oliver Hagerman Premier Pat Binns (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 4 4 Area Total  - Land  - Water... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ...

Languages
Acadian French (a dialect of French) and/or English; some areas speak Chiac; those who have resettled to Quebec typically speak Quebec French.
Religions
Predominantly Roman Catholic
Related ethnic groups

French
  Acadiens
  Cajuns
  Métis
Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Chiac is an Acadian French vernacular mixed with English, spoken in the south-east Canada, especially among youth near Moncton, Memramcook and Shediac. ... Note: This page contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ... This article is about an ethnic culture. ... The Métis (pronounced MAY tee, IPA: , in French: or ) are one of three recognized Canadian aboriginal groups whose homeland consists of the Canadian provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, and the Northwest Territories. ...

  Québécois

The Acadians (French: Acadiens) are the descendants of the 17th-century French colonists who settled in Acadia (located on the northern portion of North America's east coast). Although, today, both Acadians and Quebecers are francophone (French-speaking) Canadians, Acadia was founded in a geographically separate area from Quebec. Also, Acadians to a great extent hail from different parts of France than do Quebecers. Consequently, the two have distinct cultures. Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Official languages French Flower Blue Flag Iris (Iris versicolor Linné) Tree Yellow Birch Bird Snowy Owl Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Lieutenant-Governor Lise Thibault Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 75 24 Area Total  - Land  - Water  (% of... Map of the first (light blue) and second (dark blue — plain and hachured) French colonial empires France had colonial possessions, in various forms, from the beginning of the 17th century until the 1960s. ... The national flag of Acadia, adopted in 1884. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... As a North American society, and the only society on the continent with a French-speaking majority, the culture of the province of Quebec, Canada shows many unique features. ... Look up Francophone in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Motto: Je me souviens (French: I remember) Official languages French Flower Blue Flag Iris (Iris versicolor Linné) Tree Yellow Birch Bird Snowy Owl Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Lieutenant-Governor Lise Thibault Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 75 24 Area Total  - Land  - Water  (% of...


In the Great Expulsion of 1755, a large percentage of Acadians were driven out of Acadia by the British; many later resettled in Louisiana, where they became known as Cajuns. The Great Upheaval (le Grand Dérangement), also known as the Great Expulsion or the Acadian Expulsion, is the eviction of the Acadian population from Nova Scotia between 1755 and 1763, ordered by governor Charles Lawrence and the Nova Scotia Council. ... Map of Acadiana Region with the Cajun Heartland USA subregion highlighted in dark red. ... Cajuns are an ethnic group consisting essentially of the descendants of Acadians who came from Nova Scotia to Louisiana as a result of their refusal to swear allegiance to the British Crown. ...

Contents

History

Acadia is home to the first permanent French settlement in North America, which was established at Port-Royal in 1604. In 1603 Henry IV, the King of France, granted Pierre Dugua, Sieur de Monts, the right to colonize lands in North America between 40º- 60º North latitude. Arriving in 1604, the French settlers built a fort at the mouth of the St. Croix River which separates present day New Brunswick and Maine, on a small island named Île-Ste-Croix. The following spring, the settlers sailed across the bay to Port-Royal (Annapolis Royal) in present day Nova Scotia. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Habitation at Port-Royal is a National Historic Site located at Port Royal in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. ... King James I of England/VII of Scotland, the first monarch to rule the Kingdoms of England and Scotland at the same time Events March - Samuel de Champlain, French explorer, sails to Canada March 24 - Elizabeth I of England dies and is succeeded by her cousin King James I of... Henry IV (French: Henri IV; December 13, 1553 – May 14, 1610), was the first monarch of the Bourbon dynasty in France. ... Kings ruled in France from the Middle Ages to 1848. ... Pierre Dugua, the Sieur de Monts, (c. ... Latitude, usually denoted symbolically by the Greek letter phi, , gives the location of a place on Earth north or south of the equator. ... The St. ... See also Saint Croix an island in the United States Virgin Islands Saint Croix Island, or Dochet Island as it is called today, is a small uninhabited island in Maine located at 45° 07′ 42″ N 067° 08′ 02″ W, near the mouth of the Saint Croix River that forms... Annapolis Royal [[1]] , population 548 (Nova Scotia Statistical Review 2004 [[2]] ) was founded in 1610, down and across the Annapolis River from the site of Port Royal, which was the first permanent European settlement in North America north of Florida. ...


During the 17th century, about one hundred French families were established in Acadia. They developed friendly relations with the aboriginal Mi'kmaq, learning their hunting and fishing techniques. The Acadians lived mainly in the coastal regions, farming land reclaimed from the sea through diking. Living on the frontier between French and British territories, the Acadians found themselves on the frontlines in each conflict between the powers. Acadia was passed repeatedly from one side to the other, and the Acadians learned to survive through an attitude of studied neutrality, refusing to take up arms for either side, and thus came to be referred to as the "French neutrals." It has been suggested that Lnu be merged into this article or section. ...

Acadia (1754)
Acadia (1754)

In the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713, France ceded that portion of Acadia which is now Nova Scotia (minus Cape Breton Island) to the British for the last time. In 1754, the British government, no longer accepting the neutrality previously granted to the Acadians, demanded that they take an absolute oath of allegiance to the British monarch, which would require taking up arms. The Acadians did not want to take up arms against family members who were in French territory, and believed that the oath would compromise their Roman Catholic faith, and refused. Colonel Charles Lawrence ordered the mass deportation of the Acadians, without authority from London[citation needed] and despite earlier cautions from British authorities against drastic action[citation needed]. Historian John Mack Faragher has used the contemporary term, "ethnic cleansing," to describe the British actions. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1180x825, 426 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Acadian Acadia ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1180x825, 426 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Acadian Acadia ... The Treaty of Utrecht comprised a series of peace treaties signed in Utrecht in March and April 1713 that helped end the War of the Spanish Succession. ... An oath of allegiance is an oath whereby a subject or citizen acknowledges his duty of allegiance and swears loyalty to his monarch or country. ... The British Monarchy is a shared monarchy. ... The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ... Charles Lawrence (December 14, 1709 – October 19, 1760) was a British military officer who, as lieutenant governor and subsequently governor of Nova Scotia, was responsible for overseeing the expulsion of Acadians from the colony in the Great Upheaval. ... The Great Upheaval (le Grand Dérangement), also known as the Great Expulsion, The Deportation or the Acadian Expulsion, was the forced population transfer of the Acadian population from Nova Scotia between 1755 and 1763, ordered by British governor Charles Lawrence and the Nova Scotia Council. ...

Deportation of the Acadians

In what is known as the Great Expulsion (Grand Dérangement), more than 12,000 Acadians (three-fourths of the Acadian population in Nova Scotia) were expelled, their homes burned and their lands confiscated. Families were split up, and the Acadians were dispersed throughout the British lands in North America; some were returned to France. Gradually, some managed to make their way to Louisiana, creating the Cajun population, while others returned to British North America, settling in coastal villages and in northern New Brunswick. Image File history File links Deportation_of_Acadians_order,_painting_by_Jefferys. ... Image File history File links Deportation_of_Acadians_order,_painting_by_Jefferys. ... The Great Upheaval (le Grand Dérangement), also known as the Great Expulsion or the Acadian Expulsion, is the eviction of the Acadian population from Nova Scotia between 1755 and 1763, ordered by governor Charles Lawrence and the Nova Scotia Council. ... // Louisiana (French: La Louisiane) was the name of an administrative district of New France. ... This article is about an ethnic culture. ... British North America was an informal term first used in 1783, but uncommon before the Report on the Affairs of British North America (1839), called the Durham Report. ... Motto: Spem reduxit (Hope restored) Official languages English, French Flower Purple Violet Tree Balsam Fir Bird Black-capped Chickadee Capital Fredericton Largest city Saint John Lieutenant-Governor Herménégilde Chiasson Premier Shawn Graham (Liberal) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 10 10 Area Total  - Land  - Water  (% of total)  Ranked...


In 2003, at the request of Acadian representatives, a proclamation was issued in the name of Queen Elizabeth II, acting as the Canadian monarch, officially acknowledging the deportation and establishing August 15 as a day of commemoration. The day of commemoration is observed by the Government of Canada, as the successor of the British Government. Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... The Arms of Her Majesty in Right of Canada, proclaimed by King George V, November 21, 1921. ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... The Canada wordmark, used by most agencies of the Canadian federal government. ...


Geography

Present-day Acadian communities
Present-day Acadian communities

The Acadians today predominantly inhabit the northern and eastern shores of New Brunswick, Miscou Island (French: Île Miscou) and Île Lamèque. Other groups of Acadians can be found in the Magdalen Islands and throughout other parts of Quebec, in Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia such as Chéticamp, Isle Madame, and Clare. Still others can be found in the southern and western regions of New Brunswick and in New England. Many of these latter communities have faced varying degrees of assimilation. For many families in predominantly Anglophone communities, French language attrition has occurred, particularly in younger generations. The Acadians who settled in Louisiana after 1764, known as Cajuns, have had a dominant cultural influence in many parishes, particularly in the southwestern area of the state known as Acadiana.
Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1180x824, 429 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Acadian Acadia ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1180x824, 429 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Acadian Acadia ... Miscou Island (French: ÃŽle Miscou) is located in the Gulf of St. ... Lamèque Island (French:ÃŽle de Lamèque) is situated on the north-east corner of New Brunswick, Canada. ... Magdalen Islands — location The Magdalen Islands (French, ÃŽles de la Madeleine) form a small archipelago in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence with a land area of 205. ... Motto: Parva Sub Ingenti The Small Protected By The Great) Official languages English Flower Pink Ladys Slipper Tree Red Oak Bird Blue Jay Capital Charlottetown Largest city Charlottetown Lieutenant-Governor Barbara Oliver Hagerman Premier Pat Binns (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 4 4 Area Total  - Land  - Water... Chéticamp, Nova Scotia is an Acadian fishing community on the Cabot Trail on the west coast of Cape Breton Island at the western entrance to Cape Breton Highlands National Park. ... Isle Madame (45º3300N, 61º0257W) is a Canadian island located at off the southeastern corner of Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia. ... Clare is a municipal district in western Nova Scotia, Canada at where St. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Language attrition is the loss of a first or second language or a portion of that language by either a community or an individual. ... Official language(s) de jure: none de facto: English & French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city Baton Rouge [1] Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33°N  - Longitude 89°W... Cajuns are an ethnic group consisting essentially of the descendants of Acadians who came from Nova Scotia to Louisiana as a result of their refusal to swear allegiance to the British Crown. ... Parish Hall of St. ... Map of Acadiana Region with the Cajun Heartland USA subregion highlighted in dark red. ...


Culture

Today Acadians are a vibrant minority, particularly in New Brunswick and Louisiana (Cajuns). Since 1994, Le Congrès Mondial Acadien has united Acadians of the Maritimes, New England, and Louisiana. Cajuns are an ethnic group consisting essentially of the descendants of Acadians who came from Nova Scotia to Louisiana as a result of their refusal to swear allegiance to the British Crown. ... The Acadian World Congress, or Le Congrès Mondial Acadien, is a festival of Acadian and Cajun culture and history, held every five years. ...


Notable Acadians in the Maritimes include singers Weldon Boudreau, Delores Boudreau, Angèle Arsenault and Edith Butler, writer Antonine Maillet, boxer Yvon Durelle, pitcher Rheal Cormier, former Governor General Roméo LeBlanc, former premier of Prince Edward Island Aubin-Edmond Arsenault, the first Acadian premier of any province and the first Acadian appointed to a provincial supreme court, his father, Joseph-Octave Arsenault, the first Acadian appointed to the Canadian Senate, and former New Brunswick premier Louis Robichaud, who was responsible for modernizing education and the government of New Brunswick in the mid-20th century. Angèle Arsenault on the cover of her 1994 album Transparente Angèle Arsenault O.C., BA, MA, D. (h. ... Édith Butler O.C. (born Marie Nicole Butler 27 July 1942 in Paquetville, New Brunswick) is an Acadian singer-songwriter and folklorist. ... Antonine Maillet in 1984 The Honourable Antonine Maillet, PC, CC, OQ, ONB, LL.D, FRSC, (born May 10, 1929) is a Canadian Acadian novelist, playwright, and scholar. ... Yvon Durelle, born October 14, 1929 in Baie-Ste-Anne, New Brunswick, Canada, was a British Empire champion boxer. ... Rheal Paul Cormier (born April 23, 1967) is a Canadian of Acadian ancestry who is a pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... The Governor General of Canada (French: Gouverneure générale du Canada or Gouverneur général du Canada) is the representative of the Canadian Monarch. ... The Right Honourable Roméo-Adrien LeBlanc, PC, CC, ONB, CMM, CD (born December 18, 1927 in Memramcook, New Brunswick) is a former Governor General of Canada. ... Motto: Parva Sub Ingenti The Small Protected By The Great) Official languages English Flower Pink Ladys Slipper Tree Red Oak Bird Blue Jay Capital Charlottetown Largest city Charlottetown Lieutenant-Governor Barbara Oliver Hagerman Premier Pat Binns (PC) Parliamentary representation  - House seats  - Senate seats 4 4 Area Total  - Land  - Water... Aubin-Edmond Arsenault (1870–1968) was a Prince Edward Island politician. ... The Honourable Joseph-Octave Arsenault (August 5, 1828 – December 14, 1897) was a Canadian politician who was the first Acadian from Prince Edward Island to be named to the Canadian Senate. ... The Honourable Louis Joseph Robichaud, PC , CC , QC , BA , LL.D (October 21, 1925 - January 6, 2005), popularly known as Little Louis or Ti-Louis (due both for his short height and his sharing a name with Uncle Louis St. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999...


August 15, the feast of the Assumption, is the national feast day of the Acadians. The national anthem of the Acadians is "Ave, maris stella". On that day, the Acadians celebrate by having the tintamarre which consists mainly of a big parade where people can dress up with the colours of Acadia and make a lot of noise. August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... The Assumption has been a subject of Christian art for centuries. ... Ave Maris Stella (Hail Star of the Sea) is a plainsong hymn to the Virgin Mary. ...


Flags

The flag of the Acadians is the French tricolour with a golden star in the blue field, which symbolizes the Our Lady of the Assumption, patron saint of the Acadians and the "Star of the Sea". This flag was adopted in 1884 at the Acadian National Congress in Miscouche, PEI. Flag of Acadia The flag of Acadia was adopted on August 15, 1884, at the Acadian National Convention Miscouche (Prince Edward Island) by the Acadian people of Canada. ... French tricolour flag A tricolour is a flag or banner having three colours, usually in approximately equal size (horizontally or vertically) and lacking additional symbols. ... The Assumption has been a subject of Christian art for centuries. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ...


Acadians in the diaspora have adopted other symbols. The flag of Acadians in Louisiana, known as Cajuns, was designed by Thomas J. Arceneaux of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, and adopted by the Louisiana legislature as the official emblem of the Acadiana region in 1974. A group of New England Acadians attending Le Congrès Mondial Acadien in Nova Scotia in 2004, endorsed a design for a New England Acadian flag by William Cork, and are advocating for its wider acceptance. Cajuns are an ethnic group consisting essentially of the descendants of Acadians who came from Nova Scotia to Louisiana as a result of their refusal to swear allegiance to the British Crown. ... The University of Louisiana at Lafayette, or UL Lafayette[1], is a coeducational public research university located in Lafayette, Louisiana, in the heart of Acadiana. ... Map of Acadiana Region with the Cajun Heartland USA subregion highlighted in dark red. ... The Acadian World Congress, or Le Congrès Mondial Acadien, is a festival of Acadian and Cajun culture and history, held every five years. ...

Acadiana flag

Flag of Acadiana region of Louisiana
New England Acadian flag

Flag of New England Acadians

Image File history File links Flag_of_Acadiana. ... Map of Acadiana Region with the Cajun Heartland USA subregion highlighted in dark red. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_New_England_Acadians. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ...

Language

Acadians speak a dialect of French called Acadian French. Many of those in the Moncton area speak Chiac and English. The Louisiana Cajun descendants mostly speak English but some still speak Cajun French. Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Chiac is an Acadian French vernacular mixed with English, spoken in the south-east Canada, especially among youth near Moncton, Memramcook and Shediac. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... English language prevalence in the United States. ... Cajun French spread in Louisiana. ...


Tributes to The Expulsion

A statue of Evangéline - fictional heroine of the poem Evangeline by Longfellow - at St. Martinville, Louisiana. The statue was donated by actress Dolores Del Rio (who also posed for it), who portrayed Evangéline in a 1929 silent film by director Edwin Carewe.
A statue of Evangéline - fictional heroine of the poem Evangeline by Longfellow - at St. Martinville, Louisiana. The statue was donated by actress Dolores Del Rio (who also posed for it), who portrayed Evangéline in a 1929 silent film by director Edwin Carewe.

In 1847, an epic poem by American writer Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Evangeline, was loosely based on the events surrounding the 1755 deportation. The poem became an American classic, and also contributed to a rebirth of Acadian identity in both Maritime Canada and in Louisiana. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (996x1096, 708 KB) Summary statue dEvangéline - héroïne de la déportation acadienne - à Saint Martinville en Louisiane self made PRA Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Acadian St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (996x1096, 708 KB) Summary statue dEvangéline - héroïne de la déportation acadienne - à Saint Martinville en Louisiane self made PRA Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Acadian St. ... Statue of Evangeline - heroine of the Acadian deportation - Saint Martinville, Louisiana Evangeline, A Tale of Acadie is a poem by the American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. ... The city of St. ... Dolores Del Rio Dolores del Río (August 3, 1905 - April 11, 1983) was a Mexican film actress. ... Edwin Carewe Edwin Carewe (Jay Fox) (March 5, 1883 - January 22, 1940) was an American motion picture director, an actor, a Producer, and a Screenwriter. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Statue of Evangeline - heroine of the Acadian deportation - Saint Martinville, Louisiana Evangeline, A Tale of Acadie is a poem by the American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. ...


Robbie Robertson wrote a popular song based on the Acadian Expulsion titled Acadian Driftwood that appeared on The Band's 1975 album, Northern Lights - Southern Cross. Jaime Robert Robertson (born July 5, 1943 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada) is a songwriter, guitarist and singer, best known for his membership in The Band. ... The Band was an influential Canadian-American rock group of the 1960s and 1970s. ... Northern Lights - Southern Cross - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


Antonine Maillet's Pélagie-la-charette concerns the return voyage to Acadia of several deported families starting 15 years after the Great Expulsion. Antonine Maillet in 1984 The Honourable Antonine Maillet, PC, CC, OQ, ONB, LL.D, FRSC, (born May 10, 1929) is a Canadian Acadian novelist, playwright, and scholar. ... The Great Upheaval (le Grand Dérangement), also known as the Great Expulsion or the Acadian Expulsion, is the eviction of the Acadian population from Nova Scotia between 1755 and 1763, ordered by governor Charles Lawrence and the Nova Scotia Council. ...


Legend

The American folklore hero, Paul Bunyan, is believed by some to have been influenced if not inspired by Acadian stories about lumberjacks. A folk hero is type of hero, real or possibly mythological. ... Paul and Babe in Bemidji, Minnesota Paul Bunyan is a mythical lumberjack in tall tales. ... Lumberjacks in Oregon, c. ...


See also

The national flag of Acadia, adopted in 1884. ... This is a list of members of the Acadian people, and people of Acadian origins. ... Cajuns are an ethnic group consisting essentially of the descendants of Acadians who came from Nova Scotia to Louisiana as a result of their refusal to swear allegiance to the British Crown. ... Flag Capital Quebec Language(s) French Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy King See List of French monarchs Governor See list of Governors Legislature Sovereign Council of New France Historical era Ancien Régime in France  - Royal Control 1655  - Articles of Capitulation of Quebec 1759  - Articles of Capitulation of Montreal 1760... French Canadian is a term that has several different connotations. ...

References

Sources

  • Dupont, Jean-Claude (1977). Héritage d'Acadie. Montreal: Éditions Leméac.
  • Faragher, John Mack (2005). A Great and Noble Scheme: The Tragic Story of the Expulsion of the French Acadians from their American Homeland. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.
  • Frink, Tim (1999). New Brunswick, A Short History. Summerville, N.B.: Stonington Books.

Notes
1 Canadian census, ethnic data. Rather than go by self-identification, many would instead define an Acadian as a French speaking person living in the Maritime provinces of Canada; which according to the same 2001 census, was 276,355 (236,665 in New Brunswick, 34,025 in Nova Scotia, and 5,665 in PEI). [1]
2 Le Grand Dérangement An exhibit by the Massachusetts State Archives in conjunction with the Commonwealth Museum, made possible through a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Massachusetts State Archives


Further reading

  • J. Chetro-Szivos "Talking Acadian: Work, Communication, and Culture, YBK 2006, New York ISBN 0-9764359-6-9.
  • Dean Jobb, The Acadians: A People's Story of Exile and Triumph, John Wiley & Sons, 2005 (published in the United States as The Cajuns: A People's Story of Exile and Triumph)
  • James Laxer, The Acadians: In Search of a Homeland, Doubleday Canada, October 2006 ISBN 0-385-66108-8.
  • Naomi Griffiths, From Migrant to Acadian: a North American border people, 1604-1755, Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2005.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Acadian - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1231 words)
An Acadian delegation came to Halifax in 1755 with a petition to present to the lieutenant-governor of Nova Scotia, Colonel Charles Lawrence.
Massachusetts passed a law in November 1755 placing the Acadians under the custody of "justices of the peace and overseers of the poor"; Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Connecticut adopted similar laws.
The flag of the Acadians is the French tricolour with a golden star in the blue field, which symbolizes the Blessed Virgin Mary, the "Star of the Sea".
Acadian - definition of Acadian in Encyclopedia (885 words)
Some of the Acadians who were deported in 1755 were encouraged by the French king to settle in Louisiana, where their descendants, the Cajuns, have become a dominant cultural influence in many a Louisiana parish.
Notable Acadians include singer Angele Arsenault, writer Antonine Maillet, boxer Yvon Durelle, former Governor General Roméo LeBlanc, and former New Brunswick premier Louis Robichaud, who was the first Acadian premier and who was responsible for modernizing education and the government of New Brunswick in the mid-20th century.
The flag of the Acadians is the French tricolor with a golden star in the blue section, which symbolizes the Blessed Virgin Mary, the "Star of the Sea".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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