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Encyclopedia > Abuse (computer game)
Abuse
Developer(s) Crack dot Com
Publisher(s) Electronic Arts, Red Hat
Release date(s) 1996
Genre(s) Run and gun
Mode(s) Single player, Multiplayer
Rating(s) ESRB: Teen (13+)
ELSPA: 11+
Platform(s) PC (DOS, Linux), Mac, Acorn Archimedes, Amiga
Media CD-ROM
System requirements DOS version: 486DX 50 MHz (66 MHz recommended for network play), VESA graphics card, SoundBlaster compatible sound card, 8MB RAM, 13MB hard drive space, MS-DOS 5.0 or later (Windows 95 for IPX network support)
Input Keyboard and Mouse

Abuse is a run and gun computer game developed by Crack dot Com, and published by Origin Systems/Electronic Arts. It was released in 1996, and runs on DOS and Linux operating systems. An improved port of the game was released for Mac OS by Bungie Studios and for the Acorn Archimedes by R-Comp Interactive. The game has been in the public domain since the late 1990s. Image File history File links Abuse_box_art. ... A video game developer is a software developer (a business or an individual) that creates video games. ... Crack dot Coms logo Crack dot Com was a computer game development company. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that Electronic Arts Square be merged into this article or section. ... Red Hat, Inc. ... 1996 1996 in games 1995 in video gaming 1997 in video gaming Notable events of 1996 in video gaming. ... Video games are categorized into genres based on their gameplay. ... A run and gun (also known as run n gun or for some variants, overhead shooter) is a sub-genre of video games that incorporates elements from shoot em up games and platform games. ... In computer games and video games, single-player refers to the variant of a particular game where input from only one player is expected throughout the course of the gaming session. ... Online gaming redirects here. ... The Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) is a self-regulatory organization that applies and enforces ratings, advertising guidelines, and online privacy principles for computer and video games in the United States. ... The Entertainment and Leisure Software Publishers Association (or ELSPA) is an organisation set up in 1989 by British software publishers. ... A personal computer (PC) is a computer whose price, size, and capabilities make it useful for individuals. ... Instructions on how to use the directory command. ... Linux (IPA pronunciation: ) is a Unix-like computer operating system. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The original Amiga 1000 (1985) with various peripherals The Amiga 500 (1987) was the most popular variant of the Amiga. ... The CD-ROM (an abbreviation for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory (ROM)) is a non-volatile optical data storage medium using the same physical format as audio compact discs, readable by a computer with a CD-ROM drive. ... It has been suggested that Keystroke be merged into this article or section. ... A contemporary computer mouse, with the most common standard features — two buttons and a scroll-wheel. ... A run and gun (also known as run n gun or for some variants, overhead shooter) is a sub-genre of video games that incorporates elements from shoot em up games and platform games. ... A computer game is a game composed of a computer-controlled virtual universe that players interact with in order to achieve a defined goal or set of goals. ... Crack dot Coms logo Crack dot Com was a computer game development company. ... Origin Systems, Inc. ... It has been suggested that Electronic Arts Square be merged into this article or section. ... 1996 1996 in games 1995 in video gaming 1997 in video gaming Notable events of 1996 in video gaming. ... Instructions on how to use the directory command. ... Linux (IPA pronunciation: ) is a Unix-like computer operating system. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Bungie Studios is an American video game developer founded in May 1991 under the name Bungie Software Products Corporation (more popularly shortened to Bungie Software) by two undergraduate students at the University of Chicago, Alex Seropian and Jason Jones that primarily concentrated on Macintosh games for its first nine... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

Contents

Description

The protagonist of the game, Nick Vrenna, has been unjustly incarcerated in a prison where the staff is performing unethical medical experiments upon the inmates. A prison riot occurs and an experiment goes horribly wrong. The people inside the prison - except for Nick, who seems to be immune - get infected with a substance called Abuse that transforms them into monsters. Nick takes a laser gun and goes on to single-handedly destroy all mutants, stop the substance from spreading further and escape from the prison complex.


The basic premise of the game, as well as the general look of the character, enemies, locations and some weapons, is a homage to the Predator and Alien series of films. Predator is a 1987 science fiction, action and horror film directed by John McTiernan and starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, Carl Weathers and Jesse Ventura. ... Alien; for other films/spin-offs see Alien (film series) Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Alien (film) Alien, a 1979 science fiction/horror film directed by Ridley Scott, became a cultural phenomenon. ...


Abuse resembles a side-scrolling platform game. The game is marked for its unusual control scheme: The keyboard is used to move Nick, while the mouse is used for aiming the weapons. The basic gameplay consists of fighting various enemies (mostly the various forms of mutants, who prefer to attack in huge swarms) and solving some simple puzzles, most involving switches. A simple platform sequence from the game Wonder Boy Platform game, or platformer, is a video game genre characterized by jumping to and from suspended platforms or over obstacles. ...


Networked play, through IPX/SPX, is also supported. The game originally had support for TCP/IP play, but this was not present in the retail version. IPX/SPX stands for Internetwork Packet Exchange/Sequenced Packet Exchange. ...


Legacy

Abuse was quite well received by the game press, who hailed the game as "the Doom of platform games", the comparison being particularly easy due to the involvement of id Software contributors like Dave Taylor and Bobby Prince. Doom (or DOOM)[1] is a 1993 computer game by id Software that is a landmark title in the first-person shooter genre. ... id Software (IPA: officially, though originally ) is an American computer game developer based in Mesquite, Texas, a suburb of Dallas. ... Dave D. Taylor Dave D. Taylor is a game programmer, perhaps best known as a former id Software employee and noted for his work promoting Linux gaming. ... Robert Caskin Prince III, also known as Bobby Prince is a composer and sound designer. ...


The game was not particularly popular in the world-wide market, but nevertheless, it remains a cult classic. It has, among other things, achieved a Top Dog position in Home of the Underdogs. After Crack dot Com's demise, sequel ideas were exchanged on abuse2.com (primarily set up by Crack dot Com to spread Golgotha source code), but work on an official sequel was minimal, most of it being conceptual. The team for the sequel consisted of very few of the original Abuse developers and members of the abuse2.com community. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Home of the Underdogs (HOTU) is a PC game archive founded by Sarinee Achavanuntakul in September 1998, and has grown to be one of the largest abandonware sites on the Internet. ... Golgotha was a computer game that was being developed by Crack dot Com prior to shutting down. ...


There was a 3D "fan-sequel" being made by a few fans of the game, primarily Jeremy Scott and JAS (both contributing to Abuse 2), called Abuse 3 (Abuse 2 was announced as being "in production" before the idea for Abuse 3). It was being built upon the Quake 2 engine with added features such as shaders, dynamic shadows, and particle effects. Work continued on the game for nearly 9 months, when the project fell through due to a "conflict in the team."


Modifications and editing

Abuse took an unusual (at the time) approach to making modifications ("mods"). The game includes a rather polished level editor, which is fully usable from the game itself. The editor, once enabled with command-line parameter, can be toggled with Tab key, and the game can be fully edited while testing the level - for example, the states of various triggers can be surveyed in real-time. The game came with a complete guide to the level editor. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Event-driven programming is a computer programming paradigm. ...


More advanced editing is also possible. Using a separate program called Satan Paint, new graphics can be created and added to the game. (Currently, Satan Paint is not very well supported, so separate conversion to the *.spe format may be required.)


Probably the most unusual thing under the hood of the game, however, was that the game logic was programmed in a variant of Lisp. This allows for incredibly complex modifications - one of the relatively simple examples was a Breakout clone, which, however, no longer functions on the retail version. Regrettably, the Lisp interface was undocumented, and with Abuse's own Lisp code as the only reference, there were relatively few modifications that used Lisp code. Lisp is a family of computer programming languages with a long history and a distinctive fully-parenthesized syntax. ... This computer game has been incorrectly referred to or categorized with the PC game misnomer. ...


Distribution methods and later developments

The game was originally released as shareware, though in modern terms, a "beta-version demo" would be a more appropriate description. The free release was done based on incomplete game and final version was published through major software publishing house and distributed through ordinary retail channels.


The shareware versions were released for MS-DOS and Linux. Abuse was distributed with many GNU/Linux distributions at the time. Regrettably, the Lisp API in shareware releases (1.x) was not compatible with the final retail version (2.0), making modifications incompatible. The retail version was only available for MS-DOS (though the source code for 2.0 can be built to produce a Linux binary). Microsofts disk operating system, MS-DOS, was Microsofts implementation of DOS, which was the first popular operating system for the IBM PC, and until recently, was widely used on the PC compatible platform. ... Linux (IPA pronunciation: ) is a Unix-like computer operating system. ... Microsofts disk operating system, MS-DOS, was Microsofts implementation of DOS, which was the first popular operating system for the IBM PC, and until recently, was widely used on the PC compatible platform. ...


Abuse was also ported to Mac OS by Oliver Yu of Crack dot Com and published by Bungie Studios. The port was an unusual port in that it was largely reworked for Mac. Graphics were partially redone to work better in the 640x480 resolution. (The PC version runs in 320x200 VGA resolution, and can be made to run in higher resolutions, though the graphics will not be scaled.) This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Approximately two years after the release of the game, Crack dot Com decided to release the game source code, as well as the shareware release game data (excluding the sound effects), to public domain. There has been little development based on this source release, though it did allow up-to-date GNU/Linux builds and making the game work over TCP/IP. An SDL port of the game is now available, allowing the game to run in Microsoft Windows and also in X11 systems in displays with more than 256 colors. The Mac version has been updated to run on OS X. Source code (commonly just source or code) is any series of statements written in some human-readable computer programming language. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Internet protocol suite is the set of communications protocols that implement the protocol stack on which the Internet runs. ... Simple DirectMedia Layer (SDL) is a cross-platform multimedia free software library written in C that creates an abstraction over various platforms graphics, sound, and input APIs, allowing a developer to write a computer game or other multimedia application once and run it on many operating systems including GNU/Linux... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, the lead section of this article may need to be expanded. ... In computing, the X Window System (commonly X11 or X) is a windowing system for bitmap displays. ... Mac OS X (official IPA pronunciation: ) is a line of proprietary, graphical operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. ...


External links

Video games Portal
  • Abuse at MobyGames
  • Abuse at Home of the Underdogs
  • Free Abuse (fRaBs) (link not working) Internet Archive backup - package of PD Abuse data.
  • Abuse32 (windows port by Jeremy Scott)
  • some designs for Abuse 3 fan-game (JAS)
  • JAS's official site
  • Abuse.PlasmaFire.org - an Abuse archive site with game discussion; a mirror of fRaBs v2.1 is also provided.
  • Abuse for Mac OS X (link not working) Internet Archive backup
  • Internet Archive Capture of one of the Abuse 3 forum threads
  • Internet Archive Capture of the Abuse 3 official news page
  • Internet Archive Capture of JAS's Abuse 3 progress log

 
 

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