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Encyclopedia > Absorption (optics)

Absorption, in optics, is the process by which the energy of a photon is taken up by another entity, for example, by an atom whose valence electrons make a transition between two electronic energy levels. The photon is destroyed in the process. Molecules can lose absorbed energy by heat and radiation. Absorption is often measured by spectroscopy. See also list of optical topics. ... For the Science Fiction weapon, as seen in Star Trek, see Photon torpedo. ... Properties For alternative meanings see atom (disambiguation). ... Valence is a scientific term in chemistry to describe electrons in the outermost orbital. ... Properties The electron is a subatomic particle. ... A quantum mechanic system can only be in certain states, so that only certain energy levels are possible. ... A molecule is the smallest particle of a pure chemical substance that still retains its chemical composition and properties. ... A red-hot iron rod cooling after being worked by a blacksmith. ... Radiation has a variety of different meanings. ... Spectrum of fluorescent lights showing prominent mercury peaks. ...


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Absorption - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (177 words)
In physics, absorption is a process in which particles of some sort encounter another material and are taken up by or even disappear in it.
Volume absorption of particles of gas or liquid in liquid or solid material is studied in physical chemistry.
Absorption should not be confused with adsorption, the formation of a liquid or gas film on a solid surface.
Tiger Optics Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy In-Depth (CRDS) (1246 words)
Based upon the known cross-section of this absorption line [18] and the observed value for the noise in the determination of the ring-down time, the instrument should be able to detect water vapor at a few parts per trillion (ppt) levels in nitrogen or other inert gases.
Based upon the known cross section of this absorption line [18] and the observed value for the noise in the determination of the ring-down time, the instrument should be able to detect water vapor at a few ppt levels in nitrogen or other inert gases.
This absorption coefficient is related to the number density by a known factor, the cross-section of the line.
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