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Encyclopedia > Abrahamic mythology

Abrahamic mythology is a term used in comparative mythology to refer to those aspects of religious belief and tradition common to the Abrahamic religions, as distinct from those of the "Pagan religions" from which most mainstream research in this field suggests they developed. Comparative mythology, related to comparative religion, is a field of study which is technically part of anthropology but more usually regarded as part of the subject of ancient history. ... // In the study of comparative religion, an Abrahamic religion is any of those religions deriving from a common ancient Semitic tradition and traced by their adherents to Abraham (אַבְרָהָם Father/Leader of many), a patriarch whose life is narrated in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, and in the Quran. ... Paganism (from Latin paganus) and Heathenry are catch-all terms which have come to connote a broad set of spiritual/religious beliefs and practices of a natural religion, as opposed to the Abrahamic religions. ...

Contents


Controversy of terminology

Some Abrahamic religionists reject the categorisation of their beliefs as mythology, arguing that the term connotes untruth and has more commonly been used to refer to beliefs they regard as fiction. Comparative mythologists might respond that mythology is not necessarily ahistorical nor counterfactual, and correct use within its field of such terminology — which in this case uniquely encompasses the shared religious conceptions of the Abrahamic faiths — is not intended to be argumentative, nor to imply disrespect. In logic and in some branches of semantics, connotation is more or less synonymous with intension. ... The Three Graces, here in a painting by Sandro Botticelli, were the goddesses of charm, beauty, nature, human creativity and fertility in Greek mythology. ...


Abrahamic views

The traditional perspective of adherents of the Abrahamic faiths is that there is indeed a common source and history for the world's religions, and borrowing which has produced a shared folklore, which is a kind of shared memory of the truth, partially obscured elsewhere, but preserved in Scripture by divine revelation. The view does not claim, as it may at first seem, that the pagans borrowed from Scripture; but rather the view is that Scripture directly confronts the history, folklore and religious perspectives of the surrounding peoples, contradicting its connection to idols, and in contrast re-orienting religion toward one God, creator, and ruler over all, who is described as an attentive actor in history. The constant refrain of these religions is, "remember".


This view has recently been challenged on multiple fronts, by modern scholarship, as partially described below.


(More needs to be written about how Abrahamics feel about their shared mythology) One of Wikipedias rules to consider: Please make omissions explicit when creating or editing an article. ...


Secular views

Although not all agree on the reliability of Old Testament accounts of Abraham, most scholars who use the term "Abrahamic Mythology" believe these belief systems originated four to five thousand years ago under the influence of earlier traditions — primarily Chaldean mythology — and subsequently developed through interaction with contemporaneous religions such as Zoroastrianism. Many historians, comparative mythologists and archeologists came to hold this view towards the end of the 19th Century, as academia became increasingly secularized and non-Abrahamic analogues of the central stories came to light. Note: Judaism uses the term Tanakh instead of Old Testament, because it does not recognize the New Testament as being part of the Biblical canon. ... Abraham (אַבְרָהָם Father/Leader of many, (circa 1700 BCE) Standard Hebrew Avraham, Tiberian Hebrew ; Arabic ابراهيم ; Geez አብርሃም ) is regarded as a patriarch of Israelite religion, recognized by Judaism and later Christianity, and a very important prophet in Islam. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Zoroastrianism was once the official religion of Sassanid (Sassanian) Persia, and played an important role in the Achaemenid as well as Parthian empires in Persia. ...


Typically, features of resemblance are pointed out between the Abrahamic traditions and those of far greater antiquity, in the effort to trace the borrowing and amendations that may have resulted in the Abrahamic stories. While there are obvious and striking similarities between, for example, the Sumerian myth of Enuma Elish and the later Abrahamic stories of creation, and the cataclysmic flood in the 11th tablet of the epic poem The Epic of Gilgamesh and the Noahic Deluge of Abrahamic legend, there are also a number of other, finer points of similarity shared with other religions of Middle-East. On the basis of such numerous similarities, it is theorized that the Abrahamic myths either originated in Chaldean mythology itself, or at least borrowed heavily from it, as such similarities seem unlikely to have appeared by chance. Higher critics in the academic mainstream have tended to incorporate some of these secular historical perspectives, including the point of view that the Bible, the Qu'ran and Hadiths represent a tradition of mythology, which was originally based on some true historical events that were gradually supernaturalized, incorporating a mythical and allegorical character. Consequently, theologians who have adopted this perspective might argue that if the stories are to be seen as true, they should be judged true by other standards than those of modern historical science. Chaldean mythology is the collective name given to Sumerian, Assyrian and Babylonian mythologies, although Chaldea did not comprehend the whole territory inhabited by those peoples. ... Enûma Elish is the creation epic of Babylonian mythology. ... In mathematics, see epic morphism. ... The Deluge tablet of the Gilgamesh epic in Akkadian The Epic of Gilgamesh is from Babylonia, dating from long after the time that king Gilgamesh was supposed to have ruled. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with The Historical-Critical Method. ... The Quran ( Arabic al-qurʾān أَلْقُرآن; its literal meaning is the recitation and is often called Al Quran Al Karim: The Noble Quran, also transliterated as Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ... Hadith (Arabic: , Arabic pl. ... The supernatural refers to conscious magical, religious or unknown forces that cannot ordinarily be perceived except through their effects. ...


Abrahamic mythology as includes (but not limited to):

Closely related, but distinct from Abrahamic mythology are: Jewish mythology is a body of stories that explains or symbolizes Jewish beliefs. ... Christian mythology is a body of stories that explains or symbolizes Christian beliefs. ... Islamic mythology is a body of mythology developed in Islamic cultures, it should be distinguished from Islamic beliefs. ...

Religions whose mythologies represent a blend of Abrahamic and Pagan myths include: This diorite head is believed to represent king Hammurabi Babylonian and Assyrian religion was a series of belief systems in places in the early civilisations of the Euphrates valley. ... Babylonian mythology is a set of stories depicting the activities of Babylonian deities, heroes, and mythological creatures. ... Egyptian mythology or Egyptian religion is the succession of tentative beliefs held by the people of Egypt for over three thousand years, prior to major exposure to Christianity and Islam. ... Paganism (from Latin paganus) and Heathenry are catch-all terms which have come to connote a broad set of spiritual/religious beliefs and practices of a natural religion, as opposed to the Abrahamic religions. ... Monotheism (in Greek μόνος = single and θεός = God) is the belief in a single, universal, all-encompassing deity. ...

Ways of the Strega published in 1994, described Raven Grimassis view of Stregheria and popularized Italian-based religious witchcraft. ... The Roman Catholic Church, (also known as the Catholic Church), is the ancient Christian Church led by the Bishop of Rome (commonly called the Pope). ... Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... The Etruscans were a race of unknown origin from North Italy who were eventually integrated into Rome. ... A large sequined Voodoo dwapo or flag by the artist George Valris The term Voodoo (Vodun in Benin; also Vodou or other phonetically equivalent spellings in Haiti; Vudu in the Dominican Republic) is applied to the branches of a West African ancestor-based spiritist-animist religious tradition. ... The Roman Catholic Church, (also known as the Catholic Church), is the ancient Christian Church led by the Bishop of Rome (commonly called the Pope). ...

Recent developments

In recent times, modern historical method has been applied to the sacred texts. These efforts seek to discover whether aspects of the ancient stories can be shown to be historical by the standards of historical science. For example, a leading archaeologist Kenneth Kitchen, who authored the work On the Reliability of the Old Testament, offers the opinion that the patriarchal narratives of the Bible are historical, in contrast to myth (Kenneth A. Kitchen, The Patriarchal Age: Myth or History?, Biblical Archeological Review 21:02, Mar/Apr 1995). Prominent Yale archaeologist, Millar Burrows stated the following: "On the whole, however, archaeological work has unquestionably strengthened confidence in the reliability of the Scriptural record...Archaeology has in many cases refuted the views of modern critics." [1]. Apologists working from an historical perspective, offer evidence that archaeology greatly corroborates the Bible. [2][3] [4] The historical method comprises the techniques and guidelines by which historians use primary sources and other evidence to research and then to write history. ... Kenneth Anderson Kitchen is Personal and Brunner Professor Emeritus of Egyptology and Honorary Research Fellow at the School of Archaeology, Classics and Oriental Studies, University of Liverpool, England. ...


See also



  Results from FactBites:
 
Abrahamic mythology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (678 words)
Abrahamic mythology is a term used in comparative mythology to refer to those aspects of religious belief and tradition common to the Abrahamic religions, as distinct from those of the "Pagan religions" from which most mainstream research in this field suggests they developed.
Some Abrahamic religionists reject the categorisation of their beliefs as mythology, arguing that the term connotes untruth and has more commonly been used to refer to beliefs they regard as fiction.
The traditional perspective of adherents of the Abrahamic faiths is that there is indeed a common source and history for the world's religions, and borrowing which has produced a shared folklore, which is a kind of shared memory of the truth, partially obscured elsewhere, but preserved in Scripture by divine revelation.
Abrahamic religion - encyclopedia article about Abrahamic religion. (6272 words)
Abrahamic religions is a term used in the study of comparative religion to describe those religions deriving from a common ancient Semitic tradition and traced by their adherents to Abraham (אַבְרָהָם "Father/Leader of many"), a patriarch whose life is narrated in the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and in the Qur'an.
All the Abrahamic religions are derived to some extent from Judaism as practiced in ancient kingdoms of Israel and Judah prior to the Babylonian Exile, at the beginning of the 1st millennium BCE.
Christians view Abraham as an important exemplar of faith, and a spiritual ancestor of Jesus, a Jew and the Son of God, through whom God promised to bless all the families of the earth.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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