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Encyclopedia > Abraham Lincoln assassination
Assassination of Abraham Lincoln
From left to right: Major Henry Rathbone, Clara Harris, Mary Todd Lincoln, Abraham Lincoln, and John Wilkes Booth.

The Abraham Lincoln assassination, one of the last major events in the American Civil War, took place on Friday, April 14, 1865 at around 10 o'clock PM. President Abraham Lincoln was shot while attending a performance of Our American Cousin at Ford's Theatre with his wife and two guests. Lincoln died the following day April 15, 1865 in the home of William Petersen, at 7:22 am. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 561 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 1078 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 561 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 1078 pixel, file size: 3. ... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ... Henry Reed Rathbone (July 1, 1837 – August 14, 1911) was present at the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, and was sitting with his fiancée, Clara Harris, next to the President and his wife at the time of its occurence. ... Clara Harris (1845 - December 23, 1883) was the daughter of U.S. Senator Ira Harris of New York. ... Mary Ann Todd Lincoln (December 13, 1818 – July 16, 1882) was the First Lady of the United States when her husband, Abraham Lincoln, served as the sixteenth President, from 1861 until 1865. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... John Wilkes Booth (May 10, 1838 – April 26, 1865) assassinated Abraham Lincoln the 16th President of the United States at Fords Theatre in Washington, D.C. on April 14, 1865. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... This article is about the play. ... Fords Theatre at 511 10th Street, NW, Washington, D.C. is an active theatre in Washington DC, United States, used for various performances. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Fords Theatre in the 19th century Fords Theatre at 511 10th Street, NW, Washington, D.C. was the site of the assassination of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865. ...


Lincoln’s assassin, actor and Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth, had also planned the attack on William H. Seward (then Secretary of State). Booth hoped to overthrow the Federal government by assassinating Lincoln, Seward, and Vice President Andrew Johnson. Though Booth succeeded in killing Lincoln, the larger plot failed. Seward would recover from his wounds, and Johnson's potential assassin simply left Washington when he learned Johnson was not home. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial) Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia (May 29, 1861–April 2, 1865) Danville, Virginia (from April 3, 1865) Language(s) English (de facto) Religion... John Wilkes Booth (May 10, 1838 – April 26, 1865) assassinated Abraham Lincoln the 16th President of the United States at Fords Theatre in Washington, D.C. on April 14, 1865. ... William Henry Seward, Sr. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Original plot

John Wilkes Booth's plot was to kidnap Lincoln and take him south, to hold him hostage and force his government to resume its earlier policy of exchanging prisoners. [1] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1025x1493, 319 KB)John Wilkes Booth source File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1025x1493, 319 KB)John Wilkes Booth source File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... John Wilkes Booth (May 10, 1838 – April 26, 1865) assassinated Abraham Lincoln the 16th President of the United States at Fords Theatre in Washington, D.C. on April 14, 1865. ... John Wilkes Booth (May 10, 1838 – April 26, 1865) assassinated Abraham Lincoln the 16th President of the United States at Fords Theatre in Washington, D.C. on April 14, 1865. ...


Booth had organized a circle of conspirators to help him in attempting this. He recruited Samuel Arnold, George Atzerodt, David Herold, Michael O'Laughlen, Lewis Powell a.k.a. "Lewis Paine" and John Surratt. In time, Surratt's mother, Mary, left her tavern in Surrattsville, Maryland, and moved to a house in Washington, where Booth became a frequent visitor. Prosecutors would later point out that this move coincided with Booth's need to have a base of operations in the city. Samuel Arnold Samuel Bland Arnold (September 6, 1838-September 21, 1906) was involved in the group to kidnap President Abraham Lincoln in 1865. ... George Atzerodt George Andreas Atzerodt (June 12, 1835 – July 7, 1865)[1][2] was a U.S. conspirator with John Wilkes Booth. ... David Herold, Washington Navy Yard, 1865 Execution of the four persons condemned as conspirators (Mary E. Surratt, Lewis T. Powell, David E. Herold, and George A. Atzerodt), July 7, 1865, at Fort McNair in Washington, D.C. David Edgar Herold (16 June 1842 – 7 July 1865) conspired with John Wilkes... Michael OLaughlen after his arrest for conspiracy in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. ... Lewis Thornton Powell (April 22, 1844 – July 7, 1865), also known as Lewis Paine or Payne, attempted unsuccessfully to assassinate United States Secretary of State William H. Seward, and was one of four people hanged for the Lincoln assassination conspiracy. ... Lewis Powell After arrest, 1865 Lewis Powell (alias Lewis Paine). ... John Surratt, in Zouave uniform John Surratt (April 13, 1844 - April 21, 1916), son of Mary Surratt, was accused of plotting to kidnap U.S. president Abraham Lincoln. ... Mary Surratt Mary Elizabeth Eugenia Jenkins Surratt (May/June 1823 in Waterloo, Maryland, USA – July 7, 1865 in Washington, D.C), was a member of the Abraham Lincoln assassination conspiracy and the first woman executed by the United States federal government, for her role in the conspiracy. ...


Booth attended Lincoln's second inauguration on March 4, 1865, as the invited guest of his secret fiancée Lucy Hale, the daughter of John P. Hale, soon to be United States Ambassador to Spain. Booth remarked afterwards, "What an excellent chance I had, if I wished, to kill the President on Inauguration day!" [2] On March 17, 1865, Booth told his conspirators that Lincoln would be attending a play, Still Waters Run Deep, at Campbell Military Hospital. He assembled his team in a restaurant at the edge of town, evidently intending that they should soon join him on a stretch of road nearby and ambush the president on his way back from the hospital. But after going out to check on Lincoln, Booth returned with the news that Lincoln had not gone there after all. Instead, the president was at the National Hotel, attending a ceremony in which the officers of the 140th Indiana were presenting their governor with a captured Confederate battle flag. Ironically, Booth lived at the National. [3] is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... John Parker Hale (March 31, 1806 - November 19, 1873) was an American politician. ... // ^ John Jay proceeded to post but was not formally received at court. ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ...


On April 11, 1865, Booth attended a speech outside the White House in which Lincoln gave support for the idea of voting rights for blacks. Furious at the prospect, Booth changed to a plan for assassination. is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ...


Assassination

Plot

The Confederacy began to fall apart shortly after Booth's last kidnapping plan failed. Although many Southerners had given up hope, Booth continued to believe in his cause, writing in his diary that "something decisive and great must be done."[4] He decided that if he could simultaneously kill the President, Vice-President Andrew Johnson, and Secretary of State William Seward, he could throw the Union government into chaos for enough time that the Confederacy could mount a resurgence. Atzerodt wanted nothing to do with it, saying he had signed up for a kidnapping, not a killing. Booth told him he was too far in to back out. Booth suspected that Atzerodt would not follow through with the assassination, so on his way to Ford's Theatre, Booth stopped by Johnson's apartment leaving a note that read "I don't wish to disturb you. Are you at home? J. Wilkes Booth." [5] This message has been interpreted in many different ways throughout the years.[6] One theory is that Booth, afraid that Atzerodt would not be successful in killing Johnson, tried to use the message to implicate Johnson in the conspiracy.[7]


Booth then assigned Powell to kill Seward, and Herold to coordinate the various attacks. [8]


Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln and wife Mary Todd Lincoln were going to attend Laura Keekle's performance in Our American Cousin.[9] The Lincolns were under much stress, put on them by both the war and the death of their son in 1862. President Lincoln had also been plagued by dreams which concerned his own death. The play was supposed to give them a chance to enjoy themselves. Several people were invited to join them, but only Major Henry Rathbone and his fiancée Clara Harris accepted the invitation.[10] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3376x4606, 2747 KB) Description One of the last photographs of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln, taken on April 10, 1865, five days before his assassination. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3376x4606, 2747 KB) Description One of the last photographs of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln, taken on April 10, 1865, five days before his assassination. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... This article is about the play. ... Major is a military rank the use of which varies according to country. ... Henry Reed Rathbone (July 1, 1837 – August 14, 1911) was present at the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, and was sitting with his fiancée, Clara Harris, next to the President and his wife at the time of its occurence. ... Clara Harris (1845 - December 23, 1883) was the daughter of U.S. Senator Ira Harris of New York. ...


The President and First Lady arrived at Ford's Theatre after the play began, and were led to the presidential box, where Lincoln was seated in a rocking chair on the left-hand side. The show was briefly paused to acknowledge the presence of the President and First Lady, who were applauded by the audience.


Lincoln had been delayed at the White House by Missouri Senator John B. Henderson who successfully appealed for a pardon for George S.E. Vaughn who had thrice been convicted of espionage for the Confederates and was sentenced to die. It was Lincoln's last official act as President.[11] John B. Henderson John Brooks Henderson (November 16, 1826 – April 12, 1913) was a United States Senator from Missouri and a co-author of the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. ... For the Breton religious festivals, see Pardon (ceremony). ... George S. E. Vaughn (sometimes spelled George Vaughan or George E. Vaughn) (1823-August 26, 1899) was an accused Confederate spy during the American Civil War who was pardoned by Abraham Lincoln an hour before Lincolns assassination in the Presidents last official act. ...


At about 9 o'clock Booth arrived at the back door of Ford's Theatre, where he handed the reins of his horse over to a stagehand named Edman Spangler. Spangler, having work to do, asked Joseph Borrows (known as "Peanuts," for the snacks he once sold in the theater) to hold the horse. As an actor at Ford's Theatre, Booth was well known there and he knew his way around. He entered a narrow hallway between Lincoln's box and the theatre's balcony, and barricaded the door. [12]


Mrs. Lincoln whispered to her husband, who was holding her hand, "What will Miss Harris think of my hanging on to you so?" The president replied, "She won't think anything about it."[13] Those were the last words ever spoken by Abraham Lincoln.


Booth shot the president and the bullet went all the way through his head. Lincoln slumped over in his rocking chair, unconscious. Rathbone jumped from his seat and tried to prevent Booth from escaping, but Booth stabbed the Major violently in the arm with a knife. Rathbone quickly recovered and tried to grab Booth as he was preparing to jump from the sill of the box. Booth again stabbed at Rathbone, and then attempted to vault over the rail and down to the stage. His foot was caught on the Treasury flag, and Booth came down full-face to the audience. He raised himself up and, holding a knife over his head, yelled, "Sic semper tyrannis,"[14] the Virginia state motto, meaning "Thus always to tyrants." Other accounts state that he also uttered "The South is avenged!"[15] He then ran across the stage, and went out the door onto the horse he had waiting outside. Some of the men in the audience chased after him, but failed to catch him. Booth rode to the navy yard to meet up with Herold. Great Seal of Virginia with the state motto. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


While on the run, Booth would claim that he had broken his leg when his horse — a high-spirited mare — tripped and rolled over on him. But after reading newspaper accounts that called him a coward, he changed his story, and implied that the fracture had occurred on the leap to the stage. By then he was playing up the danger he had faced by attacking Lincoln in a crowded theater. Eyewitness accounts, and injuries suffered by the horse, support the original story.[16]


In U.S. News & World Report it was reported that doctors at a symposium indicated that if Lincoln had received similar wounds today, he might have lived, albeit with a speech impediment due to the brain injury. [17] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


William H. Seward

Booth assigned Lewis Powell to kill Secretary of State William H. Seward. At this time, Seward was bedridden due to a carriage accident he was in about a week before. He was at his home in Lafayette Park in Washington, not too far from the White House. Presidents Park, located in Washington, D.C., includes the White House, a visitor center, Lafayette Park, and the Ellipse. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ...

Powell and Herold went to Seward's residence on Booth's orders. Booth probably thought that Powell would not be able to find the house and that Herold was too cowardly to attempt the murder himself. Powell was carrying an 1858 Whitney revolver which was a large, heavy and popular gun during the Civil War. Additionally, he carried a huge silver-mounted bowie knife. Image File history File links FSewardLPaine. ... Image File history File links FSewardLPaine. ... Frederick William Seward (July 8, 1830 – April 25, 1915) was the Assistant Secretary of State during the American Civil War, serving in Abraham Lincolns administration. ... Lewis Thornton Powell (April 22, 1844 – July 7, 1865), also known as Lewis Paine or Payne, attempted unsuccessfully to assassinate United States Secretary of State William H. Seward, and was one of four people hanged for the Lincoln assassination conspiracy. ... A typical bowie knife, with its hallmark large blade and unique shape. ...


Powell knocked at the front door of the house a little after 10:00 p.m. William Bell, Seward's butler, answered the door. Powell told Bell that he had medicine for Seward from Dr. Verdi, and that he was to personally deliver and show Seward how to take the medicine. He was let in and Powell made his way up the stairs to Seward's third floor bedroom.[18] [19][20]


At the top of the staircase, he was approached by Seward's son and Assistant Secretary of State Frederick Seward. Powell told Frederick the same alibi that he had told Bell at the front door. Seward was suspicious of the intruder and told Powell that his father was asleep. Assistant Secretary of State is a title used for many executive positions in the United States State Department. ... Frederick William Seward (July 8, 1830 – April 25, 1915) was the Assistant Secretary of State during the American Civil War, serving in Abraham Lincolns administration. ...


After hearing voices in the hall, Seward's daughter Fanny opened the door to Seward's room and said, "Fred, Father is awake now," and then returned to the room. Powell now knew where Seward was. Powell started down the stairs when suddenly he jolted around again and drew his revolver, placing it upon Frederick's forehead. He pulled the trigger, but the gun misfired. Panicking, he then smashed the gun over Frederick's head continuously until Frederick collapsed. Fanny, wondering what all the noise was, looked out the door again. She saw her brother bloody and unconscious on the floor and Powell running towards her. Powell ran to Seward's bed and stabbed him continuously in the face and neck. He missed the first time he swung his knife down, but the third blow sliced open Seward's cheek.[21] The metal neck brace Seward was wearing was the only thing that prevented the blade from penetrating his jugular.[22] Sergeant Robinson and Seward's son Augustus tried to drive Powell away. Augustus had been asleep in his room, but was awakened by Fanny's screams of terror. Outside, Herold also heard Fanny's screaming. He became frightened and ran away, abandoning Powell.[23] External and internal jugular veins bring deoxygenated blood from head region back to heart. ...


Secretary Seward had rolled off the bed and onto the floor where he could not be reached by his attacker. Powell fought off Robinson, Augustus and Fanny stabbing them as well. He ran down stairs and headed to the front door.[24] Just then, a messenger named Emerick Hansell arrived with a telegram for Seward. Powell stabbed Hansell in the back, causing him to fall to the floor. Before running outside, Powell exclaimed, "I'm mad! I'm mad!" He untied his horse from the tree where Herold left it and rode away.


Andrew Johnson

Booth assigned George Atzerodt to kill Vice President Andrew Johnson. Johnson was staying at the Kirkwood Hotel in Washington. Atzerodt was to go to the Vice President's room at 10:15 p.m. and shoot him.[25]


On April 14, 1865, Atzerodt rented room 126 at the Kirkwood directly above the room where Johnson was staying. Atzerodt was hesitant. He went to the bar downstairs and asked the bartender, Michael Henry, about the Vice President's character and behavior. However, Atzerodt never attempted the assassination. After spending some time at the Hotel saloon, Atzerodt wandered away down the streets of Washington.[26] is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ...


Aftermath

Escape attempt

Booth reunited with Herold after the assassination,[27] but he was injured. After retrieving weapons and supplies previously stored at Surattsville, Herold and Booth went to Samuel A. Mudd, a local doctor and acquaintance of Booth, who determined that Booth's leg was broken, and put it in a splint.[28] After spending a day at Mudd's house, Booth and Herold hired a local man to guide them to Samuel Cox's house.[29] Cox in turn led them to Thomas Jones, who hid Booth and Herold in a swamp near his house for five days until they could cross the Potomac River.[30] They remained on the run until April 26, when Union soldiers tracked them down. They had been locked in a barn belonging to Richard Garrett and while Herold surrendered himself, Booth refused to come out.[31] The soldiers then set fire to the barn.[32] After that, a soldier named Boston Corbett crept up behind the barn, and fatally shot Booth in the neck, coincidentally close to where Booth had shot Lincoln.[33] Booth was dragged out on to the steps of the barn. A soldier attempted to put a watery bandage on him, but Booth refused. He then told the soldier "Tell my mother I died for my country." Writhing in agony, he lifted his hands then whispered "Useless...Useless." Booth died soon afterward. [34] Clinton is a census-designated place (CDP) in Prince Georges County, Maryland, United States. ... Samuel Alexander Mudd, I (December 20, 1833 – January 10, 1883) was a Maryland doctor implicated and imprisoned for aiding John Wilkes Booth in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. ... A splint is a medical device for the immobilisation of limbs or of the spine. ... The Potomac River flows into the Chesapeake Bay, located along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States (USA). ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... Boston Corbett Thomas P. Boston Corbett (1832 – presumed dead 1894) was the Union Army soldier who shot and killed Abraham Lincolns assassin, John Wilkes Booth. ...


Conspirators' trial

Eight of Booth's co-conspirators were tried by a military tribunal after his death. The fact that they were tried by a military tribunal provoked criticism from both Edward Bates and Gideon Welles, who believed that a civil court should have presided. The trial lasted for about seven weeks, with 366 witnesses testifying. The verdict was given on July 5. All of the defendants were found guilty. Mary Surratt, Lewis Powell, David Herold, and George Atzerodt were sentenced to death by hanging. Samuel Mudd, Samuel Arnold, and Michael O'Laughlen were given life in prison. Edmund Spangler was sentenced to imprisonment for six years.[35] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1405x1090, 409 KB)Execution of the four persons condemned as conspirators (Mary E. Surratt, Lewis T. Powell, David E. Herold, and George A. Atzerodt), July 7,1865. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1405x1090, 409 KB)Execution of the four persons condemned as conspirators (Mary E. Surratt, Lewis T. Powell, David E. Herold, and George A. Atzerodt), July 7,1865. ... Mary Surratt Mary Elizabeth Eugenia Jenkins Surratt (May/June 1823 in Waterloo, Maryland, USA – July 7, 1865 in Washington, D.C), was a member of the Abraham Lincoln assassination conspiracy and the first woman executed by the United States federal government, for her role in the conspiracy. ... Lewis Thornton Powell (April 22, 1844 – July 7, 1865), also known as Lewis Paine or Payne, attempted unsuccessfully to assassinate United States Secretary of State William H. Seward, and was one of four people hanged for the Lincoln assassination conspiracy. ... David Herold, Washington Navy Yard, 1865 Execution of the four persons condemned as conspirators (Mary E. Surratt, Lewis T. Powell, David E. Herold, and George A. Atzerodt), July 7, 1865, at Fort McNair in Washington, D.C. David Edgar Herold (16 June 1842 – 7 July 1865) conspired with John Wilkes... George Atzerodt George Andreas Atzerodt (June 12, 1835 – July 7, 1865)[1][2] was a U.S. conspirator with John Wilkes Booth. ... Note: This article is about the American lawyer. ... Gideon Welles (July 1, 1802–February 11, 1878) was the United States Secretary of the Navy from 1861 to 1869, including the entire duration of the American Civil War: his dedication to naval blockades was one of the key reasons for the Norths victory over the South. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Surratt, Powell, Herold, and Atzerodt were hanged in the Old Arsenal Penitentiary on July 7.[36][37] Mary Surratt was the first woman to be hanged by the U.S. government.[38] O'Laughlen died in prison of yellow fever in 1867. Mudd, Arnold, and Spangler were pardoned in February 1869 by President Johnson.[39] Military District of Washington Shoulder Sleeve Insignia Military District of Washington Distinctive Unit insignia Fort Lesley J. McNair, DC is located on the point of land where the Potomac and Anacostia rivers join in Washington, D.C. It has been an Army post for more than 200 years, third only... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ...


Impact

Abraham Lincoln was the first American President to be assassinated. His assassination had a long-lasting impact upon the country. He was mourned around the country. There were attacks in many cities against those who expressed support for Booth.[40] On the Easter Sunday after Lincoln's death, clergymen around the country praised him in their sermons.[41] Millions of people came to Lincoln's funeral procession in Washington, D.C. on April 19, 1865,[42] and as his body was transported 1,700 miles through New York to Springfield, Illinois. His body and funeral train were viewed by millions along the route.[43] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1800x1200, 2412 KB) [edit] Summary Description: The Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D.C. Author: David Bjorgen [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Abraham Lincoln assassination Metadata... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1800x1200, 2412 KB) [edit] Summary Description: The Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D.C. Author: David Bjorgen [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Abraham Lincoln assassination Metadata... The Lincoln Memorial, in Washington, D.C., is a United States Presidential memorial built to honor 16th President Abraham Lincoln. ... Easter (also called Pascha) is generally accounted the most important holiday of the Christian year, observed March or April each year to celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus from the dead (after his death by crucifixion; see Good Friday), which Christians believe happened at about this time of year, almost two... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... : Home of President Abraham Lincoln United States Illinois Sangamon 60. ... Abraham Lincolns funeral train. ...


After Lincoln's death, Ulysses S. Grant called him, "Incontestably the greatest man I ever knew."[44] Southern-born Elizabeth Blair said that, "Those of southern born sympathies know now they have lost a friend willing and more powerful to protect and serve them than they can now ever hope to find again."[45] The Lincoln Memorial was opened in 1922. Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ... The Lincoln Memorial, in Washington, D.C., is a United States Presidential memorial built to honor 16th President Abraham Lincoln. ...


Andrew Johnson was sworn in as President following Lincoln's death. Johnson has become one of the less popular presidents in American history.[46] He was impeached by the House of Representatives in 1868 but his enemies in the Senate failed to convict him by only one vote.[47] For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... The impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton in 1999, Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist presiding. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States...


Seward recovered from his wounds and continued to serve as Secretary of State. He later negotiated the deal, known as Seward's Folly, by which the United States purchased Alaska from Russia.[48] The Alaska Purchase from Russia by the United States occurred in 1867 at the behest of Secretary of State William Seward. ... For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ...


See also

This is a list of assasinated American politicians. ... James O. Hall (1911 or 1912 - February 2007) was an amateur historian who specialized in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. ...

References

  1. ^ Kauffman, M. American Brutus: John Wilkes Booth and the Lincoln Conspiracies (Random House, 2004)pp. 130-134
  2. ^ Kauffman, M. American Brutus, 174, 437 n. 41.
  3. ^ Kauffman, M. American Brutus, pp. 185-6 and 439 n. 17
  4. ^ Goodwin, D: "Team of Rivals.", p. 728. Simon & Schuster, 2005
  5. ^ George Alfred Townsend, The Life, Crime and Capture of John Wilkes Booth. (ISBN 978-0976480532)
  6. ^ Sandburg, C: "Abraham Lincoln: The War Years IV.", p. 334. Harcourt, Brace & World, 1936
  7. ^ U.S. Senate: Art & History Home. "Andrew Johnson, 16th Vice President (1865)", United States Senate. Retrieved on 2006-2-17.
  8. ^ Kauffman, M: American Brutus, p. 212 Random House, 2004
  9. ^ Swanson, J: "Manhunt.", p. 13. HarperCollins, 2006
  10. ^ Swanson, J: "Manhunt.", p. 32. HarperCollins, 2006
  11. ^ [http://books.google.com/books?id=3z5Iafbm6MkC&pg=PA211&dq=%22George+E.+Vaughn%22+Lincoln#PPA213,M1 Lincoln in story; the life of the martyr-president told in authenticated anecdotes, by Silas Gamaliel Pratt - New York, D. Appleton and co., 1901] (available on print.google)
  12. ^ Kauffman, M: American Brutus, pp. 224-5 Random House, 2004
  13. ^ Swanson, J: "Manhunt.", p. 39. HarperCollins, 2006
  14. ^ Goodwin, D: "Team of Rivals.", p. 739. Simon & Schuster, 2005
  15. ^ Swanson, J: "Manhunt.", p. 48. HarperCollins, 2006
  16. ^ Kauffman, M: American Brutus, pp. 272-3 Random House, 2004
  17. ^ http://www.usnews.com/usnews/news/articles/070624/2corpse.b1.htm
  18. ^ George Alfred Townsend, The Life, Crime and Capture of John Wilkes Booth. (ISBN 978-0976480532)
  19. ^ Goodwin, D: "Team of Rivals.", p. 736. Simon & Schuster, 2005
  20. ^ Swanson, J: "Manhunt.", p. 54. HarperCollins, 2006
  21. ^ Swanson, J: "Manhunt.", p. 58. HarperCollins, 2006
  22. ^ Goodwin, D: "Team of Rivals.", p. 737. Simon & Schuster, 2005
  23. ^ Swanson, J: "Manhunt.", p. 59. HarperCollins, 2006
  24. ^ Sandburg, C: "Abraham Lincoln: The War Years IV.", p. 275. Harcourt, Brace & World, 1936
  25. ^ Goodwin, D: "Team of Rivals.", p. 735. Simon & Schuster, 2005
  26. ^ Sandburg, C: "Abraham Lincoln The War Years IV.", p. 335. Harcourt, Brace & World, 1936
  27. ^ Swanson, J: "Manhunt.", p. 87. HarperCollins, 2006
  28. ^ Swanson, J: "Manhunt.", p. 131. HarperCollins, 2006
  29. ^ Swanson, J: "Manhunt.", p. 163. HarperCollins, 2006
  30. ^ Swanson, J: "Manhunt.", p. 224. HarperCollins, 2006
  31. ^ Swanson, J: "Manhunt.", p. 326. HarperCollins, 2006
  32. ^ Swanson, J: "Manhunt.", p. 331. HarperCollins, 2006
  33. ^ Swanson, J: "Manhunt.", p. . HarperCollins, 2006
  34. ^ George Alfred Townsend, The Life, Crime and Capture of John Wilkes Booth. (ISBN 978-0976480532)
  35. ^ Swanson, J: "Manhunt.", p. 363. HarperCollins, 2006
  36. ^ Swanson, J: "Manhunt.", p. 365. HarperCollins, 2006
  37. ^ Swanson, J: "Manhunt.", p. 362. HarperCollins, 2006
  38. ^ Linder, D: "Biography of Mary Surratt, Lincoln Assassination Conspirator", University of Missouri–Kansas City. Retrieved on 2006-12-10.
  39. ^ Swanson, J: "Manhunt.", p. 367. HarperCollins, 2006
  40. ^ Sandburg, C: "Abraham Lincoln: The War Years IV.", p. 350. Harcourt, Brace & World, 1936
  41. ^ Sandburg, C: "Abraham Lincoln: The War Years IV.", p. 357. Harcourt, Brace & World, 1936
  42. ^ Swanson, J: "Manhunt.", p. 213. HarperCollins, 2006
  43. ^ Sandburg, C: "Abraham Lincoln: The War Years IV.", p. 394. Harcourt, Brace & World, 1936
  44. ^ Goodwin, D: "Team of Rivals.", p. 747. Simon & Schuster, 2005
  45. ^ Goodwin, D: "Team of Rivals.", p. 744. Simon & Schuster, 2005
  46. ^ Stadelmann, M: "U.S. Presidents For Dummies.", p. 355. Hungry Minds, 2002
  47. ^ Goodwin, D: "Team of Rivals.", p. 752. Simon & Schuster, 2005
  48. ^ Goodwin, D: "Team of Rivals.", p. 751. Simon & Schuster, 2005

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