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Encyclopedia > Abraham Baldwin
Abraham Baldwin
Abraham Baldwin

Abraham Baldwin (November 23, 1754March 4, 1807) was an American politician, Patriot, and Founding Father from the U.S. state of Georgia. Baldwin was a Georgia representative in the Continental Congress and served in the United States House of Representatives and Senate after the adoption of the Constitution. From www. ... From www. ... November 23 is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 38 days remaining. ... 1754 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1807 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      Politics of the United States of America takes place in a framework of a federal presidential... Patriots (also known as Americans, Whigs, or Rebels) were British North American colonists who rebelled against the British monarchy during the American Revolution and established the independent states that became the United States of America. ... Founding Fathers of the United States, also known to some Americans as the Fathers of Our Country, the Forefathers, Framers or the Founders, are the political leaders who signed the Declaration of Independence or the United States Constitution, or otherwise participated in the American Revolution as leaders of the Patriots. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      A state of the United States is any one of the fifty subnational entities referred to... The Continental Congress is the label given to two successive bodies of representatives of the inhabitants of the Thirteen Colonies in 18th century British North America: The First Continental Congress met from September 5, 1774, to October 26, 1774. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is the lower of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ...

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==Insert non-formatted text here Image:Example.jpgInsert non-formatted text hereLink titleItalic texthello Abraham was born at Guilford, Connecticut. He was the second son of a blacksmith who fathered 12 children by two wives. Besides Abraham, several of the family attained distinction in life. His sister Ruth Baldwin married the poet and diplomat Joel Barlow, and his half-brother Henry became an Associate Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. Their ambitious father went heavily into debt to educate his children. Image File history File links Example. ... Part of the Style and how-to series Shortcut: WP:HEP See also Help:Editing, m:Help:Editing, m:Help:Starting_a_new_page Wikipedia is a WikiWiki, which means that anyone can easily edit any unprotected article and have those changes posted immediately to that page. ... Guilford is a town in New Haven County, Connecticut, United States, that borders Madison, Branford, North Branford and Durham, and is situated on I-95 and the coast. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A blacksmith A blacksmith at work A blacksmith at work A blacksmiths fire Hot metal work from a blacksmith A blacksmith is a person who creates objects from iron or steel by forging the metal; i. ... Joel Barlow (March 24, 1754-December 24, 1812), American poet and politician, born in Redding, Fairfield County, Connecticut. ... Henry Baldwin (January 14, 1780 - April 21, 1844) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from January 18, 1830, to April 21, 1844. ... Associate Justice or Puisne (pronounced puny) Justice is the title for a member of a judicial panel who is not the Chief Justice. ... The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the judicial branch of the United States federal government. ...


After attending a local village school, Abraham graduated from Yale University in nearby New Haven in 1772. Three years later, he became a minister and tutor at the college. He held that position until 1779, when he served as a chaplain in the Continental Army. Two years later, he declined an offer from Yale for a divinity professorship. Instead of resuming his ministerial or educational duties after the war, he turned to the study of law and in 1783 was admitted to the bar at Fairfield. Yale redirects here. ... Nickname: The Elm City Location in Connecticut Coordinates: Counties New Haven County Mayor John DeStefano, Jr. ... Year 1772 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... For other types of minister, see Minister In Christian churches, a minister is a man or woman who serves a congregation or participates in a role in a parachurch ministry; such persons can minister as a Pastor, Preacher, Bishop, Chaplain, Deacon or Elder. ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... A chaplain is typically a member of the clergy serving a group of people who are not organized as a mission or church; lay chaplains are also found in some settings such as universities. ... Illustration depicting uniforms and weapons used during the 1779 to 1783 period of the American Revolution by showing four soldiers standing in an informal group General George Washington, was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army on June 15, 1775. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Fairfield is a town located in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. ...


After Baldwin turned down a prestigious teaching position as professor of divinity at Yale, Georgia governor Lyman Hall persuaded him to accept the responsibility of creating an educational plan for both secondary and higher education in the state. Baldwin strongly believed that education was the key to developing frontier states like Georgia. Once elected to the Georgia House of Representatives in the state legislature, he developed a comprehensive educational plan that ultimately included land grants from the state to fund the establishment of the University of Georgia (UGA) in Athens, Georgia. Through Baldwin's efforts, UGA became the first state-chartered school in the nation when UGA was incorporated on January 27, 1785. Baldwin served as the first president of the institution during its initial planning phase, from 1785 to 1801. In 1801, Franklin college, UGA's initial college, opened to students with Josiah Meigs succeeding Baldwin as president to oversee the inaugural class of students. The school was architecturally modeled on Baldwin's alma mater, Yale. This article is about the Georgia governor and signer of the Declaration of Independence. ... The Georgia House of Representatives is the lower house of the General Assembly (the state legislature) of Georgia. ... The Georgia General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Georgia. ... The University of Georgia (UGA) is the largest institution of higher learning and research in the State of Georgia. ... Athens is a city in Athens-Clarke County, Georgia, U.S., in the northeastern part of the state, at the eastern terminus of Georgia 316. ... January 27 is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Josiah Meigs was born on August 21, 1757 in Middletown, Connecticut. ...


Continental Congress

Within a year, Baldwin moved Georgia, won legislative approval to practice law, and obtained a land grant in Wilkes County. In 1785 he sat in the assembly and the Continental Congress. Two years later, his father died and Baldwin undertook to pay off his debts and educate, out of his own pocket, his half-brothers and half-sisters. A land grant is a gift of land made by the government for projects such as roads, railroads, or especially academic institutions. ... Wilkes County is a county located in the state of Georgia. ... The Continental Congress is the label given to two successive bodies of representatives of the inhabitants of the Thirteen Colonies in 18th century British North America: The First Continental Congress met from September 5, 1774, to October 26, 1774. ...


That same year, Baldwin attended the Constitutional Convention, from which he was absent for a few weeks. Although usually inconspicuous, he sat on the Committee on Postponed Matters and helped resolve the large-small state representation crisis. At first, he favored representation in the Senate based upon property holdings, but possibly because of his close relationship with the Connecticut delegation he later came to fear alienation of the small states and changed his mind to representation by state. Abraham Baldwin was pro-slavery. Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States, by Howard Chandler Christy. ...


According to some notes of Abraham Baldwin that were made public in 1987, George Washington told Baldwin privately that he did not expect the U.S. Constitution to last more than 20 years. George Washington (February 22, 1732–December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and was later elected the first President of the United States. ...


United States Congress

After the convention (1787 - 1789), Baldwin was elected to the U.S. Congress, where he served for 18 years (House of Representatives, 1789 - 1799; Senate, 1799 - 1807). During these years, he became a bitter opponent of Hamiltonian policies and, unlike most other native New Englanders, an ally of Madison and Jefferson and the Democratic-Republicans. In the Senate, he presided for a year as President Pro Tempore. Congress in Joint Session. ... Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 — July 12, 1804) was an American politician, leading statesman, financier, intellectual, military officer, and one of the founders of the Federalist party. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... The Democratic-Republican party was a United States political party, which evolved early in the history of the United States. ... A President Pro Tempore is a constitutionally recognized officer of the United States Senate who presides over the chamber in the absence of the President of the Senate. ...


Death and legacy

Baldwin, who never married, died after a short illness during his 53rd year in 1807. Still serving in the Senate at the time, he was buried in Washington's Rock Creek Cemetery. Baldwin County, Alabama, Baldwin County, Georgia and Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College (ABAC) in southern Georgia are all namesakes. Adams Memorial Rock Creek Cemetery (also Rock Creek Church Cemetery) is located at Webster Street and Rock Creek Church Road, NW, Washington, D.C. The Cemetery falls under the governance of the St. ... Baldwin County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. ... Baldwin County is a county located in the Georgia. ... Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College is a coeducational college specializing in agriculture, located in Tifton, Georgia. ...


Sources

Preceded by
None
At-large U.S. Representative from Georgia
March 4, 1789 - March 3, 1799
Succeeded by
James Jones
Preceded by
Josiah Tattnall
United States Senator (Class 2) from Georgia
1799–1807
Served alongside: James Gunn, James Jackson, John Mitchell
Succeeded by
George Jones
Preceded by
James Hillhouse
President pro tempore of the United States Senate
December 7, 1801December 13, 1802
Succeeded by
Stephen R. Bradley
Preceded by
none
President of the University of Georgia
1785 - 1801
Succeeded by
Josiah Meigs

  Results from FactBites:
 
New Georgia Encyclopedia: Abraham Baldwin (1754-1807) (851 words)
The founder of the University of Georgia and a delegate to the Constitutional Convention in 1787, Abraham Baldwin was born on November 22, 1754, in North Guilford, Connecticut.
Baldwin studied theology at Yale and prepared for a career as a minister before the turbulent years of the American Revolution (1775-83).
After Baldwin turned down a prestigious teaching position as professor of divinity at Yale, Georgia governor Lyman Hall persuaded him to accept the responsibility of creating an educational plan for both secondary and higher education in the state.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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