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Encyclopedia > Abergavenny Castle

Abergavenny Castle is a castle in the town of Abergavenny, Monmouthshire in south east Wales. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... , Abergavenny (Welsh: ), meaning Mouth of the River Gavenny, is a town in the principal area of Sir Fynwy, Cymru / Monmouthshire, Wales. ... Monmouthshire (Welsh: ) is both a historic county and principal area in south-east Wales. ... This article is about the country. ...

Contents

A Naturally Fortified Site

The castle was sited above the River Usk overlooking the river valley and the confluence of the River Gavenny with the River Usk on a site that would have been naturally defensible in earlier times and may well have been a fortified site from Bronze Age and Iron Age periods and was then also favoured by the Romans who built their Roman fort of Gobannium on the same hilltop just a little to the west of the site later developed into the castle. With steep slopes down to the river on two sides the remaining third side was where the town under the protection of the castle developed, over what must have been the Roman fort and settlement site. The main castle gatehouse faced the town, which was later walled. The River Usk, Afon Wysg in Welsh, rises in the mountains of mid-Wales then flows south-east through Abergavenny and the eponymous town of Usk to the Roman legionary fortress of Caerleon and the Bristol Channel at Newport. ... The River Usk, Afon Wysg in Welsh, rises in the mountains of mid-Wales then flows south-east through Abergavenny and the eponymous town of Usk to the Roman legionary fortress of Caerleon and the Bristol Channel at Newport. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... Roman or Romans has several meanings, primarily related to the Roman citizens, but also applicable to typography, math, and a commune. ... Basic ideal plan of a Roman castrum. ...


Norman Origins

The castle has Norman origins: the early motte was recorded as being built by Hamelin de Ballon the first Norman conqueror of the Abergavenny area in 1090 AD. Norman conquests in red. ... A motte-and-bailey is a form of castle. ...


In 1233 AD the early castle was destroyed by Richard Marshal, Earl of Pembroke during his alliance with the Welsh Princes. Soon after this a stronger stone keep was built on the motte to deter and prevent repeat attacks. Richard Marshal, 3rd Earl of Pembroke (died 1234, was the brother of William Marshal, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, whom he succeeded to the earldom. ... The keep of Scarborough Castle Rochester Castle featuring a massive turreted keep Early 13th century keep (Rouen, France) The 14th century residential keep at Largoët A keep is a strong central tower which normally forms the heart of a castle. ... A motte-and-bailey is a form of castle. ...


The Abergavenny Massacre

In 1175 Abergavenny Castle was the scene of an infamous act: the Massacre of Abergavenny. Henry, the third son of Miles Fitz walter had been killed by a Welsh leader, Seisyll ap Dynfnwal early in 1175. As there were no other other male heirs, Abergavenny castle and lands in Brecknockshire and Upper Gwent passed to his mother Bertha who was a daughter of Miles Fitz Walter. , Abergavenny (Welsh: ), meaning Mouth of the River Gavenny, is a town in the principal area of Sir Fynwy, Cymru / Monmouthshire, Wales. ... Brecknockshire (Welsh: ), also known as Breconshire, or the County of Brecon is one of thirteen historic counties of Wales, and a former administrative county. ...


William de Braose and Lord of Abergavenny decided to avenge the death of his uncle Henry. He summoned Seisyll ap Dyfnwal, his son Geoffrey, and a number of other local leading Welshmen from Gwent to Abergavenny Castle for a dinner--and reconciliation meeting--on Christmas Day ; a traditional time for settling differences between the Welsh tribes. They were all murdered and their lands were taken. William de Braose, Fourth Lord of Bramber (1140/1150 - August 9, 1211) at his peak was also lord of Gower, Abergavenny, Brecknock, Builth, Radnor, Kington, Limerick, Skenfrith, Grosmont, and White Castle. ... Mediaeval kingdoms of Wales. ...


Control of the castle passed back and forth during the turbulent years as the Welsh Marches changed hands in the twelfth century between the English and Welsh forces. During the thirteenth and fourteeth centuries a huge amount of building work was undertaken on the castle whilst it was in the hands of the Hastings family. The most prominent features that remain from this period are the towers in the western side of the castle. In European history, marches are border regions between centres of power. ... For other uses, see Hastings (disambiguation). ...


Owain Glyndwr Rebellion

During the rebellion of Owain Glyndwr in the early 1400's the town of Abergavenny was sacked and burned by Welsh forces in 1404, however the castle didnt fall as it was capable of defence against an infantry attack and could have at this stage withstood a seige. Owain Glyndŵr, sometimes anglicised as Owen Glendower (1359–c. ... , Abergavenny (Welsh: ), meaning Mouth of the River Gavenny, is a town in the principal area of Sir Fynwy, Cymru / Monmouthshire, Wales. ...


English Civil War

The keep along with most of the other castle buildings, was damaged badly in the Civil War when the castle was sleighted to prevent it becominga stronghold. For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ...


Today

In the 19th century, the present square 'keep' building - now housing the Museum - was constructed on top of the motte as a hunting lodge for the Marquess of Abergavenny. The grounds are laid to lawn and are used for events such as plays and historical re-enactments including the celebrations of the castles founding back in 1990 when 900 years of history was marked by the people of Abergavenny.


External links

  • Abergavenny Museum

  Results from FactBites:
 
Abergavenny Castle (677 words)
Abergavenny Castle today, pictured above, is a picturesque ruin set against a spectacular backdrop of the mountains which surround the town.
The only remains of the original castle are the motte, on which the museum stands, and a length of Norman bank discovered under the east tower in 1990.
The castle was at its most splendid in the 13th and 14th centuries, but as peace returned to this turbulent border area only a constable and a small garrison would have been left in occupation.
Abergavenny - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (802 words)
Abergavenny, often known as 'Aber' to the locals, was the Roman Gobannium, a small fort guarding the road along the valley of the Usk for keeping the peace among the hill tribes.
Abergavenny (Bergavenny) grew under the protection of the lords of Abergavenny, whose title dated from William I (the Conqueror).
Hamelyn de Baalun, first lord of Abergavenny, founded the Benedictine priory, which was subsequently endowed by William de Braose with a tenth of the profits of the castle and town.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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