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Encyclopedia > Abergavenny
Abergavenny
Welsh - Y Fenni
Population 14,055
OS grid reference SO295145
Principal area Monmouthshire
Ceremonial county Gwent
Constituent country Wales
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town ABERGAVENNY
Postcode district NP7
Dialling code 01873
Police Gwent
Fire South Wales
Ambulance Welsh
UK Parliament Monmouth
European Parliament Wales
List of places: UKWalesMonmouthshire

Coordinates: 51°49′26″N 3°01′00″W / 51.824, -3.0167 Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x800, 11 KB) Summary Description: A blank map of the United Kingdom, with country outline and coastline; contact the author for help with modifications or add-ons Source: Reference map provided by Demis Mapper 6 Date: 2006-21-06 Author: User... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... For local government purposes, Wales is divided into 22 unitary authorities. ... Monmouthshire (Welsh: ) is both a historic county and principal area in south-east Wales. ... The Preserved counties of Wales are the current areas used in Wales for ceremonial purposes such as Lieutenancy. ... Gwent is the area of south-easternmost Wales, bordering on the Welsh Marches of southwest England. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the former Yugoslavia[1], the Soviet Union and European institutions such as the Council of... This article is about the country. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The NP postcode area, also known as the Newport postcode area[2], is a group of postal districts around Newport, Wales // The approximate coverage of the postal districts: ^ National Statistics, Postcode Directory Version Notes, (2006) ^ Royal Mail, Address Management Guide, (2004) List of postcode areas in the United Kingdom Categories... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... Gwent Police (Welsh: Heddlu Gwent) is the Home Office police force responsible for policing the local authority areas of Blaenau Gwent, Caerphilly, Monmouthshire, Newport and Torfaen in southeast Wales. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... The South Wales Fire and Rescue Service (Welsh Gwasanaeth Tân ac Achub De Cymru) is the fire and rescue service covering the ten Welsh principal areas of Blaenau Gwent, Bridgend, Caerphilly, Cardiff, Merthyr Tydfil, Monmouthshire, Newport, Rhondda Cynon Taff, Torfaen and Vale of Glamorgan. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Welsh Ambulance Service (also called the Welsh Ambulance Services NHS Trust or Ymddiriedolaeth GIG Gwasanaethau Ambiwlans Cymru) was established on April 1, 1998 and has 2,500 staff providing ambulance and related services to the 2. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Creation 1536 MP David Davies Party Conservative Type House of Commons County Gwent EP constituency Wales Monmouth is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... Wales is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in Wales Lists of places within principal areas List of places in Anglesey List of places in Blaenau Gwent List of places in Bridgend List of places in Caerphilly List of places in Cardiff List of places in Carmarthenshire List... This is a list of places in Monmouthshire, Wales, sorted alphabetically. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Abergavenny (Welsh: Y Fenni), meaning Mouth of the River Gavenny, is a town in the principal area of Sir Fynwy, Cymru / Monmouthshire, Wales. Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... For local government purposes, Wales is divided into 22 unitary authorities. ... Monmouthshire (Welsh: Sir Fynwy) is a county in south-east Wales. ... For alternate meanings, see Wales (disambiguation) National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Official languages: English and Welsh Capital: Cardiff First Minister: Rhodri Morgan AM Area  - Total:  - % water: Ranked 3rd UK 20,779 km² xx% Population  - Total (2001):  - Density: Ranked 3rd UK 2,903,085 140/km² NUTS... Monmouthshire (Welsh: ) is both a historic county and principal area in south-east Wales. ... This article is about the country. ...


It is 15 miles (24 km) west of Monmouth. Situated at the confluence of a tributary stream called the Gavenny with the River Usk, it is almost surrounded by seven lofty hills, namely the huge Blorenge (over 1,800 feet above sea level), the conical Sugar Loaf / Mynnydd Pen-y-Fal (nearly 2000 feet high), the craggy Holy Mountain / Big Skirrid / Ysgyryd Fawr, the conical Little Skirrid / Ysgyryd Fach, the rounded Deri, the beautiful Rholben and Mynnydd Llanwenarth one of the guardians of the upper Usk valley. The town is situated just south of the Black Mountains, Wales, part of the Brecon Beacons National Park. Monmouth (Welsh: Trefynwy) is a town in south Wales, county town of the historic county of Monmouthshire. ... The River Usk, Afon Wysg in Welsh, rises in the mountains of mid-Wales then flows south-east through Abergavenny and the eponymous town of Usk to the Roman legionary fortress of Caerleon and the Bristol Channel at Newport. ... Blorenge (Welsh: ) is a hill in Wales near Abergavenny and Llanfoist, near Blaenavon World Heritage Site. ... A sugarloaf was the traditional form, a soft cone like a vertically-stretched gumdrop, in which refined sugar was exported from the Caribbean and eastern Brazil from the 17th to 19th centuries. ... Skirrid redirects here. ... The Black Mountains are a group of hills in south-eastern Wales, and a small part of Herefordshire, England. ... Part of the Brecon Beacons National Park, looking from the highest point Pen Y Fan, 886 m (2907 feet), to Corn Du, 873 m (2864 feet) The Brecon Beacons National Park is one of three national parks in Wales. ...


The town was formerly walled for defence, and was possibly initially an Iron Age or even Bronze Age settlement and subsequently a Roman fort called Gobannium and contains the substantial remains of a stone castle built soon after the Norman Conquest, frequently the scene of border strife. It is in the Welsh Marches some nine miles from the English border at its nearest point. Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Basic ideal plan of a Roman castrum. ... Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... The Welsh Marches is an area along the border of England and Wales in the island of Great Britain. ...


A sign on the Town Hall gives Abergavenny the title 'Gateway to Wales' — this is thought to refer to the historically fought-after border running north-south through the town to other castles including Ewyas Harold Castle and Usk and the towns modern day position on the road into the Brecon Beacons National Park and mid Wales. When formed, the county of Monmouthshire (referred to historically as 'Wales and Monmouthshire') comprised a 'Welsh sector' to the west and English to the east. Today, as well as the local Monmouthshire accent, those from the nearby Welsh valleys, Herefordshire and the Forest of Dean can be heard in the town along with accents of tourists and visitors from all over the world in summer. Ewyas Harold Castle was in the village of Ewyas Harold which is in the Golden Valley in Herefordshire near to the Welsh border, about half way between the towns of Abergavenny and Hereford (grid reference SO385287). ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Part of the Brecon Beacons National Park, looking from the highest point Pen Y Fan, 886 m (2907 feet), to Corn Du, 873 m (2864 feet) The Brecon Beacons National Park is one of three national parks in Wales. ... Herefordshire is a historic and ceremonial county and unitary district (known as County of Herefordshire) in the West Midlands region of England. ... The Forest of Dean is a geographical, historical and cultural region in the county of Gloucestershire, England. ...

Contents

History

Abergavenny seen from the castle ruins

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1333 KB) Summary Photo of Abergaveny from castle, showing white buildings in the main street. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1333 KB) Summary Photo of Abergaveny from castle, showing white buildings in the main street. ...

Romans

Abergavenny was the Roman Gobannium, a fort guarding the road along the valley of the River Usk linking the legionary fortress of Usk or Burrium and later Caerleon or Isca Silurum in the south with Brecon and mid Wales and for keeping the peace among the local Iron Age tribe, the Silures. Remains of the walls of this fort were discovered not too far west of the castle when excavating the foundations of the then new Post Office and telephone exchange building in the late 1960s. Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Burrium was a legionary fortress in the Roman province of Britannia. ... Caerleon (Welsh: ) is a suburban village and community, situated on the River Usk in the northern outskirts of the city of Newport (of which it is also a electoral ward) in south-east Wales. ... Caerleon is a village situated on the river Usk on the northern outskirts of Newport. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... The Silures were a powerful and warlike tribe of ancient Britain, occupying approximately the counties of Monmouth, Brecon and Glamorgan. ...


The name is associated with the Welsh smith from folk-lore Govannon. In the Welsh mythology, Govannon of Gofannon was a smith and the son of the goddess Don. ...


Normans

Abergavenny (Bergavenny) as a town grew under the protection of the Lords of Abergavenny Baron Abergavenny in early Norman times, whose title dated from William I (the Conqueror). The title Baron Abergavenny (or Bergavenny) was a barony by tenure in the Peerage of England. ... Norman may refer to: M.E. Norman, a steamboat that capsized in Memphis in 1925 Normans, a people who colonized Normandy and conquered England Norman architecture, styles of Romanesque architecture developed by the Normans Norman dynasty, a series of monarchs who ruled England and/or Normandy Norman language, a Romance... William I of England (c. ...


The Priory Church of St Mary's

The Priory Church of St Mary, Abergavenny belonged originally to a Benedictine priory (member of the St Vincent Abbay Le Mans founded in the early 12th Century. St Mary's Priory church contains some unique alabaster effigies and unique medieval carving such as the Jesse. For the college, see Benedictine College. ... Le Mans is a city in France, located at the Sarthe River. ...


Border Conflict

Owing to its geographical location the town was frequently embroiled in the border warfare and power play of the 12th and 13th centuries, and Giraldus Cambrensis relates how in 1173 Abergavenny Castle was seized back by the Welsh. Giraldus Cambrensis (c. ... Canonization of Saint Thomas à Becket, buried at Canterbury Castle at Abergavenny was seized by the Welsh. ... Abergavenny Castle is a castle in the town of Abergavenny, Monmouthshire in south east Wales. ... Look up Welsh in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Marcher Lord's Massacre

In 1175 Abergavenny Castle was the scene of an infamous massacre of local Welsh chieftains by the then Baron Abergavenny, William de Braose, who after a period of discord and conflict invited the local leaders to a Christmas banquet under the pretext of resolving differences and building relations. His plan was simply to eliminate them. Accepting his supposed hospitality at a traditional time for settling differences the influential Welsh leaders of the surrounding areas nearly all arrived, proffered their swords as tokens of peaceful intent to servants and, unarmed, were ushered further into the castle where de Braose's armed soldiers hacked them down in cold blood. Abergavenny Castle is a castle in the town of Abergavenny, Monmouthshire in south east Wales. ... The title Baron Abergavenny (or Bergavenny) was a barony by tenure in the Peerage of England. ... William de Braose was the name of several Norman barons in southern Wales following the Norman Conquest. ...


Benedictine Priory

Hamelin de Balun, an early Norman Lord from "Ballon" ( i.e. from a small town and castle called "Gateway to Maine", near Le Mans, today in the Sarthe département, France ) , first Lord of or Baron Abergavenny, founded the Benedictine priory, which was subsequently endowed by William de Braose with a tenth of the profits of the castle and town. Norman may refer to: M.E. Norman, a steamboat that capsized in Memphis in 1925 Normans, a people who colonized Normandy and conquered England Norman architecture, styles of Romanesque architecture developed by the Normans Norman dynasty, a series of monarchs who ruled England and/or Normandy Norman language, a Romance... Ballon may refer to: Look up Ballon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Ballon (Balana in Irish), a village in County Carlow, Ireland Ballon, in the Charente-Maritime département, in France Ballon, in the Sarthe département, in France This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with... Le Mans is a city in France, located at the Sarthe River. ... The Château de Boisclaireau, residence of the Gueroust family, Counts of Boisclaireau, in Sarthe. ... The title Baron Abergavenny (or Bergavenny) was a barony by tenure in the Peerage of England. ... A priory is an ecclesiastical circumscription run by a prior. ... William de Braose, Lord of Abergavenny (ca. ...


Owain Glyndwr

Owain Glyndwr attacked Abergavenny in 1404 - his raiders gained access to the walled town due to a local woman who sympathised with the rebellion, letting a small party in via the Market Street gate at midnight, they were able to open the gate and allow a much larger party in who set fire to the town and plundered its churches and homes leaving the castle intact. Market Street was referred to as Traitors Lane locally afterwards. Owain Glyndŵr, sometimes anglicised as Owen Glendower (1359–c. ...


The Dissolution

At the dissolution of the priory part of this endowment went towards the foundation of a free grammar school, the site itself passing to the Gunter family. Dissolution or dissolvetiyny can have the following meanings: Dissolve (song), a song on Gusters album Parachute to crumble into a liquid. ... A grammar school is a school that may, depending on regional usage as exemplified below, provide either secondary education or, a much less common usage, primary education (also known as elementary). Grammar schools trace their origins back to medieval Europe, as schools in which university preparatory subjects, such as Latin...


The English Civil War

During the Civil War prior to the siege of Raglan Castle in 1645, Charles I visited Abergavenny, and presided in person over the trial of Sir Trevor Williams of Llangibby, a Royalist who changed sides and other Parliamentarians. For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... The front of Raglan Castle, showing the main gatehouse. ... // Events January 10 - Archbishop Laud executed on Tower Hill, London. ... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... This is an article about the village in Monmouthshire: see also the disambiguation page Llangybi. ... The Roundheads was the nickname given to the supporters of Parliament during the English Civil War. ...


Charter

In 1639 Abergavenny received a charter of incorporation under the title of bailiff and burgesses. A charter with extended privileges was drafted in 1657, but appears never to have been enrolled or to have come into effect. Owing to the refusal of the chief officers of the corporation to take the oath of allegiance to William III in 1688, the charter was annulled, and the town subsequently declined in prosperity. Events January 14 - Connecticuts first constitution, the Fundamental Orders, is adopted. ... Events January 8 - Miles Sindercombe, would-be-assassin of Oliver Cromwell, and his group are captured in London February - Admiral Robert Blake defeats the Spanish West Indian Fleet in a battle over the seizure of Jamaica. ... An oath of allegiance is an oath whereby a subject or citizen acknowledges his duty of allegiance and swears loyalty to his monarch or country. ... William III of England (The Hague, 14 November 1650 – Kensington Palace, 8 March 1702; also known as William II of Scotland and William III of Orange) was a Dutch aristocrat and a Protestant Prince of Orange from his birth, Stadtholder of the main provinces of the Dutch Republic from 28... // Events A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the Immortal Seven, invite William and Mary to depose James II of England. ...


Chapter 28 of the 1535 Act of Henry VIII, which provided that Monmouth, as county town, should return one burgess to Parliament, further stated that other ancient Monmouthshire boroughs were to contribute towards the payment of the member. In consequence of this clause Abergavenny on various occasions shared in the election, the last instance being in 1685. The Laws in Wales Acts 1535–1542 were a series of parliamentary measures by which the legal system of Wales was annexed to England and the norms of English administration introduced in order to create a single state and a single legal jurisdiction, which is frequently referred to as England... Monmouth (Welsh: Trefynwy) is a town in south Wales, county town of the historic county of Monmouthshire. ... A county town is the capital of a county in the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland. ... Monmouthshire (Welsh: ) is both a historic county and principal area in south-east Wales. ... Events February 6 - James Stuart, Duke of York becomes King James II of England and Ireland and King James VII of Scotland. ...


The Market

Reference to a market at Abergavenny is found in a charter granted to the Prior by William de Braose (d. 1211). The right to hold two weekly markets and three yearly fairs, as held ever since, was confirmed in 1657. Abergavenny was celebrated for the production of Welsh flannel, and also for the manufacture, whilst the fashion prevailed, of goats' hair periwigs. // Events The oldest extant double entry bookkeeping record dates from 1211 Canons regular of the Order of the Holy Cross founded September 14 1211 Troops led by Estonian resistance fighter Lembitu of Lehola destroy a garrison of missionaries in the historical Estonian region of Sakala and raid the Russian town... Roundabouts (or carousels) are traditional attractions, often seen at fairs. ... Events January 8 - Miles Sindercombe, would-be-assassin of Oliver Cromwell, and his group are captured in London February - Admiral Robert Blake defeats the Spanish West Indian Fleet in a battle over the seizure of Jamaica. ... A young man wearing a tartan flannel shirt. ... This article needs cleanup. ...


Later Barons, Earls & Marquesses of Abergavenny

The title of Baron Abergavenny, in the Nevill family, dates from Edward Nevill, 3rd Baron Bergavenny (d. 1476), who was the youngest son of the 1st Earl of Westmoreland by Joan Beaufort, daughter of John of Gaunt. He married the heiress of Richard, Earl of Worcester, whose father had inherited the castle and estate of Abergavenny, and was summoned in 1392 to parliament as Lord Bergavenny. Edward Nevill was summoned to parliament with this title in 1450. His direct male descendants ended in 1387 in Henry Nevill, 6th Baron Bergavenny, but a cousin, Edward Nevill, 8th Baron Bergavenny (d. 1622), was confirmed in the Barony in 1604. From him it has descended continuously, through fifteen individuals, the title being increased to an Earldom in 1784; and in 1876 William Nevill (sic) 5th Earl (b. 1826),(d.1915) an indefatigable and powerful supporter of the Tory party, was created 1st Marquess of Abergavenny in 1876. The title Baron Abergavenny (or Bergavenny) was a barony by tenure in the Peerage of England. ... Sir Edward Nevill, 3rd Baron Bergavenny (b. ... Events March 2 - Battle of Grandson. ... Joan Beaufort was the name of several noted women in history. ... John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster (June 24, 1340 - February 3, 1399), the third surviving son of King Edward III of England, gained his name because he was born at Ghent in 1340. ... Events December 16 - Emperor Go-Kameyama of Japan abdicates in favor of rival claimant Go-Komatsu, ending the nanboku-cho period of competing imperial courts James of Jülich is boiled alive for pretending to be a bishop and ordaining his own priests Korean founder of the Joseon Dynasty General... // March - French troops under Guy de Richemont besiege the English commander in France, Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, in Caen. ... Events June 2 - John Holland, a maternal half-brother of Richard II of England, is created Earl of Huntingdon. ... Henry Nevill, 6th Baron Bergavenny K.B. (also spelt Neville) (bet. ... Edward Nevill, 8th Baron Bergavenny, MP (c. ... Events January 1 - In the Gregorian calendar, January 1 is declared as the first day of the year, instead of March 25. ... Events January 14 – Hampton Court conference with James I of England, the Anglican bishops and representatives of Puritans September 20 – Capture of Ostend by Spanish forces under Ambrosio Spinola after a three year siege. ... Year 1876 Pick up Sticks(MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Most Honourable Sir William Nevill, 1st Marquess of Abergavenny KG (September 16, 1826–December 12, 1915) was an English peer. ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nicéphore Niépce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Tory (disambiguation). ... The title of Marquess of Abergavenny (pronounced Abergenny) was created in 1876 in the Peerage of the United Kingdom for the Earl of Abergavenny. ...

Bailey Park bandstand
Bailey Park bandstand

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x666, 73 KB) Summary Bandstand at Cubbon park. ...

Sporting Traditions

Abergavenny is the home of Abergavenny Thursdays F.C. which was formed in 1927 and is currently a member of the Gwent County League Division 3. The club's current position comes within 15 years of their being one of the top sides in Welsh football, winning the old format Welsh Football League in 1991 and 1992 but being relegated in 1993 after just one season in the newly formed League of Wales. The club suffered relegation from the Welsh Football League in 2001 and has since slipped through the next two divisions into its current position, although the future is now looking brighter. Abergavenny Thursdays F.C. is a football team, a founder member of the League of Wales, but now playing in the Gwent County League Division 3. ... The Welsh Football League is a club football league in Wales, immediately below the Welsh Premier League in the Welsh football league system. ... The Welsh Premiership is the national football league for Wales and is at the top of the Welsh football league system. ...


Abergavenny is the home of Abergavenny RFC a rugby union team founded in 1875 who play at Bailey Park. As of 2007 they play in the WRU Division Three East league. Official website www. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... The Welsh Rugby Union (WRU) (Welsh: ) is the governing body of rugby union in Wales, recognised by the International Rugby Board. ...

Wikisource has an original article from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica about:
Abergavenny

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ...

Etymology

The name Abergavenny is derived from the Welsh language Aber (meaning 'mouth of') and the river Gavenny. As with many other Welsh places a new Welsh name Y Fenni was assigned in the latter part of the 20th century. This can loosely be derived from Y (meaning 'the') and Fenni (the last syllable of the river name). English and Welsh speakers generally continue to use the original.


Recent developments

Abergavenny residents have been battling with local council chiefs over the planned construction of an ASDA superstore on the site of the town's cattle market. Some residents believe it will upset the carefully cultivated 'traditional market town' feeling Abergavenny has and lose visits by many tourists, as well as taking business from the town but this isn't the feeling of the whole town. Some 3,000 letters of protest were received, and on 3rd October 2006, the planning committee turned down the Henry Boot scheme incorporating the ASDA superstore. ASDA is a chain of supermarkets in the United Kingdom offering food, clothing and general merchandise products. ...


Abergavenny Cattle Market

A Cattle Market has been held in Abergavenny on its current site since 1863. Before 1863 a sheep market was held at a site in Castle Street between 1825-1863 to stop the sale of sheep on the streets of the town.


Today the market is leased and operated by Abergavenny Market Auctioneers LTD who holds regular livestock auctions on the site.


Market days:


Monday – The sale of finished lambs and cull stock.


Tuesday – The sale of finished sheep, cull ewe/store, a Fodder auction and sale of hay.


Some Fridays – The sale of Cattle and teenagers.


A few other sales are held on the site on other days throughout the year.


However the Cattle Market is likely to be moved to Raglan in the near future, much to the dismay of the local farmers.


Abergavenny Market and Fairs

Tuesdays – One of the best (possibly the best) retail markets held in Wales. Held in the Market hall, Town hall car park and Brewery yard car park.


Wednesday – Flea Market held in the Market Hall.


Every 4th Thursday of the month a Farmers market is held in the Market hall, which sells products direct from the producer.


Friday – Retail market held in the Market Hall.


Saturday – Retail market held in the Market Hall and Town hall car park.


Every 3rd Sunday of the month is an Antique Fair in the Market Hall.


A Craft fair is held in the Market Hall on the 2nd Saturday of the month.


Incidental Information

  • Abergavenny hosted the National Eisteddfod in 1838 and 1913.
  • The novelist Alexander Cordell most famously the author of The Rape of the Fair Country is buried in the nearby village of Llanfoist, where he lived when he wrote that work..
  • Abergavenny is twinned with Östringen in Germany, Beaupreau in France and Sarno in Italy.
  • In 1968, the town was immortalised in the song 'Taking a Trip Up to Abergavenny' "Abergavenny" by Shannon, aka Marty Wilde.
  • In 1404 Abergavenny was declared its own nation by Ieuan ab Owain Glyndwr, illegitimate son of Owain Glyndŵr. The arrangement lasted approximately two weeks.
  • One of the eleven Victoria Cross gallantry medals awarded at Rorke's Drift was awarded to John Fielding from Abergavenny. He had enlisted under the false name of John Williams (VC). One was also awarded for the same action to Robert Jones (VC), born at Clytha between Abergavenny and Raglan.
  • Each September, Abergavenny holds a very successful Food Festival throughout the town centre and castle.
  • The Beatles played at the Borough Theatre in Abergavenny on Saturday June 22, 1963, just as they became really famous - 'Love Me Do' had charted at 17 in late 1962 coinciding with their first televised performance in October '62 and 'Please Please Me' reached number 2 in early '63.
  • The 'Knight Bus' in 'The Prisoner of Azkaban' Harry Potter stops at Abergavenny.
  • In 1996 a film, Intimate Relations starring Julie Walters, Rupert Graves, Les Dennis and Amanda Holden was filmed at many locations in and around Abergavenny - watch the film and see how many you can spot.
  • In the Dangermouse episode The Four Tasks of Dangermouse it is mentioned that Penfold has an aunt in Abergavenny.
  • Rudolf Hess Hitler's Deputy was kept under escort at Maindiff Court during the War after his flight to Britain.
  • Abergavenny Thursdays are the only football team in Britain besides Sheffield Wednesday to have the name of a day as their suffix. They were mainly comprised of shopboys and local workers and Thursday was the half-day closing day in Aber, thus the only day they could play. Sundays were for church and chapel in those days.
  • Malcolm Nash the cricketer famous for bowling to Gary Sobers who hit six sixes off one Nash over is from Abergavenny.
  • Lord Abergavenny is a character in Shakespeare's play King Henry VIII.
  • Raymond Williams (1921 - 1988) academic, critic and writer was born and brought up locally.
  • Owen Sheers current up and coming poet grew up in Abergavenny.
  • Matthew Jay, the late singer-songwriter also, spent much of his life in the town.
  • Abergavenny produced a worldfamous strongwoman, Vulcana.
  • Abergavenny hosted the British National Cycling Championships in 2007.

The Eisteddfod (literally sitting) is a Welsh festival of literature, music, and song. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Alexander Cordell was the pen-name of George Alexander Graber (1914-1997), a prolific novelist and author of thirty acclaimed works including Rape of the Fair Country, The Hosts of Rebecca and Song of the Earth. ... Rape of the Fair Country is a novel by Alexander Cordell, first published in 1959. ... Llanfoist is a village in Monmouthshire, Wales at grid reference SO287130, near Abergavenny. ... Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ... Östringen is a town in Northern Karlsruhe County in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ... Sarno is a town of Campania, Italy, in the province of Salerno, 15 miles northeast from that city and 30 miles east of Naples by the main railway. ... Shannon is a name originated in Ireland and is directly linked to the countrys longest river. ... Marty Wilde (born Reginald Leonard Smith, April 15, 1939, in Greenwich, South London) is an English singer and songwriter. ... Events June 14 - Owain Glyndwr of Wales allies with the French against the English and the Henry of Lancaster. ... Seal of Owain Glyndŵr The Banner of the Arms of Owain Glyndŵr showing his parentage Owain Glyndŵr [], sometimes anglicised as Owen Glendower (1359–c. ... The Victoria Cross (VC) is a military decoration awarded for valour in the face of the enemy to members of armed forces of some Commonwealth countries and previous British Empire territories. ... Combatants Britain Zulu Nation Commanders John Chard Gonville Bromhead Prince Dabulamanzi Strength 139 4,000–5,000 Casualties 17 killed, 10 wounded Around 500-600 dead found in 500 foot perimeter Rorkes Drift was a mission station in Natal, South Africa, situated near a natural ford (drift) on the... Photo submitted by John Young Photo by Simon Clabon John Williams (?1857-November 25, 1932) was a Welsh recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... Robert Jones Robert Jones VC (19 August 1857 - 6 September 1898) was a Welsh recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... Raglan is a seaside town and surrounding district associated with Whaingaroa Harbour (also known as Raglan Harbour) on the west coast of the Waikato region in New Zealands North Island. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... The Borough Theatre is the principal theatre in the Monmouthshire town of Abergavenny in Wales. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... Intimate Relations is a 1996 British movie It was the first movie by writer and director Philip Goodhew and starred Rupert Graves and Julie Walters. ... Julia Mary Walters, OBE (born February 22, 1950) is an English Golden Globe-winning actress. ... DangerMouse is a British animated television series which was produced by Cosgrove Hall Films. ... Penfold in The Odd Ball Runaround DangerMouse last aired on Boomerang Penfolds tarzan cry Lord of the Bungle Timid hamster Penfold with a mole Dangermouse and Penfold appearing human size in Trip to America Penfold is a fictional character from DangerMouse, the British animated television series by Cosgrove Hall... Not to be confused with Rudolf Hoess. ... Abergavenny Thursdays F.C. is a football team, a founder member of the League of Wales, but now playing in the Gwent County League Division 3. ... Sheffield Wednesday are a football club in the English Football League. ... Malcolm Nash, (born May 9, 1945) was a cricketer, a left arm medium pace bowler who played for Glamorgan. ... Sir Garfield St Aubrun Sobers (born July 28, 1936 in Barbados), better known as Garry Sobers, was a West Indies cricket player. ... Shakespeare redirects here. ... Henry VIII King of England and Ireland by Hans Holbein the Younger His Grace King Henry VIII (28 June 1491–28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Raymond Henry Williams (31 August 1921 - 26 January 1988) was a Welsh academic, novelist and critic. ... Matthew Jay was a singer and songwriter from the UK (1979-2003). ... Vulcana in 1900 Kate Williams (1875 – 1946), sometimes called Kate Roberts, better known by her stage name Vulcana, was a Welsh strongwoman born in Abergavenny. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...

See also

The Black Mountains are a group of hills in south-eastern Wales, and a small part of Herefordshire, England. ... Part of the Brecon Beacons National Park, looking from the highest point Pen Y Fan, 886 m (2907 feet), to Corn Du, 873 m (2864 feet) The Brecon Beacons National Park is one of three national parks in Wales. ... The hundred of Abergavenny is a division of the traditional county of Monmouthshire. ... Nevill Hall Hospital is a district general hospital in Abergavenny, Monmouthshire. ... Abergavenny Castle is a castle in the town of Abergavenny, Monmouthshire in south east Wales. ... The Monmouthshire & Brecon Canal is isolated from the rest of the United Kingdoms canals. ... AAODS (short for Abergavenny Amateur Operatic and Dramatic Society) was established in 1911. ... Wales is an emerging tourist destination, with 8,078,900 visitors to National Trust and Welsh Tourist Board destinations in 2002. ... Llanthony Priory is a picturesque dissolved Augustinian priory, located in the Black Mountains area of the Brecon Beacons National Park in South Wales. ...

External links

References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
  • see also : Jürgen Klötgen, "Prieuré d'Abergavenny - Tribulations mancelles en Pays de Galles au temps du Pape Jean XXII (d'après des documents français et anglais du XIV° siècle collationnés avec une source d'histoire retrouvée Archives Secrètes du Vatican)", in Revue Historique et Archéologique du Maine, Le Mans, 1989, p.65 - 88 (1319 : cf John of Hastings, lord of Abergavenny ; Adam de Orleton, bishop of Hereford, John de Monmouth, bishop of Llandaff).

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Abergavenny, the gateway to Wales (389 words)
Abergavenny is steeped in history and enjoys an enviable position close to the industry of middle and western England whilst bathing in the beauty of the Brecon Beacons national park.
With a wide variety of pubs, take-aways and restaurants in Abergavenny there is bound to be an establishment to cater for your your cullinary tastes, plus the now famous `Abergavenny Food Festival` held over a September weekend and you have a great gastronomic venue.
Abergavenny is a bustling market town working with agriculture and industry alike and equally responsive to the needs of tourists which are increasing in numbers every year.
Abergavenny Castle (1133 words)
From its early beginnings this was an important castle, the headquarters of the Norman lordship of Abergavenny, used for accommodation by kings if they were in the locality.
William Camden, the 16th-century antiquary, said that Abergavenny Castle "has been oftner stain'd with the infamy of treachery, than any other castle in Wales." Only fragments of the rest of the curtain wall remain, mainly on the east side where the stub of a rectangular projecting tower is visible.
Built into a later cottage, now part of a museum, is the fragment of a tower, and on the north side the curtain wall is much reduced and was landscaped into a rock garden in the late 19th century.
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