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Encyclopedia > Aberdeen
Aberdeen
Scottish Gaelic: Obar Dheathain
Scots: Aiberdeen
Granite City, Oil Capital of Europe, Silver City

Aberdeen shown within Scotland
Population 202,370[1]
 - Density 2819 mile² (1,089 km²)[2]
Language English
Scots (Doric)
OS grid reference NJ925065
 - Edinburgh 94 miles (151 km)[3]
 - London 403 miles (649 km)[3]
Council area City of Aberdeen
Lieutenancy area Aberdeen
Constituent country Scotland
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town ABERDEEN
Postcode district AB10-AB13 (part), AB15, AB16, AB22-AB25
Dialling code 01224
Police Grampian
Fire Grampian
Ambulance Scottish
Scottish Parliament North East Scotland
Aberdeen Central
Aberdeen North
Aberdeen South
UK Parliament Aberdeen South
Aberdeen North
Gordon
European Parliament Scotland
Website: aberdeencity.gov.uk
List of places: UKScotlandAberdeen

Coordinates: 57°09′09″N 2°06′36″W / 57.1526, -2.11 Aberdeen is the name of many places, all named after a city in Scotland: Aberdeen, a major port city in north-east Scotland Aberdeen is the name of a place in Australia: Aberdeen, New South Wales Aberdeen is the name of several places in Canada: Aberdeen, Nova Scotia Aberdeen, Saskatchewan... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... This article is about the Anglic language of Scotland. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 451 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1154 × 1535 pixel, file size: 661 KB, MIME type: image/png) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... This article is about the country. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article is about the Anglic language of Scotland. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For local government purposes, Scotland is divided into 32 areas designated as Council Areas of Scotland which are all governed by unitary authorities designated as Councils which have the option under the Local Government (Gaelic Names) (Scotland) Act 1997 (as chosen by Na h-Eileanan an Iar) of being known... City of Aberdeen crest City of Aberdeen (Mòr-bhaile Obar Dheathain in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland. ... The Lieutenancy areas of Scotland are the areas used for the ceremonial lords-lieutenant, the monarchs representatives, in Scotland. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping, concerning these countries; thus the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has used the phrase in reference to the parts of former Yugoslavia... This article is about the country. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The AB postcode area, also known as the Aberdeen postcode area[2], is a group of postal districts around Aberdeen, Aberlour, Aboyne, Alford, Ballater, Ballindalloch, Banchory, Banff, Buckie, Ellon, Fraserburgh, Huntly, Insch, Inverurie, Keith, Laurencekirk, Macduff, Milltimber, Peterculter, Peterhead, Stonehaven, Strathdon, Turriff and Westhill in Scotland. ... +44 redirects here. ... Grampian Police are a police force in north east of Scotland, covering the borough of the City of Aberdeen and the counties of Aberdeenshire and Moray. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... Grampian Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service for the area of Grampian, Scotland. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Two Mercedes-Benz Sprinter-based ambulances of the Scottish Ambulance Service The Scottish Ambulance Service serves all of Scotland and is a special health board funded directly by the health department of the Scottish Executive. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... North East Scotland is one of the eight electoral regions of the Scottish Parliament which were created in 1999. ... Aberdeen Central is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood). ... Aberdeen North is a constituency represented in the Scottish Parliament. ... Aberdeen South is a constituency represented in the Scottish Parliament. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Aberdeen South is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Aberdeen North is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Gordon is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... Scotland constitutes a single constituency of the European Parliament. ... List of burghs in Scotland List of cities in the United Kingdom Lists of places within Scottish regions List of places in Orkney List of places in Shetland List of places in the Borders region of Scotland List of places in the Central region of Scotland List of places in... Areas of Aberdeen, Scotland   Category: ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Aberdeen (pronounced /ˌæbɚˈdiːn/ ; Scottish Gaelic: Obar Dheathain) is Scotland's third largest city with an official population of 202,370.[1] Image File history File links Aberdeencity. ... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... This article is about the country. ... Historically, city status in England and Wales was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ...


Nicknames include the Granite City and the Silver City with the Golden Sands. During the mid-18th to mid-20th centuries, Aberdeen's buildings incorporated locally quarried grey granite, whose mica deposits sparkle like silver.[4] The city has a long, sandy coastline. Since the discovery of North Sea oil in the 1970s, other nicknames have been the Oil Capital of Europe or the Energy Capital of Europe.[5] For other uses, see granite (disambiguation). ... // North Sea Oil Platforms North Sea oil refers to oil and natural gas (hydrocarbons) produced from oil reservoirs beneath the North Sea. ...


The area around Aberdeen has been settled for at least 8000 years,[6] when prehistoric villages lay around the mouths of the River Dee and River Don.[citation needed] River Dee near Braemar The Linn of Dee, small gorge near Braemar The River Dee is a 90 mile (140 km) long river, that rises in the Cairngorms, Aberdeenshire, Scotland and flows into the North Sea at Aberdeen. ... The article is about the Don River in Scotland. ...


In 1319, Aberdeen received Royal Burgh status from Robert the Bruce, transforming the city economically. The city's two universities, the University of Aberdeen, founded in 1495, and the Robert Gordon University, which was awarded university status in 1992, make Aberdeen the educational centre of the north-east. The traditional industries of fishing, paper-making, shipbuilding, and textiles have been overtaken by the oil industry and Aberdeen's seaport. Aberdeen Heliport is one of the busiest commercial heliports in the world[7] and the seaport is the largest in the north-east of Scotland.[8] A Royal Burgh is a type of Scottish burgh (town or city), used today for ceremonial purposes only. ... Robert I, King of Scots (Mediaeval Gaelic:Roibert a Briuis; modern Scottish Gaelic: Raibeart Bruis; Norman French: Robert de Brus or Robert de Bruys; 11 July 1274 – 7 June 1329), usually known in modern English as Robert the Bruce, was King of Scotland from 1306 until his death in 1329. ... The University of Aberdeen was founded in 1495, in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... The Robert Gordon University (often known as RGU) is a modern university located in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... The oil industry is a type of industry which brings petroleum to a financial market. ... For other uses, see Port (disambiguation). ...


Aberdeen has won the Britain in Bloom competition ten times,[9] and hosts the Aberdeen International Youth Festival. Britain in Bloom is a horticultural competition in the United Kingdom. ... Native Australian performers at the festival Aberdeen International Youth Festival is the worlds leading Festival of Youth Arts, and one of Scotland’s major international cultural events. ...

Contents

History

Aberdeen (c.1900)
Aberdeen (c.1900)
Main article: History of Aberdeen

The Aberdeen area has seen human settlement for at least 8,000 years.[6] The city began as two separate burghs: Old Aberdeen at the mouth of the river Don; and New Aberdeen, a fishing and trading settlement, where the Denburn waterway entered the river Dee estuary. The earliest charter was granted by William the Lion in 1179 and confirmed the corporate rights granted by David I. In 1319, the Great Charter of Robert the Bruce transformed Aberdeen into a property-owning and financially independent community. Granted with it was the nearby Forest of Stocket, whose income formed the basis for the city's Common Good Fund which still benefits Aberdonians.[10][11] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 1204 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Aberdeen Market cross ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 1204 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Aberdeen Market cross ... The mercat cross in Cockburnspath A mercat cross is a market cross found in Scottish cities and towns where trade and commerce was a part of economic life. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (983x733, 396 KB) This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (983x733, 396 KB) This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... Aberdeen Mercat Cross Aberdeen - approx. ... A sign in Linlithgow, Scotland. ... The town Old Aberdeen was erected into a burgh of barony on 26 December 1489, and incorporated into Aberdeen by Act of Parliament in 1891. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... William I the Lion ( known in Gaelic as Uilliam Garm1 or William the Rough), (1142/1143 - December 4, 1214) reigned as King of Scots from 1165 to 1214. ... Linguistic division in early twelfth century Scotland. ... Robert I, King of Scots (Mediaeval Gaelic:Roibert a Briuis; modern Scottish Gaelic: Raibeart Bruis; Norman French: Robert de Brus or Robert de Bruys; 11 July 1274 – 7 June 1329), usually known in modern English as Robert the Bruce, was King of Scotland from 1306 until his death in 1329. ... Aberdeens Common Good Fund is a fund to benefit the people of Aberdeen, Scotland. ... Aberdeens Common Good Fund is a fund to benefit the people of Aberdeen, Scotland. ...


During the Wars of Scottish Independence, Aberdeen was under English rule, so Robert the Bruce laid siege to Aberdeen Castle before destroying it in 1308 followed by the massacring of the English garrison and the retaking of Aberdeen for the townspeople. The city was burned by Edward III of England in 1336, but was rebuilt and extended, and called New Aberdeen. The city was strongly fortified to prevent attacks by neighbouring lords, but the gates were removed by 1770. During the Wars of the Three Kingdoms of 1644-1647 the city was impartially plundered by both sides. In 1644, it was taken and ransacked by Royalist troops after the Battle of Aberdeen.[12] A quarter of the population died in 1647 from an outbreak of bubonic plague. The Wars of Scottish Independence were a series of military campaigns fought between Scotland and England in the late 13th and early 14th centuries. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Robert I, King of Scots (Mediaeval Gaelic:Roibert a Briuis; modern Scottish Gaelic: Raibeart Bruis; Norman French: Robert de Brus or Robert de Bruys; 11 July 1274 – 7 June 1329), usually known in modern English as Robert the Bruce, was King of Scotland from 1306 until his death in 1329. ... Aberdeen Castle was a late Middle Ages fortification,[1] in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... This article is about the King of England. ... Combatants Scottish Royalists and Irish Catholic Confederate troops Scottish Covenanters Commanders James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose Archibald Campbell, 1st Marquess of Argyll and David Leslie Strength Fluctuating, 2000-4000 troops at any one time over 30,000 troops, but many based in England and Ireland Casualties Total of 28... Battle of Aberdeen Conflict Wars of the Three Kingdoms Date September 13, 1644 Place Aberdeen, Scotland Result Royalist Victory The Battle of Aberdeen was an engagement in the Scottish Civil War which took place between Royalist and Covenanter forces outside the city of Aberdeen on September 13, 1644. ... The bubonic plague or bubonic fever is the best-known variant of the deadly infectious disease caused by the enterobacteria Yersinia pestis (Pasteurella pestis). ...


In the eighteenth century, a new Town Hall was built and the first social services appeared with the Infirmary at Woolmanhill in 1742 and the Lunatic Asylum in 1779. The council began major road improvements at the end of the century with the main thoroughfares of George Street, King Street and Union Street all completed at the start of the next century. Aberdeen Royal Infirmary or ARI is a teaching hospital in the city of Aberdeen, Scotland. ... View of Woolmanhill Woolmanhill Hospital is a hospital in the centre of Aberdeen, Scotland. ... Union Street looking east Looking up Union Street from the Citadel Union Street International Market The Castlegate at the east of Union Street Union Street is the main street and shopping thoroughfare in Aberdeen, Scotland. ...


A century later, the increasing economic importance of Aberdeen and the development of the shipbuilding and fishing industries led to the existing harbour with Victoria Dock, the South Breakwater, and the extension to the North Pier. The expensive infrastructure program had repercussions, and in 1817 the city was bankrupt. However, a recovery was made in the general prosperity which followed the Napoleonic wars. Gas street lighting arrived in 1824 and an enhanced water supply appeared in 1830 when water was pumped from the Dee to a reservoir in Union Place. An underground sewer system replaced open sewers in 1865.[11] Combatants Austria[a] Portugal Prussia[a] Russia[b] Sicily[c] Sardinia  Spain[d]  Sweden[e] United Kingdom French Empire Holland[f] Italy Etruria[g] Naples[h] Duchy of Warsaw[i] Confederation of the Rhine[j] Bavaria Saxony Westphalia Württemberg Denmark-Norway[k] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack...


The city was first incorporated in 1891. Although Old Aberdeen still has a separate charter and history, it and New Aberdeen are no longer truly distinct. They are both part of the city, along with Woodside and the Royal Burgh of Torry to the south of the River Dee. A Municipal Corporation is a legal defintion for a local governing body, including (but not necessarily limited to) cities, counties, and towns. ... A Royal Burgh is a type of Scottish burgh (town or city), used today for ceremonial purposes only. ... Torry is an area within the city of Aberdeen, Scotland, UK. // Torry, lying on the south bank of the River Dee, was once a Royal Burgh in its own right, having been erected a burgh of barony in 1495. ...


Etymology

Main article: Etymology of Aberdeen

Old Aberdeen is the approximate location of Aberdon the first settlement of Aberdeen; this literally means "at the confluence of the Don [ie. with the sea]" in relation to the local river. The modern name, Aberdeen literally means between the Dee and Don (the other local river) The Celtic prefix; "Aber-" means "the confluence of" in relation to the rivers.[13] In 500AD, Aberdeen was Pict stronghold, but the name originates from earlier times when the celts (the Welsh on this map) lived there. ... The town Old Aberdeen was erected into a burgh of barony on 26 December 1489, and incorporated into Aberdeen by Act of Parliament in 1891. ... The Celtic languages are the languages descended from Proto-Celtic, or Common Celtic, a branch of the greater Indo-European language family. ...


Gaelic scholars believe the name came from the prefix Aber- and da-aevi (variation;Da-abhuin, Da-awin) - which means "the mouth of two rivers". In Gaelic the name is Obar Dheathain (variation; Obairreadhain) and in Latin, the Romans referred to it as Devana. Mediaeval (or ecclesiastical) Latin has it as Aberdonia. // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ...


Heraldry

Main article: Heraldry of Aberdeen

Symbols of the city typically show three castles, such as in the case of the flag and coat of arms. The image has been around since the time of Robert the Bruce and represents the buildings that stood on the three hills of Aberdeen; Aberdeen Castle on Castle Hill (today's castlegate); an unknown building on Windmill Hill and a church on St. Catherine's Hill (now levelled).[14] Aberdeens coat of arms Aberdeens flag The Heraldry of Aberdeen, Scotland is important as it represents the long history or the city and its people. ... Robert I, King of Scots, usually known as Robert the Bruce (July 11, 1274 – June 7, 1329, reigned 1306 – 1329), was, according to a modern biographer (Geoffrey Barrow), a great hero who lived in a minor country. ... Aberdeen Castle was a late Middle Ages fortification,[1] in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... Aberdeens Mercat Cross The Castlegate is a small area of Aberdeen, Scotland, located centrally at the east-end of the citys main thoroughfare Union Street. ...


Bon Accord, is the motto of the city and is French literally for "Good Agreement". Legend tells that its use dates from the fourteenth century password used by Robert the Bruce during the Wars of Scottish Independence, when he and his men laid siege to Aberdeen Castle before destroying it in 1308.[10] For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The Wars of Scottish Independence were a series of military campaigns fought between Scotland and England in the late 13th and early 14th centuries. ...


The leopard has traditionally been associated with the city and its emblem can be seen on the city crest. The local magazine is called the "Leopard" and when Union Bridge was constructed in the nineteenth century small statues of the creature in a sitting position were cast and placed on top of the railing posts. For other uses, see Leopard (disambiguation). ...


The city's toast is "Happy to meet, sorry to part, happy to meet again", this has been commonly misinterpreted as the translation of Bon Accord.[15]


Architecture

Seamount Court and Porthill Court (foreground)
Seamount Court and Porthill Court (foreground)

Union Street, built of granite in 1801-05, runs from Castle Street for nearly a mile (1.5 km), is 70 feet (21 m) wide, and originally contained the principal shops and most public buildings. Part of the street crosses the Denburn ravine (utilised for the line of the Great North of Scotland Railway) by Union Bridge, a granite arch of 132 feet (40 m) span,[16] with portions of the older town still fringing the gorge, 50 feet (15 m) below the level of Union Street. Image File history File links Porthill_Court_(foreground)_and_Seamount_Courts. ... Image File history File links Porthill_Court_(foreground)_and_Seamount_Courts. ... Granite terraced houses on Craigie Street Central Library Seamount Court and Porthill Court (foreground) The Architecture in Aberdeen can be considered world famous due its principal use of granite in Victorian times. ... Union Street looking east Looking up Union Street from the Citadel Union Street International Market The Castlegate at the east of Union Street Union Street is the main street and shopping thoroughfare in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... The Great North of Scotland Railway (GNSR) received its Parliamentary approval on June 26, 1846, following over two years’ of local meetings. ... Union Street looking east Looking up Union Street from the Citadel Union Street International Market The Castlegate at the east of Union Street Union Street is the main street and shopping thoroughfare in Aberdeen, Scotland. ...


The Town House, built in Franco-Scottish Gothic style, is at the east end of Union Street. Containing the great hall, with an open timber ceiling and oak-panel walls, the Sheriff Court House and the Town and County Hall contains portraits of various Lord Provosts and distinguished citizens. On the south-western corner is the 210 foot (64 m)[17] grand tower high enough to give a view of the city and surrounding country. Adjoining the Town House is the old North of Scotland Bank building, in Greek Revival style (Now a Restaurant & Bar named after Archibald Simpson). The Town and County Hall is located in the Town House of the City of Aberdeen. ... The Lord Provost of Aberdeen is the convener of the City of Aberdeen local authority in Scotland. ... The Tower of the Winds, Athens from The Antiquities of Athens, 1762. ... Archibald Simpson (1790 - 1847) was one of the major architects of Aberdeens Granite City. ...


Other notable buildings on the street are the Town and County Bank, the Music Hall, the Trinity Hall of the incorporated trades (1398-1527, now a shopping centre) and the former office of the Northern Assurance Company. Many of the city's most renowned buildings were designed by local architect Archibald Simpson. Just off Union Street, Marischal College is the second largest granite building in the world.[18] Its present frontage was inaugurated by King Edward VII in 1906, but the central parts by Archibald Simpson are considerably older. The Music Hall is a concert hall in Aberdeen, formerly the citys Assembly Rooms, located on Union Street in the city centre. ... Archibald Simpson (1790 - 1847) was one of the major architects of Aberdeens Granite City. ... Marschal College viewed from Upper Kirkgate Marischal College was founded in 1593 in Aberdeen by George Keith, 5th Earl Marischal of Scotland. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ...


The Mercat Cross, built in 1686 by John Montgomery, is an open-arched structure, 21 feet (6 m) in diameter and 18 feet (5 m) high with a large hexagonal base from the centre of which rises a shaft with a Corinthian capital, on which is the royal unicorn. The base is highly decorated, including medallions illustrating Scottish monarchs from James I to James VII.[17] The mercat cross in Cockburnspath A mercat cross is a market cross found in Scottish cities and towns where trade and commerce was a part of economic life. ... John Montgomery is a name shared by several notable men: John Montgomery (died 1794), U.S. pioneer in Tennessee John Montgomery (1722-1808), U.S. merchant, Continental Congressman for Pennsylvania John Montgomery (1764-1828), U.S. lawyer, Congressman from Maryland John Gallagher Montgomery (1805-1857), U.S. lawyer, Congresman for... The gentle and pensive maiden has the power to tame the unicorn, in this fresco in Palazzo Farnese, Rome, probably by Domenichino, ca 1602 For other uses, see Unicorn (disambiguation). ... James I (December 10, 1394 – February 21, 1437) reigned as King of Scots from April 4, 1406 until February 21, 1437. ... James VII and II (14 October 1633–16 September 1701) became King of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 6 February 1685. ...


Notable religious buildings are the Kirk of St Nicholas, in the centre of the city, with a large kirkyard separated from Union Street by a 147 foot (45 m) long Ionic facade, built in 1830.[17] The divided church within, with a central tower and spire, forms one continuous building 220 feet (67 m) in length. In Old Aberdeen, St. Machar's Cathedral was started in the twelfth century but took centuries to complete with the exception of the period of the episcopates of William Elphinstone and Gavin Dunbar, who completed the structure by adding the two western spires and the southern transept.[17] The Kirk of St Nicholas is a historic church located in the city centre of Aberdeen, Scotland. ... Castle Ashby Graveyard Northamptonshire A cemetery is a place in which dead bodies and cremated remains are buried. ... Union Street looking east Looking up Union Street from the Citadel Union Street International Market The Castlegate at the east of Union Street Union Street is the main street and shopping thoroughfare in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... The town Old Aberdeen was erected into a burgh of barony on 26 December 1489, and incorporated into Aberdeen by Act of Parliament in 1891. ... St. ... William Elphinstone (1431 - October 25, 1514), Scottish statesman, Bishop of Aberdeen and founder of the University of Aberdeen. ... Gavin Dunbar († 1532) was a 16th century bishop of Aberdeen. ...


The ancient Brig o' Balgownie, a picturesque single arch spanning the deep black stream, is said to have been built by King Robert I.[17] The Bridge of Dee consists of seven semicircular ribbed arches, is about 30 feet (10 m) high, and was built early in the sixteenth century by Bishops Elphinstone and Dunbar. It was nearly all rebuilt in 1718-1723 and in 1842 was widened from 14 to 26 feet (4 to 8 m) wide.[17] The Brig o Balgownie (originally Bridge of Don) is a 12th century bridge spanning the river Don in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... Robert I, King of Scots (Mediaeval Gaelic:Roibert a Briuis; modern Scottish Gaelic: Raibeart Bruis; Norman French: Robert de Brus or Robert de Bruys; 11 July 1274 – 7 June 1329), usually known in modern English as Robert the Bruce, was King of Scotland from 1306 until his death in 1329. ... William Elphinstone (1431 - October 25, 1514), Scottish statesman, Bishop of Aberdeen and founder of the University of Aberdeen. ... Gavin Dunbar († 1532) was a 16th century bishop of Aberdeen. ...

Granite terrace in central Aberdeen
Granite terrace in central Aberdeen

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 224 pixelsFull resolution (5184 × 1452 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 224 pixelsFull resolution (5184 × 1452 pixel, file size: 1. ... For other uses, see granite (disambiguation). ... A street of British Victorian/Edwardian terraced homes. ...

Religion

Main article: Religion in Aberdeen

Traditionally Christian, Aberdeen's largest denominations are the Church of Scotland through the Presbytery of Aberdeen and the Roman Catholic Church. The last census revealed that Aberdeen is the least religious city in Scotland, with nearly 43 % of people claiming to have no religion[19] and several former churches in the city have been converted into bars and restaurants.[20] Image File history File links St. ... Image File history File links St. ... St. ... Kirk of St Nicholas Queens Cross Church Religion in Aberdeen is traditionally Christian with the city being represented by a number of denominations, particularly the Church of Scotland through the Presbytery of Aberdeen and the Catholic faith. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... The Church of Scotland (CofS; Scottish Gaelic: ), known informally by its pre-Union Scots name, The Kirk, is the national church of Scotland. ... Queens Cross Church Rubislaw Church The Presbytery of Aberdeen is one of the forty-six presbyteries of the Church of Scotland, being the local presbytery for the city of Aberdeen. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ...


There is also an Islamic Mosque in Old Aberdeen and an Orthodox Jewish Synagogue established in 1945. There are no formal Buddhist or Hindu buildings. The University of Aberdeen has a small Bahá'í society. For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... A statue of the Sakyamuni Buddha in Tawang Gompa, India. ... Hinduism (known as in modern Indian languages)[1] is a religious tradition[2] that originated in the Indian subcontinent. ... The University of Aberdeen was founded in 1495, in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... This article is about the generally-recognized global religious community. ...


In the Middle Ages, the Kirk of St Nicholas was the only burgh kirk and one of Scotland's largest parish churches. Like a number of other Scottish kirks, it was subdivided after the Reformation, in this case into the East and West churches. At this time, the city also was home to houses of the Carmelites (Whitefriars) and Franciscans (Greyfriars), the latter of which surviving in modified form as the chapel of Marischal College as late as the early twentieth Century. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The Kirk of St Nicholas is a historic church located in the city centre of Aberdeen, Scotland. ... This article is about the country. ... John Knox regarded as the leader of the Scottish Reformation The Scottish Reformation was Scotlands formal break with the papacy in 1560, and the events surrounding this. ... The Order of Our Lady of Mt. ... The Order of Our Lady of Mt. ... Franciscans is the common name used to designate a variety of mendicant religious orders of men or women tracing their origin to Francis of Assisi and following the Rule of St. ... The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ...


St Machar's Cathedral was formed twenty years after David I (1124-53) transferred the pre-Reformation Diocese from Mortlach in Banffshire to Old Aberdeen in 1137. With the exception of the episcopate of William Elphinstone (1484-1511), building progressed slowly. Gavin Dunbar, who followed him in 1518, completed the structure by adding the two western spires and the southern transept. The Cathedral Church of St Machar is a Church of Scotland church in Aberdeen. ... Linguistic division in early twelfth century Scotland. ... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... Banffshire (Siorrachd Bhanbh in Gaelic) is a small traditional county in the north of Scotland. ... William Elphinstone (1431 - October 25, 1514), Scottish statesman, Bishop of Aberdeen and founder of the University of Aberdeen. ... Gavin Dunbar († 1532) was a 16th century bishop of Aberdeen. ...


St. Mary's Cathedral is a Roman Catholic Cathedral in Gothic style, erected in 1859. The Cathedral Church of St Mary of the Assumption, usually know as St Marys Cathedral is a cathedral of the Roman Catholic Church in the city of Aberdeen, Scotland. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Gothic architecture characterizes any of the styles of European architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, in use throughout Europe during the high and late medieval period, from the 12th century onwards. ...


St. Andrew's Cathedral is the Scottish Episcopal Cathedral, constructed in 1817 as Archibald Simpson's first commission. It is notable for having consecrated the first bishop of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America. St Andrews Cathedral, or the Cathedral Church of Saint Andrew, is a cathedral of the Scottish Episcopal Church situated in the Scottish city of Aberdeen. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ...


Economy

Donside Paper Mill under demolition, February 15 2006
Donside Paper Mill under demolition, February 15 2006
North Sea Oil Platforms
North Sea Oil Platforms
Belmont Street Farmers Market
Belmont Street Farmers Market

Traditionally, Aberdeen was home to fishing, textile mills, shipbuilding and paper making. These industries have been largely replaced. High technology developments in the electronics design and development industry, research in agriculture and fishing and the oil industry, which has been largely responsible for Aberdeen's economic boom in the last three decades, are now major parts of Aberdeen's economy. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 849 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 849 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links BelmontStreetMarket-81625-Peter_Ward. ... Image File history File links BelmontStreetMarket-81625-Peter_Ward. ... Traditionally Aberdeen was home to fishing, textile mills, ship building and paper making. ... Aberdeen is the main shopping location in the north-east of Scotland. ... The Oil Industry in Aberdeen, Scotland has been extremely important for the cities economic development. ... The Oil industry brings to market what is currently considered the lifeblood of nearly all other industry, if not industrialized civilization itself. ...


Until the 1970s, most of Aberdeen's leading industries dated from the eighteenth Century; mainly these were textiles, foundry work, shipbuilding and paper-making, the oldest industry in the city, with paper having been first made there in 1694. Paper-making has reduced in importance since the closures of Donside Paper Mill in 2001 and the Davidson Mill in 2005 leaving the Stoneywood Paper Mill with a workforce of approximately 500. Textile production ended in 2004 when Richards of Aberdeen closed. For other uses, see Paper (disambiguation). ... Richards mill, in March 2006 Richards of Aberdeen was a textile company based in the Hutcheon Street area of Aberdeen. ...


Grey granite was quarried at Rubislaw quarry for more than 300 years, and used for paving setts, kerb and building stones, and monumental and other ornamental pieces. Aberdeen granite was used to build the terraces of the Houses of Parliament and Waterloo Bridge in London. Quarrying finally ceased in 1971. For other uses, see Quarry (disambiguation). ... Rubislaw Quarry was opened in 1740. ... This may refer to the: British Houses of Parliament. ... View of the old Waterloo Bridge from Whitehall stairs, John Constable, 18 June 1817 Waterloo Bridge granite stone in Canberra, Australia. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Fishing was once the predominant industry, but was surpassed by deep-sea fisheries, which derived a great impetus from improved technologies throughout the twentieth Century. Catches have fallen due to overfishing and the use of the harbour by oil support vessels, [21] and so although still an important fishing port it is now eclipsed by the more northerly ports of Peterhead and Fraserburgh. The Fisheries Research Services is based in Aberdeen, including its headquarters, and a marine research lab in Torry. , There is also a suburb of Adelaide named Peterhead, South Australia Peterhead called Ceann Phadraig in Gaelic is a town in Scotland with a population of approximately 18,000. ... , Fraserburgh, called The Broch in Scots, is a town in Aberdeenshire, Scotland on the extreme North East corner. ... The FRV Scotia Fisheries Research Services (FRS) is an Executive Agency of the Scottish Executive, part of the Scottish Executive Environment and Rural Affairs Department. ...


Aberdeen is well regarded for the agricultural and soil research that takes place at The Macaulay Institute, which has close links to the city's two universities. The Rowett Research Institute is a world renowned research centre for studies into food and nutrition located in Aberdeen. It has produced three Nobel laureates and there is a high concentration of life scientists working in the city.[22][23] The Macaulay Institute is a land use research institute based in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... The Rowett Research Institute is a research centre for studies into food and nutrition located in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology is the science of life (from the Greek words bios = life and logos = word). ...


There is also a dynamic and fast growing electronics design and development industry.


With the discovery of significant oil deposits in the North Sea during the late twentieth Century, Aberdeen became the centre of Europe's petroleum industry. With the second largest heliport in the world and an important service ship harbour port serving oil rigs off-shore, Aberdeen is often called the Oil Capital of Europe.[24] // North Sea Oil Platforms North Sea oil refers to oil and natural gas (hydrocarbons) produced from oil reservoirs beneath the North Sea. ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Petro redirects here. ... Natural gas drilling rig A drilling rig or oil rig is a structure housing equipment used to drill for and extract oil or natural gas from underground reservoirs. ...


Local political attempts have been made to turn Aberdeen's reputation as the Oil Capital of Europe into the Energy Capital of Europe as oil supplies may start to dwindle in coming years, and there is considerable interest in the development of new energy sources; technology transfer from oil to other industries is anticipated.[25]


The city ranks fourth in Scotland for shopping. The traditional shopping streets are Union Street and George Street which are now backed up by inner-city shopping centres, notably the Bon Accord-St Nicholas Centre and the The Mall Trinity. Major retail parks away from the city centre include the Berryden Retail Park, the Kittybrewster Retail Park and the Beach Boulevard Retail Park. Union Street looking east Looking up Union Street from the Citadel Union Street International Market The Castlegate at the east of Union Street Union Street is the main street and shopping thoroughfare in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... The Bon Accord St Nicholas Shopping Centre (formerly The Bon Accord Shopping Centre Aberdeen & The St. ... The Mall Trinity is a one floor shopping centre in Aberdeen, Scotland. ...


Education

University of Aberdeen, Elphinstone Hall
University of Aberdeen, Elphinstone Hall
King's College, Old Aberdeen
King's College, Old Aberdeen
Main article: Education in Aberdeen

Image File history File linksMetadata Elphinstone_Hall2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Elphinstone_Hall2. ... Download high resolution version (896x592, 129 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (896x592, 129 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Robert Gordons College University of Aberdeen, Elphinstone Hall Kings College, Old Aberdeen Lord Byrons Statue, facing Skene Street. ...

Universities and colleges

Aberdeen has two universities, the University of Aberdeen and Robert Gordon University. Aberdeen's student rate of 11.5% is higher than the national average of 7%.[26] The University of Aberdeen was founded in 1495, in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... The Robert Gordon University (often known as RGU) is a modern university located in Aberdeen, Scotland. ...


The University of Aberdeen began life as King's College, Aberdeen, which was founded in 1495 by William Elphinstone (1431-1514), Bishop of Aberdeen and Chancellor of Scotland. Marischal College, a separate institution, was founded in "New" Aberdeen by George Keith, fifth Earl Marischal of Scotland in 1593. These institutions were amalgamated to form the present University of Aberdeen in 1860. The university is the fifth oldest in the English speaking world.[27] The University of Aberdeen was founded in 1495, in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... Kings College, Aberdeen was founded on 10 February 1495 by Bishop William Elphinstone in Old Aberdeen. ... William Elphinstone (1431 - October 25, 1514), Scottish statesman, Bishop of Aberdeen and founder of the University of Aberdeen. ... The Bishop of Aberdeen is the Ordinary of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Aberdeen in the Province of Saint Andrews and Edinburgh. ... Marschal College viewed from Upper Kirkgate Marischal College was founded in 1593 in Aberdeen by George Keith, 5th Earl Marischal of Scotland. ...


Robert Gordon's College (originally Robert Gordon's Hospital) was founded in 1729 by the merchant Robert Gordon, grandson of the map maker Robert Gordon of Straloch, and was further endowed in 1816 by Alexander Simpson of Collyhill. Originally devoted to the instruction and maintenance of the sons of poor burgesses of guild and trade in the city, it was reorganised in 1881 as a day and night school for secondary and technical education. In 1903, the vocational education component of the college was designated a Central Institution and was renamed as the Robert Gordon Institute of Technology in 1965. In 1992, university status was gained and it became the Robert Gordon University. Robert Gordons College (known by the acronym RGC) is a private co-educational day school in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... Robert Gordon (1668-1731) was born in Aberdeen. ... Scottish Central Institutions Central Institutions were a range of higher education institutes in 20th Century Scotland responsible for providing degree-level education but emphasising teaching rather than research. ... The Robert Gordon University (often known as RGU) is a modern university located in Aberdeen, Scotland. ...


Aberdeen is also home to two artistic schools: Gray's School of Art, founded in 1886, which is one of the oldest established colleges of art in the UK, and is now incorporated into Robert Gordon University; and The Scott Sutherland School of Architecture and The Built Environment, which is situated on the Garthdee Campus of the Robert Gordon University, next to Gray's School of Art. Bust of John Gray, School Founder. ... The Scott Sutherland School of Architecture and the Built Environment (previously the Scott Sutherland School of Architecture; The Scott Sutherland School of Art Architecture and Design) is situated on the Garthdee Campus of the Robert Gordon University in Aberdeen, Scotland. ...


Aberdeen College has several campuses in the city and offers a wide variety of part-time and full-time courses leading to several different qualifications. It is the largest further education institution in Scotland.[28] Aberdeen College is the largest further education college in Scotland. ...


Schools

There are currently 12 secondary schools and 54 primary schools which are run by the city council. The most notable are Cults Academy, Oldmachar Academy and Aberdeen Grammar School (founded in 1263) which were all rated in the top 50 Scottish secondary schools league tables published by The Times in 2005.[29] Cults Academy is an Aberdeen City Council secondary school in Cults, Aberdeen, Scotland. ... Oldmachar Academy is a Scottish Secondary School or comprehensive school situated in the Bridge of Don suburb of Aberdeen, Scotland and established in 1982. ... Aberdeen Grammar School is one of the twelve state secondary schools in the City of Aberdeen, Scotland, which are run by the Aberdeen City Council education department. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ...


There are a number of private schools in Aberdeen; Albyn School for Girls (co-educational as of 2005), St Margaret's School for Girls, the Hamilton School (a Montessori school), Robert Gordon's College, the Total French School (for French oil industry families), the International School of Aberdeen and a Waldorf/Steiner School. This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... St Margarets School for Girls is a girls school in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... The Hamilton is an Independent Day School in Aberdeen presently offering Care and Education to pupils from three months to twelve years. ... The Montessori method is a methodology for nursery and elementary school education, first developed by Dr. Maria Montessori. ... Robert Gordons College (known by the acronym RGC) is a private co-educational day school in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... Total S.A. (Euronext: FP, NYSE: TOT) is a French oil company headquartered in Paris, France. ... The International School of Aberdeen (ISA) is a school in Milltimber, Aberdeen, Scotland. ... Waldorf Education, sometimes called Steiner education, is a world-wide movement based on an educational philosophy formulated by Austrian Rudolf Steiner after World War I. With a goal of educating the whole child, Waldorf educators place a strong emphasis on balancing the childs natural stages of development with creativity...


Geography

Main article: Geography of Aberdeen

Snow in Aberdeen, on Union Terrace The Geography of Aberdeen, Scotland is of a city located between the River Dee and the River Don. ...

Climate

The mean temperature is 8 °C (47 °F) and it varies between an average low of 5 °C (41 °F) and 11 °C (52 °F). In summer (June - August) the average high is 16 °C (63 °F) and average low 9 °C (49 °F). In winter (December - February) the average high is 6 °C (43 °F) and average low 0 °C (33 °F).[30] Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... For other uses, see Fahrenheit (disambiguation). ...


The average yearly precipitation is 753 millimetres (29.7 in), with 64 millimetres (2.5 in) in summer (June - August) and 62 millimetres (2.5 in) in winter (December - February). The wettest months are October and November.[30]
A millimetre (American spelling: millimeter, symbol mm) is an SI unit of length that is equal to one thousandth of a metre. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... An inch (plural: inches; symbol or abbreviation: in or, sometimes, ″ - a double prime) is the name of a unit of length in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ...

Average (unless stated) per Month Average Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
High temperature Celsius (°F) 11 (52) 5 (42) 6 (43) 7 (46) 10 (50) 12 (55) 15 (60) 17 (64) 17 (64) 15 (59) 11 (53) 8 (47) 6 (44)
Low temperature Celsius (°F) 5 (41) 0 (32) 0 (33) 1 (35) 2 (37) 5 (42) 8 (47) 10 (51) 10 (50) 7 (46) 5 (42) 2 (37) 1 (35)
Highest recorded temp. Celsius (°F) Highest ever: 30 (86) 17 (63) 17 (63) 20 (68) 23 (74) 24 (76) 26 (79) 30 (86) 29 (84) 24 (76) 21 (70) 16 (62) 15 (60)
Lowest recorded temp. Celsius (°F) Lowest ever: -18 (-2) -18 (-2) -15 (5) -11 (12) -3 (25) -3 (26) 0 (33) 2 (37) 0 (32) -2 (28) -3 (25) -15 (5) -13 (7)
Source: Washington Post Weather

Demographics

Aberdeen demographics
Aberdeen demographics[31]

In 1396 the population was about 3,000. By 1801 it had become 26,992; (1901) 153,503; (1941) 182,467.[32] In 2001 the UK census records the Aberdeen City Council area's population at 212,125,[33] but the Aberdeen locality's population at 184,788.[34] The latest official population estimate, published by the General Register for Scotland for 2005, is 202,370.[1] Data from the Aberdeen specific locality of the 2001 UK census shows that the demographics include a median male age of 35 and female age of 38 which are younger than Scotland's average and a 49% to 51% male to female ratio.[33] Image File history File links AberdeenDemographic. ... Image File history File links AberdeenDemographic. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... Aberdeen City Council represents the Aberdeen City council area of Scotland. ...


The census showed that there are fewer young people in Aberdeen, with 16.4 % under 16, opposed to the national average of 19.2 %.[19] Ethnically, 15.7 % were born outside of Scotland, higher than the national average of 12.9 %. Of this population 8.4 % were born in England.[19] 3 % of Aberdonians stated to be from an ethnic minority (non-white) in the 2001 census, with 0.7% from the Indian-subcontinent and 0.6% Asian, in comparison Scotland's overall population of non-white origin is 2 %. However this is a lower percentage than any of Scotland's other three main cities, Glasgow, Edinburgh, and Dundee.[19] For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ...


In the household, there were 97,013 individual dwellings recorded in the city of which 61% were privately owned, 9% privately rented and 23% rented from the council. The most popular type of dwellings are apartments which compromise 49% of residences followed by semi-detached at just below 22%.[35] The average income of a household in the city is £16,813[36] (2005) which places approximately 18% households in the city below the poverty line (defined as 60% of the mean income). Conversely, an Aberdeen postcode has the second highest number of millionaires of any postcode in the UK. [1]


Geology

see also Aberdeenshire Geology

Aberdeen has grown over a site of mainly metamorphic quartzite mica schist, formed during the Dalradian period (approximately 480-600 million years ago) with sporadic areas of igneous Diorite granites to be found, such as that at the Rubislaw quarry which was used to build much of the Victorian parts of the city.[37] The traditional county of Aberdeenshire (Siorrachd Obar Dheathain in Gaelic) borders Banffshire and Inverness-shire to the west, Perthshire, Angus and Kincardineshire to the south, and the North Sea to the north and east. ... Quartzite, a form of metamorphic rock, from the Museum of Geology at University of Tartu collection. ... Quartzite Quartzite (from German Quarzit[1]) is a hard, metamorphic rock which was originally sandstone. ... Rock with mica Mica sheet Mica flakes The mica group of sheet silicate minerals includes several closely related materials having highly perfect basal cleavage. ... Schist The schists form a group of medium-grade metamorphic rocks, chiefly notable for the preponderance of lamellar minerals such as micas, chlorite, talc, hornblende, graphite, and others. ... Dalradian, in geology, a series of metamorphic rocks, typically developed in the high ground which lies southeast of the Great Glen of Scotland. ... Volcanic rock on North America Plutonic rock on North America Igneous rocks (etymology from latin ignis, fire) are rocks formed by solidification of cooled magma (molten rock), with or without crystallization, either below the surface as intrusive (plutonic) rocks or on the surface as extrusive (volcanic) rocks. ... Categories: Mineral stubs | Igneous rocks ... For other uses, see granite (disambiguation). ... Rubislaw Quarry was opened in 1740. ... The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ...


On the coast, Aberdeen has a long sand beach between the two rivers, the Dee and the Don, which turns into high sand dunes north of the Don stretching as far as Fraserburgh and to the south of the Dee rocky cliff faces with pebble and shingle beaches. River Dee near Braemar The Linn of Dee, small gorge near Braemar The River Dee is a 90 mile (140 km) long river, that rises in the Cairngorms, Aberdeenshire, Scotland and flows into the North Sea at Aberdeen. ... The article is about the Don River in Scotland. ... This article is about the sand formations, for other meanings see Dune (disambiguation) Mesquite Flat Dunes in Death Valley National Park In physical geography, a dune is a hill of sand built by eolian (wind-related) processes. ... , Fraserburgh, called The Broch in Scots, is a town in Aberdeenshire, Scotland on the extreme North East corner. ...


Topography

The city extends to 71.22 square miles (184.46 km²), and includes the former burghs of Old Aberdeen, New Aberdeen, Woodside and the Royal Burgh of Torry to the south of River Dee. This gives the city a population density of 2,819 per square mile (1,089 per km²).[38]The city is built on many hills, with the original beginnings of the city growing from Castle Hill, St. Catherine's Hill and Windmill Hill.[39] A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... The town Old Aberdeen was erected into a burgh of barony on 26 December 1489, and incorporated into Aberdeen by Act of Parliament in 1891. ... A Royal Burgh is a type of Scottish burgh (town or city), used today for ceremonial purposes only. ... Torry is an area within the city of Aberdeen, Scotland, UK. // Torry, lying on the south bank of the River Dee, was once a Royal Burgh in its own right, having been erected a burgh of barony in 1495. ... River Dee near Braemar The Linn of Dee, small gorge near Braemar The River Dee is a 90 mile (140 km) long river, that rises in the Cairngorms, Aberdeenshire, Scotland and flows into the North Sea at Aberdeen. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ...


Neiboughrhoods

PeterCulter Milltimber Beildside Cults Mannofield Garthdee Craigiebuckler Hazlehead Kincorth Torry Tullos Cove Cove bay Leggart Nigg Nigg bay Queens Market Kittybrewster Mastrick Northfield Woodside Middlefield Tillydrone Hayton Hilton Old Aberdeen Seaton The Beach Bucksburn Bankhead Persely Danestone Bridge of Don Denmore


Culture

Main article: Culture in Aberdeen
His Majesty's Theatre
His Majesty's Theatre
Looking down Shiprow with Provost Ross's house on the right
Looking down Shiprow with Provost Ross's house on the right

The city is blessed with amenities which cover a wide range of cultural activities and boasts a selection of museums. The city is regularly visited by Scotland's National Arts Companies. The Aberdeen Art Gallery houses a collection of Impressionist, Victorian, Scottish and twentieth Century British paintings as well as collections of silver and glass. It also includes The Alexander Macdonald Bequest, a collection of late nineteenth century works donated by the museum's first benefactor and a constantly changing collection of contemporary work and regular visiting exhibitions.[40] Gordon Highlanders Museum Provost Skenes House His Majestys Theatre Kings College, Old Aberdeen The Culture in Aberdeen, Scotland is friendly and inviting and the city is blessed with amenities which cover a wide range of cultural activities and boasts a selection of museums and galleries. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1934 KB)His Majestys Theatre, Aberdeen File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1934 KB)His Majestys Theatre, Aberdeen File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links RossHouse-117156-Richard_Slessor. ... Image File history File links RossHouse-117156-Richard_Slessor. ... Scotlands national arts companies are directly funded by the Scottish Executive. ... Aberdeen Art Gallery is the main visual arts exhibition space in the city of Aberdeen in Scotland. ... See also Impressionist (entertainment): A girl with a watering can by Renoir, 1876 Impressionism was a 19th century art movement, which began as a private association of Paris-based artists who exhibited publicly in 1874. ... The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ...


Museums and galleries

The Aberdeen Maritime Museum, located in Shiprow, tells the story of Aberdeen's links with the sea from the days of sail and clipper ships to the latest oil and gas exploration technology. It includes an 8.5m (28 feet) high model of the Murchison oil production platform and a nineteenth century assembly taken from Rattray Headlighthouse.[41] Aberdeen Maritime Museum is a maritime museum in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... Summary details of famous Clipper Ships (those without a separate Wikipedia Article) Ariel, 1865, 197. ... Rattray Head is a headland in Aberdeenshire, north east Scotland. ...


Provost Ross' House is the second oldest dwelling house in the city. It was built in 1593 and became the residence of Provost John Ross of Arnage in 1702. The house retains some original medieval features, including a kitchen, fire places and beam-and-board ceilings.[42] The Gordon Highlanders Museum tells the story of one of Scotland's best known regiments.[43] Looking down Shiprow with Provost Rosss house on the right Provost Rosss House Provost John Ross was Lord Provost in Aberdeen, Scotland from 1710 - 1712. ... Looking down Shiprow with Provost Rosss house on the right Provost Rosss House Provost John Ross was Lord Provost in Aberdeen, Scotland from 1710 - 1712. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Gordon Highlanders Museum The Gordon Highlanders Museum is based in Aberdeen, Scotland and celebrates the story of the Gordon Highlanders which we active from 1881 to 1994. ...


Marischal Museum holds the principal collections of the University of Aberdeen, comprising some 80,000 items in the areas of fine art, Scottish history and archaeology, and European, Mediterranean & Near Eastern archaeology. The permanent displays and reference collections are augmented by regular temporary exhibitions.[44] The Marischal Museum is the main museum in the city of Aberdeen in Scotland. ... The University of Aberdeen was founded in 1495, in Aberdeen, Scotland. ...


Performing arts

Aberdeen is home to a host of events and festivals including the Aberdeen International Youth Festival (the world's largest arts festival for young performers), Aberdeen Jazz Festival, Rootin' Aboot (folk and roots music event based at The Lemon Tree), Triptych, and the University of Aberdeen's literature festival Word. Native Australian performers at the festival Aberdeen International Youth Festival is the worlds leading Festival of Youth Arts, and one of Scotland’s major international cultural events. ... The University of Aberdeen was founded in 1495, in Aberdeen, Scotland. ...


In 2006 Simon Farquhar's play Rainbow Kiss was staged at London's Royal Court Theatre. Directed by Richard Wilson and starring Joe McFadden and Dawn Steele, the play was an uncompromising depiction of Aberdeen life which, despite its strong sexual and violent content, won rave reviews from the liberal press and was applauded by MP for Aberdeen South Anne Begg. Simon Farquhar, (born December 15, 1972) is a Scottish writer hailing from Cullen, Aberdeenshire. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Royal Court Theatre is a non-commercial theatre in Sloane Square, in the Chelsea area of London noted for its contributions to modern theatre. ... Richard Wilson, OBE (born July 9, 1936) is a Scottish actor and theatre director, best known for playing Victor Meldrew in the popular BBC situation comedy One Foot in the Grave. ... Dawn Anne Steele was born on December 11th, 1975 in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Constituencies commonly known as Aberdeen South are: Aberdeen South — a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom Aberdeen South — a constituency represented in the Scottish Parliament This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might... Margaret Anne Begg (born December 6, 1955, Brechin, Scotland) is a Scottish politician and member of Parliament, for Aberdeen South since 1997. ...


Music and film

Aberdeen's music scene includes a variety of live music venues including pubs, clubs, and church choirs. The bars of Belmont Street are particularly known for featuring live music. Cèilidhs are also common in the city's halls. The many popular venues include The Moorings, The Lemon Tree, Kef, Drummond's, Moshulu, Snafu, The Tunnels, the Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Centre, and Aberdeen Music Hall. Belmont Street is a north-south street in the centre of Aberdeen, Scotland. ... A céilidh (pronounced ) is the traditional Gaelic social dance in Ireland, Scotland and Atlantic Canada. ... The Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Centre is a large exhibition and conference complex in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... The Music Hall is a concert hall in Aberdeen, formerly the citys Assembly Rooms, located on Union Street in the city centre. ...


Notable Aberdonian musicians include Evelyn Glennie and Annie Lennox. Contemporary composers John McLeod and Martin Dalby also hail from Aberdeen. Evelyn Glennie on the cover of her greatest hits album. ... Annie Lennox (born Ann Lennox on 25 December 1954) is a Scottish musician, vocalist, and Academy Award-winning songwriter. ... John McLeod (born 1795 - died sometime after 1842) was a Scottish-born explorer of Canada, in his capacity as a fur trader with the North West Company and Hudsons Bay Company. ...


Cultural cinema, educational work and local film events are provided by The Belmont Picturehouse on Belmont Street, Peacock Visual Arts and The Foyer. The Belmont Picturehouse is an art cinema on Belmont Street, Aberdeen, Scotland that shows films that generally would not be shown in a mainstream multiplex cinema that shows mostly blockbusters. ... Belmont Street is a north-south street in the centre of Aberdeen, Scotland. ...


Open spaces

Union Terrace Gardens
Union Terrace Gardens
Duthie Park Winter Gardens
Duthie Park Winter Gardens
Aberdeen Beach
Aberdeen Beach

Aberdeen has long been famous for its 45[9] outstanding parks and gardens, and citywide floral displays which include two million roses, eleven million daffodils and three million crocuses. The city has won the Royal Horticultural Society's Britain in Bloom 'Best City' award ten times,[9] the overall Scotland in Bloom competition twenty times[9] and the large city category every year since 1968.[9] At one point after winning a period of nine years straight, Aberdeen was banned from the Britain in Bloom competition to give another city a chance.[45] The city won the 2006 Scotland in Bloom "Best City" award along with the International Cities in Bloom award. The suburb of Dyce also won the Small Towns award.[46][47] Image File history File links Union_Terrace_Gardens. ... Image File history File links Union_Terrace_Gardens. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2576 × 1932 pixel, file size: 487 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2576 × 1932 pixel, file size: 487 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Union Terrace Gardens Johnston Gardens Duthie Park Winter Gardens The Green Spaces in Walkways in Aberdeen have long been famous for being outstanding. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Royal Horticultural Society was founded in 1804 as the London Horticultural Society, and gained its present name in a Royal Charter granted in 1861 by Prince Albert. ... Britain in Bloom is a horticultural competition in the United Kingdom. ... Dyce is a suburb of Aberdeen, Scotland, about six miles (about nine kilometres) northwest of Aberdeen city, best known for being the location of the citys airport. ...


Duthie Park opened in 1899 on the north bank of the river Dee. It was named after and gifted to the city by Miss Elizabeth Crombie Duthie of Ruthrieston in 1881. It has extensive gardens, a rose hill, boating pond, bandstand, and play area as well as Europe's second largest enclosed gardens the David Welch Winter Gardens. Hazlehead Park, is large and forested, located on the outskirts of the city, it is popular with walkers in the forests, sports enthusiasts, naturalists and picnickers. There are football pitches, two golf courses, a pitch and putt course and a horse riding school. Duthie park, situated in Aberdeen, Scotland, by the banks of the River Dee, comprises 44 acres of land gifted to the council in 1881 by Lady Elizabeth Duthie of Ruthrieston, in memory of her uncle and of her brother. ... River Dee may refer to: River Dee, Wales (Afon Dyfrdwy), mostly in North Wales, flowing from Snowdonia to Chester. ... The parks golf course overlooking Aberdeen city. ...


Aberdeen's success in the Britain in Bloom competitions is often attributed to Johnston Gardens, a small park of one hectare in the west end of the city containing many different flowers and plants which have been renowned for their beauty. The garden was in 2002, named the best garden in Britain.[9] Johnston Gardens is a small public garden in Aberdeen, Scotland. ...


Seaton Park, formerly the grounds of a private house, is on the edge of the grounds of St Machar's Cathedral. The Cathedral Walk is maintained in a formal style with a great variety of plants providing a popular display. The park includes several other areas with contrasting styles to this. Seaton Park is located in Aberdeen, Scotland and is one of the cities biggest parks. ... The Cathedral Church of St Machar is a Church of Scotland church in Aberdeen. ...


Union Terrace Gardens opened in 1879 and is situated in the centre of the city. It is a popular rendezvous location in the heart of the city and is filled with trees of over 200 years old and flowers arranged in the city's coat of arms in summer. Union Terrace Gardens is a park in the city centre of Aberdeen, Scotland. ...


Situated next to each other, Victoria Park and Westburn Park cover 26 acres between them. Victoria Park opened in 1871. There is a conservatory used as a seating area and a fountain made of fourteen different granites, presented to the people by the granite polishers and master builders of Aberdeen. Opposite to the north is Westburn Park opened in 1901. With large grass pitches it is widely used for field sports. There is large tennis centre with indoor and outdoor courts, a children's cycle track, play area and a grass boules lawn. Victoria Park is a small park in the city of Aberdeen, Scotland. ... Iron rocking duck beside the pond (no longer rocks as rusted up) Westburn Park is located in Aberdeen, Scotland and is a large Aberdeen City Council owned public park. ... Victoria Park is a small park in the city of Aberdeen, Scotland. ... Iron rocking duck beside the pond (no longer rocks as rusted up) Westburn Park is located in Aberdeen, Scotland and is a large Aberdeen City Council owned public park. ...


Dialect

Listen to recordings of a speaker of Scots from Aberdeen

The local dialect of Lowland Scots is often known as the Doric, and is spoken not just in the city, but across the north-east of Scotland. It differs somewhat from other Scots dialects most noticeable are the pronunciation f for what is normally written wh and ee for what in standard English would usually be written oo (Scots ui). Every year the annual Doric Festival[48] takes place in Aberdeenshire to celebrate the history of the north-east's language. As with all Scots dialects in urban areas, it is not spoken as widely as it used to be in Aberdeen. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Scots (or Lallans, meaning Lowlands), properly Lowland Scots, is used in Lowland Scotland, as well as parts of Northern Ireland and border areas of the Republic of Ireland, where it is known in official circles as Ulster Scots or Ullans but by speakers simply as Scotch or Scots. On the...


Media

Main article: Media in Aberdeen

Aberdeen is home to Scotland's oldest newspaper the Press and Journal, first published in 1747. The Press and Journal and its sister paper the Evening Express are printed six days a week by Aberdeen Journals. There are three free newspapers: Aberdeen Record PM, Aberdeen Citizen and Aberdeen Independent. Image File history File links PressAndJournalFrontPage. ... Image File history File links PressAndJournalFrontPage. ... The Press and Journal is a daily regional newspaper serving the northern areas of Scotland including the cities of Aberdeen and Inverness. ... The Press and Journal Media in Aberdeen has long been published or broadcast. ... The Press and Journal is a daily regional newspaper serving the northern areas of Scotland including the cities of Aberdeen and Inverness. ... The name Evening Express could refer to one of several things The Evening Express, a local newspaper serving the city of Aberdeen in Scotland. ... Aberdeen Journals Ltd. ...


BBC Scotland has a small building in Aberdeen's Beechgrove area, and BBC Aberdeen produces the Beechgrove Garden television and radio programmes.[49] The city is home for the STV headquarters alongside Glasgow, which has replaced Grampian Television and Scottish Television. The local news programme North Tonight is produced from the STV Aberdeen headquarters and broadcasted to northern Scotland. BBC Scotland (BBC Alba in Gaelic) is a constituent part of the British Broadcasting Corporation, the publicly-funded broadcaster of the United Kingdom. ... The Beechgrove Garden is a television programme broadcast on BBC Two Scotland since 1978. ... This article is about the Scottish television network. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Grampian Television is the ITV franchisee for the North of Scotland, based in Aberdeen. ... Scottish Television (now legally known as STV Central Ltd and referred to on-air as STV) is Scotlands largest ITV franchisee, and has held the ITV franchise for Central Scotland since August 31, 1957. ... North Tonight is stvs nightly news programme covering the North of Scotland. ...


There are two commercial radio stations operating within the city, Northsound Radio, which runs Northsound One and Northsound Two [50], and Original 106 run by CanWest. Other radio stations include NECR FM (North-East Community Radio FM) DAB station[51] and shmu FM [2], managed by Station House Media Unit [3] which supports community members to run Aberdeen's first (and only) full-time community radio station, broadcasting on 99.8MHz FM. Northsound Radio broadcast two commercial local radio stations serving Aberdeen and the north east of Scotland. ... NorthSound One Categories: Station stubs | UK Radio Stations ... NorthSound Two NorthSound Two is a radio station based in Aberdeen, Scotland, UK. See also NorthSound One External link Northsound 2 Categories: United Kingdom broadcasting stubs | Radio stations in the United Kingdom ... Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB), also known as Eureka 147, is a technology for broadcasting of audio using digital radio transmission. ...


Sport

Pittodrie's Dick Donald Stand
Pittodrie's Dick Donald Stand
Main article: Sport in Aberdeen

The Scottish Premier League football club, Aberdeen FC play at Pittodrie. The club won the European Cup Winners Cup and the European Super Cup in 1983, and three Scottish Premier League Championships between 1980 and 1985. The other senior team is Cove Rangers F.C. of the Highland Football League (HFL), who play at Allan Park in the suburb of Cove Bay.[52]. Cove won the HFL championship in 2001. There was also a historic senior team Bon Accord F.C. who no longer play. Local junior teams include Banks O' Dee F.C., Culter F.C., F.C. Stoneywood, Glentanar F.C. and Hermes F.C.. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1632x1224, 211 KB) Photo taken by Euan Bain (User:Discosebastian) in Aberdeen on August 7th, 2006. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1632x1224, 211 KB) Photo taken by Euan Bain (User:Discosebastian) in Aberdeen on August 7th, 2006. ... Pittodrie is a football stadium situated in the Scottish city of Aberdeen. ... Sport in Aberdeen, Scotland is a major affair with Aberdeen being home to Commonwealth Games swimmers and Aberdeen Football Club // Aberdeens largest football club is Aberdeen Football Club but there are also other senior teams, notably Cove Rangers F.C.. There was also a historic senior team Bon Accord... The Clydesdale Bank Scottish Premier League commonly known as the Scottish Premier League, Premier League or SPL is a professional league competition for football clubs located at the top level of the Scottish football league system - above the Scottish Football League. ... Aberdeen Football Club is a football team from Scotland, who compete in the Scottish Premier League. ... Pittodrie is a football stadium situated in the Scottish city of Aberdeen. ... The Cup Winners Cup was a football club competition between the winners of the European domestic league cups. ... The European Super Cup (UEFA Super Cup) is at stake in an annual football game between the reigning champions of the UEFA Cup(formally UEFA Cup Winners Cup) and the Champions League. ... The Clydesdale Bank Scottish Premier League commonly known as the Scottish Premier League, Premier League or SPL is a professional league competition for football clubs located at the top level of the Scottish football league system - above the Scottish Football League. ... Cove Rangers are a senior Scottish football club currently playing in the Highland Football League. ... The Highland Football League (HFL) is a league of football (soccer) clubs operating not in just the Scottish highlands as the name may suggest, but across all of the North of Scotland. ... Allan Park is a football ground located in Cove, a suburb of Aberdeen. ... Cove Bay is a suburban coastal village which sits on the south-east edge of Aberdeen. ... Bon Accord were a football team from Aberdeen, Scotland who suffered the worst defeat in any British senior football match, losing 36-0 to Arbroath in the 1885 Scottish Cup. ... Banks O Dee F.C. are a junior football club from the city of Aberdeen, Scotland. ... Culter F.C. are a junior football club from the village of Peterculter, Aberdeen, Scotland. ... F.C. Stoneywood are a junior football team from the Stoneywood area of Aberdeen, Scotland. ... Glentanar F.C. are a junior football team based in Woodside, an area of the city of Aberdeen, Scotland. ... Hermes F.C. are a junior football team based in Bridge of Don, an area of the city of Aberdeen, Scotland. ...


Aberdeen is also home to the BT Premiership Division One rugby club Aberdeen GSFP RFC who play at Rubislaw Playing Fields, and Aberdeen Wanderers RFC. Former Wanderers' player Jason White was captain of the Scotland national rugby union team. BT Premier League Div 1 is Scotlands national rugby union league. ... Aberdeen Grammar School Former Pupils Rugby Club is a BT Premiership 1 club based in Aberdeen. ... Rubislaw Astroturf hockey pitch Rubislaw Playing Fields in Aberdeen, Scotland is an 18 acre sports field for Aberdeen Grammar School and for the Scottish BT Premiership 1 rugby union team Aberdeen GSFP RFC. An extension to the existing granite pavilion has been given planning permission. ... Jason Phillip Randall White (born 17 April 1978 in Edinburgh) is a Scottish rugby union footballer. ... First international (also the worlds first)  Scotland 4 - 1 England  (27 March 1871) Largest win  Scotland 100 - 8 Japan  (13 November 2004) Worst defeat  Scotland 10 - 68 South Africa  (6 December 1997) World Cup Appearances 6 (First in 1987) Best result Semi-finals, 1991 The Scotland national rugby union...


The Royal Aberdeen Golf Club, founded in 1780 and the oldest golf club in Aberdeen, hosted the Senior British Open in 2005.[53] The club has a second course, and there are public golf courses at Auchmill, Balnagask, Hazlehead and King's Links.[54] The 1999 winner of the The Open Championship, Paul Lawrie, hails from the city. Royal Aberdeen Golf Club in Aberdeen, Scotland was founded in 1780 and claims to be the sixth oldest golf club in the world. ... The Senior British Open Championship is a professional golf tournament for men aged fifty and over. ... Balnagask is an area of Torry, a burgh of Aberdeen in Scotland. ... The parks golf course overlooking Aberdeen city. ... “British Open” redirects here. ... Paul Stewart Lawrie (born 1 January 1969, Aberdeen) is a British professional golfer from Scotland who is best known for winning The Open Championship in 1999. ...


The City of Aberdeen Swim Team (COAST) is based in Northfield swimming pool and has been in operation since 1996. The team comprises several smaller swimming clubs, and has enjoyed success throughout Scotland and in international competitions. Three of the team's swimmers qualified for the 2006 Commonwealth Games.[55] Current flag of the Commonwealth Games Federation Locations of the games, and participating countries Commonwealth Games Federation seal, adopted in 2001 The Commonwealth Games is a multinational, multi-sport event. ...


The city council operates public tennis courts in various parks including an indoor tennis centre at Westburn Park. The Beach Leisure Centre is home to a climbing wall and gymnasium and there are numerous swimming pools dotted around the city notably the largest, the Bon-Accord Baths.


Infrastructure

Health

Aberdeen's health is provided for most people by NHS Scotland through the NHS Grampian health board. Aberdeen Royal Infirmary is the main hospital in the city, with the Royal Aberdeen Children's Hospital for children, the Royal Cornhill Hospital for mental health and the Woodend Hospital and Woolmanhill Hospitals. The logo of NHS Scotland NHSScotland is the official corporate style of the National Health Service operations in Scotland. ... NHS Grampian Logo NHS Grampian is one of the fifteen Scottish regions of the National Health Service. ... Aberdeen Royal Infirmary or ARI is a teaching hospital in the city of Aberdeen, Scotland. ... The Royal Aberdeen Childrens Hospital or RACH is a childrens hospital in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... The Royal Cornhill Hospital is a psychiatric hospital in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... Woodend Hospital is a hospital in the Mastrick area of Aberdeen, Scotland. ... View of Woolmanhill Woolmanhill Hospital is a hospital in the centre of Aberdeen, Scotland. ...


Privately there is the Albyn Hospital on Albyn Place which is owned and operated by BMI Healthcare. Albyn Hospital is a private hospital in Aberdeen, Scotland. ...


Transport

Aberdeen Railway Station
Aberdeen Railway Station
Main article: Transport in Aberdeen

Aberdeen Airport (ABZ), at Dyce in the north of the city, serves a number of domestic and international destinations including France, Netherlands, Spain, Belgium, Austria, Ireland and Scandinavian countries. The heliport which serves the oil industry and rescue services is one of the busiest commercial heliports in the world.[7] Image File history File linksMetadata Aberdeenconcourse. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Aberdeenconcourse. ... Brig o Balgownie Aberdeen Railway Station A ship in Aberdeen Harbour Victoria Bridge, Torry Aberdeen Airport terminal building Aberdeen heliport see also Aberdeen for walkways in Aberdeen see Green Spaces and Walkways in Aberdeen for future transport infrastructure see Future Developments in Aberdeen The network of Transportation in Aberdeen, is... For the airport in Aberdeen, South Dakota, see Aberdeen Regional Airport. ... Dyce is a suburb of Aberdeen, Scotland, about six miles (about nine kilometres) northwest of Aberdeen city, best known for being the location of the citys airport. ... For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ...


Aberdeen railway station is on the main UK rail network and connects directly to major cities such as Edinburgh and London. Aberdeen railway station is a railway station in Aberdeen, Scotland, UK. // Aberdeen railway station is served by daytime trains from Inverness and from Dundee and the south, including London Kings Cross, England. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


There are five major roads in and out of the city. The A90 is the main arterial route into the city from the north and south, linking Aberdeen to Edinburgh, Dundee and Perth in the south and Ellon, Peterhead and Fraserburgh in the north. The A96 links to Elgin and Inverness and the north west. The A93 is the main route to the west, heading towards Royal Deeside and the Cairngorms. After Braemar, it turns south, providing an alternative tourist route to Perth. The A92 was the original southerly road to Aberdeen prior to the building of the A90, and is now used as a tourist route, connecting the towns of Montrose, Arbroath and Brechin on the east coast. The A947 exits the city at Dyce and goes on to Newmachar, Oldmeldrum and Turriff finally ending at Banff and Macduff. For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... Perth (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a royal burgh in central Scotland. ... This article is about a town in France. ... , There is also a suburb of Adelaide named Peterhead, South Australia Peterhead called Ceann Phadraig in Gaelic is a town in Scotland with a population of approximately 18,000. ... , Fraserburgh, called The Broch in Scots, is a town in Aberdeenshire, Scotland on the extreme North East corner. ... For other uses, see Elgin. ... This article is about the city in Scotland. ... The Cairngorms: Ben Macdhui seen from Carn aMhaim This article is about the Scottish mountain range. ... Braemar (Scottish Gaelic, Baile a Chaisteil Bhràigh Mhàrr) is a village in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, around 58 miles west of Aberdeen in the Highlands. ... , Montrose is a port, tourist resort and royal burgh in Angus, on the east coast of Scotland. ... Arbroath from the south Arbroath or Aberbrothock (Scottish Gaelic: Obair Bhrothaig which translates literally as at the mouth of the Brothock[2]) is a former royal burgh and the largest town in the council area of Angus in Scotland, and has a population of approximately 23,000 people. ... For other uses, see Brechin (disambiguation). ... Newmachar is a village in the north-east of Scotland, 10 miles to the north-west of Aberdeen. ... Oldmeldrum is a village and parish in Aberdeenshire, not far from Inverurie in north east Scotland. ... , Turriff is a town and parish in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. ... This article is about the towns in Scotland. ...


Aberdeen Harbour is important as the largest in the north of Scotland and as a ferry route to Orkney and Shetland. Established in 1136, it has been referred to as the oldest business in Britain.[56] Location Geography Area Ranked 16th  - Total 990 km²  - % Water  ? Admin HQ Kirkwall ISO 3166-2 GB-ORK ONS code 00RA Demographics Population Ranked 32nd  - Total (2006) 19,800  - Density 20 / km² Scottish Gaelic  - Total () {{{Scottish council Gaelic Speakers}}} Politics Orkney Islands Council http://www. ... For other uses, see Shetland (disambiguation). ...


First Group, headquartered in Aberdeen, operate the city buses in the city under the name FirstBus Aberdeen. There are 19 routes (numbered 1-2, 5-6, 9, 11-17, X18, 19-20, 22-24, 27, 40-41). First Group PLC (LSE: FGP) is a British transport company operating in the United Kingdom, Ireland and North America, with headquarters in Aberdeen, Scotland. ...


Aberdeen is connected to the UK National Cycle Network, and has a track to the south connecting to cities such as Dundee and Edinburgh and one to the north that forks about 10 miles from the city into two different tracks heading to Inverness and Fraserburgh respectively. Two particularly popular footpaths along old railway tracks are the Deeside Way to Banchory (which will eventually connect to Ballater) and the Formartine and Buchan Way to Ellon, both are used by a mixture of cyclists, walkers and occasionally horses. It has two Park and Ride sites which service the city, Stonehaven and Ellon. The first section of the NCN to be built was the Bristol and Bath Railway Path, opened in 1984. ... , Fraserburgh, called The Broch in Scots, is a town in Aberdeenshire, Scotland on the extreme North East corner. ... Deeside Way The Deeside Way (locally known as the Old Deeside Line; or sometimes the Royal Deeside Line, as the British Royal Family would travel on it to get to Balmoral. ... , Banchory (Scottish Gaelic: Beannchar, blessed place) is a burgh or town in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, lying approximately 20 miles west of Aberdeen, near where the Feugh River meets the River Dee. ... The Formartine and Buchan Way is a long distance footpath that goes from Dyce north to Peterhead and Fraserburgh. ...


Utilities

Aberdeen City Council is responsible for city owned infrastructure which is paid for by a mixture of council tax and income from HM Treasury. Infrastructure and services run by the council include: clearing snow in winter, maintaining parks, refuse collection, sewage, street cleaning and street lighting. Infrastructure in private hands includes electricity, gas and telecoms. Water supplies are provided by Scottish Water. Aberdeen City Council represents the Aberdeen City council area of Scotland. ... The new eastern entrance to HM Treasury HM Treasury, in full Her Majestys Treasury, informally The Treasury, is the United Kingdom government department responsible for developing and executing the UK Governments financial and economic policy. ... Scottish Water is a state-owned company in Scotland that provides water and sewer facilities. ...


Politics

Aberdeen City Council's logo with "Simplified" Coat of Arms.
Main article: Politics of Aberdeen
see also List of Provosts and Lord Provosts of Aberdeen

Aberdeen is locally governed by Aberdeen City Council, which comprises forty-three councillors who represent the city's wards and is headed by the Lord Provost who is currently Provost Peter Stephen. Image File history File links New_acc_logo. ... Image File history File links New_acc_logo. ... Aberdeen City Council represents the Aberdeen City council area of Scotland. ... Old council logo The Politics of Aberdeen, Scotland have changed significantly in recent years. ... The Lord Provost of Aberdeen is the convener of the City of Aberdeen local authority in Scotland. ... A ward is an electoral district used in local politics, most notably in England, Scotland, and Wales, as well as Australia, Canada, the Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa and many cities in the United States and the federal district of Washington, DC. Wards are usually named after neighbourhoods... The Lord Provost of Aberdeen is the convener of the City of Aberdeen local authority in Scotland. ...


From May 2003 until May 2007 the council was run with a Liberal Democrat and Conservatives coalition. Following the May 2007 elections the Liberal Democrats formed a new coalition with the Scottish National Party[57]. The council consists of: 15 Liberal Democrat, 13 SNP, 10 Labour, 4 Conservative councillors and a single independent councillor.[58] The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in Great Britain formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long after... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ...


Aberdeen is represented in the United Kingdom Parliament, by three constituencies: Aberdeen North, Aberdeen South and Gordon, of which the first two are wholly within the Aberdeen City council area while the latter also encompasses a large swathe of Aberdeenshire. Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons Michael Martin MP Lord Speaker Hélène Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... A constituency is any cohesive corporate unit or body bound by shared structures, goals or loyalty. ... Aberdeen North is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Aberdeen South is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Gordon is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Logo of Aberdeenshire Council Aberdeenshire (Siorrachd Obar Dheathain in Gaelic) is one of the 32 unitary council areas in Scotland. ...


In the Scottish Parliament the city is represented again by three constituencies, all of which are solely within the council area: Aberdeen North, Aberdeen Central and Aberdeen South and by a further seven MSPs elected as part of the North East Scotland electoral region. For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... Aberdeen North is a constituency represented in the Scottish Parliament. ... Aberdeen Central is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood). ... Aberdeen South is a constituency represented in the Scottish Parliament. ... North East Scotland is one of the eight electoral regions of the Scottish Parliament which were created in 1999. ...


In the European Union, the city is represented by seven MEPs, as part of the all inclusive Scotland constituency in the European Parliament. A Member of the European Parliament (English abbreviation MEP)[1] is a member of the European Unions directly-elected legislative body, the European Parliament. ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild...


Emergency services

  • Police: Policing in Aberdeen is responsibility of Grampian Police (the British Transport Police has responsibility for railways). The Grampian Police headquarters (and Aberdeen divisional headquarters) is located in Queen Street, Aberdeen.

Grampian Police are a police force in north east of Scotland, covering the borough of the City of Aberdeen and the counties of Aberdeenshire and Moray. ... The British Transport Police (BTP) is a non-Home Office national police service responsible for policing the railway system throughout Great Britain. ... Two Mercedes-Benz Sprinter-based ambulances of the Scottish Ambulance Service The Scottish Ambulance Service serves all of Scotland and is a special health board funded directly by the health department of the Scottish Executive. ... Grampian Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service for the area of Grampian, Scotland. ... Engine 4 - City of Chico, CA A Fire Engine is one of many specialized fire suppression apparatuses. ... Swanage lifeboat being winched up its slipway The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity based in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland dedicated to saving lives at sea around the coasts of Great Britain and Ireland. ...

Sister cities

Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Regensburg (also Ratisbon, Latin Ratisbona) is a city (population 151. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Clermont-Ferrand is a city of France, in the Auvergne region, with a population of approximately 140,000. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... County District Jæren Municipality NO-1103 Administrative centre Stavanger Mayor (1995-) Leif Johan Sevland (H) Official language form BokmÃ¥l Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 406 71 km² 68 km² 0. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belarus. ... Homel (Belarusian and Russian: Гомель, Gomeľ; Yiddish: , Homl), also known as Gomel, is the second-largest city of Belarus and the main city of Homel Province. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Zimbabwe. ... The City of Bulawayo is highlighted in this map of Zimbabwe. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bulgaria. ... Gabrovo municipality is located in Northern Bulgaria, in Gabrovo micro region. ...

Notable Aberdonians

Main article: Notable Aberdonians

King Lear and the Fool in the Storm, by artist William Dyce Astronomer James Gregory Singer Annie Lennox Thomas Blake Glover, founder of Mitsubishi There are many notable Aberdonians from Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire in Scotland. ... Paul Stewart Lawrie (born 1 January 1969, Aberdeen) is a British professional golfer from Scotland who is best known for winning The Open Championship in 1999. ... The Open are an English five-piece Indie-rock band who are signed to Loog Records. ... Annie Lennox (born Ann Lennox on 25 December 1954) is a Scottish musician, vocalist, and Academy Award-winning songwriter. ... Simon Farquhar, (born December 15, 1972) is a Scottish writer hailing from Cullen, Aberdeenshire. ... Denis Law (born February 24, 1940, in Aberdeen, Scotland) is a retired Scottish football player, who enjoyed a long and successful career as a striker from the 1950s to the 1970s. ... Nicol Ross Stephen (born 23 March 1960) is the Deputy First Minister of Scotland, Minister for Enterprise and Lifelong Learning, leader of the Scottish Liberal Democrats, and Member of the Scottish Parliament for Aberdeen South. ... The Deputy First Minister of Scotland is, as the name suggests, the Deputy to the First Minister of Scotland. ... Thomas Blake Glover. ... For information on Mitsubishi brand computer monitors, see NEC-Mitsubishi Electronics Display of America Inc. ... Bertie Charles Forbes (May 14, 1880 – May 6, 1954) was a financial journalist and author who founded Forbes Magazine. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Archibald Simpson (1790 - 1847) was one of the major architects of Aberdeens Granite City. ... George Steele, better known as George The Animal Steele, real name William James (Jim) Myers (b. ...

See also

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Categories: Art stubs | Literature stubs | Illuminated manuscripts ...

References

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  4. ^ The Granite City. Aberdeen and Grampian Tourist Board. Retrieved on 2007-02-08.
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  18. ^ City council appoints Marischal College Programme Director for new corporate headquarters. Retrieved on 2007-02-24.
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  20. ^ Minister thrown out of trendy nightclub that used to be his church, The Scotsman, May 24, 2006
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  38. ^ General Register for Scotland. Land Area and Population Density. Retrieved on 2007-03-12.
  39. ^ Aberdeen City. The Gazetteer for Scotland. Retrieved on 2007-02-20.
  40. ^ Aberdeen Art Gallery. Aberdeen Art Galleries and Museums. Retrieved on 2007-02-18.
  41. ^ Aberdeen Maritime Museum. Aberdeen Art Galleries and Museums. Retrieved on 2007-02-18.
  42. ^ Provost Ross' House. The Gazetteer for Scotland. Retrieved on 2007-02-18.
  43. ^ The Gordon Highlanders Museum. Army Museums Ogilby Trust. Retrieved on 2007-02-18.
  44. ^ Marischal Museum: Introduction. University of Aberdeen. Retrieved on 2007-02-18.
  45. ^ Simpson, Maureen. "We're top of Brit parade", Press and Journal, 2006-09-22. 
  46. ^ 2006 winners. Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved on 2007-02-08.
  47. ^ "Aberdeen's blooming success goes worldwide", Press and Journal, 2006-12-28. 
  48. ^ The Doric Festival
  49. ^ The Beechgrove Garden. Tern Television.
  50. ^ Northsound Radio.
  51. ^ Digital Radio Now, Station List.
  52. ^ Cove Rangers FC. Highland Football League. Retrieved on 2007-02-16.
  53. ^ Golf event to swing into Aberdeen. British Broadcasting Corporation (2006-05-08).
  54. ^ Aberdeen City Golf Homepage. Aberdeen City Council. Retrieved on 2007-02-16.
  55. ^ City of Aberdeen Swim Team. Retrieved on 2007-02-08.
  56. ^ It's a fact: 50 things you may not have known about Aberdeen. Aberdeen Official Guide. Retrieved on 2007-02-15.
  57. ^ Lib Dems and SNP in Aberdeen deal, BBC News, May 14 2007
  58. ^ Aberdeen City Councillors. Aberdeen City Council. Retrieved on 2007-02-08.
  59. ^ a b c d e f Twinning. Aberdeen City Council. Retrieved on 2007-02-08.

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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Aberdeen was founded in 1495, in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Brown, Chris (2002). The Battle of Aberdeen 1644. Tempus Publishing. 
  • Carter, Jennifer (1994). Crown and Gown: Illustrated History of the University of Aberdeen, 1495-1995. Aberdeen University Press. ISBN 1857522400. 
  • Fraser, W. Hamish (2000). Aberdeen, 1800 to 2000: A New History. Tuckwell Press. ISBN 1862321752. 
  • Keith,, Alexander (1987). A Thousand Years of Aberdeen. Aberdeen University Press. ISBN 0900015292. 

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Aberdeen
  • Aberdeen City Council
  • Aberdeen travel guide from Wikitravel
  • Map sources for Aberdeen
  • Aberdeen Facts
  • Guide to Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire
  • A brief history of Aberdeen
  • Undiscovered Scotland Aberdeen History

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