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Encyclopedia > Abdominal pain
Name of Symptom/Sign:
Abdominal pain
ICD-10 R10
ICD-9 789.0

Abdominal pain can be one of the symptoms associated with transient disorders or serious disease. Making a definitive diagnosis of the cause of a person's abdominal pain can be quite difficult, because so many diseases can result in this symptom. The term symptom (from the Greek syn = con/plus and pipto = fall, together meaning co-exist) has two similar meanings in the context of physical and mental health: Strictly, a symptom is a sensation or change in health function experienced by a patient. ... In medicine, a sign is a feature of disease as detected by the doctor during physical examination of a patient. ... The following codes are used with International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. ... The following is a list of codes for International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. ... The term symptom (from the Greek syn = con/plus and pipto = fall, together meaning co-exist) has two similar meanings in the context of physical and mental health: Strictly, a symptom is a sensation or change in health function experienced by a patient. ...

Contents


Introduction

Abdominal pain is traditionally described by its chronicity (acute or chronic), its progression over time, its nature (sharp, dull, colicky), its distribution (by various methods, such as abdominal quadrant (left upper quadrant, left lower quadrant, right upper quadrant, right lower quadrant) or other methods that divide the abdomen into nine sections), and by characterization of the factors that make it worse, or alleviate it. Colic may refer to: Baby colic – a condition, usually in infants, characterized by incessant crying. ...


Approaches

Due to the many organ systems in the abdomen, abdominal pain is a concern of general practitioners/family physicians, surgeons, internists, emergency medicine doctors, pediatricians, gastroenterologists, urologists and gynecologists. Occasionally, patients with rare causes can see a number of specialists before being diagnosed adequately (e.g., chronic functional abdominal pain). The abdomen is a part of the body. ... A general practitioner (GP) or family physician (FP) is a physician/medical doctor who provides primary care. ... A general practitioner (GP) or family physician (FP) is a physician who provides primary care. ... A thoracic surgeon performs a mitral valve replacement at the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center, November 1990. ... Internal medicine is concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of internal diseases, that is, those that affect internal organs or the body as a whole. ... Emergency medicine is a branch of medicine that is practiced in a hospital emergency department, in the field (in a modified form; see EMS), and other locations where initial medical treatment of illness takes place. ... Pediatric polysomnography patient Childrens Hospital (Saint Louis), 2006 Pediatrics (also spelled paediatrics) is the branch of medicine that deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents (from newborn to age 18 or 19). ... Gastroenterology or gastrology is the medical specialty concerned with the field of digestive diseases. ... Urology is the field of medicine that focuses on the urinary tracts of males and females, and on the reproductive system of males. ... The shamefulness associated with the examination of female genitalia has long inhibited the science of gynaecology. ... Chronic functional abdominal pain (CFAP) is the ongoing presence of abdominal pain for which there is no physical explanation. ...


Types and mechanisms

  1. The pain associated with inflammation of the parietal peritoneum is steady and aching, and worsened by changes in the tension of peritoneum caused by pressure or positional change. It is often accompanied by tension of the abdominal muscles contracting to relieve such tension.
  2. The pain associated with obstruction of the hollow viscera is often intermittent or "colicky"
  3. The pain associated with abdominal vascular disturbances (thrombosis or embolism) can be sudden or gradual in onset, and can be severe or mild. Pain associated with the rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm may radiate to the back, flank, or genitals.
  4. Pain that is felt in the abdomen may be "referred" from elsewhere (e.g., a disease process in the chest, like a subdiaphragmatic abscess, may cause pain in the abdomen), and abdominal processes can cause radiated pain elsewhere (e.g., gall bladder pain—in cholecystitis or cholelithiasis—is often referred to the shoulder).

This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... In higher vertebrates, the peritoneum is the serous membrane that forms the lining of the abdominal cavity - it covers most of the intra-abdominal organs. ... In anatomy, the viscera are the internal organs of an animal, in particular the internal organs of the head, thorax and abdomen. ... Colic may refer to: Baby colic – a condition, usually in infants, characterized by incessant crying. ... Thrombosis is the formation of a clot or thrombus inside a blood vessel, obstructing the flow of blood through the circulatory system. ... In medicine, an embolism occurs when an object (the embolus, plural emboli) migrates from one part of the body (through circulation) and cause(s) a blockage (occlusion) of a blood vessel in another part of the body. ... This article is in need of attention. ... The gallbladder (or cholecyst) is a pear-shaped organ that stores bile (or gall) until the body needs it for digestion. ... Cholecystitis is inflammation of the gallbladder. ... In medicine, gallstones are crystalline bodies formed within the body by accretion or concretion of normal or abnormal bile components. ... The human upper arm Grays Fig. ...

Selected causes

This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Inflammation is the first response of the immune system to infection or irritation and may be referred to as the innate cascade. ... An infection is the detrimental colonization of a host organism by a foreign species. ... Grays Fig. ... Appendicitis, or epityphlitis, is a condition characterised by inflammation of the appendix. ... Pelvic inflammatory disease (or disorder) (PID) is a generic term for infection of the female uterus, fallopian tubes, and/or ovaries. ... Peptic ulcer is a non-malignant ulcer of the stomach (called gastric ulcer) or duodenum (called duodenal ulcer). ... Peptic ulcer is usually a non-malignant ulcer of the stomach (called gastric ulcer) or duodenum (called duodenal ulcer). ... Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. ... Mittelschmerz (German: middle pain) is a medical term for ovulation pain. Some women have mittelschmerz regularly and can time their ovulation by it, but many never experience it. ... Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a hereditary inflammatory disorder that affects groups of patients originating from around the Mediterranean Sea (hence its name). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Diverticulitis is a common disease of the bowel, in particular the large intestine. ... Gastroenteritis, or inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, is an illness of fever, diarrhea and vomiting caused by an infectious virus, bacterium or parasite. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Coeliac disease (also termed non-tropical sprue, celiac disease and gluten intolerance) is an autoimmune disease characterised by chronic inflammation of the proximal portion of the small intestine caused by exposure to certain dietary gluten proteins. ... Autoimmune diseases arise from an overactive immune response of the body against substances and tissues normally present in the body. ... In medicine, vasculitis (plural: vasculitides) is a group of diseases featuring inflammation of the wall of blood vessels. ... Diagram showing the small intestine In biology the small intestine is the part of the gastrointestinal tract between the stomach and the large intestine (colon). ... In anatomy of the digestive system, the colon is the part of the intestine from the cecum to the rectum. ... An intussusception is a situation in which a part of the intestine has prolapsed into another section of intestine, similar to the way in which the parts of a collapsible telescope slide into one another. ... A bile duct is any of a number of long tube-like structures that carry bile. ... In medicine, gallstones (choleliths) are crystalline bodies formed within the body by accretion or concretion of normal or abnormal bile components. ... Transverse section of ureter. ... Kidney stones are solid accretions (crystals) of dissolved minerals in urine found inside the kidneys or ureters. ... Vascular is an adjective for the word vessel and refers to tube-like structures. ... In medicine, ischemia (Greek ισχαιμία, isch- is restriction, hema or haema is blood) is a restriction in blood supply, generally due to factors in the blood vessels, with resultant damage or dysfunction of tissue. ... In medicine, an embolism occurs when an object (the embolus, plural emboli) migrates from one part of the body (through circulation) and cause(s) a blockage (occlusion) of a blood vessel in another part of the body. ... Thrombosis is the formation of a clot or thrombus inside a blood vessel, obstructing the flow of blood through the circulatory system. ... A volvulus is a loop of the bowel whose nose has twisted on itself. ... Sickle-shaped red blood cells Sickle cell anemia (American English), sickle cell anaemia (British English) or sickle cell disease is a genetic disease in which red blood cells may change shape under certain circumstances. ... In medicine, the nutcracker syndrome, also known as nutcracker phenomenon, renal vein entrapment syndrome and mesoaortic compression of the left renal vein, is compression of the left renal vein between the abdominal aorta (AA) and superior mesenteric artery (SMA). ... The abdomen (from the Latin word meaning belly) is the part of the body between the pelvis and the thorax. ... Diverticulosis, otherwise known as diverticular disease, is the condition of having diverticula in the large colon which are outpocketings of the colonic mucosa and submucosa through weaknesses of muscle layers in the colon wall. ... The liver is an organ in vertebrates including humans. ... The renal capsule is a tough fibrous layer surrounding the kidney and covered in a thick layer of perinephric adipose tissue. ... Referred pain is an unpleasant sensation localised to an area separate from the site of the causative injury or other painful stimulation. ... Diagram of a tsetse fly, showing the head, thorax and abdomen The thorax is a division of an animals body that lies between the head and the abdomen. ... Pneumonia is an illness of the lungs and respiratory system in which the microscopic, alveoli (air-filled sacs) responsible for absorbing oxygen from the atmosphere become inflamed and flooded with fluid. ... A myocardial infarction occurs when an atherosclerotic plaque slowly builds up in the inner lining of a coronary artery and then suddenly ruptures, totally occluding the artery and preventing blood flow downstream. ... The vertebral column seen from the side Different regions (curvatures) of the vertebral column The vertebral column (backbone or spine) is a column of vertebrae situated in the dorsal aspect of the abdomen. ... Radicular Pain, or Radiculitis, is transferred pain radiated along the dermatome (sensory distribution) of a nerve due to pressure on the radicle (nerve root; so named for its resemblance to plant roots) at its connection to the spinal column. ... Arthritis(from Greek arthro-, joint + -itis, inflammation) is a group of conditions that affect the health of the bone joints in the body. ... A sex organ, or primary sexual characteristic, narrowly defined, is any of those parts of the body (which are not always bodily organs according to the strict definition) which are involved in sexual reproduction and constitute the reproductive system in an complex organism; namely: Male: penis (notably the glans penis... In testicular torsion the spermatic cord that provides the blood supply to a testicle is twisted, cutting off the blood supply, often causing orchalgia. ... A metabolic disorder is a medical disorder which affects the production of energy within individual human (or animal) cells. ... Lead poisoning is a medical condition, also known as saturnism, plumbism or painters colic, caused by increased blood serum lead levels. ... Species Fabricius, 1775 Chamberlin & Ivie, 1935 Walckenaer, 1837 The black widow spider (Latrodectus spp. ... Uremia is a toxic condition resulting from renal failure, when kidney function is compromised and urea, a waste product normally excreted in the urine, is retained in the blood. ... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is one consequence of severe, out-of-control diabetes mellitus (chronic high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia). ... This article is about the disease. ... Angioedema (BE: angiooedema), also known by its eponym Quinckes edema and the older term angioneurotic edema, is the rapid swelling (edema) of the skin, mucosa and submucosal tissues. ... The nervous system of an animal coordinates the activity of the muscles, monitors the organs, constructs and processes input from the senses, and initiates actions. ... Tabes dorsalis (also called locomotor ataxia) is a late form of syphilis resulting in a degeneration of the dorsal columns of the spinal cord and marked by shooting pains, emaciation, loss of muscular coordination (resulting in the wide-based unsteady gait characteristic of the disease), and disturbances of sensation and... Herpes zoster blisters on the neck and shoulder. ... Wikispecies has information related to: Borrelia Lyme disease or Lyme borreliosis is the most common vector-borne disease in the Northern Hemisphere. ...

Acute Abdomen

Definition, severe abdominal pain of recent onset , (+/- vomiting, distention, fever or shock)


General causes::

The liver is the largest internal organ of the human body. ... The spleen is a ductless, vertebrate gland that is not necessary for life but is closely associated with the circulatory system, where it functions in the destruction of old red blood cells in holding a reservoir of blood. ... The intestine is the portion of the alimentary canal extending from the stomach to the anus and, in humans and other mammals, consists of two segments, the small intestine and the large intestine. ... Human kidneys viewed from behind with spine removed The kidneys are bean-shaped excretory organs in vertebrates. ... Human male pelvis, viewed from front Human female pelvis, viewed from front The pelvis is the bony structure located at the base of the spine (properly known as the caudal end). ... Spine is a word with several meanings. ... Peptic ulcer is usually a non-malignant ulcer of the stomach (called gastric ulcer) or duodenum (called duodenal ulcer). ... In anatomy of the digestive system, the cecum or caecum is a pouch connected to the large intestine between the ileum and the colon. ... A diverticulum (plural: diverticula) is medical term for an outpouching of a hollow (or a fluid filled) structure in the body. ... Appendicitis, or epityphlitis, is a condition characterised by inflammation of the appendix. ... Gastritis is a medical term for inflammation of the lining of the stomach. ... Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. ... Female internal reproductive anatomy The Fallopian tubes, also known as oviducts and uterine tubes, are two very fine tubes leading from the ovaries of female mammals into the uterus. ... Hepatitis is a gastroenterological disease, featuring inflammation of the liver. ... Adenitis is a general term for an inflammation of a gland or lymph node. ... Diagram showing the small intestine In biology the small intestine is the part of the gastrointestinal tract between the stomach and the large intestine (colon). ... A stenosis is an abnormal narrowing in a blood vessel or other tubular organ or structure. ... Adhesions are abnormal bands of tissue that grow in the human body. ... Grays Fig. ... In medicine, carcinoma is any cancer that arises from epithelial cells. ...

See also

Health science - Medicine - Gastroenterology - edit
Diseases of the esophagus - stomach
Halitosis | Nausea | Vomiting | GERD | Achalasia | Esophageal cancer | Esophageal varices | Peptic ulcer | Abdominal pain | Stomach cancer | Functional dyspepsia | Gastroparesis
Diseases of the liver - pancreas - gallbladder - biliary tree
Hepatitis | Cirrhosis | NASH | PBC | PSC | Budd-Chiari | Hepatocellular carcinoma | Acute pancreatitis | Chronic pancreatitis | Pancreatic cancer | Gallstones | Cholecystitis
Diseases of the small intestine
Peptic ulcer | Intussusception | Malabsorption (e.g. Coeliac, lactose intolerance, fructose malabsorptionWhipple's) | Lymphoma
Diseases of the colon
Diarrhea | Appendicitis | Diverticulitis | Diverticulosis | IBD (Crohn'sUlcerative colitis) | IBS | Constipation | Colorectal cancer | Hirschsprung's | Pseudomembranous colitis

  Results from FactBites:
 
Abdominal Pain Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment by MedicineNet.com (760 words)
Abdominal pain is pain that is felt in the abdomen.
Although abdominal pain can arise from the tissues of the abdominal wall that surround the abdominal cavity (i.e., skin and abdominal wall muscles), the term abdominal pain generally is used to describe pain originating from organs within the abdominal cavity (i.e., beneath the skin and muscles).
Occasionally, pain may be felt in the abdomen even though it is arising from organs that are close to but not within the abdominal cavity, for example, the lower lungs, the kidneys, and the uterus or ovaries.
The Physician and Sportsmedicine: Assessing Acute Abdominal Pain (1984 words)
Pain arising from the embryonic hindgut (distal two-thirds of the colon), internal reproductive organs (ovaries, fallopian tubes, uterus, seminal vesicles, and prostate), and the urinary bladder presents in the hypogastrium.
Pain that is noted shortly after a normal menstrual period, is bilateral, and is accompanied by a fever and abdominal pain—but not nausea and vomiting—favors pelvic inflammatory disease.
Painful abdominal conditions frequently are reflected in the vital signs as tachycardia, tachypnea, elevated temperature, and, in conditions that involve the upper abdomen (inflammatory diseases) or the lower lobes of the lung, respiration that is rapid, shallow, painful (grunting), or splinted.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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