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Encyclopedia > Abbas Kiarostami
عباس کیارستمی
`Abbās Kiyārostamī

Abbas Kiarostami (2004)
Born: June 22, 1940 (1940-06-22) (age 66)
Tehran, Iran
Occupation: Filmmaker

Abbas Kiarostami (Persian: عباس کیارستمی `Abbās Kiyārostamī; born 22 June 1940) is an internationally acclaimed Iranian film director, screenwriter, and film producer.[1][2][3] An active filmmaker since 1970, Kiarostami has been involved in over forty films, including shorts and documentaries. Kiarostami attained critical acclaim for directing the Koker trilogy, A Taste of Cherry, and The Wind Will Carry Us. Image File history File linksMetadata Kiarostami. ... June 22 is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 192 days remaining. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Iran. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... Persian (Local names: فارسی Fârsi or پارسی Pârsi)* is an Indo-European language spoken in Iran, Afghanistan and Tajikistan as well as by minorities in Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, India, Pakistan, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Southern Russia, neighboring countries, and elsewhere. ... June 22 is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 192 days remaining. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... Screenwriters, scenarists or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... Short subject is an American film industry term that historically has referred to any film in the format of two reels, or approximately 20 minutes running time, or less. ... Documentary film is a broad category of cinematic expression united by the intent to remain factual or non-fictional. ... Koker triology refers to a series of three films directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ... Taste of Cherry (Tam e guilass) is a 1997 film by acclaimed Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami. ... The Wind Will Carry Us (Bad ma ra khahad bord) is a 1999 film by Abbas Kiarostami. ...


Kiarostami has worked extensively as a screenwriter, film editor, art director and producer and has designed credit titles and publicity material. He is also a poet, photographer, painter, illustrator, and graphic designer. A screenplay or script is a blueprint for producing a motion picture. ... Film editing is the connecting of one or more shots to form a sequence, and the subsequent connecting of sequences to form an entire movie. ... The term art director, is an overall title for a variety of similar job functions in advertising, publishing, film and television, the Internet, and video games. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... This is a list of notable photographers in the art, documentary and fashion traditions. ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... An illustrator is a graphic artist who specializes in enhancing written text by providing a visual representation that corresponds to the content of the associated text. ... Graphic design is the applied art of arranging image and text to communicate a message. ...


Kiarostami is part of a generation of filmmakers in the Iranian New Wave, a Persian cinema movement that started in the late 1960s and includes pioneering directors Forough Farrokhzad, Sohrab Shahid Saless, Bahram Beizai, and Parviz Kimiavi. The filmmakers share many common techniques including the use of poetic dialog and allegorical storytelling dealing with political and philosophical issues.[4] Abbas Kiarostami and Jafar Panahi belong to the so called New wave of Persian cinema Iranian New Wave refers to a new movement in Persian cinema. ... The cinema of Iran (or Persian cinema) is a flourishing film industry with a long history. ... Forooghs tomb is located in Darband, Shemiran, Tehran. ... Sohrab Shahid Saless (Born 1944 Ghazvin) was an Iranian filmmaker and one of the most celebrated figures in 20th century Iranian cinema. ... Bahram Beyzayi (born 26 December 1938) is an Iranian play writer and film director. ... Parviz Kimiavi (Born 1939 Tehran) is an internationally acclaimed Iranian (Persian) film director, screenwriter, editor and one of the most prominent figure of Persian cinema of the 20th century. ...


Kiarostami has a reputation for using child protagonists, for documentary style narrative films,[5] for stories that take place in rural villages, and for conversations that unfold inside cars, using stationary mounted cameras. He is also known for his use of contemporary Iranian poetry in the dialog, titles, and themes of his films. Persian literature (in Persian: ‎ ) spans two and a half millennia, though much of the pre-Islamic material has been lost. ...

Contents

Personal life

Kiarostami majored in painting and graphic design at the Tehran University College of Fine Arts
Kiarostami majored in painting and graphic design at the Tehran University College of Fine Arts

Kiarostami was born in Tehran. His first artistic experience was painting, which he continued into his late teens, winning a painting competition at the age of eighteen shortly before he left home to study at the Tehran University School of Fine Arts.[6] There he majored in painting and graphic design, and supported his degree by working as a traffic policeman. As a painter, designer, and illustrator, Kiarostami worked in advertising in the 1960s, designing posters and creating commercials. Between 1962 and 1966, he shot some 150 advertisements for Iranian television. Towards the late 1960s, he began creating credit titles for films (including Gheysar by Masoud Kimiai) and illustrating children's books.[6][7] Image File history File links UT_honarhaye_ziba. ... Image File history File links UT_honarhaye_ziba. ... The University of Tehran (دانشگاه تهران in Persian), also known as Tehran University, is the oldest and largest university of Iran. ... Fine art is a term used to refer to fields traditionally considered to be artistic. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The University of Tehran (دانشگاه تهران in Persian), also known as Tehran University, is the oldest and largest university of Iran. ... Poster from the Spanish Revolution A poster is any large piece of printed paper which hangs from a wall or other such surface. ... Qeysar (Persian: ),also written as Gheisar, Kaiser and Gheysar, is a 1969 film by acclaimed Iranian filmmaker Masoud Kimiai. ... Masoud Kimiai (Persian: ‎ ​) is a well known and award-wining Iranian director, screenwriter and producer. ...


Abbas married Parvin Amir-Gholi in 1969, and divorced in 1982. They had two sons: Ahmad was born in 1971, and Bahman in 1978. Bahman Kiarostami has himself become a director and cinematographer, and directed the documentary Journey to the Land of the Traveller in 1993, at the age of fifteen. Bahman Kiarostami (b. ... Journey to the Land of the Traveller (Persian: Safari be Diare Mosafer) is a 1993 Iranian documentary film directed by Bahman Kiarostami. ...


Kiarostami was one of the few directors who remained in Iran after the 1979 revolution, when many of his fellow Iranian filmmakers and directors fled to the west, and he believes that it was one of the most important decisions of his career. He has stated that his permanent base in Iran and his national identity have consolidated his ability as a filmmaker: 1980 Iranian stamp commemorating the Islamic Revolution Protestors take to the street in support of Ayatollah Khomeini. ...


"When you take a tree that is rooted in the ground, and transfer it from one place to another the tree will no longer bear fruit," he says. "And if it does, the fruit will not be as good as it was in its original place. This is a rule of nature. I think if I had left my country, I would be the same as the tree."[8][9]


Kiarostami frequently appears wearing dark-lensed spectacles or sunglasses. He wears them for medical reasons due to a sensitivity to light.[10]


In 2000, at the San Francisco Film Festival award ceremony, Kiarostami surprised everyone by giving away his Akira Kurosawa Prize for lifetime achievement in directing to veteran Iranian actor Behrooz Vossoughi for his many years of contribution to Iranian Cinema.[11][12] The San Francisco International Film Festival, first held in March of 1957 in San Francisco, was the first North American film festival. ... Behrooz Vossoughi (Persian: ‎ , born 1937 in Khoy, West Azarbaijan, Iran) is one of the most legendary Iranian actors of all times. ...


Film career

See also: Filmography of Abbas Kiarostami

Abbas Kiarostami The director, Abbas Kiarostami has produced a large number of films, the following attempts to be a comprehensive filmography. ...

1970s

In 1969, when the Iranian New Wave began with Dariush Mehrjui's film The Cow, Kiarostami helped to set up a filmmaking department at the Institute for Intellectual Development of Children and Young Adults (Kanun) in Tehran. Its debut production and Kiarostami's first film was the twelve-minute The Bread and Alley (1970), a neo-realistic short film about an unfortunate schoolboy's confrontation with an aggressive dog. Breaktime followed in 1972. The department went on to become one of Iran’s most famous film studios, producing not only Kiarostami's films, but acclaimed Persian films such as The Runner and Bashu, the Little Stranger.[6] Abbas Kiarostami and Jafar Panahi belong to the so called New wave of Persian cinema Iranian New Wave refers to a new movement in Persian cinema. ... Darius Mehrjui (Persian: داریوش مهرجویی , born 8 December 1939 in Tehran) is an Iranian film director, screenwriter, producer, and film editor. ... Surat al-Baqarah (the Cow) is the second, and the longest, sura of the Quran, with 286 ayat. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Bread and Alley (Persian: ,Nān o KÅ«che) is a 1970 Iranian short film directed and written by Abbas Kiarostami. ... For neorealism in international relations, see neorealism. ... Breaktime (Persian: , Zang-e TafrÄ«h) is a 1972 Iranian drama film directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ... The Runner (Davandeh) is a 1985 film by Amir Naderi, one of the major directors of Iranian cinema before and after the Iranian Revolution. ... Bashu is a 1986 Iranian drama film directed by Bahram Beizai. ...

A close-up of the boy in Kiarostami's first film The Bread and Alley (1970)

In the 1970s, as part of the Iranian cinematic renaissance, Kiarostami pursued an individualistic style of film making.[13] When discussing his first film, he stated: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Bread and Alley (Persian: ,Nān o Kūche) is a 1970 Iranian short film directed and written by Abbas Kiarostami. ... Individualism is a term used to describe a moral, political, or social outlook that stresses human independence and the importance of individual self-reliance and liberty. ...

"Bread and Alley was my first experience in cinema and I must say a very difficult one. I had to work with a very young child, a dog, and an unprofessional crew except for the cinematographer, who was nagging and complaining all the time. Well, the cinematographer, in a sense, was right because I did not follow the conventions of film making that he had become accustomed to."[14]

Abbas Kiarostami and Bernardo Bertolucci on the poster of "Exhibition of the Persian Maestro's Art work" held in Rome.
Abbas Kiarostami and Bernardo Bertolucci on the poster of "Exhibition of the Persian Maestro's Art work" held in Rome.

Following The Experience (1973), Kiarostami released The Traveller (Mossafer) in 1974. The Traveller tells the story of Hassan Darabi, a troublesome, amoral ten-year-old boy in a small Iranian town. He wishes to see the Iran national football team play an important match in Tehran. In order to achieve that, he scams his friends and neighbors. After a number of adventures, he finally reaches Tehran stadium at the time of the match. The film addresses the boy's determination in his goal, and his indifference to the effects of his actions on other people, particularly those that are closest to him. The film is an examination of human behavior and the balance of right and wrong. The film furthered Kiarostami's reputation of realism, diegetic simplicity, and stylistic complexity, as well as showing a fascination with physical and spiritual journeys.[15] Image File history File linksMetadata Last_Tango_in_Rhome. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Last_Tango_in_Rhome. ... Bernardo Bertolucci. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... The Experience (Persian: , Tajrebe) is a 1973 Iranian short feature film directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ... The Traveller (Persian: , Mosāfer) is a 1974 Iranian drama film directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ... First international Afghanistan 0 - 0 Iran (Kabul, Afghanistan; January 1, 1941) Biggest win Iran 19 - 0 Guam (Tabriz, Iran; November 24, 2000) Biggest defeat Turkey 6 - 1 Iran (Istanbul, Turkey; May 28, 1950) South Korea 5 - 0 Iran (Tokyo, Japan; May 28, 1958) World Cup Appearances 3 (First in 1978... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Realism in the theatre was a general movement in the later 19th century that steered theatrical texts and performances toward greater fidelity to real life. ... In diegesis the author tells the story. ...


In 1975, Kiarostami directed the short films So Can I and Two Solutions for One Problem. In early 1976, he released Colors, followed by the fifty-four-minute film A Wedding Suit, a story about three teenagers coming into conflict over a suit for a wedding.[16][17] Kiarostami's first feature film was the 112-minute Report (1977). It revolved around the life of a tax collector accused of accepting bribes; suicide was among its themes. In 1979, he produced and directed First Case, Second Case. So Can I (Persian: Man ham Mitoumam) is a 1975 Iranian short film directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ... Two Solutions for One Problem (Persian: Dow Rahehal Baraye yek Massaleh) is a 1975 Iranian short film directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ... The Colours (Persian: Rang-ha) is a 1976 Iranian short film directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ... A Wedding Suit (Persian: , Lebāsī Barā-ye Arūsī) is a 1976 Iranian film directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ... A reel of film, which predates digital cinematography. ... The Report (Persian: , Gozāresh) is a 1977 Iranian drama film directed by Abbas Kiarostami and starring Academy Award-nominated actress Shohreh Aghdashloo. ... A tax collector is a person who collects unpaid taxes from other people or corporations. ... It has been suggested that Suicide method be merged into this article or section. ... First Case, Second Case (Persian: Ghazieh-e Shekl-e Aval, Ghazieh-e Shekl-e Dou Wom) is a 1979 Iranian film directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ...


1980s

In the early 1980s Kiarostami directed several short films including Dental Hygiene (1980), Orderly or Disorderly (1981), and The Chorus (1982). In 1983, he directed Fellow Citizen, but it was not until 1987 that Abbas began to gain recognition outside of Iran with the release of Where Is the Friend's Home?. Short subject is an American film industry term that historically has referred to any film in the format of two reels, or approximately 20 minutes running time, or less. ... Oral hygiene is keeping the mouth clean. ... Orderly or Disorderly (Persian: Be Tartib Ya Bedun-e Tartib) is a 1981 Iranian short film directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ... The Chorus (Persian: Hamsarayan) is a 1982 Iranian short film directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ... Fellow Citizen (Persian: Hamshahri) is a 1983 Iranian documentary film directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ... Where Is the Friends Home? (Khane-ye doust kodjast?) (aka Where Is My Friends House?) is a 1987 Iranian film directed and written by Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami. ...

Where Is the Friend's Home? 1987
Where Is the Friend's Home? 1987

Where Is the Friend's Home? tells a deceptively simple account of a conscientious eight-year-old schoolboy's quest to return his friend's notebook in a neighboring village. If the friend fails to hand it in the next day, he may be expelled. The traditional beliefs of Iranian rural people were depicted throughout the movie. The film has been noted for its poetic use of the Iranian rural landscape and its earnest realism, both important elements of Kiarostami's work. Kiarostami also made the film from a child's point of view, without the condescending tone common to many films about children.[18][19] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China An artists rendering of an aerial view of the Maryland countryside: Jane Frank (Jane Schenthal Frank, 1918-1986), Aerial Series: Ploughed Fields, Maryland, 1974, acrylic and mixed materials on apertured double canvas, 52...


Where Is the Friend's Home? and the following films And Life Goes On (1992) (also known as Life and Nothing More), and Through the Olive Trees (1994) are described by critics as the Koker trilogy, because all three films feature the village of Koker in northern Iran. The films are based around the 1990 earthquake disaster in which 50,000 people lost their lives, and Kiarostami uses the themes of life, death, change, and continuity to connect the films. The trilogy went on to be become successful in France in the 1990s and other countries such as the Netherlands, Sweden, Germany and Finland.[20] However, Kiarostami himself does not consider the films a trilogy, suggesting instead that the last two titles plus Taste of Cherry (1997) comprise a trilogy, given their common theme — the preciousness of life.[21] In 1987, Kiarostami was involved in the screenwriting of The Key, which he edited but did not direct. In 1989, he released Homework. Life, and Nothing More. ... Through the Olive Trees (Zire darakhatan zeyton) is a 1994 film directed and written by Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami, set in earthquake-ravaged Northern Iran. ... Koker triology refers to a series of three films directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ... Koker is a village in northern Iran. ... The Iran Earthquake of June 1990 caused widespread damage in areas within a one hundred kilometer radius of the epicenter near the City of Rasht and about two hundred kilometers northwest of Tehran. ... Taste of Cherry (Persian: طعم گيلاس Tam-e gilass) is a 1997 film by acclaimed Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami. ... The Key by Marianne Curley is the third and last book in the Guardians of Time Trilogy Cover // Narration As with all of the Guardians of Time books, the prologue is writting in third person, while all the chapters are written in first person switching points of view between two... Homework (Persian: Mashgh-e Shab) is a 1989 Iranian film directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ...


1990s

In 1990 Abbas directed Close-Up, a film in which documentary and fiction constantly change places to challenge the conventions of cinema.

In 1990 Kiarostami directed Close-Up, which tells the story of the real-life trial of a man who impersonated film-maker Mohsen Makhmalbaf, conning a family into believing they would star in his new film. The family suspects theft as the motive for this charade, but the impersonator, Hossein Sabzian, argues that his motives were more complex. The part documentary, part staged film examines Sabzian's moral justification for usurping Makhmalbaf's identity, questioning his ability to sense his cultural and artistic flair.[22][23] Close-Up received praise from directors such as Quentin Tarantino, Martin Scorsese, Werner Herzog, Jean-Luc Godard, and Nanni Moretti.[24] and was released across Europe.[25] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Close up (1990), directed by Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami, is based on real events, which are recreated by actors playing themselves. ... Close up (1990), directed by Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami, is based on real events, which are recreated by actors playing themselves. ... Mohsen Makhmalbaf Mohsen Makhmalbaf (in Persian:محسن مخملباف; born May 29, 1957) is a film director and writer from Iran (Persia), whose films during the last ten years were presented in international film festivals more than 1,000 times. ... Hossein Sabzian is an Iranian actor, mostly known for his role in Abbas Kiarostamis Close-Up. ... Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is an American film director, actor, and Academy Award-winning screenwriter. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (born November 17, 1942) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA, and Directors Guild of America award winner and critically acclaimed American film director. ... Werner Herzog passionately singing a traditional Croatian ode of love to beautiful Serbian girls who he wants to take to Germany to have German babies with. ... Jean-Luc Godard (photograph by David Horvitz) Jean-Luc Godard (born 3 December 1930 in Paris) is a French filmmaker and one of the most influential members of the Nouvelle Vague, or French New Wave. Born in Paris to Franco-Swiss parents, he was educated in Nyon, later studying at... Giovanni (Nanni) Moretti (born August 19, 1953) is an Italian film director. ...


In 1992, Kiarostami directed Life, and Nothing More..., regarded by critics as the second film of the Koker trilogy. The film follows a father and his young son as they drive from Tehran to Koker in search of the two young boys who starred in the 1987 film Where is the Friend's Home?, fearing that the boys might have lost their lives in the 1990 earthquake. As they travel through the devastated landscape, they meet earthquake survivors forced to carry on with their lives amid tragedy.[26][27][28] That year Kiarostami won a Prix Roberto Rossellini, the first professional film award of his career, for his direction of the film. The last film of the so-called Koker trilogy was Through the Olive Trees (1994), which turns a peripheral scene from Life and Nothing More into the central drama.[29] Life, and Nothing More. ... Koker triology refers to a series of three films directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Roberto Rossellini (May 8, 1906 - June 3, 1977), was an Italian film director. ... Through the Olive Trees (Zire darakhatan zeyton) is a 1994 film directed and written by Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami, set in earthquake-ravaged Northern Iran. ...

Through the Olive Trees (1994), was the third and final film in the Koker trilogy.

Critics such as Adrian Martin have called the style of filmmaking in the Koker trilogy as "diagrammatical", linking the zig-zagging patterns in the landscape and the geometry of forces of life and the world.[30][31] A flashback of the zigzag path in Life and Nothing More... (1992) in turn triggers the spectator’s memory of the previous film, Where Is the Friend’s Home? back in 1987, shot before the earthquake. This in turn symbolically links to post-earthquake reconstruction in Through the Olive Trees in 1994. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 452 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 795 pixel, file size: 126 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) found at http://www. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 452 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 795 pixel, file size: 126 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) found at http://www. ... Through the Olive Trees (Zire darakhatan zeyton) is a 1994 film directed and written by Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami, set in earthquake-ravaged Northern Iran. ... Dr. Adrian Martin is an Australian film critic from Melbourne. ...


Kiarostami next wrote the screenplays for The Journey and The White Balloon (1995), for his former assistant Jafar Panahi.[6] Between 1995 and 1996, he was involved in the production of Lumière and Company, a collaboration with 40 other film directors. The Journey (Persian: Safar) is a 1995 Iranian film directed by Ali-Reza Raisian, written by Abbas Kiarostami. ... The White Balloon (Persian: ‎ , Badkonake sefid, 1995) is the debut feature film of Iranian director, Jafar Panahi, with a screenplay by Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami . ... Jafar Panahi (born July 11, 1960 in Mianeh, Iran) is an internationally-acclaimed independent filmmaker. ... Lumière and Company (1996) was a collaboration between several film directors in which each made a short film using the original Lumière brothers camera. ...


In 1997, Kiarostami won the Palme d'Or (Golden Palm) award at the Cannes Film Festival for Taste of Cherry, the tale of a desperate man, Mr. Badii, bent on committing suicide. The film involves themes such as morality, the legitimacy of the act of suicide, and the meaning of compassion.[32] Palme dOr The Palme dOr (Golden Palm) is the highest prize given to a film at the Cannes Film Festival. ... Cannes Film Festival logo. ... Taste of Cherry (Persian: طعم گيلاس Tam-e gilass) is a 1997 film by acclaimed Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


Kiarostami next directed The Wind Will Carry Us (1999), which won the Grand Jury Prize (Silver Lion) at the Venice International Film Festival. The film contrasted rural and urban views on the dignity of labor, addressing themes of female equality and the benefits of progress, by means of a stranger's sojourn in a remote Kurdish village.[20] Many of the characters are heard but not seen, and there are some thirteen or fourteen characters in the film who remain invisible throughout.[33] The Wind Will Carry Us (Bad ma ra khahad bord) is a 1999 film by Abbas Kiarostami. ... The Venice Film Festival (Mostra Internazionale dArte Cinematografica) takes place every year in late August/early September on the Lido di Venezia in the historic Palazzo del Cinema on the Lungomare Marconi, in Venice, Italy. ... Kurdish may refer to: The Kurdish people The Kurdish language This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


2000s

In 2002, Kiarostami directed Ten, revealing an unusual method of filmmaking and abandoning many scriptwriting conventions.[33] Kiarostami focuses on the socio-political landscape of Iran, and the images are seen through the eyes of one woman as she drives through the streets of Tehran over a period of several days. Her journey is composed of ten conversations with various passengers, including her sister, a hitchhiking prostitute and a jilted bride, as well as her demanding young son. This style of filmmaking was praised by a number of professional film critics such as A. O. Scott in The New York Times, who wrote that Kiarostami, "in addition to being perhaps the most internationally admired Iranian filmmaker of the past decade, is also among the world masters of automotive cinema...He understands the automobile as a place of reflection, observation and, above all, talk."[34] Ten (Persian: Dah) is a 2002 Iranian film directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... A.O. Scott is a film critic for The New York Times newspaper. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ...

A film poster for ABC Africa, a UN commissioned documentary about programmes assisting orphans in Uganda.
A film poster for ABC Africa, a UN commissioned documentary about programmes assisting orphans in Uganda.

In 2001, Kiarostami and his assistant, Seifollah Samadian, traveled to Kampala, Uganda at the request of the United Nations International Fund for Agricultural Development, to film a documentary about programs assisting Ugandan orphans. He stayed for ten days and made ABC Africa. The trip was originally intended as research in preparation for the actual filming, but Kiarostami ended up editing the entire film from the video footage obtained.[35] Although Uganda's orphans are overwhelmingly the result of the AIDS epidemic, Time Out editor and National Film Theatre chief programmer Geoff Andrew stated about Kiarostami's film: "Like his previous four features, this film is not about death but life-and-death: how they're linked, and what attitude we might adopt with regard to their symbiotic inevitability."[36] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... ABC Africa is a 2001 Iranian documentary feature film directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ... This article is about the United Nations, for other uses of UN see UN (disambiguation) Official languages English, French, Spanish, Russian, Chinese, Arabic Secretary-General Kofi Annan (since 1997) Established October 24, 1945 Member states 191 Headquarters New York City, NY, USA Official site http://www. ... Kampala is the capital city of Uganda. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... The International Fund for Agricultural Development is an agency of the United Nations. ... ABC Africa is a 2001 Iranian documentary feature film directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ... AIDS education at a school in Uganda. ... Time-out can mean: sport time-out, a break in play that may be called by a side to formulate strategy or respond to an players injury. ... The used book sale in front of the National Film Theatre The National Film Theatre is located on the South Bank of the river Thames in London. ...


In 2003, Kiarostami directed Five, a poetic feature with no dialog or characterization. It consists of five long shots of nature which are single-take sequences, shot with a hand-held DV camera, along the shores of the Caspian Sea. Although the film lacks a clear storyline, Geoff Andrew argues that the film is "more than just pretty pictures": "Assembled in order, they comprise a kind of abstract or emotional narrative arc, which moves evocatively from separation and solitude to community, from motion to rest, near-silence to sound and song, light to darkness and back to light again, ending on a note of rebirth and regeneration."[37] He further notes the degree of artifice concealed behind the apparent simplicity of the imagery. Five Dedicated to Ozu (Persian: Panj) is a 2003 Iranian documentary film directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ... A MiniDV tape For other uses, see DV (disambiguation). ... The Caspian Sea (Russian: Каспийское море; Kazakh: Каспий теңізі; Turkmen: Hazar deňizi; Azeri: XÉ™zÉ™r dÉ™nizi; Persian: دریای خزر Daryā-ye Khazar) is the largest lake on Earth by area[2], with a surface area of 371,000 square kilometers (143,244 sq mi) and a volume of 78,200 cubic kilometers (18...


In 2004, Kiarostami produced 10 on Ten, a journal documentary that shares ten lessons on movie-making while driving through the locations of his past films. The movie is shot on digital video with a stationary camera mounted inside the car, in a manner reminiscent of Taste of Cherry and Ten. 10 on Ten is a 2004 Iranian documentary film directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ...


In 2005 and 2006, he directed The Roads of Kiarostami, a 32-minute documentary that reflects on the power of landscape, combining austere black-and-white photographs with poetic observations, engaging music with political subject matter. Roads of Kiarostami is a 2006 Iranian documentary film directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ...


Kiarostami's most recent film was Tickets, directed in collaboration with Ken Loach and Ermanno Olmi. It covers the interactions between people on public transport and in the street of everyday life. Tickets is a 2005 Iranian comedy-drama film directed by Abbas Kiarostami, Ken Loach and Ermanno Olmi. ... Ken Loach Kenneth Loach (born June 17, 1936), known as Ken Loach, is an English television and film director, known for his naturalistic style and socialist themes. ... Ermanno Olmi (born July 24, 1931) is a noted Italian director. ... Skytrain Bangkok. ...


Cinematic style

Kiarostami in 10 on Ten, looking back on his film-making techniques Abbas Kiarostami is known for his characteristic use of techniques and themes that are instantly recognizable in his films, from the use of child protagonists, to stories that take place in rural villages, to conversations that unfold inside...

Individualism

A poster of Kiarostami's Palme d'Or winning film, Taste of Cherry.
A poster of Kiarostami's Palme d'Or winning film, Taste of Cherry.

Though Kiarostami has been compared to Satyajit Ray, Vittorio de Sica, Eric Rohmer, and Jacques Tati, his films exhibit a singular style, often employing techniques of his own invention.[6] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Palme dOr The Palme dOr (Golden Palm) is the highest prize given to a film at the Cannes Film Festival. ... Taste of Cherry (Persian: طعم گيلاس Tam-e gilass) is a 1997 film by acclaimed Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami. ...   (Bengali: সত্যজিত্ রায় Shottojit Rae) (May 2, 1921–April 23, 1992) was an Indian filmmaker who is widely regarded as one of the greatest auteurs of 20th century cinema. ... Vittorio De Sica (July 7, 1901 - November 13, 1974) was an Italian neorealist director and actor. ... Eric Rohmer (born Jean-Marie Maurice Scherer, April 4, 1920, Nancy, France) is a French film director. ... Jacques Tati as Monsieur Hulot. ...


During the filming of The Bread and Alley in 1970, Kiarostami disagreed with his experienced cinematographer about how to film the boy and the attacking dog. Whereas the cinematographer wanted separate shots of the boy approaching, a close up of his hand as he enters the house and closes the door, followed by a shot of the dog, Kiarostami believed that if the three scenes could be captured as a whole it would have a more profound impact in creating tension over the situation. That one shot took some forty days days to complete, until Kiarostami was fully content with the scene. Abbas later commented that the breaking of scenes can disrupt the rhythm and content of the film's structure, preferring to let the scene flow as one.[14] A Cameraman-Reporter during a MINUSTAH mission in 2007 (Photo: Patrick-André Perron A cinematographer is one photographing with a motion picture camera (the art and science of which is known as cinematography). ... For the popular Tamil film, see Rhythm (film) Rhythm (Greek = flow, or in Modern Greek, style) is the variation of the length and accentuation of a series of sounds or other events. ...


Unlike other directors, Kiarostami has showed no interest in staging extravagant combat scenes or complicated chase scenes in large-scale productions, but instead attempted to mold the medium of film to his own specifications.[38] Kiarostami appeared to have settled on his style with the Koker trilogy which included a myriad of references to his own film material, connecting common themes and subject matter between each of the films. Stephen Bransford has contended that Kiarostami's films do not contain references to the work of other directors, but are fashioned in such a manner that they are self-referenced. Bransford believes his films are often fashioned into an ongoing dialectic: one film reflecting on and partially demystifying an earlier film.[29] “Fights” redirects here. ... Koker triology refers to a series of three films directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ...

The dashboard camera used to film the daily routines of a woman in Ten without the personal presence of the director
The dashboard camera used to film the daily routines of a woman in Ten without the personal presence of the director

Nevertheless, he continued experimenting with new modes of filming, using different directorial methods and techniques. Much of Ten, for example, was filmed in a moving automobile in which Kiarostami was not present. He gave suggestions to the actors about what to do, and a camera placed on the dashboard then filmed them while they drove around Tehran.[14][39] The camera was allowed to roll, capturing the faces of the people involved during their daily routine, using a series of extreme-close shots. Ten was an experiment that used digital cameras to virtually eliminate the director. This new direction is towards a Digital-Micro-Cinema, defined as a micro-budget filmmaking practice allied with a digital production basis.[40] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A dashboard from a 1940s car The dashboard of a modern car, a Bentley Continental GT A Hayabusas dash A modern Formula 1 car has all its gauges mounted on the steering wheel A dashboard or dash board in an automobile is a panel located under the windscreen and... Ten (Persian: Dah) is a 2002 Iranian film directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ... A dashboard from a 1940s car The dashboard of a modern car, a Bentley Continental GT A Hayabusas dash A modern Formula 1 car has all its gauges mounted on the steering wheel A dashboard or dash board in an automobile is a panel located under the windscreen and... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... Kiarostami in 10 on Ten, looking back on his film-making techniques Abbas Kiarostami is known for his characteristic use of techniques and themes that are instantly recognizable in his films, from the use of child protagonists, to stories that take place in rural villages, to conversations that unfold inside...

Kiarostami in 10 on Ten, looking back on his film-making techniques
Kiarostami in 10 on Ten, looking back on his film-making techniques

Kiarostami's cinema offers a different definition of film. According to film professors such as Jamsheed Akrami of William Paterson University, Kiarostami has consistently attempted to redefine film by lowering its full definition and forcing the audience's increased involvement. In recent years, he has also progressively trimmed down the size of his films, which Akrami believes reduces the filmmaking experience from a collective endeavor to a purer, more basic form of artistic expression.[38] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... 10 on Ten is a 2004 Iranian documentary film directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ... William Paterson University is a public university located in Wayne, New Jersey, an affluent suburb of New York City. ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ...


Fiction and non-fiction

Kiarostami's films contain a notable degree of ambiguity, an unusual mixture of simplicity and complexity, and often mix fiction and documentary elements. Kiarostami has said, "We can never get close to the truth except through lying."[6][41]


The boundary between fiction and non-fiction is significantly reduced in Kiarostami's cinema.[42] The French philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy, writing about Kiarostami, and in particular Life and Nothing More..., has argued that his films are neither quite fiction nor quite documentary. Life and Nothing More..., he argues, is neither representation nor reportage, but rather "evidence": Jean-Luc Nancy. ...

[I]t all looks like reporting, but everything underscores (indique à l'évidence) that it is the fiction of a documentary (in fact, Kiarostami shot the film several months after the earthquake), and that it is rather a document about "fiction": not in the sense of imagining the unreal, but in the very specific and precise sense of the technique, of the art of constructing images. For the image by means of which, each time, each opens a world and precedes himself in it (s'y précède) is not pregiven (donnée toute faite) (as are those of dreams, phantasms or bad films): it is to be invented, cut and edited. Thus it is evidence, insofar as, if one day I happen to look at my street on which I walk up and down ten times a day, I construct for an instant a new evidence of my street.[43]

For Jean-Luc Nancy, this notion of cinema as "evidence," rather than as documentary or imagination, is tied to the way Kiarostami deals with life-and-death (cf. the remark by Geoff Andrew on ABC Africa, cited above, to the effect that Kiarostami's films are not about death but about life-and-death):

Existence resists the indifference of life-and-death, it lives beyond mechanical "life," it is always its own mourning, and its own joy. It becomes figure, image. It does not become alienated in images, but it is presented there: the images are the evidence of its existence, the objectivity of its assertion. This thought—which, for me, is the very thought of this film [Life and Nothing More...]—is a difficult thought, perhaps the most difficult. It's a slow thought, always under way, fraying a path so that the path itself becomes thought. It is that which frays images so that images become this thought, so that they become the evidence of this thought—and not in order to "represent" it.[44]

In other words, wanting to accomplish more than just represent life and death as opposing forces, but rather to illustrate the way in which each element of nature is inextricably linked, Kiarostami has devised a cinema that does more than just present the viewer with the documentable "facts," but neither is it simply a matter of artifice. Because "existence" means more than simply life, it is projective, containing an irreducibly fictive element, but in this "being more than" life, it is therefore contaminated by mortality. Nancy is giving a clue, in other words, toward the interpretation of Kiarostami's statement that lying is the only way to truth.[45][46]


Themes of life and death

The devastation caused by the 1990 Iran earthquake

Themes of life and death and the concepts of change and continuity play a major role in Kiarostami's works. In the Koker trilogy these themes play a central role. As illustrated in the aftermath of the 1990 Tehran earthquake disaster, they represent an ongoing opposition between life force and death and the power of human resilience to overcome and defy destruction. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Iran Earthquake of June 1990 caused widespread damage in areas within a one hundred kilometer radius of the epicenter near the City of Rasht and about two hundred kilometers northwest of Tehran. ... Look up Change in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In fiction, continuity is consistency of the characteristics of persons, objects, places and events seen by the reader or viewer. ... Koker triology refers to a series of three films directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ...


However, unlike the Koker films, which convey an instinctual thirst for survival, Taste of Cherry also explores the fragility of life and rhetorically focuses also on the preciousness of life .[21]

The dark graveyard in The Wind Will Carry Us.
The dark graveyard in The Wind Will Carry Us.

In contrast, symbols of death abound in The Wind Will Carry Us with the scenery of graveyard, the imminence of the old woman’s passing, and the ancestors that the character Farzad mentions early in the film. Such devices prompt the viewer to consider the parameters of the afterlife and immaterial existence. The viewer is asked to consider what constitutes the soul, and what happens to it after death. In discussing the film, Kiarostami has said that he is the person who raises questions, rather than the person who answers them.[47] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Wind Will Carry Us (Bad ma ra khahad bord) is a 1999 film by Abbas Kiarostami. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Graves at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York A cemetery is a place (usually an enclosed area of land) in which dead bodies are buried. ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ...


Some film critics believe that the assemblage of light versus dark scenes in Kiarostami's film grammar, such as in Taste of Cherry and Wind Will Carry Us, suggests the mutual existence of life with its endless possibilities and death as a factual moment of anyone’s life in his films.[48]

Visual and audio techniques

Kiarostami's style is notable for the use of panoramic long shots, such as in the closing sequences of Life and Nothing More and Through the Olive Trees, where the audience is intentionally distanced physically from the characters in order to stimulate reflection on their fate. Taste of Cherry is punctuated throughout by shots of this kind, including distant overhead shots of the suicidal Badii's car moving across the hills, usually while he is conversing with a passenger. However, the visual distanciation techniques stand in juxtaposition to the sound of the dialog, which always remains in the foreground. Like the coexistence of private and public space, or the frequent framing of landscapes through car windows, this fusion of distance with proximity can be seen as a way of generating suspense in the most mundane of moments.[27] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Life, and Nothing More. ... Life, and Nothing More. ... Through the Olive Trees (Zire darakhatan zeyton) is a 1994 film directed and written by Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami, set in earthquake-ravaged Northern Iran. ... Taste of Cherry (Persian: طعم گيلاس Tam-e gilass) is a 1997 film by acclaimed Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami. ...

The consistent close up of the character Badii in Taste of Cherry is later juxtaposed by a panoramic overhead view as his car moves across the hills

This relationship between distance and intimacy, between imagery and sound, is also present in the opening sequence to The Wind Will Carry Us. Michael J. Anderson has argued that such a thematic application of this central concept of presence without presence, through using such techniques, and by often referring to characters which the viewer does not see and sometimes not hear directly affects the nature and concept of space in the geographical framework in which the world is portrayed. Kiarostami's use of sound and imagery conveys a world beyond what is directly visible and/or audible, which Anderson's believes emphasizes the interconnectedness and shrinking of time and space in the modern world of telecommunications.[47] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Taste of Cherry (Persian: طعم گيلاس Tam-e gilass) is a 1997 film by acclaimed Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami. ... The Wind Will Carry Us (Bad ma ra khahad bord) is a 1999 film by Abbas Kiarostami. ... In linguistics: root word and Athematic In literature: Theme (literary) In music: Theme (music) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Look up Technique in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Physical map of the Earth (Medium) (Large 2 MB) Geography is the scientific study of the locational and spatial variation in both physical and human phenomena on Earth. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Telecommunication involves the transmission of signals over a distance for the purpose of communication. ...


Other commentators such as film critic Ben Zipper believe that Kiarostami’s work as a landscape artist is evident in his compositional distant shots of the dry hills throughout a number of his films directly impacting on his construction on the rural landscapes within his films.[48] Film criticism is the analysis and evaluation of films. ...


Poetry and imagery

Ahmad Karimi-Hakkak, of the University of Maryland, argues that one aspect of Kiarostami's cinematic style is that he is able to capture the essence of Persian poetry and create poetic imagery within the landscape of his films. In several of Kiarostami's pictures such as Where's the Friend's Home and The Wind Will Carry Us, classical Persian poetry is directly quoted in the film, highlighting the artistic link and intimate connection between them. This in turn reflects on the connection between the past and present, between continuity and change.[49] Ahmad Karimi-Hakkak is a Persian literary figure and Iranologist. ... The University of Maryland, College Park (also known as UM, UMD, or UMCP) is a public university located in the city of College Park, in Prince Georges County, Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C., in the United States. ... Persian literature is literature written in Persian, or by Persians in other languages. ... Where Is the Friends Home? (Khane-ye doust kodjast?) (aka Where Is My Friends House?) is a 1987 Iranian film directed and written by Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami. ... The Wind Will Carry Us (Bad ma ra khahad bord) is a 1999 film by Abbas Kiarostami. ...


The characters recite poems mainly from classical Persian poet Omar Khayyám or modern Persian poets such as Sohrab Sepehri and Forough Farrokhzad. One scene in The Wind Will Carry Us has a long shot of a wheat field with rippling golden crops through which the doctor, accompanied by the filmmaker, is riding his scooter in a twisting road. In response to the comment that the other world is a better place than this one, the doctor recites this poem of Khayyam:[48] Ghiyath al-Din Abul-Fath Omar ibn Ibrahim al-Nisaburi Khayyámi, (Persian: غیاث الدین ابو الفتح عمر بن ابراهیم خیام نیشابوری, born: May 31, 1048 in Nishapur, Iran (Persia) – died: December 4, 1131), was a Persian poet, mathematician, philosopher and astronomer. ... Sohrab Sepehri (Persian: ‎ transliteration: ) (October 7, 1928 - April 21, 1980) was a notable modern Iranian poet and a painter. ... Forooghs tomb is located in Darband, Shemiran, Tehran. ...

They promise of houries in heaven

But I would say wine is better


Take the present to the promises


A drum sounds melodious from apart

However, the aesthetic involved with the poetry goes much farther back in time and is used much more subtly than these examples suggest. Beyond issues of adaptation of text to film, Kiarostami often begins with an insistent will to give visual embodiment to certain specific image-making techniques in Persian poetry, both classical and modern. This prominently results in enunciating a larger philosophical position, namely the ontological oneness of poetry and film.[49] Philosophy (from the Greek words philos and sophia meaning love of wisdom) is understood in different ways historically and by different philosophers. ...


It has been argued that the creative merit of Kiarostami's adaptation of Sohrab Sepehri and Forough Farrokhzad's poems extends the domain of textual transformation. Adaptation is defined as the transformation of a prior to a new text. Sima Daad of the University of Washington contends that Kiarostami's adaptation arrives at the theoretical realm of adaptation by expanding its limit from inter-textual potential to trans-generic potential.[50] The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ...


Spirituality

Kiarostami's films often reflect upon immaterial concepts as the soul and afterlife. At times, however, the very concept of the spiritual seems to be contradicted by the medium itself, given that it has no inherent means to confer the metaphysical. Some film theorists have argued that The Wind Will Carry Us provides a template by which a filmmaker can communicate metaphysical reality. The limits of the frame, the material representation of a space in dialog with another that is not represented, physically become metaphors for the relationship between this world and those which may exist apart from it. By limiting the space of the mise en scène, Kiarostami expands the space of the art.[47] Plato and Aristotle (right), by Raphael (Stanza della Segnatura, Rome). ... Mise en scène [mizɑ̃sÉ›n] has been called film criticisms grand undefined term, but that is not because of a lack of definitions. ...


Kiarostami's "complex" sound-images and philosophical approach have caused frequent comparisons with "mystical" filmmakers such as Andrei Tarkovsky and Robert Bresson. Irrespective of substantial cultural differences, much of western writing about Kiarostami positions him as the Iranian equivalent of such directors, by virtue of universal austere, "spiritual" poetics and moral commitment.[51] Some draw parallels between certain imagery in Kiarostami's films with that of Sufi concepts.[52] Andrei Arsenyevich Tarkovsky (Андре́й Арсе́ньевич Тарко́вский) (April 4, 1932 - December 29, 1986) was a Russian film director, opera director, writer, and actor. ... Robert Bresson (September 25, 1901–December 18, 1999) was a French film director well known for his mastery of minimalist film-making. ... Sufism (Arabic تصوف taṣawwuf) is a system of esoteric philosophy commonly associated with Islam. ...


Differing viewpoints have arisen about this issue. While the vast majority of English-language writers, such as David Sterritt and Spanish film professor Alberto Elena, interpret Kiarostami's films as spiritual films, other critics including David Walsh and Hamish Ford have diminished its influence in his films.[51][52][21] David Walsh, born in New York City, New York, is a film critic and political writer for the World Socialist Web Site. ...


Poetry and photography

Kiarostami directing Five in 2004
Kiarostami directing Five in 2004

Abbas Kiarostami, along with Ridley Scott, Jean Cocteau, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Derek Jarman, and Gulzar, is part of a tradition of filmmakers whose artistic expressions are not restricted to one medium, but who show the ability to use other forms such as poetry, set designs, painting, or photography to relate their interpretation of the world we live in and to illustrate their understanding of our preoccupations and identities.[53] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Five Dedicated to Ozu (Persian: Panj) is a 2003 Iranian documentary film directed by Abbas Kiarostami. ... Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, England) is an influential Academy Award-nominated English film director and producer. ... Jean Cocteau Jean Maurice Eugène Clément Cocteau (July 5, 1889 – October 11, 1963) was a French poet, novelist, dramatist, designer, boxing manager and filmmaker. ... Pier Paolo Pasolini (March 5, 1922 - November 2, 1975) was an Italian poet, intellectual, film director, and writer. ... Derek Jarman Derek Jarman (January 31, 1942 – February 19, 1994) was an English film director, stage designer, artist, and writer. ... Sampooran Singh Gulzar (born as on August 18, 1936), famously known as Gulzar, is an Indian poet, lyricist, film-maker, director, and playwright from India. ... The Chinese poem Quatrain on Heavenly Mountain by Emperor Gaozong (Song Dynasty) Poetry (from the Greek , poiesis, making or creating) is a form of art in which language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its ostensible meaning. ... Scenic design also known as Stage design is the creation of theatrical scenery. ... For building painting, see painter and decorator. ... Photography is the process of making pictures by means of capturing light on a light-sensitive medium, such as a sensor or film. ...


Kiarostami is a noted photographer and poet. A bilingual collection of more than 200 of his poems, Walking with the Wind, was published by Harvard University Press. His photographic work includes Untitled Photographs, a collection of over thirty photographs, essentially of snow landscapes, taken in his hometown Tehran, between 1978 and 2003). He has also published a collection of his poems in 1999.[54][6] This is a list of notable photographers in the art, documentary and fashion traditions. ... The Harvard University Press is a publishing house, a division of Harvard University, that is highly respected in academic publishing. ...


Riccardo Zipoli, from the Università Ca' Foscari Venezia in Venice, has examined some aspects of the relations and interconnections between Kiarostami's poems and his films. The results of the analysis reveal how Kiarostami's treatment of this theme is similar in his poems and films.[55] The University of Venice (Università Ca Foscari Venezia) was founded on August 6, 1868 as the Scuola Superiore di Commercio, the first institution in Italy to deal with higher education in the fields of economics and commerce. ... Venice (Italian: Venezia, Venetian: Venezsia) is the capital of region Veneto, and has a population of 271,663 (census estimate January 1, 2004). ...


Kiarostami's poetry is reminiscent of the later nature poems of the Persian painter-poet, Sohrab Sepehri. On the other hand, the succinct allusion to philosophical truths without the need for deliberation, the non-judgmental tone of the poetic voice, and the structure of the poem—absence of personal pronouns, adverbs or over reliance on adjectives—as well as the lines containing a kigo (a season word) gives much of this poetry a Haikuesque characteristic.[53] Sohrab Sepehri (Persian: ‎ transliteration: ) (October 7, 1928 - April 21, 1980) was a notable modern Iranian poet and a painter. ... Philosophy (from the Greek words philos and sophia meaning love of wisdom) is understood in different ways historically and by different philosophers. ... Haiku )   is a mode of Japanese poetry, the late 19th century revision by Masaoka Shiki of the older hokku ), the opening verse of a linked verse form, haikai no renga. ...


Reception and criticism

This book was released when Kiarostami was the honored guest of the 45th Thessaloniki Film Festival in Greece where he opened an exhibition titled "The Roads of Abbas Kiarostami".
This book was released when Kiarostami was the honored guest of the 45th Thessaloniki Film Festival in Greece where he opened an exhibition titled "The Roads of Abbas Kiarostami".

Kiarostami has received worldwide acclaim for his work from both audiences and critics, and, in 1999, he was unequivocally voted the most important film director of the 1990s by two international critics' polls.[56] Four of his films placed in the top six of Cinematheque Ontario's Best of the '90s poll.[57] He has gained recognition from film theorists, critics, as well as peers such as Jean-Luc Godard, Nanni Moretti (who made a short film about opening one of Kiarostami's films in his theater in Rome), Chris Marker and Akira Kurosawa, who said of Kiarostami's films: "Words cannot describe my feelings about them ... When Satyajit Ray passed on, I was very depressed. But after seeing Kiarostami’s films, I thanked God for giving us just the right person to take his place."[6][58] Critically-acclaimed directors such as Martin Scorsese have commented that "Kiarostami represents the highest level of artistry in the cinema."[59] In 2006, The Guardian's panel of critics ranked Kiarostami as the best non-American film director.[60] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Jean-Luc Godard (photograph by David Horvitz) Jean-Luc Godard (born 3 December 1930 in Paris) is a French filmmaker and one of the most influential members of the Nouvelle Vague, or French New Wave. Born in Paris to Franco-Swiss parents, he was educated in Nyon, later studying at... Giovanni (Nanni) Moretti (born August 19, 1953) is an Italian film director. ... Chris Marker (born July 29, 1921) is a French writer, photographer, film director, multimedia artist and documentary maker. ... Akira Kurosawa , 23 March 1910—6 September 1998) was a prominent Japanese film director, film producer, and screenwriter. ...   (Bengali: সত্যজিত্ রায় Shottojit Rae) (May 2, 1921–April 23, 1992) was an Indian filmmaker who is widely regarded as one of the greatest auteurs of 20th century cinema. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (born November 17, 1942) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA, and Directors Guild of America award winner and critically acclaimed American film director. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ...

A poster from the "Kiarostami event" at The Nantes Three Continents Film Festival (2004)
A poster from the "Kiarostami event" at The Nantes Three Continents Film Festival (2004)

Nevertheless, critics such as Jonathan Rosenbaum have argued that "there's no getting around the fact that the movies of Abbas Kiarostami divide audiences—in this country, in his native Iran, and everywhere else they're shown."[27] Rosenbaum argues that disagreements and controversy over Kiarostami's pictures have arisen from his style of filmmaking because what in Hollywood would count as essential narrative information is frequently missing from Kiarostami's films. Camera placement, likewise, often defies standard audience expectations. In the closing sequences of Life and Nothing More and Through the Olive Trees, the audience is forced to imagine missing scenes. In Homework and Close-Up, parts of the sound track have been masked, or drop in and out. It has also been argued that the subtlety of Kiarostami's form of cinematic expression is resistant to critical analysis.[61] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Jonathan Rosenbaum is the main film critic for the Chicago Reader. ...


While Kiarostami has won significant acclaim in Europe for several of his films, the Iranian government has refused to permit the showing of his films in his native Iran. Kiarostami has responded, "The government has decided not to show any of my films for the past 10 years... I think they don't understand my films and so prevent them being shown just in case there is a message they don't want to get out".[59] Kiarostami has faced opposition in the United States as well. In 2002, he was refused a visa to attend the New York Film Festival in the wake of the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center.[62][63] Festival director Richard Pena, who had invited him, said: "It's a terrible sign of what's happening in my country today that no one seems to realize or care about the kind of negative signal this sends out to the entire Muslim world".[59] Finnish film director Aki Kaurismäki boycotted the festival in protest.[64] Kiarostami had been invited by the New York International Film Festival, as well as Ohio University and Harvard University.[65] Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Entry visa valid in Schengen treaty countries. ... The New York Film Festival is the one of the United Statess most prestigious film festivals, first held in 1962 in New York. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly... Richard Pena (born 1953) is an American film program director noted for his organization of the New York Film Festival. ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Aki Olavi Kaurismäki (born April 4, 1957 in Orimattila, Finland) is a Finnish script writer and film director. ... The New York Film Festival is the one of the United Statess most prestigious film festivals, first held in 1962 in New York. ... Ohio University is a public university located in Athens, Ohio that is situated on a 1,800 acre (7. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. Founded in 1636,[2] Harvard is the oldest institution of higher learning still operating in the United States. ...


In 2005, London Film School organized a festival of the Kiarostami’s work, named "Abbas Kiarostami: Visions of the Artist", as well as a workshop. Ben Gibson, Director of the London Film School, said, "Very few people have the creative and intellectual clarity to invent cinema from its most basic elements, from the ground up. We are very lucky to have the chance to see a master like Kiarostami thinking on his feet."[66] In 2007, The Museum of Modern Art and P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center co-organized a festival of the Kiarostami's work, named "Abbas Kiarostami: Image Maker".[67] Kiarostami and his cinematic style have been the subject of several books and two films, Il Giorno della prima di Close Up (1996, directed by Nanni Moretti) and Abbas Kiarostami: The Art of Living (2003, directed by Fergus Daly). The London Film School was founded in 1956. ... General Electric GE90-115B fanblade, on display at MOMA. The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is an art museum located in Midtown Manhattan in New York City. ... Founded in 1971, the P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center is one of the largest and oldest museums in the United States dedicated solely to contemporary art. ... Giovanni (Nanni) Moretti (born August 19, 1953) is an Italian film director. ...


Honors and awards

Kiarostami accepting a lifetime achievement award from Martin Scorsese in Marrakech International Film Festival.
Kiarostami accepting a lifetime achievement award from Martin Scorsese in Marrakech International Film Festival.

Kiarostami has won the admiration of audiences and critics worldwide and received some 70 awards till 2000.[68] Here are some representatives: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (born November 17, 1942) is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA, and Directors Guild of America award winner and critically acclaimed American film director. ...

Roberto Rossellini (May 8, 1906 - June 3, 1977), was an Italian film director. ... François Truffaut. ... Pier Paolo Pasolini (March 5, 1922 - November 2, 1975) was an Italian poet, intellectual, film director, and writer. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Palme dOr The Palme dOr (Golden Palm) is the highest prize given to a film at the Cannes Film Festival. ... Akira Kurosawa , 23 March 1910—6 September 1998) was a prominent Japanese film director, film producer, and screenwriter. ... The quadrangle at the main ENS building on rue dUlm is known as the Cour aux Ernests – the Ernests being the goldfish in the pond. ... Konrad Wolf (Hechingen 20 October 1925 - Berlin, 7 March 1982) was a East German film director, son of Friedrich Wolf, brother of Markus Wolf. ... Henri Langlois Henri Langlois (November 13, 1914 - January 13, 1977) was a pioneer in film preservation and restoration. ...

Film festival work

Kiarostami was a member of the jury at the 1993 Cannes Film Festival and in 2005 president of the Camera d'or Jury
Kiarostami was a member of the jury at the 1993 Cannes Film Festival and in 2005 president of the Camera d'or Jury

Kiarostami was a member of the jury at numerous festivals, most notably the Cannes Film Festival in 1993, 2002 and 2005. He was also the president of the Camera d'or Jury in Cannes Film Festival 2005. Download high resolution version (1280x960, 267 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1280x960, 267 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Cannes Film Festival logo. ... Cannes Film Festival logo. ...


Some representatives:[69][70]

The Venice Film Festival (it: Mostra Internazionale dArte Cinematografica) is the oldest Film Festival in the World (began in the 1932) and takes place every year in late August/early September on the Lido di Venezia in the historic Palazzo del Cinema on the Lungomare Marconi, in Venice, Italy. ... The Locarno International Film Festival is an international film festival held annually in Locarno, Switzerland. ... Cannes Film Festival logo. ... The San Sebastian International Film Festival was founded in 1953 in San Sebastian, Spain. ... Cannes Film Festival logo. ... The São Paulo International Film Festival is a film festival held annually in São Paulo, Brazil since 1976. ... Cannes Film Festival logo. ...

Books by Kiarostami

  • Abbas Kiarostami, Abbas Kiarostami: Cahiers du Cinema Livres (October 24, 1997) ISBN 2866421965.
  • Abbas Kiarostami, Walking with the Wind (Voices and Visions in Film): English translation by Ahmad Karimi-Hakkak and Michael C. Beard, Harvard Film Archive; Bilingual edition (February 28, 2002) ISBN 0674008448.
  • Abbas Kiarostami, 10 (ten): Cahiers du Cinema Livres (September 5, 2002) ISBN 2866423461.
  • Abbas Kiarostami, Nahal Tajadod and Jean-Claude Carrière Avec le vent: P.O.L. (May 5, 2002) ISBN 2867448891.
  • Abbas Kiarostami, Le vent nous emportera: Cahiers du Cinema Livres (September 5, 2002) ISBN 286642347X.
  • Abbas Kiarostami, La Lettre du Cinema: P.O.L. (December 12, 1997) ISBN 2867445892.

October 24 is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 68 days remaining. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... September 5 is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (126th in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... September 5 is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... December 12 is the 346th day (347th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 19 days remaining. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Kiarostami's poetry collection: Walking with the wind (2002)
Kiarostami's poetry collection: Walking with the wind (2002)
Kiarostami's films
Kiarostami's assistants
General

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Abbas Kiarostami The director, Abbas Kiarostami has produced a large number of films, the following attempts to be a comprehensive filmography. ... Jafar Panahi (born July 11, 1960 in Mianeh, Iran) is an internationally-acclaimed independent filmmaker. ... Hassan Yektapanah (Born 1963 Tehran) is a world class Iranian (persian) filmmaker and screen writer. ... Bahman Ghobadi (born February 1, 1969) is a Kurdish film director. ... Bahman Kiarostami (b. ... Dariush Shayegan. ... Abbas Kiarostami and Jafar Panahi belong to the so called New wave of Persian cinema Iranian New Wave refers to a new movement in Persian cinema. ... The cinema of Iran (or Persian cinema) is a flourishing film industry with a long history. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ Panel of critics (2006). The world's 40 best directors. Guardian Unlimited. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  2. ^ Karen Simonian (2002). Abbas Kiarostami Films Featured at Wexner Center. Wexner center for the art. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  3. ^ 2002 Ranking for Film Directors. British Film Institute (2002). Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  4. ^ Ivone Margulies (2007). Abbas Kiarostami. Princeton University. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  5. ^ Abbas Kiarostami Biography. Firouzan Film (2004). Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h Abbas Kiarostami: Biography. Zeitgeist, the spirit of the time. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  7. ^ Ed Hayes (2002). 10 x Ten: Kiarostami’s journey. Open Democracy. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  8. ^
  9. ^ Landscapes of the mind. Guardian Unlimited (2005). Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
  10. ^ Ari Siletz (2006). Besides censorship. iranian.com. Retrieved on 2007-02-27.
  11. ^ Judy Stone and Ari Siletz. Not Quite a Memoire. Firouzan Films. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  12. ^ Jeff Lambert (2000). 43rd Annual San Francisco International Film Festival. Sense of Cinema.
  13. ^ Hamid Dabashi (2002). Notes on Close Up - Iranian Cinema: Past, Present and Future. Strictly Film School. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  14. ^ a b c Shahin Parhami (2004). A Talk with the Artist: Abbas Kiarostami in Conversation. Synoptique. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  15. ^ David Parkinson (2005). Abbas Kiarostami Season. BBC. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  16. ^ Chris Payne. Abbas Kiarostami Masterclass. Channel4. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  17. ^ Films by Abbas Kiarostami. Stanford University (1999).
  18. ^ Rebecca Flint. Where Is the friend's home?. World records. Retrieved on 2007-02-27.
  19. ^ Chris Darke. Where Is the Friend's Home?. Zeitgeistfilms. Retrieved on 2007-02-27.
  20. ^ a b David Parkinson (2005). Abbas Kiarostami Season: National Film Theatre, 1st-31 May 2005. BBC. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  21. ^ a b c Godfrey Cheshire. Taste of Cherry. The Criterion Collection. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  22. ^ Ed Gonzalez (2002). Close Up. Slant Magazine.
  23. ^ Jeffrey M. Anderson (2000). Close-Up: Holding a Mirror up to the Movies. Combustible Celluloid.
  24. ^ Close-Up. Bfi Video Publishing (1998).
  25. ^ Hemangini Gupta (2005). Celebrating film-making. The Hindu.
  26. ^ Jeremy Heilman (2002). Life and Nothing More… (Abbas Kiarostami) 1991. MovieMartyr.
  27. ^ a b c Jonathan Rosenbaum (1997). Fill In The Blanks. Chicago Reader.
  28. ^ Film Info. And Life Goes On (synopsis). Zeitgeistfilms.
  29. ^ a b Stephen Bransford (2003). Days in the Country: Representations of Rural Space .... Sense of Cinema.
  30. ^ Maximilian Le Cain. Kiarostami: The Art of Living. Film Ireland.
  31. ^ Where is the director?. British Film Institute (2005).
  32. ^ Constantine Santas (2000). Concepts of Suicide in Kiarostami's Taste of Cherry. Sense of Cinema.
  33. ^ a b Geoff Andrew (2005). Abbas Kiarostami, interview. Guardian Unlimited.
  34. ^ Ten info. Ten (film) synopsis. Zeitgeistfilms. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  35. ^ Geoff Andrew, Ten (London: BFI Publishing, 2005), p. 35.
  36. ^ Geoff Andrew, Ten, (London: BFI Publishing, 2005) p. 32.
  37. ^ Geoff Andrew, Ten, (London: BFI Publishing, 2005) pp 73–4.
  38. ^ a b Jamsheed Akrami (2005). Cooling Down a 'Hot Medium'. Iran Heritage Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  39. ^ Ben Sachs (2003). With liberty for all: the films of Kiarostami. The Mac Weekley. Retrieved on 2007-02-27.
  40. ^ Ganz, A. & Khatib, L. (2006) "Digital Cinema: The transformation of film practice and aesthetics" in New Cinemas, vol. 4 no 1, pp 21-36
  41. ^ Adrian Martin (2001). The White Balloon and Iranian Cinema. Sense of Cinema. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  42. ^ Charles Mudede (1999). Kiarostami's Genius Style. The Stranger. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  43. ^ Jean-Luc Nancy, "On Evidence: Life and Nothing More, by Abbas Kiarostami," Discourse 21.1 (1999), p.82. Also, cf., [1].
  44. ^ Jean-Luc Nancy, "On Evidence: Life and Nothing More, by Abbas Kiarostami," Discourse 21.1 (1999), p.85–6.
  45. ^ Jean-Luc Nancy, The Evidence of Film - Abbas Kiarostami, Yves Gevaert, Belgium 2001, ISBN 2930128178
  46. ^ Injy El-Kashef and Mohamed El-Assyouti (2001). Strategic lies. Al-Ahram Weekly. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  47. ^ a b c Michael J. Anderson (2004). Beyond Borders. reverse shot. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  48. ^ a b c Khatereh Sheibani (2006). Kiarostami and the Aesthetics of Modern Persian Poetry. Taylor & Francis Group. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  49. ^ a b Karimi-Hakkak, Ahmad. "From Kinetic Poetics to a Poetic Cinema: Abbas Kiarostami and the Esthetics of Persian Poetry." University of Maryland (2005)
  50. ^ Sima Daad (2005). Adaption, Fidelity, and Transformation: Kiarostami and the Modernist Poetry of Iran. Iran Heritage Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  51. ^ a b Hamish Ford (2005). The Cinema of Abbas Kiarostami by Alberto Elena. Sense of Cinema. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  52. ^ a b Nacim Pak (2005). Religion and Spirituality in Kiarostami's Works. Iran Heritage Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  53. ^ a b Narguess Farzad (2005). Simplicity and Bliss: Poems of Abbas Kiarostami. Iran Heritage Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  54. ^ Kiarostami mostra fotos de neve (Kiarostami shows snow photographs) (Portuguese) - a newspaper article on the display of Untitled Photographs in Lisbon.
  55. ^ Riccardo Zipoli (2005). Uncertain Reality: A Topos in Kiarostami's Poems and Films. Iran Heritage Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  56. ^ Dorna Khazeni (2002). Close Up: Iranian Cinema Past Present and Future, by Hamid Dabashi.. Brightlightsfilms. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  57. ^ Jason Anderson (2002). Carried by the wind: Films by Abbas Kiarostami. Eye Weekley. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  58. ^ Cynthia Rockwell (2001). Carney on Cassavetes: Film critic Ray Carney sheds light on the work of legendary indie filmmaker, John Cassavetes.. NEFilm. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  59. ^ a b c Stuart Jeffries (2005). Abbas Kiarostami - Not A Martyr. The Guardian. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  60. ^ Panel of critics (2006). The world's 40 best directors. The Guardian. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  61. ^ Daniel Ross, Review of Geoff Andrew, Ten.
  62. ^ Andrew O'Hehir (2002). Iran's leading filmmaker denied U.S. visa. Salon.com. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  63. ^ Iranian director hands back award. BBC (2002). Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  64. ^ Celestine Bohlen (2002). Abbas Kiarostami Controversy at the 40th NYFF. Human Rights Watch. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  65. ^ Jacques Mandelbaum (2002). No entry for Kiarostami. Le Monde. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  66. ^ Abbas Kiarostami workshop 2- 10 May 2005. Pars times (2005). Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  67. ^ Abbas Kiarostami: Image Maker. Museum of Modern Art (2007). Retrieved on 2007-02-28.
  68. ^ Mehrnaz Saeed-Vafa (2002). Abbas Kiarostami. Sense of Cinema. Retrieved on 2007-02-27.
  69. ^ Abbas Kiarostami. IndiePix (2004). Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  70. ^ Abbas Kiarostami. Cannes Film Festival. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 27 is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 27 is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 27 is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 27 is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Location    - Country Portugal    - Region Lisboa  - Subregion Grande Lisboa  - District or A.R. Lisbon Mayor Carmona Rodrigues  - Party PSD Area 84. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Daniel Ross (born 1970) is an Australian philosopher and filmmaker. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 27 is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Secondary literature

Books

  • Geoff Andrew, Ten (London: BFI Publishing, 2005).
  • Erice-Kiarostami. Correspondences, 2006, ISBN 8496540243, catalogue of an exhibition together with the Spanish filmmaker Víctor Erice
  • Alberto Elena, The Cinema of Abbas Kiarostami, Saqi Books 2005, ISBN 0-86356-594-8
  • Mehrnaz Saeed-Vafa, Jonathan Rosenbaum, Abbas Kiarostami (Contemporary Film Directors), University of Illinois Press 2003 (paperback), ISBN 0-252-07111-5
  • Jean-Luc Nancy, The Evidence of Film - Abbas Kiarostami, Yves Gevaert, Belgium 2001, ISBN 2-930128-17-8
  • Jean-Claude Bernardet, Caminhos de Kiarostami, Melhoramentos; 1 edition (2004), ISBN 978-8535905717
  • Marco Dalla Gassa, Abbas Kiarostami, Publisher: Mani (2000) ISBN 978-8880121473
  • Youssef Ishaghpour, Le réel, face et pile: Le cinéma d'Abbas Kiarostami , Farrago (2000) ISBN 978-2844900630
  • Alberto Barbera and Elisa Resegotti (editors), Kiarostami, Electa (April 30, 2004) ISBN 978-8837023904

Víctor Erice (born 30 June 1940) is a Spanish film director. ... Jean-Luc Nancy. ... The International Standard Book Number, or ISBN (sometimes pronounced is-ben), is a unique[1] identifier for books, intended to be used commercially. ... April 30 is the 120th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (121st in leap years), with 245 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Articles

  • Laurent Kretzschmar, "Is Cinema Renewing Itself?", Film-Philosophy. vol. 6 no 15, July 2002.
  • Jonathan Rosenbaum, "Lessons from a Master," Chicago Reader, June 14, 1996

June 14 is the 165th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (166th in leap years), with 200 days remaining. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ...

External links

  • Abbas Kiarostami at the Internet Movie Database
  • Abbas Kiarostami at SensesOfCinema.com
  • Biography of Abbas Kiarostami at Zeitgeist Films
  • Abbas Kiarostami: Image, Voice and Vision, Conference Abstracts (2005)
  • (Spanish) Erice/Kiarostami: Correspondencias
  • (Spanish) Erice, Angelopoulos, Kiarostami
  • The compassionate gaze 2000 San Francisco International Film Festival
  • Firouzan Films Iranian Movie Hall of Fame Inductee Abbas Kiarostami
Cinema of Iran

Actors • Directors • Films A-Z • Chronology of films • Cinematographers • Iranian New Wave • Producers • Screenwriters • The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Zeitgeist Films is an American independent film distributor based in New York City. ... The San Francisco International Film Festival held in March 1957 in San Francisco was the first North American Film Festival. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The cinema of Iran (or Persian cinema) is a flourishing film industry with a long history. ... A list of films produced in Iran ordered by year of release. ... Abbas Kiarostami and Jafar Panahi belong to the so called New wave of Persian cinema Iranian New Wave refers to a new movement in Persian cinema. ...

Persondata
NAME Kiarostami, Abbas
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Film director, photographer and poet
DATE OF BIRTH June 22, 1940
PLACE OF BIRTH Tehran, Iran
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Abbas Kiarostami - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (487 words)
Abbas Kiarostami (عباس کیارستمی in Persian) (born June 22, 1940 in Tehran) is one of the most influential and controversial post-revolutionary Iranian filmmakers and one of the most highly celebrated directors in the international film community of the last decade.
Although Kiarostami made several award-winning films early in his career, it was after the Iranian Revolution that he earned a highly esteemed reputation on the stage of world cinema.
Kiarostami belongs to a generation of filmmakers who created the so called "New Wave", a movement in Iranian cinema that started in the 1960s, before the revolution of 1979 and flourished in the 1970s.
Abbas Kiarostami- Not A Martyr By Stuart Jeffries (3348 words)
Abbas Kiarostami- Not A Martyr By Stuart Jeffries
Kiarostami cut the soundtrack to this scene after complaints from religious groups angered that the recital of the prayer was robotic and ultimately not very devout.
Kiarostami managed to secure the agreement of the judge (another Makhmalbaf devotee) to film the trial, where Sabzian was to be accused of not repaying money he had borrowed from the family to pay for a taxi and a gift for his son.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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