FACTOID # 19: Cheap sloppy joes: Looking for reduced-price lunches for schoolchildren? Head for Oklahoma!
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > A Hard Day's Night (song)
"A Hard Day's Night"
"A Hard Day's Night" cover
Single by The Beatles
from the album A Hard Day's Night
B-side(s) "I Should've Known Better" (UK)
"I Should Have Known Better" (US)
Released July 10, 1964 (UK)
July 13, 1964 (US)
Format 7"
Recorded Abbey Road Studios: April 16, 1964
Genre Rock
Length 2 min 32 sec
Label Parlophone R5160 (UK)
Capitol 5222 (US)
Writer(s) Lennon/McCartney
Producer(s) George Martin
Peak chart positions
  • #1 (UK)
  • #1 (US)
The Beatles singles chronology
"Can't Buy Me Love""
(1963)
"A Hard Day's Night"
(1964)
"I Feel Fine"
(UK-1964)
---
"I'll Cry Instead"
(US-1964)
Music sample

"A Hard Day's Night" ( file info)
Play in browser (beta) Image File history File links Size of this preview: 350 × 350 pixelsFull resolution (350 × 350 pixel, file size: 20 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Better resolution of US single sleeve. ... A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ... The Beatles were an English rock band from Liverpool whose members were John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. ... A Hard Days Night by The Beatles (side 1) - Parlophone yellow and black label A Hard Days Night was the third album by The Beatles, released on July 10, 1964 as the soundtrack to their first film of the same name. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This Side is the Grammy-winning sophomore album by the band Nickel Creek, released in the summer of 2002. ... For the Jim Diamond song, see I Should Have Known Better (Jim Diamond song) I Should Have Known Better is a John Lennon composition credited to Lennon & McCartney, and recorded by The Beatles for the soundtrack to their film A Hard Days Night. I Should Have Known Better is... July 10 is the 191st day (192nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 174 days remaining. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... July 13 is the 194th day (195th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 171 days remaining. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... It has been suggested that Childrens gramophone records be merged into this article or section. ... The legendary recording studio Abbey Road Studios, created in November of 1931 by EMI in London, England is best known as the legendary recording studio used by the rock artists: The Beatles, Cliff Richard, Pink Floyd and The Shadows. ... April 16 is the 106th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (107th in leap years). ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Rock and roll. ... A minute is a unit of time equal to 1/60th of an hour and to 60 seconds. ... Look up second in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Parlophone is a record label which was founded in Germany prior to World War I by the Carl Lindstrom Company. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... The songwriting credit Lennon/McCartney appears on all Beatles songs that were written by John Lennon and/or Paul McCartney without the aid of the other two Beatles, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Sir George Martin CBE (born 3 January 1926 in Highbury, London, England) is sometimes referred to as the fifth Beatle, a title that he owes to his work as producer of almost all of the Beatles records. ... A record chart, also known as a music chart, is a method of ranking music according to popularity during a given period of time. ... The Beatles were an English rock band from Liverpool whose members were John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. ... Cant Buy Me Love is the name of a song written by Paul McCartney (although credited to Lennon-McCartney) and released by The Beatles on the A side of their fifth British single, Cant Buy Me Love/You Cant Do That. ... I Feel Fine is the name of a song written by John Lennon (although credited to Lennon-McCartney) and released in 1964 by The Beatles as the A side of their seventh UK single. ... Ill Cry Instead is a song by The Beatles from their album A Hard Days Night. ... Image File history File links Beatles_hard_days_night. ... Software development stages In computer programming, development stage terminology expresses how the development of a piece of software has progressed and how much further development it may require. ...

Problems? See media help.
A Hard Day's Night track listing
Side one
  1. "A Hard Day's Night"
  2. "I Should Have Known Better"
  3. "If I Fell"
  4. "I'm Happy Just to Dance with You"
  5. "And I Love Her"
  6. "Tell Me Why"
  7. "Can't Buy Me Love"
Side two
  1. "Any Time at All"
  2. "I'll Cry Instead"
  3. "Things We Said Today"
  4. "When I Get Home"
  5. "You Can't Do That"
  6. "I'll Be Back"

"A Hard Day's Night" is a 1964 hit song written by John Lennon and credited (as were all their songs) to John Lennon and Paul McCartney, performed by English band The Beatles and produced by George Martin. It was released on the movie soundtrack of the same name. It was later released as a single, with "I Should've Known Better" as its B-side. A Hard Days Night by The Beatles (side 1) - Parlophone yellow and black label A Hard Days Night was the third album by The Beatles, released on July 10, 1964 as the soundtrack to their first film of the same name. ... For the Jim Diamond song, see I Should Have Known Better (Jim Diamond song) I Should Have Known Better is a John Lennon composition credited to Lennon & McCartney, and recorded by The Beatles for the soundtrack to their film A Hard Days Night. I Should Have Known Better is... If I Fell is a song by the Beatles which first appeared on the 1964 album A Hard Days Night. ... Im Happy Just to Dance With You is a song by the Beatles on A Hard Days Night. ... And I Love Her is a song by The Beatles and is the fifth track on their third album, A Hard Days Night. ... Tell Me Why is a song by The Beatles from their album A Hard Days Night. ... Cant Buy Me Love is the name of a song written by Paul McCartney (although credited to Lennon-McCartney) and released by The Beatles on the A side of their fifth British single, Cant Buy Me Love/You Cant Do That. ... Any Time At All is a song by The Beatles from their album A Hard Days Night. ... Ill Cry Instead is a song by The Beatles from their album A Hard Days Night. ... Things We Said Today is a song by The Beatles. ... When I Get Home is a song by The Beatles from their album A Hard Days Night. ... You Cant Do That is a song by The Beatles released as the B-side of the single Cant Buy Me Love, and included on the UK album A Hard Days Night and the US album The Beatles Second Album. ... Ill Be Back is a song by The Beatles which closes their album A Hard Days Night. ... See also: 1963 in music, other events of 1964, 1965 in music, 1960s in music and the list of years in music // Events January 1 - Top of the Pops premieres on BBC television. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... Sir James Paul McCartney MBE (born June 18, 1942) is an iconic Grammy Award-winning English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... The Beatles were an English rock band from Liverpool whose members were John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. ... Sir George Martin CBE (born 3 January 1926 in Highbury, London, England) is sometimes referred to as the fifth Beatle, a title that he owes to his work as producer of almost all of the Beatles records. ... This Side is the Grammy-winning sophomore album by the band Nickel Creek, released in the summer of 2002. ... In recorded music, the terms A-side and B-side refer to the two sides of 7 inch vinyl records on which singles have been released since the 1950s. ...


The song featured prominently on the soundtrack to The Beatles' first feature film, A Hard Day's Night, and was on their album of the same name. The song topped the charts in both the United Kingdom and United States when it was released as a single. Featuring a prominent and unique opening chord, the song's success provided the first inkling that The Beatles were not the one-hit wonder some had suggested when they first came to America.[citation needed] A Hard Days Night by The Beatles (side 1) - Parlophone yellow and black label A Hard Days Night was the third album by The Beatles, released on July 10, 1964 as the soundtrack to their first film of the same name. ... A reel of film, which predates digital cinematography. ... The film A Hard Days Night (1964) is a mockumentary written by Alun Owen and starring The Beatles during the height of Beatlemania. ... Typical fingering for a second inversion C major chord on a guitar. ... UK 45 rpm single for Mickey (1982) by one-hit wonder Toni Basil CD single of the Baha Mens Who Let the Dogs Out? In the music industry, a one-hit wonder is an artist generally known for only one hit single. ...


The American and British singles of "A Hard Day's Night" as well as both the American and British albums of the same title all held the top position in their respective charts for a couple of weeks in August 1964, the first time any artist had done this.[citation needed]

Contents

Title

The song's strange title originated from something said by Ringo Starr, the Beatles' drummer. Starr described it this way in an interview with disc jockey Dave Hull in 1964: "We went to do a job, and we'd worked all day and we happened to work all night. I came up still thinking it was day I suppose, and I said, 'It's been a hard day...' and I looked around and saw it was dark so I said, '...night!' So we came to 'A Hard Day's Night.'[1] Richard Starkey, MBE (born 7 July 1940 in Liverpool),[1] known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an English musician, singer and actor, best known as the drummer of The Beatles. ... A drummer in Action A drummer is a person who plays the drums, particularly the drum kit, marching percussion, or hand drums. ... For other meanings of DJ, see DJ (disambiguation). ... Dave Hull, aka The Hullaballoer, is a legendary Los Angeles Boss Radio radio personality voted one of the top ten LA radio personalities of all time. ...


Starr's statement was the inspiration for the title of the movie, which in turn inspired the composition of the song. According to John Lennon in a 1980 interview with Playboy magazine: "I was going home in the car and Dick Lester [director of the movie] suggested the title, 'Hard Day's Night' from something Ringo had said. I had used it in 'In His Own Write' [a book Lennon was writing then], but it was an off-the-cuff remark by Ringo. You know, one of those malapropisms. A Ringo-ism, where he said it not to be funny... just said it. So Dick Lester said, 'We are going to use that title.'"[2] John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... The first issue of Playboy. ... Richard Lester (born January 19, 1932 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a UK based film director famous for his work with The Beatles. ... This article or section seems to contain too many examples (or examples of poor quality) for an encyclopedia entry. ...


In a 1994 interview for The Beatles Anthology, however, Paul McCartney disagreed with Lennon's recollections, basically stating that it was the Beatles, and not Lester, who had come up with the idea of using Starr's verbal misstep: "The title was Ringo's. We'd almost finished making the film, and this fun bit arrived that we'd not known about before, which was naming the film. So we were sitting around at Twickenham studios having a little brain-storming session... and we said, 'Well, there was something Ringo said the other day.' Ringo would do these little malapropisms, he would say things slightly wrong, like people do, but his were always wonderful, very lyrical... they were sort of magic even though he was just getting it wrong. And he said after a concert, 'Phew, it's been a hard day's night.'"[3] The Beatles Anthology is the name of a documentary series, a series of three albums and a book, all of which focus on the history of the popular rock band the Beatles. ... Sir James Paul McCartney MBE (born June 18, 1942) is an iconic Grammy Award-winning English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ...


In 1996, yet another version of events cropped up; in an Associated Press report, the producer of the film A Hard Day's Night, Walter Shenson, stated that Lennon described to Shenson some of Starr's funnier gaffes, including "a hard day's night," whereupon Shenson immediately decided that that was going to be the title of the movie (the originally planned title was Beatlemania [4]). Shenson then told Lennon that he needed a theme song for the film.[5] The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ...


Production

Regardless of who decided on the title, Lennon immediately made up his mind that he would compose the movie's title track [6]. He dashed off the song in one night, and brought it in for comments the following morning (the original manuscript lyrics may be seen in the British Library, scribbled in ballpoint on the back of an old birthday card). As he described in his 1980 Playboy interview, "...the next morning I brought in the song... 'cuz there was a little competition between Paul and I as to who got the A-side — who got the hits. If you notice, in the early days the majority of singles, in the movies and everything, were mine... in the early period I'm dominating the group.... The reason Paul sang on A Hard Day's Night (in the bridge) is because I couldn't reach the notes."[2] British Library Ossulston St entrance, with distinctive red logo. ... The first issue of Playboy. ...


In the Associated Press report, Shenson described his recollection of what happened. At 8:30 in the morning, "There were John and Paul with guitars at the ready and all the lyrics scribbled on matchbook covers. They played it and the next night recorded it." Shenson declared, "It had the right beat and the arrangement was brilliant. These guys were geniuses."[5]


On 16 April 1964, the Beatles gathered at Studio 2 of the Abbey Road Studios and recorded "A Hard Day's Night". It took them less than three hours to polish the song for its final release, eventually selecting the ninth take as the one to be released.[7] April 16 is the 106th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (107th in leap years). ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... The legendary recording studio Abbey Road Studios, created in November of 1931 by EMI in London, England is best known as the legendary recording studio used by the rock artists: The Beatles, Cliff Richard, Pink Floyd and The Shadows. ...


Release

"A Hard Day's Night" was first released to the United States, coming out on 13 June 1964 on the album A Hard Day's Night, the soundtrack to the film, and released by United Artists. The album was a hit, selling a million copies in just four days.[citation needed] UK cover of A Hard Days Night (song) This work is copyrighted. ... June 13 is the 164th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (165th in leap years), with 201 days remaining. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... A Hard Days Night by The Beatles (side 1) - Parlophone yellow and black label A Hard Days Night was the third album by The Beatles, released on July 10, 1964 as the soundtrack to their first film of the same name. ... The current United Artists logo (a variant was used during the 1980s). ...


"A Hard Day's Night" was the first Beatles single released in the UK not to use a pronoun in its title. On all of their previous British singles ("Love Me Do," "Please Please Me," "From Me to You." "She Loves You," "I Want to Hold Your Hand," and "Can't Buy Me Love"), the group had intentionally relied on the use of a pronoun to make a song "very direct and personal," so that, according to McCartney, "people can identify...with it."[citation needed]


The United Kingdom first heard "A Hard Day's Night" when it was released there on 10 July 1964, both on the album A Hard Day's Night, and as a single, backed with "Things We Said Today" on the B-side. Both the album and single were released by Parlophone Records. The album proceeded to sell 1.5 million copies within a fortnight of its release. The single began charting on 18 July 1964, a week later ousting the Rolling Stones' "It's All Over Now" from the top spot on the British charts on 25 July 1964, coincidentally the day when both the American and British albums too hit the peak of their respective charts. The single stayed on top for three weeks, and lasted another nine weeks in the charts afterwards.[citation needed] July 10 is the 191st day (192nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 174 days remaining. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Parlophone is a record label which was founded in Germany prior to World War I by the Carl Lindstrom Company. ... July 18 is the 199th day (200th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 166 days remaining. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... “Rolling Stones” redirects here. ... July 25 is the 206th day (207th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 159 days remaining. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ...


America first saw the single of "A Hard Day's Night" on 13 July 1964, featuring "I Should Have Known Better" on the B-side, and released by Capitol Records. Capitol had been in a quandary about cashing in on the success of the movie A Hard Day's Night, as United Artists held the publishing rights for the soundtrack (thus owning the rights to release the album of the same title). However, there was nothing preventing Capitol from releasing the songs in other forms, leading to six out of the seven songs from the movie's soundtrack coming out on singles.[citation needed] July 13 is the 194th day (195th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 171 days remaining. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... For the Jim Diamond song, see I Should Have Known Better (Jim Diamond song) I Should Have Known Better is a John Lennon composition credited to Lennon & McCartney, and recorded by The Beatles for the soundtrack to their film A Hard Days Night. I Should Have Known Better is... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the...


The American single began its 13-week chart run on five days after release, and on August 1 started a two-week long run at the top, setting a new record—nobody before had ever held the number one position on both the album and singles charts in the United Kingdom and the United States at the same time. The Beatles were the first to do so, and continued to be the only ones who had done this until 1970 when Simon and Garfunkel achieved the same feat with their album Bridge Over Troubled Water and its title track. "A Hard Day's Night" went on to sell one million copies in America within just over five weeks.[citation needed] Simon and Garfunkel are an American popular music duo comprised of Paul Simon and Arthur Art Garfunkel. ... Bridge Over Troubled Water is an album by Simon and Garfunkel released on January 26, 1970. ...


After the Beatles had performed on The Ed Sullivan Show when they first came to America in early 1964, some American critics had dismissed them as one-hit wonders. "A Hard Day's Night" proved them wrong, as it only strengthened The Beatles' dominance of the world music scene in 1964. They would continue to feature prominently for the next six years until their disbanding in 1970.[citation needed] Ed Sullivan The Ed Sullivan Show is an American television variety show that ran from June 20, 1948 to June 6, 1971, and was hosted by former entertainment columnist Ed Sullivan. ...


In 1965, "A Hard Day's Night" won the Beatles the Grammy Award for Best Performance by a Vocal Group. In 2004, this song was ranked number 153 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest songs of all time.[8] The Grammy Award for Best Performance by a Vocal Group was awarded from 1961 to 1968. ... This article is about the magazine. ... The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time was the cover story of a special issue of Rolling Stone magazine published in November 2004. ...


Opening chord

"A Hard Day's Night" is immediately identifiable before the vocals even begin, thanks to George Harrison's unmistakable Rickenbacker 12-string guitar's opening chord. According to George Martin, "We knew it would open both the film and the soundtrack LP, so we wanted a particularly strong and effective beginning. The strident guitar chord was the perfect launch."[7] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Mod revivalist band The Jams Bruce Foxton (left) on a Rickenbacker bass and Paul Weller on a Rickenbacker guitar Rickenbacker International Corporation, also known as Rickenbacker (IPA pronunciation: ) [1]), is an electric guitar manufacturer, notable for having invented the first electric guitar during the 1930s. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The exact chord played by Harrison has been the subject of contention. According to Walter Everett, the opening chord has an introductory dominant function because McCartney plays D in the bass; Harrison and Martin play F A C G in twelve-string guitar and piano, over the bass D, giving the chord a mixture-coloured neighbor, F; two diatonic neighbors, A and C; plus an anticipation of the tonic, G — the major subtonic as played on guitar being a borrowed chord commonly used by the Beatles, first in "P.S. I Love You" (see mode mixture), and later in "Every Little Thing", "Tomorrow Never Knows" and "Got to Get You into My Life" (in the latter two against a tonic pedal).[9] Typical fingering for a second inversion C major chord on a guitar. ... A borrowed chord is a chord borrowed from the parallel key. ... P.S. I Love You is a Lennon-McCartney song recorded by the Beatles and released on October 5, 1962 as the B-side of their Love Me Do single. ... In music mode mixture is the use of pitches or chords from the parallel minor or major scale or key of a piece or section. ... Every Little Thing ), is a J-pop and soft rock duo from Japan who debuted in August 1996 with the release of their first single called Feel My Heart. Their name is usually written in English, and only rarely in katakana or rōmaji. ... Tomorrow Never Knows is the final track of The Beatles 1966 studio album Revolver, but it was the first to be recorded for the album. ... Got to Get You into My Life is a song by The Beatles on the album Revolver. ... In tonal music, a pedal point (also pedal tone, organ point, or just pedal) is a sustained tone, typically in the bass, during which at least one foreign, i. ...


In contrast, Alan W. Pollack interprets the chord as a surrogate dominant (surrogate V, the dominant preparing or leading to the tonic chord), in G major the dominant being D, with the G being an anticipation that resolves in the G major chord that opens the verse. He also suggests it is a mixture of d minor, F major, and G major (missing the B).[10] Tony Bacon calls it a Dm7sus4 (D F G A C), which is the dominant seventh (plus the fourth, G).[11] (For more information regarding chord functions see diatonic function.) Anticipation can refer to: Anticipation (album), a 1971 album by Carly Simon. ... A diatonic function, in tonal music theory, is the specific, recognized roles of notes or chords in relation to the key. ...


Everett points out that the chord relates to the Beatles' interest in pandiatonic harmony.[12] In music pandiatonic chords and successions are those formed freely from all degrees of a diatonic scale without regard for their diatonic function, sometimes to the extent of no single pitch being felt as a tonic. ...


Dominic Pedler has also provided an interpretation of the famous chord, with the Beatles and George Martin playing the following:

  • George Harrison: Fadd9 in 1st position on 12-string electric guitar
  • John Lennon: Fadd9 in 1st position on a 6-string acoustic guitar
  • Paul McCartney: high D played on the D-string, 12th fret on electric bass
  • George Martin: D2-G2-D3 played on a Steinway Grand Piano
  • Ringo Starr: Subtle snare drum and ride cymbal

This gives the notes: G-B-D-F-A-C (the B is a harmonic). One of the interesting things about this chord (as described by Pedler) is how McCartney's high bass note reverberates inside the soundbox of Lennon's acoustic guitar and begins to be picked up on Lennon's microphone or pick-up during the sounding of the chord. This gives the chord its special "wavy" and unstable quality. Pedler describes the effect as a "virtual pull-off".[13] A microphone, sometimes referred to as a mike or mic (both IPA pronunciation: ), is an acoustic to electric transducer or sensor that converts sound into an electrical signal. ... Three magnetic pickups on an electric guitar. ... A pull-off is a stringed-instrument playing technique performed (usually on an electric guitar) by pulling a fretting finger off the fingerboard. ...


Jason Brown, Professor for the Faculty of Computer Science at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, whose research interests include graph theory, combinatorics, and combinatorial algorithms, announced in October 2004 that after six months of research he succeeded in analysing the opening chord by "de-composing the sound into original frequencies, using a combination of computer software and old-fashioned chalkboard." According to Brown, the Rickenbacker guitar wasn't the only instrument used. "It wasn't just George Harrison playing it and it wasn't just the Beatles playing on it... There was a piano in the mix." Specifically, he claims that Harrison was playing the following notes on his 12 string guitar: a2, a3, d3, d4, g3, g4, c4, and another c4; McCartney played a d3 on his bass; producer George Martin was playing d3, f3, d5, g5, and e6 on the piano, while Lennon played a loud c5 on his six-string guitar.[14] Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Dalhousie University is a university located on the Halifax Peninsula in the Halifax Regional Municipality, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... Motto: Template:Unhide = E Mari Merces (Wealth from the Sea) Logo: Location City Information Established: April 1, 1996 Area: (former city) 79. ... A pictorial representation of a graph In mathematics and computer science, graph theory is the study of graphs, mathematical structures used to model pairwise relations between objects from a certain collection. ... Combinatorics is a branch of pure mathematics concerning the study of discrete (and usually finite) objects. ... In mathematics, computing, linguistics, and related disciplines, an algorithm is a finite set of well-defined instructions for accomplishing some task which, given an initial state, will terminate in a defined end-state. ...


This famous chord was used on Get Back, the second track on the 2006 release Love (The Beatles album). Get Back sessions, see Let It Be (album). ... Love is a soundtrack compilation album by The Beatles released in November 2006. ...


Music and lyrics

The song is composed in the key of G major and in a 4/4 time signature, though Richard Middleton (1990) describes G as the dominant in the key of C major. The verse features the ♭VII or major subtonic chord that was a part of the opening chord as an ornament or embellishment below the tonic. The modal frame of the song though pentatonic features a ladder of thirds axially centered on G with a ceiling note of Bb and floor note of Eb (the low C being a passing tone) (Middleton 1990, p.203):[15] G major is a major scale based on G, consisting of the pitches G, A, B, C, D, E, F# and G. Its key signature consists of one sharp. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... A one octave music scale in C major. ... In music a melodic mode (van der Merwe 1989, p. ... In music, a pentatonic scale is a scale with five notes per octave. ... A ladder of thirds is similar to the circle of fifths, though ladders of thirds differ in being composed of thirds, major or minor, and may or may not circle back to its starting note and thus may or may not be an interval cycle. ... A nonchord tone or non-harmony note is a tone in a piece of homophonic music which is not in the chord that is formed by the other tones playing and in most cases quickly resolves to a chord tone. ...


Download high resolution version (861x456, 22 KB)A Hard Days Night melodyd Created by Hyacinth using Sibelius and Paint. ...


According to Middleton the song has "a deep kinship with typical blues melodic structures: it is centered on three of the notes of the minor-pentatonic mode (Eb-G-Bb), with the contradictory major seventh (B♮) set against that. Morever, the shape assumed by these notes - the modal frame - as well as the abstract scale they represent, is revealed, too; and this - an initial, repeated circling round the dominant (G), with an excursion to its minor third (Bb), 'answered' by a fall to the 'symmetrical' minor third of the tonic (Eb) - is a common pattern in blues."[16]


Lennon opens the twelve measure-long verse and carries it along, suddenly joined at the end by McCartney, who then sings the bridge. This represented a division of work which would feature prominently in future Beatles songs, with Lennon and McCartney each singing the parts they composed individually. This also made it easier to identify the individual styles of each composer, as McCartney was often the one with more upbeat lyrics, while Lennon's would be in a more cynical tone. Verse is a writing that uses meter as its primary organisational mode, as opposed to prose, which uses grammatical and discoursal units like sentences and paragraphs. ... In popular music, especially occidental, a bridge is a contrasting section which also prepares for the return of the original material section. ...


However, in his interview with Playboy, Lennon denied that McCartney's authorship of the bridge was the reason that he sang it: "The only reason he sang on 'A Hard Day's Night' was because I couldn't reach the notes. ...which is what we'd do sometimes. One of us couldn't reach a note but he wanted a different sound, so he'd get the other to do the harmony."[17]


The instrumental break, is often credited to George Harrison on a 12 string. This is not necessarily so. The break may have been played by George Martin on a harpsichord (the notes are two octaves apart, another clue that it may not be a 12 string guitar). In popular music a break is an instrumental or percussion section or interlude during a song derived from or related to stop-time – being a break from the main parts of the song or piece. ...


The song closes with Harrison's guitar-playing fading out, the first time the Beatles had used such a technique — most, if not all, of their earlier work had closed with a final chord (and cadence), such as "She Loves You" and "I Want to Hold Your Hand". In Western musical theory a cadence (Latin cadentia, a falling) is a particular series of intervals or chords that ends a phrase, section, or piece of music. ... She Loves You is a hit song written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, originally recorded by The Beatles for release as a single in 1963. ... I Want to Hold Your Hand is a 1963 Beatles song that was written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney and started the British Invasion of the United States music charts. ...


The lyrics speak about the singer's undying devotion to his lover, and how he toils so she can purchase the items she fancies. The singer sings about his tiredness when he comes home from work, but how the things that his lover does perk him up.


On the day the song was written, Lennon is purported to have shown reporter Maureen Cleave of London's Evening Standard the lyrics, and she said that word "tiredness" sounded weak in the line "I find my tiredness is through/And I feel alright." Lennon subsequently replaced the lines in question with "I find the things that you do/They make me feel all right".[18] Maureen Cleave was a journalist with the London Evening News and London Evening Standard who conducted interviews with famous musicians of the 1960s, including Bob Dylan and John Lennon. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Headlines of the Evening Standard on the day of London bombing on July 7, 2005, in Waterloo Station The Evening Standard is a British tabloid newspaper published and sold in London and surrounding areas of southeast England. ...


Other recordings

Peter Sellers recorded a comedy version of the song "A Hard Day's Night", in which he recited the lyrics in the style of Laurence Olivier as Shakespeare's Richard III. Sellers' version was a UK Top 20 hit in 1965. Richard Henry Peter Sellers, CBE (8 September 1925 – 24 July 1980) was an English comedian, actor, and performer, who came to prominence on the BBC radio series The Goon Show and later became a film star. ... Laurence Kerr Olivier, Baron Olivier, OM (22 May 1907–11 July 1989) was an Academy Award, Golden Globe, BAFTA and four-time Emmy winning English actor, director, and producer. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Frontispage of the First Quarto Richard The Third. ...


Billy Joel recorded the song and it was released on his Complete Hits album and My Lives, his ultimate collection. {{Infobox musical artist | Name = Billy Joel Best friend of Adam C. Price | Img = Billyjoelgreatesthits. ... My Lives is a Sony music compilation of Demos Outtakes B-Sides Soundtrack Cuts Live Recordings and Album Cuts by American singer/songwriter Billy Joel. ...


Sugarcult recorded the song for a EP A Hard Day's Night Sugarcult is an American pop punk/power-pop band of Santa Barbara, California formed in 1998. ... A Hard Days Night is a Japan-only EP from the Californian pop punks Sugarcult featuring a cover of The Beatles classic Track listing A Hard Days Night Memory (Acoustic) Stuck In America (Live) Champagne (Live) External links Official Website Pure Volume Categories: | | ...


Beatallica recorded a thrash version of this song called "A Garage Dayz Nite", with some references to Metallica's songs (coz when I see you, it's nice to play you "Trapped Under Ice" or wherever I may roam, the road becomes my bride), and other bands like Scorpions (and it kicks ass just to hear you say, when you don't want Love at First Sting). The logo of Beatallica. ... Trapped Under Ice is a song by heavy metal band Metallica. ... Wherever I May Roam is the fifth track on the Metallica (aka Black) Album by the heavy metal band Metallica. ... A scorpion is an invertebrate animal with eight legs belonging to the order Scorpiones in the class Arachnida. ... Love at First Sting is a studio album by the German heavy metal band Scorpions, released in 1984 (see 1984 in music). ...


Swedish band Mando Diao recorded a version and released it as a B-side to Tv & Me. Mando Diao are a garage rock band from Borlänge, Sweden. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Keith Badman the Beatles Off The Record P.93
  2. ^ a b Sheff, David (2000). All We Are Saying: The Last Major Interview with John Lennon and Yoko Ono. New York: St. Martin's Press, 174-175. ISBN 0-312-25464-4. 
  3. ^ Miles, Barry (1997). Paul McCartney: Many Years From Now. New York: Henry Holt & Company, 164. ISBN 0-8050-5249-6. 
  4. ^ Bill Harry The Ultimate Beatles Encyclopedia P.287
  5. ^ a b Campbell, Mary (1996-07-01). Restored 'Hard Day's Night,' 'Help!' part of AMC festival". Associated Press.
  6. ^ Paul McCartney & Barry Miles Many Years From Now P.165
  7. ^ a b Lewisohn, Mark (1988). The Beatles Recording Sessions. New York: Harmony Books, 43. ISBN 0-517-57066-1. 
  8. ^ The Rolling Stone 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. Retrieved on 2007-03-07.
  9. ^ Everett, Walter (2001,). The Beatles as Musicians: The Quarry Men Through Rubber Soul. Oxford University Press, 236-37. ISBN 0-19-514104-0. 
  10. ^ Pollack, Alan W. Notes on "A Hard Day's Night".
  11. ^ Bacon, Tony (2000). Fuzz & Feedback : Classic Guitar Music of the 60's. Backbeat Books, 5. ISBN 0-87930-612-2. 
  12. ^ Everett, Walter (2001,). The Beatles as Musicians: The Quarry Men Through Rubber Soul, 109. 
  13. ^ Pedler, Dominic (2003). The Songwriting Secrets of The Beatles. Omnibus Press. ISBN 0-7119-8167-1. 
  14. ^ As It Happens. CBC Radio (2004-10-15). Jason Brown's research on the opening chord. To hear the story, listen 12'35" into the broadcast
  15. ^ Middleton, Richard (1990). Studying Popular Music. Philadelphia: Open University Press, 203. ISBN 0-335-15275-9. 
  16. ^ Middleton, Richard (1990). Studying Popular Music, 201. 
  17. ^ Sheff, David (2000). All We Are Saying, 175. 
  18. ^ Marck, John T. I Am The Beatles - A Hard Day's Night.

Barry Miles (commonly known as, and called, simply Miles) is an author who has written biographies of Paul McCartney, William Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg as well as books about John Lennon, the Beatles and Frank Zappa. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... Mark Lewisohn (born 1958) is one of the worlds foremost experts on The Beatles. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ... March 7 is the 66th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (67th in leap years). ...

External links

Preceded by
"Rag Doll" by The Four Seasons
Billboard Hot 100 number one single
1 August 1964
Succeeded by
"Everybody Loves Somebody" by Dean Martin

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m